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CAMPUS

The year of

Ontario rocks

the sequel Blockbuster

Southern Ontario bands

titles

the ups and

downs

such as Star Wars and Die Hard return in

talk about music business.

Feature

Making things easier A new disabilities workstation

to the silver

screen

of the

2005.

makes technology more Entertamment

Monday, January

10,

in

the

4>5

LRC

accessible.

7

2005

Conestoga College, Kitchener

36th Year

— No. 28

Conestoga to offer innovative program By

RYanconne

information system for tracking diseases, design and maintain databases for medical

university has only about 20 to 30 graduates each year.

labs,

from the program is estimated to be between $40,000 and $60,000. The program offers three manda-

infectious

Health professionals collect a wealth of information about patients, from the time they are

evaluate clinical

admitted to the hospital to the time they leave. This information is dis-

pharmaceutical companies and create software for drug research and

seminated and analysed to be used in areas such as records and med-

discovery.

ical research.

Conestoga College ing Ontario

four-year bac-

first

s

be offer-

will

calaureate, college-based,

applied

Bill Jeffrey, the associate vicepresident of health sciences, community services and biotechnolo-

addition

More

is

an emerg-

Canada s health-care system. They will ic

be able

to

develop an electron-

system for a

patients-records

hospital,

than 20 students tried out

on Conestoga s team. Interested students were given a challenge similai' to one they would encounter if competing at the

manage

capable of offering applied

is

degrees. “Universities often give the theoaspect and sometimes it

a computerized

relates to

Conestoga College tied for first place at the 25th annual Ontario Colleges Marketing Competition (OCMC). Conestoga shared first place with Sheridan College. Second place was awarded to Niagara and the bronze medal went to Georgian

who hosted

College, Barrie

This

the event at

campus on Nov. 18 and is

its

19.

the eighth straight year

Conestoga students have been awarded a medal for their performance. During this time Conestoga has collected three gold medals, four silver and one bronze.

The topics

OCMC

features

1 1

events on

such as sales presentations,

marketing research, direct marketing, entrepreneurship

agement. There

is

the-top type event

bowl.

and

sales

as the quiz

Points are awarded to

dynamics,” said Symons, adding the

first-,

communication between the

teams played an important role in Conestogas victory. The team consisted of the following members: Veronique deWilde,

Trompke, Jennifer Wayne, Amanda Zettel, Kendra Allen, Matt Duench, Jaska Panic, Jared Adams, Katie Brox, Johnathan Denbok, Ben Fox, Stephanie Hewson, Erin McAnulty and Katie McConnery. Kristina

McConnery had

man-

also a reach-for-

known

a standout per-

formance for Conestoga. The duo McConnery and Fox took first

of

place in the retail case study event

second- and third-place finishers in

and she also captured gold

each event. Medals aie then awaided

quiz bowl.

based on

how many

a

you how

in the

management

sales

case,

“Altogether

I

probably

preparing for each one of In

at

these competitions because of

how

seriously they take the event.

“Doing well

at

this

event

is

important to both our faculty and students,” said

Symons.

is

one reason why Conestoga did so

“We had

a

great

faculty

that

coached us and put in a lot of time and effort to prepare us for the competition. They were a great source of support for us, and overall, a

company

five-year period to health-care education at the college, with half of

to apply it to your spejobs,” Jeffrey said. “We re trying to prepare someone to know information technology and all the aspects of health as well.” It is estimated that there are about 2,000 jobs in Canada right now for health informatics professionals,

donation going towards the development of the health informatics management program. Although the program has a focus on information technology and health. Jeffrey said several schools at the college will be working together to make the program

British

and the University of Victoria in Columbia is one of only a

health sciences, business, technolo-

few

gy and

tell

cific

institutions to offer a bachelor

degree in health informatics. The

home

the

successful, including the schools of liberal studies.

Continued on Page 2

gold

my cases.”

work with studying tition,

for the

compe-

students on the team were

also responsible for finding sponsors to

pay for team uniforms and

Ban ie.

the trip to

Conestoga s alumni association covered the majority of the costs with the rest of the tab being picked

up by businesses such as Delta Faucets and State-Farm Insurance. Symons, who has been involved

worth

well at the competition.

The

announced in December 2003 that they would donate $500,000 over a

addition to juggling school-

said the involvement of the faculty

coaches, said the

Financial.

spent

for the .students, but the effort

s

computer

around eight to 10 hours a week

international marketing case study,

one of the team

informatics

being developed from a $500,000 donation by Manulife

only part of the preparation.

Lisa Symons, Conestogas mar-

college has always performed well

health is

said the

with the event for the

co-ordinator and

lab

practicum experience.

time spent with the teachers was

Katie Brox, who, along with Veronique deWilde won gold in the

keting program

A

national marketing at the college.

lege collected during the competition.

points each col-

cal

week preparing for the competition Rob Sloan, who teaches inter-

Stephanie Hewson, who competed on both the advertising case and

team

t

clinical hands-on approach to learning. There will also be a clini-

October, Brox and deWilde spent nearly two hours

cover the different categories.

considered

but they don

work terms, one in each year of the program, and an optional work term that will give students a tory

Since being chosen to compete in

with

also

field,

starting salary for a graduate

the competition in

OCMC. Faculty then chose 14 students whom they felt would best “We

your

The

great group of people,” said Brox.

for a place

A team of marketing students from

to

is

Marketing students bring By JAMES CLARK

program is a great Conestoga College happy that the govern-

said the

gy,

retical

data storage and retrieval, highspeed communication and the application of management science. Health informatician graduates will have an important impact on

at

for

ment has now realized the college

ing field in the health industry that

Mike Conroy, Flashlight Brown guitarist, plays a guitar solo Kitchener’s Schwaben Club on Oct. 29.

results

ics management beginning in August 2005. Thirty students"^ will be accepted into the program for its first year with the program s yearly

combines computer technology,

A rocking success

trial

and he

Health informatics

by Brent Gerhart)

and pharmacies,

degree program in health informat-

tuition costing $5,500.

(Photo

hospitals

years, admitted

it

it

is

last

a lot of

seven

work is

no matter how well the

team does.

“They get one-on-bne coaching from staff, which is much more indepth than in class,” said Symons. “Year after year these contestants are well

positioned to take their

role in the industry.”

(Photo by James Ctark) Conestoga’s marketing program, stands in front of her office door which is decorated to celebrate the marketing team’s performance at an Ontario competition.

Lisa

Symons, co-ordinator

of


Page 2

— SPOKE, January

10,

News

2005

Now deep thoughts ...with

Disability services strives

Conestoga College

Random questions answered by random

make

to

What would you do if you won $1 million?

New

workstation in the Learning Resource Centre aiiows students with disabiiities to integrate into coiiege environment By JASON

SONSER services

disability

the

in

work continuously with

office

stu-

learning

full

potential.

would take a

One way trip to

first-year firefighting

is

by provid-

Recently, a disabilities workstation

was added

Learning Resource

to the

Centre (LRC),

one

the

to

similar'

located in the disabilities olfice.

Marian Mainland, co-ordinator of disability services, said the disabili-

CSX came up with

workstation located in the LRC an opportunity for students with

Catherine Wilkins, director of the

would go to Vegas for a weekend, and spend it all!” James Schwalmy,

first-year firefighting

training

too cold! trip

I’d

take a

somewhere warm.”

be read online! For the latest college,

entertainment and sports news, as well

site also

features an archive and

on

down

the

workstation go

to

LRC

halfway through their exams when the program would shut down. “It

was

she said.

terrible,”

and can be independent, we’ll get them down there first. We’re just trying to go slowly with it.” College to the According Committee on Disability Issues Data Collection 2003/2004 document, there were 597 documented

said.

said another reason for put-

LRC

from the

to help with overflow

“It started off as

being a training

on the adaptive

centre for students

technology and to do an assess-

ment of what worked best for them and then provide training to them,” Mainland said. “The more students got training on the equipment, the more they wanted to also use it for their exams and tests.” She said during the daytime hours there’s rarely a week where full.

“Towards the end of last spring, we were getting more complaints that,” about students from Mainland said. “(Setting up the workstation in the LRC) came up

New

there

first,”

students with disabilities enrolled at the

students with various disabilities, including

who

are deaf or hard of hear-

have low vision, who have medical conditions or attention deficit disorder, who have mobility impairments or who have ing, blind or

Mainland said a workstation

LRC

the one located in the

like

costs

around $8,400. Wilkins said the

of

a kind

at

employers and practitioners who advise on the program’s development and olfer advice on how the program can stay up-to-date with the ongoing changes in the health

initiatives.”

porate services for the

industry.

advisory

Glen Kearns, the vice-president and chief information officer of Grand River Hospital, is one of the members on the advisory commit-

the program's progress.

program

will have an easier time

tee.

finding

jobs

they can

into this environment to

do

group projects.”

Mainland said another advantage of having students with disabilities

doing their work in the

LRC is that

other students will see what the “If they’re

in a group,

working

that helps educate other students in

terms of that these students are really bright, they just learn very

Mainland said. “It might encourage some students differently,”

that don’t

even realize they have a

what’s available and then maybe

come down and ask

for help them-

selves.”

move forward with our

projects to

Community

Care Access Centre of Waterloo

member of the committee who oversees also a

is

a medical doctor

is

was a teacher

his

masters and

at the

University of

He said he suspects that people who come out of Conestoga's new

was

Kagalovsky

1997.

Victoria until

Glenn Roach, the director of cor-

Region,

Kagalovsky,

who completed

akso an intensive care nurse in

Israel.

Kagalovsky

said

lack

the

of

programs thfbughout the country means there is a need for people to fill the jobs. "The program will allow the stuinformatics

health

dents to get a belter understanding

of the clinical

side,

information

a need for a

trained in both information tech-

informatics |irogram in the

nology and health aspects rather

the

than just one area.

said. “1 think it's a great achieve-

"We have li'ouble with peojde who are only trained in one area, where they know cither the health

ment and a great idea to have this program at the college.'' Other degree programs that Conestoga College currently offers includes advanced manufacturing technologies, telecommunication and computer technologies, archiproject and facility mantecture agement. and advanced wood prod-

is

Kitchener- Waterloo area and that supportive of the program and college's

towards

initiative

developing health infortnatics.

"We’re aetually

leaditig the at

way

Grand

because

Roach

said.

"We

ple for (he job

need

a

skilled

leaders

atnl

initiative forwarrl,"

While

the

move

always easy

Kearns

demand

informatieiatis ti)

is

for

high,

be able

skilled that

said.

not

to hire tiew

away, said Kearns. "Sometimes wc ean hire them right away or sometitnes we have right

ical

part,

but

jicople

ground or the

Roach

are

it,"

tend to hire peo-

where we may have

nurse ‘interested

train

health it's

they

aspect or (he technical aspect of

River Hospital so we're going to

stiiff

now where

workstation

come

groups,” Potvin

in

great that they have a

technology side, management side and they will be able to understand

Kearns said there

is

and

“It’s

Conestoga

to put them on a list and go back to them when we have funding or the

the

of them are working with

reading or writing disability to see

learning disabilities.

Continued from Page 1 The program has fonned an advisory committee, which consists of

he

lot

workstation does.

college last year.

The department helps

those

“A

partners

health informatics program

technical people to help

keyword search.

the

aren’t trained

our fingers crossed because our computers were so old,” she said, adding the students would be

in the centre.

with health informatics

The

who

disabilities

for

no budget at all.” “CSI has been wonderful because this time two years ago 1 remember going into Christmas exams with

she said. “Some who are using it a lot and we know have got the training

licalth

as games, puzzles, weather and reference links, visit: WWW. conestogac. on. ca/spoke

disability services

services

disability

in

of the ones

one

Spoke can

Mainland said

money

capital, there's

down

Kyle Dezort

Smile Conestoga, you could be our next respondent!]

“(The LRC) staff doesn’t have the background to deliver (training) here for them, so they need to be independent when they get here,” Wilkins said. “I think in terms of

labs, is in the open access working with CSI,” Mainland said. “The other thing is we have no

student does.”

the lab isn’t

way

no space for

there’s

dents and participate like any other

get the students

disability services lab.

is

Mainland said

possible so they can meet other stu-

is

“Canada

to

Cathy Potvin, an employee in the LRC, said there seems to be a lot of students with disabilities working

we really try to out as much as

said, “but

ting the workstation into the

would drop out of school, travel and buy a house somewhere warm.” Laura Gratzer, second-year architecture

on.

and have to be “constantly asking staff for help.” “We’re getting our high-users

Mainland

She

“I

LRC.

workstation in the

prefers not to have students with

technology,”

the

is

was donated

see

be integrated into the

on

table

services lab, and once they’re inde-

them.”

do the

the workstation

get their training in the disability

said students with disabilities

life-long learning, that’s better for

“(Disability services) can

which

table

The hydraulic

expanding the disability .services lab. “The only alternative that I can

LRC,

is

regular college environment.

cost docs not include the hydraulic

the college.

the funding.”

ties

disabilities to

“I

and

pendent learners, they can use the

ing the newest technology.

Disneyland!”

David Vaux,

they help

that (the disabil-

services) department has

ity

dents with any kind of disability to

help them reach their

would address

as an initiative that

some of the needs Staff

“I

things easier

students

in the

we in

technolog-

usually have to

either

one back-

op placement

better,"

Kagalovsky

ucts manufacturing technologies.

other.”

said he could see (he care

centre taking advantage

patients

i)f

the co-

(hat is featured in (he

program. The program’s eo-ordinalor, Yuri

Jeffrey said he

progress

the

is

pleased with the

college

is

making

towards offering applied degrees the

college,

informatics

at

such as the health

management

degree.


CDs

New theatre company

you’ll

avoids mainstream

over

flip

By TIM

MURPHY

are mostly high school

but he theatre that dares to be differ-

It’s

By DENISE MULLER

DualDiscs will be rather

able

when

expensive There’s a

new

market, and

it’s

type of

CD on the

two-faced,

literal-

ly.

CD

new

DualDisc, and it.

is

it

called

is

a

has two sides to

Commonly, one side of the CD an audio CD, while the other

side

is

a

DVD.

screen version on one side, and a full-screen version

on the

other.

The manager of Sunrise Records both Conestoga Mall and

Fairview Mall said the DualDiscs encourage people to buy the CD instead of burning

because they

it

DVD with ‘’You get the DVD

get the

portion with

Unfortunately, labelling on the themselves has been drasti-

CDs

cally reduced because of the duali' ty of the CDs.

In order for the CD to be playable on both sides, the only surface area that can be labelled is the half-inch ring around the centre hole.

“That makes things Court said.

This leaves

“A

is

“CD

consumed with

Side” or

little

He

said the store has carried the DualDiscs for about a month.

“DVD

room

CD/DVDs

September or October, when Simple Plan’s DualDisc album was released. He said there is no price difference between a DualDisc and a normal, single-sided CD. “It probably costs the same to

the

Side.”

for artwork.

of artists still want to keep artwork on their discs,” said

lot

since

manufacture he said.

it,

why

so

not do

tle

frustrated at

CD if they

it,”

first,

lit-

trying to play

aren’t paying atten-

tion.

the

CD

is

in the

CD

play-

what it says on the label facing up is what will play. “I’ve heard complaints from er’s tray,

people,” Court said, adding it a few'times, and

people will try

get frustrated or annoyed. But the is simple; don’t take it

solution

back, flip

over!

it

Court said

the into a if

not read, and will

CD is placed the CD player, will

into a

is

player,

it

of

time, and then provide

students to adults.

and feedback

don’t want to be doing the that

tive theatre,, the

“A

company promotes

the exploration and tolerance of

all

types of performance, regardless of

commercial

viabil-

ity.

Grinder Productions holds plays at the Grand Theatre

its

in

Goudie, who graduated in 2003 with a BA in English drama from the University of Guelph, said he is looking for volunteers from the

Waterloo

the playgroup cur-

rently has 15 to

20 volunteers, who

first

comments

to the playwright.

lot

aged students,” he said. “Some of the stuff I do is sort of all ages.” Goudie said he had been chewing over the idea for several years, during his experience in the WaterlooWellington Playhouse, and various

other playgroups ranging from Goderich to Elora. He has had

experience in writing, directing, acting and the technical aspects of set design.

"Basically, I work in every area of theatre,” he said. Stephanie Russel, head of mar-

Region, Guelph and Centre Wellington areas to help with everything from advertising and costume design to acting.

Goudie said

new

of the stage readings I was doing last year was with university-

everybody else

specifically an alterna-

season,

an audience to hear a script, read live onstage for the

an audience from high school

does,” he said.

full

which will feature three full productions and four stage readings. staged reading is an opportunity

Grinder

University

of Guelph, said the majority of the plays put on have been created by Goudie.

“He touches on things from domestic abuse to gun control to the small family farm and how it’s becoming

extinct,” she said. Russel encourages people

are interested in the theatre

munity

“You know when you get a CD and it’s an enhanced CD and it has the computer component on the same side?”

Some

other DualDi seers include Blondie’s The Curse of Blondie,

to get involved with the

“It’s for experience at a professional theatre, even if you're not a professional,” she said.

Russel also said that Grinder Productions is always holding auditions for

ing

more

auditions

actors, includ-

for

a

number of

musical plays coming up

She said they are also working to organize a dinner theatre in the future.

For more information on upcoming plays or volunteering, contact Eric Goudie at 787-1981, or visit www.grinderproductions.org.

GORRECTION In the Dec. 6,

2004 edition of Spoke, Dan Cronkhite’s name was Spoke apologizes for the en-or.

spelled mconectly.

Art

l\ Fantasy

place

Wildlife

SaXKCkuLjOLCKI Giant-Sized Posters

hours

Blues Traveler’s Truth be Told, Lynyrd Skynrd’s Then and Now and assorted Christmas albums.

Music day

Frames & Hangers

9-5 Film Photography

1000s OF Posters

THE

JI|VI

(Photo by Denise Muller)

Andrew Court, manager at Sunrise Records in Fairview and Conestoga malls, said doublersided CDs are not more

expensive than one-sided CDs at Sunrise Records. Simple Plan’s new CD costs $17.99, which is the same price as regular CDs.

AG

this sea-

son.

Fine

last

who com-

group.

date

He said that the CDs shouldn’t cause older players to malfunction.

label or in the case.

tomorrow would be great.” Steve Moore, 28, said the burn-

for

founder

first

only play the music.

the burnable versions.

for them,” said a sales associate at the store in Waterloo. “Today or

Productions’

free

and

While not

his youngest and one volunteer

community with

Productions, produces plays target-

mainstream

14,

working with him is in his late 50s. The 2004-2005 season is Grinder

A

“We

moment,

in Fergus, is provid-

speech and artistic freedom without being caught up in cliches. Eric Goudie, creative director

at

is

placed the

DVD

Future Shop also carries the DualDiscs, but is still waiting on

“We’ve been waiting a long time

ing the acting

ed

the

keting for Grinder Productions, and a third-year drama student at the

it

if it

He said these have separate sides and should, therefore, be better. System requirements for the DualDiscs will be printed on the

Court.

company

Fergus.

When

some

Grinder Productions, a new theatre

At

volunteer

their content or

Court said people might get a

wrong way

instructions.

That ring

$10 each and he said CDs will be close

to that.

wrong way difficult,”

Generally, the manufacturers of the CDs use that ring for operation

words,

sell at

the double-sided

the

it.

outtakes, videos or whatever,” said Andrew Court, 25.

their

CDs and DVDs

ble-layered

Court said Sunrise has had the

Double-sided DVDs are also available, and have actually been on the market for more than five years. These DVDs have a wide-

at

come

first

onto the market. Currently, douthe store for

The

they

help.

ent.

students,

always looking for more

is

I

INI t_l

S

•*


— SPOKE, January

Page 4

10,

Feature

2005

—i

Southern Ontario musicians BRENT GERHART

By

Komer Musicians come and go, and those who Slay around for many years are making money.

many

Like

music Iliat

oilier

hard to get

is

professions, into,

although

doesn't stop plenty of talented

individuals from attempting a cai'cer. Only a select few will make it. Southern Ontario bands that have done well include Sum 41, Our Lady Peace and The Barenaked Ladies, although they were not

always popular

acts.

To many casual listeners, it may seem like some bands are overnight successes, however,

it

the sales of

Pettit

Project, get

CDs

Canada being

in

so low."

Komer

said the record executives

do not know what the under-21 pop-music crowd wants.

“We

keep playing for it and the great feeling you get when you make new friends and fans.” just

the sheer fun of

establish them-

selves by pouring their hearts

JeffSweeting,

the local

The

southern is

no

Ontario

music

guitaristfor

Green Division

“We totally

fit

in the

egory,” he said, “but

different.

Every year, thousands of local independent bands try to establish themselves in the most populated market in Canada and, every year, thousands fail. When it comes to music, very few

under-21 cat-

it’s

the old,

bad

execs in this country who don’t get it. Tire younger people in the compa-

ny

all

that

love

make

but

it,

it’s

the old retards

the decisions, so the past

few years have been

frustrating.”

bands are able to last for an entire

In a scene filled with mostly punk and hardcore bands, Komer said The

year, let alone establish a local fol-

Pettit Project is already a success.

lowing, and in the southern Ontario music scene, only a few groups'

“We're more of a pop band,

love of music keeps

them going.

Scott Komer, lead singer and guitarist

of The Pettit Project, a synthe-

band from pop-rock Burlington, said even though being sizing

an independent band gets tough.

The

Pettit Project

has to stick with

“Every single day spreads,” said Komer, almost everybody in audience likes what globally,

we

it.

your name “and since our target they

we

happen to play a lot in Burlington,” he said. “We’re not

just

most popular band at punk shows, but I don’t think it holds us back at all. The Internet has made it so it doesn’t matter where you come from, we have thousands of the

THE SCENE

hear,

get bigger and bigger

“we

to

have been incredibly us,” said Sweeting, ask

couldn’t

anything

for

more.”

He

said

it

has been hard

Green Division

for

to get publicity, but

he believes not having the exposure is the fun part of travelling and

going to play new places. “We just keep playing for the sheer fun of it,” he said, “and the great feeling

make new

you get when you

friends and fans. If

it

awesome, if not, we’ve had an awesome time working toward it.”

fans worldwide that couldn’t care

what scene we're from.” Unlike Komer, Jeff Sweeting, lead singer and guitarist of Green Division, a ska-punk band from Pickering, said he is not wonied about national success, and is less

pleased with his band's accomplish-

ments since

it

singer of Ruth’s

Mike Sloan, lead

band from London, said the band has not had a problem establishing a following in southwestern Ontario, or even in his own hometown of Hat,

a pop-punk and rock

Detroit, Mich., but

record label.

scene

fans

wonderful

gets us recognized that'd be

can take

on and independent music scenes in hopes of one day being recognized and signed to a major

he thinks it is a independent bands,

overlooked by the major labels. "The music industry in Canada is really dismal,” he said. "It's run by old and out-of-touch people, hence

to establish a loyal following.

Most musicians

said

shame most especially The

days, months, or even years

many

“Our

each week."

formed two years ago.

it

has ran into

troubles outside of those areas.

“Even though some people have heard us, and we’ve been on record labels with decent distribution and minor clout in the industry,” Sloan said,

“booking our three cross-

Canada and U.S.

tours

was nearly

impossible.”

Sloan said with bands like The White Stripes and The Hives being recognized by the mass market, he believes his band can follow suit. “1 think the rock

and

roll-injected

punk of Ruth’s Hat will soon find a place on corporate radio. Much Music and MTV,” he said. “Would we be happy with that? Sure, as long as

we can achieve that kind of success

without compromising our sound.”

Sloan said since the band formed seven years ago, Ruth’s Hat has been dedicated to fans w'ho think the band is the next big thing. “We might not be going platinum with our

latest

CD,

but people are

so we’re stoked,” he said. “To us, our music is appreciated whether we .sell 1,000 records or

into

it,

one-million records, but

we

always

wish for bigger and better things

(Photo by Brent Gerhart)

and guitarist for The Waterdown on Sept. 12.

Scott Komer, singer

Moe’s Tavern

in

because our ultimate goal is to get as many people to listen to our

music as possible. But, to think just underappreciated we’re because we haven't hit it big is merely an excuse for sucking.” John Coombs, trumpeter and backup vocalist for The Next Best Thing, a ska-punk and reggae band

Fil

Bucchino, bassist and back-up vocalist

Club

in

Kitchener on

Oct. 29.

for Flashlight

Brown, belts out a tune

at the

rocks

from Burlington, said the hardest part about playing in an independ-

ent band

is

getting breaks, expo-

sure and drawing big crowds but

having no money to show for it. “I would love to say we’re under appreciated,”

said

Coombs. I know

“However, from feedback, those

who

hear us really love

it.”

(Photo by Brent Gerhart)

(Photo by Brent Gerhart)

Schwaben

Pettit Project,

Matt Collyer, singer and guitarist for

forms at Moe’s Tavern on Sept. 12.

The Planet Smashers,

per-


Feature

SPOKE, January

Have high hopes Coombs

said southern Ontario

“We

Sault Ste. Marie due to

the best place to be in a band.

the lack of places to play,” said

“You’ll have a big gig with a band you’ve always wanted to play

“The 416, 519 and 905 scenes are by far Canada’s strongest and most

Mike Hawdon of

with,” he said, “or you’ll hear your

successful, although in this country'

for us to do, as a band,

difficult to

it’s

make

it

is

to the big

left

Surfers.

down

“We

the Inner City decided the best thing

Coombs

said

The Next Best

Thing, which has been together

to

move

south to the Toronto area,

since, there are

time.”

was

many more venues

song playing on one of Canada’s

makes

Degeneration, Cavallo previously

us want to keep doing exactly what

and a way bigger chance of being

-Bucchino said

THE SUCCESS bands become noticed without changing their style.

Ontario tour. They also toured Florida in March.

southern Ontario.

rock outfit

“We need to get noticed by those who matter,” he said. “Only

“We’re one of those bands that got together because we were

lead

few people can really make things happen in this industry and

friends

music,” he said.

we

have to put in the extra work and effort to get them to

hired, or replied to an ad in the

notice us.”

after I

become

successful in 2003, and even

included extra stops on a southern

a

just

Although most bands rely on

own stomping grounds

paper.

I

realized

to

make

“Nobody was

how

rare

it

was

moved to Toronto. Hawdon said even though being

their

to heighten

who wanted

in an

independent band

may some-

their popularity, others relocate to

times feel unfulfilling, something

southern Ontario in order to contin-

always happens to make the band keep going.

ue doing what they love.

other band, must stay together and

Not

all

Brown, a four-piece from Toronto, had two

Flashlight

guitarists and flip-flopped between different genres before

being signed to a major record Fil

label.

Bucchino, the band’s bassist

and backup

vocalist, said tlie band’s

moment came when Mike

defining

Conroy (lead

guitarist) joined,

and

helped revive the band in 2000. “It

was

blood

like getting fresh

into something that was just getting going again,” said Bucchino.

“Mikey was

new

was a conscious decision,” he “We had put out two records were kind of ska-punk, and

sound

.

“It was moments when we felt everything was going nowhere, it was one of

those months,” he said. “Then, yet again,

all

that,

figure out

want to do music and believe hardest

way

to

in

make

it.

you good

if

write

it,

It

is

the

a living.”

THE LABEL many

musicians

believe their band should be

labels for their lack of interest.

Matt Collyer, the owner of the Montreal-based independent Union Label Group, said bands need to show maturity in order to

make

(Photo oy Brent Gerhart)

more

popular, and often question record

Bucchino is Flashlight Brown’s bassist and backup Fil

vocalist.

when compared awesome bands,

it.

said Collyer.

promote

to

it

his

became

a real label.”

somebody hooks you and

pendent scene.

“There is a lack of originality in a of bands down here, especially

lot

to

Montreal” he

some

said. “Still, there are

rccdly

but there are also a

of bands doing the same thing

the

major label bands do, and

everyone copying.” Collyer said since

Flashlight

Brown jumped from The Union Group to Hollywood Label records, they have been unable to find another southern Ontario fill

band

the void.

‘AVe’re looking at a lot of bands

“I’m trying to whole scene down here, and there’s going to be a signing soon from southern right now,” he said.

get educated in the

Ontario, we’re actually looking at

The Next Best Thing

right now."

Collyer said in order to be successful, a band must have a few qualifications.

“Bands must be able to sell their good live show and attitude,” he said, "you have to do what you do, but the main thing you have to do is just have a good

record, have a

time.”

Oct. 29.

is

required at

Anyone will

without a

be required to

pay a $6 day pass to be granted access.

for

before really

Collyer said the southern Ontario

Public Skating

times to gain access to the

Thank you

just

music scene has many talented bands, however, he thinks the major label industries in Toronto have a bad influence on the inde-

when Cavallo

another one of those

student card

it,

called,

said

their careers.

valid

do

to

band was having doubts about

Hughes the

Recreation Centre.

want

1998

to

“We

all

really

ty surreal.”

all starting

three years.

A valid student card

you

heard a rumour Rob Cavallo (music producer) might have been calling, but we didn’t believe it,” said Bucchino. “Then, there was this call and it was pret-

was

With Conroy, Flashlight Brown went from a Guelph independent ska-punk band, to punk band, and finally to a major label rock band from Toronto, all within the span of

Brown

“If

don’t break up,” said Hughes. “But

to

it

the same.”

Flashlight

said people should think

band The Planet Smashers, but since has expanded to three divisions. Stomp, Union and Mayday. “We started Stomp as a joke, and pretended we were on a label,” said the lead singer and guitarist of The Planet Smashers, “and then in

fun, but

band

Hughes

twice about becoming a musician.

lot

of records for ska-punk, and by then we thought it sounded that’s a lot

his

a band.”

“We’re not going to babysit tliem,” “They have to prove that they don’t even need us. Union will help them out, w'e’re not going to make it or break it for them.” Collyer said The Union Label Group began in 1995 as Stomp records, a label which allowed him

that

Singer and guitarist

releasing records, then you’re not

Although

the band.

Matt Hughes rocks The Schwaben Club with

writing songs and keep releasing records,” he said. “If you’re in a band and you’re not writing music and

was just seemed so

Matt Hughes, lead singer and guitarist of Flashlight Brown, said the band had been together since 1995, but Conroy helped pave a new path of rock and roll music for

said.

their musical drive going.

“We must keep

in, it

energy, everything

perfect.”

“It

keep

originally a super fan,

and when he came

(Photo by Brent Gerhart)

order to be suc-

in

Flashlight Brow'n, or any

cessful

Hawdon, who sings and rotafes between guitar and drums for the genre-exceeding band, said The Surfers are a rare breed of band in

since October 1999, has

more

worked with Green Day, The Goo Dolls, Maioon 5 and more.

Goo

we’re doing.”

seen and heard.”

— Page 5

2005

for future

brings you kicking and screaming back in.” Aside from producing Flashlight Brown’s debut album. My

biggest radio stations. That

10,

am 2:50 pm Sunday 2 pm - 2:50 pm Shinny Hockey

Tuesday

1 1

Christmas Hours

your co-operation.

l\/lon,WedJhurs,

Fri

Regular hours

until:

Dec 24 - open

till 1

A ctivate Y our L,

ifel

am -

12:50

pm

2:00pm

Dec 25 and 26 -Closed

ext.

3565

to 30

Dec

and Jan

31

-

Recreation Centre Hours

Monday 7:00

am

-

Friday 11:00

pm

4pm to 9pm

Dec 27 Jan 2

11

748-3565

Activities posted daily

- 1

1

-

Closed

-Normal hours resume

Saturday & Sunday 7:00

am

-

8:00

pm


Page 6

— SPOKE, January

Time

10,

Commentary

2005

for action

James,

how many times do I have

has come As

new year

the

help those

in

to tell you? I have resolved not

make a

to

resolution

this year.

kicks off everyone should take the time to is so much suffering elsewhere

need, because there

world.

in the

New Year’s

While many wayside,

this is

one

that

resolutions have already fallen by the everyone should make and should make

an effort to keep. »

It’s embarrassing that Canada, as a nation, isn’t doing more to help the millions of people in Africa who are suffering from

--fJ

AIDS and HIV. Many other nations have

also been neglecting these issues and the only people doing something about it are those in the enter-

tainment industry.

Band Aid

20, a group of United

has released a

new

version of

Kingdom bands and

Do They Know

artists,

Christmas this yejir, and there is a Live Aid DVD box set available, with all the proceeds going to benefit African nations in need. This July will maik the 20th anniversary of the original Live Aid concerts to help the victims of the famine in Ethiopia and, 20 years later, while the situation has improved, the situation in Africa as a whole is even worse.

The HIV/AIDS epidemic has reached and there

It’s

disastrous proportions

no end in sight. Millions of children are infected with the disease and many more are left parentless and alone because of it. Young girls are being raped in huge numbers because many men wrongly believe having sex with a virgin will cure them of the disease. And don forget about some of the issues other countries are is

t

facing that have yet to see any recognition or help from the Western world.

China thousands of little girls are killed each year as a result of the country's one child per family policy. Some are aborted after the parents determined the sex of the child wasn’t male. Some aie drowned or suffocated when they are minutes old because they are female. And, worst of all, some are just dumped in the street or end up in orphanages that would make the worst puppy mill in Canada In

look like a five-star

facility. In

these places the

are

little girls

strapped into chairs that double as toilets and left there. Most are underfed if they are even fed at all. Many of these places also

have “dying rooms’’ where the girls, usually between the ages of one month to three years, are strapped on beds and literally just

The pain and suffering inflicted on such small children is enough to make anyone sick to their stomach. After suffering through years of war in the late ’90s the Democratic Republic of Congo faces the threat of another invasion from Rwanda. Those previous wars were sparked by invasions from Rwanda and left more than 3.2 million dead from

Revolution against resolutions The countdown is over. The ball has dropped.

We

hummed

all

Congo

also

dealing with problems of sexual abuse and rape committed by peacekeeping troops stationed in the area to help. The state of lawlessness in many regions of the country has left it

is

in a helpless state

and

if

something

is

not done soon the situ-

ation will only get worse.

to

And

Auld

time for Canadians to step up and live up to its reputation of helping destitute countries, not only in terms of keeping the peace, but also in terms of humanitarian aid and prevention.

new

year:

This year

decided to prepare

I

welcome

Spoke welcomes

letters to the

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be

editor. Letters

contacted

to

well. In his usual overzealous fashion,

he forced the entire family to

advance.

discuss their

thought about the infamous question, one I had always approached apprehensively.

tions during dinner.

What do

I

resolve

change

to

love

classic respon,ses; lose weight, join

the

gym, save money.

However,

me just

He gone with the

admit,

I’ll

my

track

is

reprehensible.

I

did-

So

this

year,

resolutions.

I

I

revolted against

would not be

lather didn’t take the

news

not the

In

2004,

I

was

not'

I

am?”

beloved

his

tion centre or

accused of any indeI devoted time to charity, completed all my home-

I

had

work and attended almost every family dinner to which I was invited.

New

To some,

my

breaking of the

considered blasphemous.

my

in

fami-

But

“Well, of course

I

do, dear,” he

you want

“Actually, no

myself as

1

to

I

change

don’t,”

in

some2005?”

I

Year's tradition w'as

will never again

I

declared.

strikes midnight,

to accept

kick up

had decided

in

was com-

that life

to

some-

succumb

to the

New Year’s self-deprecation party. On Jan. 1, 2006, when the clock

I

is.”

I’m on

really think

have decided

Maybe seeing the sequel to Bridget Jones twice during the holiday season had gone to my head. I

New

thing big.

finally said. “But, isn’t there

thing

arrested,

forcibly checked into a rehabilita-

ly-

a slave

to convention.

.should be a tinie

the ups,

was simply unheard of

“This year

locker.

successes, not

sacred

he questioned.

my

upon

reflect

resolved to

failures.

Year’s tradition. Such an outburst

signed up for a membership, paid the dues and even bought a combination lock to put on

my

propensity I

cent acts. Instead,

looked flabbergasted.

The only one that ever came to fruition was joining the gym. Yes, I

After one apathetic workout,

Year’s resolu-

way

the

mocked

just

record for following through on these resolutions

New

With him 1 took a Bridget Jones approach and asked, “Don’t you

about myself? In the past. I’ve

a

downs.

in

I

my

New Year’s Eve

the early

Babylonian tradition of resolution making.

My

Letters are

praise myself for

harp on

then, the dreaded aftermath

of starting a

long-distance

a-

and

towards shopaholism,

really

n’t return.

It s

No unsigned

along

Lang Syne, since no one knew the lyrics.

left to die.

famine and disease.

a quirky family,

relationship

my

heels,

I

will

once again

champagne

and

ceiling

toss the resolution tra-

dition out the

And

if,

like

window. me, you come

to the

conclusion you're just fine the

plicated enough. With the stresses

you

of a demanding program

promise you wall not regret

at school.

flute

hand, confetti falling from the

aie,

“w'obbly” parts and

way all.

it!

Spoke Is published and produced weekly by the

Journalism students of Conestoga College

Editor: Jennifer

Advertising Manager: Ryan Connell Production Managers: James Clark,

Ormston

Spoke Online

Editor-

Circulation Manager:

Kristen

Jennifer

McMurphy Howden

Desiree Finhert

for verification.

Photo Editors: Tim Murphy, Kate

be published. be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter letters will

Battler

Letters should

for publication.

Address correspondence to; The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

N2G 4M4

Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

Spoke s address

is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4 Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534

Dr.,

E-mall: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

Web

site:

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space Letters 0 the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a MS Word file would be heloful Letters must not contain any libellous statements. '

1


Entertainment

Rock legends more famous dead

SPOKE, January

/mm* i

By MIKE BORS is

It

and

no secret

that certain

2005

10,

Horoscope

!/i

Week of Jan.

2005

10,

rock

Libra

rollers are great.

Look

U2, a 25-year-old band

at

September 23 October 22

number 1 album. Bob Dylan, more than 40

that just released a

Look

at

albums under his belt and he can still be counted on to add lyrical depth to an industry that needs it. Look at Paul McCartney, at the age of 62 he can stiU stir up a commotion in the music world, as he did when he agreed to perform at this year’s Super

Bowl

Snuggle up winter

the

You're not

who likes cold climates when it comes to your

a person

When you

Stop looking

what the future

live in the

with your sweetie.

relinquish the desire

obtain happiness. for

-

your future you will

to control

Cosy up

romantic interludes.

will bring and-

moment.

halftime show.

Taurus April 20

May

-

Scorpio 20

October 23

-

November 21 You were stressed last week and week you are in for some rest

this

rock gods that can never be touched. Is

warm,

to stay

here to stay.

is

especially

But why do these artists still live in the shadows of those who have gone before them? When you think of artists like Jim John Joplin, Morrison, Janis Lennon, Bob Marley or Kurt Cobain, you think of them as these

than

— Page 7

But not for too

and relaxation.

Jim Morrison a better lyricist Bob Dylan? No way, but it’s

long,

Morrison’s death that gives him

you

on your

don't

want

to get

behind

You need

Burn baby burn! kick

to

high gear and get

into

it

moving. There is no time to waste and you certainly can't afford to procrastinate.

responsibilities.

the edge.

We worship someone like Kurt Cobain as a hero, but what did he really do? We say he died tragically but he killed himself and now he is promoted as a role model. John Lennon, on the other hand, died in a way that was totally out of his control; but does

we

this

mean

should idolize him more?

Are these death?

And

artists if so,

more why?

relevant in

“Obviously they wouldn’t be legends if they didn’t produce music that was high quality and timeless,” said

Anthony Spinak, manOn on

ager of The Beat Goes

(Photo by Mike Bars)

Many music

artists

seem

to

become more prominent

after death.

people place around

Wi nker. he doesn’t think that death should change the way we

are affected

perceive people’s music.

year-old, mairied mothers of three crying over Kurt Cobain,” said

Kurt Cobain,” said

He

said

“A good

songwriter’s

a good

kill

artists

“That’s funny.

regard

these

Deboer

He

where the culture is hold up in high tortured

who

by the death of these

“You don’t see too many 35-

were alive today.” Spinak said that the fact that Cobain killed himself shows that he gave up which should preclude him from being a rock and roll hero. Spinak also shed some light on Jim Morrison’s legend. “Morrison had a certain mystique, he was dark,” he said. “I think his

great and they died and that’s a

class

expert and media studies teacher at

all they can do is sketch books and listen to their music,” he said. “That’s their

Eastwood Collegiate

world.”

death propels that even further.”

a drug overdose'has a specific aura

but this analogy

around him that

be they music fans or not, like a story with an ending. We worship the rock stars with definitive endings, tragic or not, because we

Josh Winker, sales associate

at

Sunrise Records in Fairview Mall, said

Cobain gets a

lot

of extra

die and held in this god-like form.

“The guy who

the artist es,” said

He

credit because he’s dead.

“There are two types of rock

stars.

who

dies of suicide or

is

different

from

dies of natural caus-

Deboer.

said he can’t get a handle

around the god-like

attributes that

used

much about

a workshop about change helped

on

As a

result,

we feel

let

down,

frustrated,

If you're feel-

ability to reason.

ing stressed

because you

it's

let

yourself get distracted and too

Cancer June 22

-

Capricorn

July 22

December 22

-

January 19

their

No

Take care of your soul and will take care of

definitive

conclusions can

ever be drawn about

why we wor-

ship the dead rocker over the living

know how

is

offered: people,

their story ends.

It

just

when put

it

you

it

right back.

might be your best friend the going gets tough.

You

on the back burner and your

priorities

need

m

Beauty

is

-

fold on. But don't

son you are with

let

the opinions

is

perfectly suit-

taste.

Aquarius January 20 February 18

August

22

positive no matter

eye of the

of others bog you down. The per-

Leo July 23

the

in

beholder and you have a blind-

ed to your

to change.

how

Can you

see your reflection in

You have

negative the world around you

the

might seem. Even though the chance for success is small, there

happy disposition and your smile and friendly glow rubs off on oth-^ ers. Keep doing what you're doing, you're on the right track.

is still

a chance.

Always look

for

the bright side.

mirror?

a very

me to recognize why my New

Virgo

I

may be

in the

approach.

Remain

I

set goals that

blowing

is

relaxed. Try a different

Year’s resolutions never worked. didn't need more motivation; needed smaller goals, or at least my long-term goals needed to be organized into easily manageable steps.

Many of us tend to

The answer

wind, along with your sanity and

classroom,

make New Year’s

at

proba-

lately,

Slow down.

cate work.

what’s going on in the

that fresh feeling of having

My experience

seemed too familiar

doesn’t really care too

resoluttons ttiat generally didn’t last past January 10th. It’s a chance to solve problems, achieve new heights and challenges that encourages us to set goals. As the new year begins, we are often excited with our good intentions for positive change, despite past resolution failures. to

I

ble personality and things have

the 17-year-old kid in your

who

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: Go&hSetting I

Am

having deja-vu?

bly because you are doing dupli-

artists.

Deboer.

said people get eulogized after they

I

having deja-vu? You have a dou-

speculated on the people

“It’s

Am

artists,”

said.

Winker said. “Bob Marley and John Lennon were

in Kitchener,

November 22 December 21

They’ll

songwriter,”

we should look at their music.” Ron Deboer, popular culture

Sagittarius

June 21

-

themselves.

Fairway Road. “We try to imagine what they would be like if they

shame but that doesn’t change how

Gemini May 21

who

There are the ones that are like, T’m rich and successful and get lots of girls and that means I’m better than you,’ then there’s the ones that are like, T’m depressed and really lonely and have no self-esteem and that means I’m better than you,’ like

out of reach (This semester,

even powerless when the

firat

I’ll

get

Pisces

August 23 September 22

alt A's").

February 19

-

March 20

disappointing

grade appears. Instead, a long-term goal, such as

“I

want

my grades to

this

semester”

is

more

A step-by-step approach

might include: attending all classes, with only sickness as an exception; staying ahead by doing textbook reading prior to class; and seeking help when necessary from faculty or a peer tutor. The latter are smaller, achievable goals that will almost assuredly lead to higher marks. , attainable.

not an option, it's an This week for you means mind over matter. Stay Failure

improve

Fitness should be in the fore-

is

attitude.

focused and committed to getting things done and

you

will find suc-

cess on the other side.

front

of your priorities.

You

on the turkey this past holiday season and you1T need to work it off or risk staying binged a

little

chubby.

Set goals for yourself that are realistic, achievable and measurable. Failure saps confidence and motivation. Success builds confidence and irotivation. For goal setting or any other assistance, see a counsellor in Student Services.

Janet Morris

A Message from Student Services Visit

our website httDJ/www.conestoqac.on.caAsD/stservAndex.isD

is

a 2nd-year journalism

student in tune with the universe.


— SPOKE, January

Page 8

10,

Entertainment

2005

Home back in the studio

Close to STEPH BAULK

By

Close places

Home

Kitchener haiul CU)se to

making a haiul

come

is

have into

putting everything they

music they love ... trying to make their dreams the

true.

The group I'ormed just over two years ago alter lead guitarist Chris

Monteiro,

1

and vocalist John

9,

Maksyn, 21. decided to leave the hand they were in at the time and form their own. The two of them asked their and now hasc and vocalist, De Serpa, 21, to Join and a few' auditions found drum-

friend,

Darrell after

mer Dan Close

Gottfried.

Home

to

an

making

19.

official

The group, which plays

hand. a

mix of

Home

to

all

has performed

in

over Kitchener including

the Registry Theatre, Button Factoiy,

Starlit.^he

Wax and The

The band went on

Still.

in August and September, travelling to Guelph. Listowei, Barrie, Orillia and Toronto, playing three shows every weekend, anil having a good lime both on and off stage. Currently, Close to Home is taking some time off the stage and is hack in the studio writing songs for their .second album. "We have had to turn down shows because it can get in the way of work," said Monteiro, adding if the group kept leaving the studio to do a show, it would

tour

be unprofessional.

punk, rock and emo, came up with

The band has spent countless

many

hours together writing song lyrics

the

name during one of

their

days of practising.

"We were down room and

there

for their in

was

a paper lying

around,” said Monteiro.

an article

titled

"We saw

Close to Home, so We still have the

w'e just used that. article.”

The hand came out with their first album back in April 2004. They decided to title the album It’s Not

Me

...

It’s

You

talking to one of our

friends and he

was saying how he

got the old it's not you,

me’

Monteiro. “So we around because that's the reason people break up. We

line,”

said

flipped

it

real

it's

just thought

it

was kind of funny."

second album.

mostly write about things

that have happened to us or are happening to us right now," said

Monteiro. "Girls, relationships

“After

we

Yet another year in its

wake

we

is

behind us,

ly-anticipated movies.

Last year brought us such blockbuster sequels as Shrek 2 and the

much-hyped Spider-Man

2.

Movie

buffs were also treated to Bridget

Jones:

have to

“But

great stuff.”

still

after that’s all finished we’ll

doing shows again." Monteiro said the band definitely has its moments, both ups and downs, but it’s definitely worth it. "We disagree on just about everystart

is

to disagree about,” he

The Edge of Reason and

Home

to

are currently working on their next album.

Day

The

After

Tomorrow. With so many coveted films under our belts can there be anything to look forward to in 2005? You bet your latex rubber bodysuit, Batman! In June expect Batman Begins, the

latest

said.

more than

to

be successful, but with

every dream comes a

little

doubt.

instalment

in

the

Batman

A

Die Hardest. The

franchise.

prequel, the film will focus on

date

tentative release

is

July. Willis will reprise his

Bruce Wayne’s early days as the caped crusader. He will go up

role as

John McClane. In the fourth McClane and his daugh-

against international criminal Ra’s

ter

A1 Ghul as well as the infamous Doctor Jonathan Crane, better

terrorist plot

known

to

villain

as the straw'-bellied super-

The Scarecrow.

Bruce Willis

stars in

instalment

become entangled

a sinister

in

while on holiday

the Caribbean.

McClane

will

in

have

use his characteristic instinct for

survival to unravel the terrorists’

Die Hard

4:

plans.

movie

www.clos-

advice. “Just don’t give up,"

little

he said. “Keep trying and practising, that’s the biggest thing.”

will see the sixth instalment

history.

As

in

spring brings about

is

III:

expected to

Revenge of

come out May

back

light

projector

marks film

In the

depaiiment of less-anticipat-

.sequels.

Scary Movie 4 theatres early

known about

Natalie

will reprise their roles as

is

expectyear.

this

the

latest

movie hut audiences can likely the same jabs at lioiTor movies and popular culture as

expect

appeared

in earlier in.stalments.

time around the film

in 1977.

Ewan McGregor and

designs from a

it

first

into eonflict with Obi-

George Lucas directs and produces the film with some production help from Rick MacCallum.

is

Porlman

Loft trace

eomes

Kenobi.

Little

Wars Episode

in the series

and Emily

Wan

hit

the anniversary of the very

First-year graphics design students Brent King

tually

ed to

this as a historic date since

(Photo by Ryan Connell)

Samuel L. Jackson plays Mace Windu. Episode III, like Episode II, is set during the Clone Wars. It will feature Anakin's struggle as he is tempted by the dark side and even-

nemesis Darth Vader.

25. Fans of the films will recognize

right

Vader.

ed

the Silh

has to be lined up Just

Kenobi and Padme Amidala. Hayden Christensen will play Anakin Skywalker and Darth

Obi-Wan

moviegoers will witness the continued changing of Anakin Sky walker into that familiar black-helmeted Star

3.

at

buy their CD. For anyone thinking about starting their own band, Monteiro has a

the metamorphosis of the outdoors,

the graphics design lab on Dec.

Home, you

website

and what we do, but the odds .seem to be against us at times.” Until they do make it big the band continues to write songs for their loyal fans and ones to come. If you are interested in finding

May

in

to

visit their

etohome.ca, where you can also

of possibly the most popular series

It

more about Close

can

band

“All of our hearts are in this

Monteiro said Close to Home has one goal with no set time. “We just want a record label, we want to tour all over the States, we want a career,” he said." Close to Home wants nothing

out

bring blockbuster sequels

other non-sequel films such as

a slew of high-

band Close

“But we" always pull through and manage to come out with some

write

Polar Express and The leaving

of the Kitchener

record and do demos,” he said.

will

By JUSTIN BASTIN

(Internet photo)

Members

in the writing stage,

thing there

2005

...

and relationships." Monteiro said he is uncertain when their second album will be released because they are still only girls

after a conversation

with one of their friends.

"We were

“We

our practice

light

is

said to

This

make

of movies like Spider-Man,

Daredevil,

The Hulk and X-Men.


Digital Edition - January 10, 2005