Page 1

Canines lend a helping

your

Start

paw

Xmas shopping

early

The Homer Watson House and Gallery’s Christmas show and sale has begun.

Autistic children

benefit from the

companionship

of

College ready for Rae Review Town hall meeting will be

trained National

Service Dogs.

at

Feature

held

Conestoga’s rec centre on Thursday.

13

News

Monday, November 22, 2004

Conestoga College, Kitchener

36th Year

2

— No. 25

CSI president does CSA work on CSI time By

RYAN CONNELL

the students nothing,” Falconer said.

However, Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) has budgeted $5,000 this year for travel expenses for their president to do

work for a separate organization. CSI president Justin Falconer

that rep-

CSA

Ontario colleges.

repre-

and

103,984 students, speaking as the cial

government.

CSA

The

president’s job

is

an

unpaid, volunteer position. Falconer’s annual salary as CSI president

$36,300, which comes

is

out of the $90 student association

six tickets in

ticket.

fee that all students pay each year. Falconer is scheduled to work 37.5 hours a week for CSI. Ail students from the Ontario colleges that belong to the CSA are forced to pay $1.89 to fund the

Conestoga students’ comes out of the

organization.

30 minutes.

portion of this fee

student association fee.

Security fights parking fraud

The $5,000

for Falconer’s travel

an additional expense that also comes out of the student assocosts

By JENNIFER

HOWDEN

windshield and automatically say, ‘That’s

If you’re

having problems find-

parking space when you come to school in the morning it may be because people are parking ing

a

illegally in the lots.

Brown is

fake.’

She’s

fast,”

that

how good

said. “That’s

she

simply because that’s what she’s

all the time. I mean, it’s like any function in life, the more you do it, the better you get at it.”

doing

Every week Conestoga’s security team finds five to 10 cars that are parked at the college using forged

ticket as well as a note requesting

or altered parking passes.

the

an issue that we’re trying to address and the only way we can

security office.

do

to security so the incident

“It’s

is

it

ment.

through parking enforce-

It is

a serious violation.

only are you taking the

money

system

college

but

inconveniencing those ing by the rules,” said

Not

out of

you’re

who are livRob Brown,

If a fake

parking pass

found,

is

$15 parking

security will leave a

car owner’s presence

worked out. “We’ve been

the

at the college.

“We’re not here

money

off the

owner to

report

can be

to

make

a ton of

students because

100 per cent.

hitting

regional

vice-presi-

who

belong to other college student unions, only pay $2,000 in travel expenses for their position with the CSA because their positions are not as time-consuming as the president’s.

Falconer said the work he does CSA indirectly affects CSI. The

money

he

the time he isn’t working at the col-

said.

she

is

a student

is

caught he or

dealt with under the Student

Code of Conduct and

not under the

Criminal Code.

Every pass (Samantha) feels has been a forgery has been a forgery and every person we contacted to

CSA

The dents,

students don’t have a whole lot of money. We’re trying to come up with something that’s workable,”

When

then up to the

It is

at

One idea is charging $30 for each month that the student used the forged pass because it costs approximately $30 a month to park office.

“We have strictly

Code

but if

we went

by the Criminal Code and

we were

for

out arresting students for

spent on his travel costs and

“I

president,

would be

it

say otherwise,” he

why we have

we

forging parking passes that could

think that’s

have had to go get them,” Brown

adversely affect the rest of their

dent) vice-president so that

said.

lives,”

The

passes,

school year,

which cost $240 are

to

a

ensure the

He

also stresses that

when

a stu-

organization and safety of the park-

dent gets called to security he or

ing

she

lots.

Samantha Russell

is

the security

guard responsible for surveying the parking lots and finding the forged passes.

According

Brown, Russell is comes to scooping out fake passes. She can tell when lines aren’t straight and when the flawless

to

when

it

parking pass colour

is

not the right

shade.

is

not going to be

kicked out of school. will usually just admit to using a

forged pass and then security will turn the information over to the registrars’

mended will

office

with a recom-

The

registrars’ office

fine.

review the incident and deterfine the person will

mine the final have to pay.

Currently, there

“Samantha’s our

little

resident

She’s very, very good at

tom apart or The student

tary

fine

for

is

no

students

set

mone-

who

are

spotting the ones that aren’t legiti-

caught with a fake parking pass, but Brown says he is working on

mate. She can look through a car

some

expert.

ideas

with the registrars’

“We

Brown

the president

said.

understand people are tight

on money and yes, it is fairly expensive to come up with $240 to pay for parking to go to school, but it’s

a lot cheaper to take public

transit then

it

is

to drive a car

and

pay your insurance and gas,” he said.

The bottom

line,

Brown

said, is

students need to follow the parking rales.

“We run into a lot of things we have to control and if everyone would park legally and legitimately we wouldn’t have nearly the number of parking problems we have,” he said.

been around as long as me,” Falconer said. “It’s a good indication that it’s my time to go soon, but I have had the most experience. I’ve been deeply involved and I have a good understanding of provincial issues.”

Although Falconer’s

president

to

assume

now

when

away, the viceresponsibili-

at the point

where

should be able to function

in the

ties. it

is

is

a (stu-

CSI

is

members have requested that he spend 20 hours a week in his office. Falconer said he

retreat

beginning Nov. 5 in Toronto

have

to

“To get

changed though,

if

CSA is based),

the salary has to

$35,000 annually,” he said. “That’s a $35,000 increase that will affect 100,000 students, which would be about 35 cents a member. However, we can’t do that at least

without a budget, without a longterm plan and not without some-

Falconer said his position as the

CSA president

ment.

as Confederation College in

Thunder Bay. The board members stayed in a Holiday Inn for two nights costing $70 per room.

The

board member’s lunches and one

CSA. and not

CSI, aside from the gas to get there (in travel expenses). It cost

is

a benefit because

makes Conestoga College more

away

and back

this

you’re working in Toronto (where

it

for this retreat

have one of their presidents

the position.

where he met with seven other board members from other colleges as far

“CSA paid

advocating

is

a full-time presi-

dent so student unions wouldn’t

CSA weekend

dinner were paid for by the

CSA hire

thing that’s sustainable.”

absence of the president.” Falconer attended a

availability at

CSI is more limited because of his work with the CSA, the CSI board

be

come

in or

“There’s no other student leader

the

I

CSA.

that has

“But

at the college.

come

for the

they can run for the position.

foolish to

said.

CSA. Algonquin Ottawa and the St.

running for president requires permission and financial support from their student union’s board before

could certainly see there being

a perceived barrier to accessing the

in

Falconer was voted CSA president by their members at an annual conference last May. Each person

fill

head of safety and security services

in has either

work

members of the

college, he said.

3 to 19 vis-

Lawrence College campus in Cornwall were recruited during the trip. Falconer attended Canadore College, Northern College and St. Clair College board meetings to raise awareness about what CSA was doing and to discuss the Rae Review with them. Falconer also went to Mohawk College to discuss the Rae Review. Falconer was still being paid by CSI during the week he was doing

that the

is still

1

order to get

in

to join the

College

going to benefit the students, even when he is not on campus to meet with students or with lege

the option of going to

the Criminal

them

is

ciation fee.

associations

of the alliance. Students fund these associations. Falconer also took a week-long

iting six colleges

voice of the students to the provin-

handed out

student

“road trip” from Oct.

president, a non-profit, non-

sents 16 colleges, 23 councils

Officers

ious college

(CSA)

at

Waterloo Regional police were enforcing red-light violations on Nov. 9 at the corner of Wilson Avenue and Kingsway Drive, by Fairview Park Mall in Kitchener. The penalty is steep: a $190

of the money to from the var-

that are a pail

is

resents student-governing councils

Red means stop

all

CSA comes

also the College Student Alliance

governmental association

(Photo by Melissa Hancock)

fund the

visible

to

the provincial govern-

“I think it’s important to

have a

strong voice at the provincial level,”

he

said. “I

can go and speak to the

Minister (of Training, Colleges and Universities)

about a

CSA

and although she knows

I

issue,

represent

everyone with the CSA, she also knows I’m from Conestoga.”


Page 2

News

— SPOKE, November 22, 2004

Now deep thoughts Conestoga College

...with Random

School system broken

questions answered by

random

Rae needs

hear

to

students By DESIREE FINHERT

Tibbits

worked

What

did you always want

for Christmas, but never got?

“I

got everything

I

wanted,

because my parents were good to me.” Heather Jamieson, nursing

“I

always wanted an

now

The system is broken, said Conestoga College's president at an information forum. Nov. 16. explained to John Tibbits employees that the forum was to provide an overview of the Rae Review, to state the college’s position and to prepare them for the upcoming town hall meeting. Tibbits said former premier Bob Rae, who is heading the post-secondary review board, will not hear anything new at the town hall meeting being held at Conestoga's rec centre on Nov. 25. “I’m not trying to criticize anyone, but there is only so many ways you can cut this up,” said Tibbits. “But if he keeps hearing the same thing:

electric guitar,

but

I’m actually

making one.” Landon Clarkson,

broken,"

‘It’s

who

well,

electronics technician

I

kid.

just couldn’t get

enough

Amber recreation

and

would

government

have strict

they weren’t serious

if

expected to release in

us,” Tibbits told

who

January 2005.

some 30 employ-

attended the meeting in

the

A

Place for Change.

latter

document

the

is

Arts and Technology of Ontario’s

(ACAATO)

response to the post-

secondary review from the commission titled Higher Expectation for Higher Education. The former college’s

the

is

review.

leisure

Both

response to the

were

responses

released this month.

“We

haven't had a lot of time to

Tonka It

The

review, post-secondary Higher Expectations for Higher

Education, released Oct.

I,

includ-

ed a workbook to be completed by

“We were

the only college in the

system that had to go head to head with

the

on getting Grade 12,” said “But maybe there should be more focus on applied apprenticeships. Applied learning should have a greater focus.” Regarding funding, Tibbits said there should be an end to slip-year funding, which means colleges would receive funding for growth sis

Tibbits.

when

there

is

a student population

increase and not three years

table meeting.

three

said

universities,”

He would

round table meeting,

after.

like to see a

labour force

market development implemented.

agreement

Tibbits about Conestoga's presence that also

Tibbits said there

are different

“But our position

meeting would be getting hold of the microphone. “You have an opportunity to the

town

make

hall

com-

However, colleges and universihad to complete and return

ties

the

five minutes.”

outlined

would

like to see

the

he

points

changed

in the

workbook by Oct.

29, in time

round table meeting with the review board. for a

should pay something.”

After

that

system include a third-party arbitrator and bridging programs.

the

and has

ability is not acceptable

it’s

is,”

now, up the

to

said

street,

‘no.’”

In Section 2 of Post-Secondary

Education states

in

that

the 21st Century

colleges

should

it

be

two years of some university programs as they do in the United Stales and some other provinces. The college said the two-year programs should to deliver the first

in the

said she agreed with the president’s

“The

vision.

transferability

between colleges and is

universities

very important,” said Higgins.

Sherley Loucks, a Conestoga employee in the International English Language Testing System Tibbits

"My It’s

it’s

nice

to

know

taking a position.

is

because I have a be coming to college. for his future. Plus, I'm a longinterest is

who

will

term employee," said Loucks, who has worked at Conestoga for 27 years. "This direction the college

taking

She

is

To

is

very important."

said she has already registered

town

to attend the

hall meeting.

register, to read the post-sec-

ondary review Higher Expectations for Higher Education or fill out the workbook, go to raereview.on.ca. Achieving Higher Expectations in Postsecondary Ontario’s Education Sector: A Place for viewed at Change can be

acaato.on.ca.

Post-Secondary Education

in the

21st Century can be viewed on the

college website.

This was one of four meetings for faculty and staff at Conestoga’s campuses. The last

held

one was

lead to an associate degree.

Kristen

computer programmer/analyst program,

son

Tibbits. “Right

meeting,

the

Conestoga’s.

recommending

"The

who benefit the most are the individuals who study, so they

(IELTS), said

universities,

we need

people

system and said there was only about a 10 per cent difference between ACAATO’s paper and

"From our point of view, access, system design and funding are the issues," said Tibbits. "This system we have is not a modern one.” The president spoke about transferability between colleges and

is

flexibility,” said Tibbits.

Higgins, a professor

microphone. There will be one stationary and one roaming microphone. During the hour-long meeting Tibbits

more

“And

a point," said Tibbits.

encouraged

truck.

to be

Nov.

1

7 in Waterloo.

Stratford student wins bursary

was a red Jeep.” Dave Trouten,

By CHANTELLE TIMPERLEY

mechanical techician

A student who graduated from Conestoga College’s Stratford campus was awarded a $500 bur“I

less

upcoming

meeting would be a lot intimidating than the round hall

end. "Tell us what the gap

get ready for this,” said Tibbits.

mission.

as a kid was the big-wheeled

town

Tibbits said the lack of transfer-

the public and returned to the

“My Christmas wish

liked.”

Tibbits added that the

He suggested people wishing to comment should sit next to the

is

review

its final

The

and

round table meeting and each table was responsible for answering one question from the workbook. “People at 17 tables gave answers

commission

Association of Colleges of Applied

recreation

tables, seating eight people, at the

you have

Sector:

Michelle Timbers,

were 20

said there

about changing the system. The

Ontario’s Postsecondary Education

wanted the doll that peed her pants and cried.”

The president

we

in

“Right now, there’s great empha-

Tibbits.

Tibbits said the toughest thing at

E-wing amphitheatre. At the forum, he discussed two documents, Post-Secondary Education in the 21st Century, and Achieving High Expectations in

“I

should be the third pillar education system.

frozen.

engineering/robotics

leisure

could

and the University of Waterloo.

ees

Tait,

we

Guelph, Wilfrid Laurier University

Allan Stahl, mechanical

“I always wanted an Easy Bake Oven.”

Tibbits said that apprenticeships

have had broad consultation," said

that

applied learning.

to

include an increase in funding for

"This could be a watershed for

Lego.”

and the review. “If we had six months,

said there should be

pathways from high school

better

involved officials from the Rae Commission, the University of

deadlines

was a

workbook

college’s response to the

The response

staff

Premier Dalton McGuinty commissioned the review board following the May budget that did not

ordered a commission and set

I

college

views regarding tuition because some people have said it should be free and others said it should be

the

Lego when

the

at the

Tibbits said he doesn't believe

loved to play with

said

diligently to complete the

knows.”

colleges.

“I

again and again

this

always wanted

sary in June.

a Barbie dollhouse.” Melissa Rubach,

Dori Woolrich. a 31 -year-old mother from Mitchell, Ont., was awarded the bursary by the

architecutral construction

University

engineering technology

It is

Women’s

Club.

rare a college student

is

cho-

sen for the bursary.

She

is

a graduate of both

upgrading program and

(gen-

and science). She had maintained marks ranging from the high 80s to 90s in both programs. Woolrich was nominated by Ruth

eral

Smile Conestoga, you could be our next respondent!

GAS

the

arts

MacIntyre, the co-ordinator

in aca-

and she was coming

to school during

demic upgrading at the Stratford campus. MacIntyre had been approached by the dub to submit the name of a student who was headed into a post-secondary pro-

at the same time." “She did really well in her math, her marks were in the high 80s,”

gram.

she

MacIntyre said it was an achievement for Woolrich to be able to balance both school and home life at the same time, and excel in both. That is why she chose Woolrich. “I think the most outstanding

admirable,

tiring,

the primary reason for

why

she was considered seriously by the University

she

has

MacIntyre.

Women's Club, is young son,” a “She works

that

said

full-time.

and managing to get volunteer work in and look after her

the daytime

preschool son

said.

“I

saw

that

that

as

very

she was able to

keep herself so organized and focused, and still spend quality time with her son."

Woolrich was on the waiting list program and said

for a paramedics

she hopes to use the bursary to put

toward “It

was

that.

was

great,” said Woolrich. “It

a really big surprise and an

honour.”


j

News

SPOKE, November

2004

22,

— Page 3

College always looking for more donations By BENJAMIN

RICHMOND

ment

began asking people second week of November, and will continue until office

The donor indicates the amount and designation of their contribution on the pledge sheet handed out by the development office. A fund

for donations in the

As

season

the

many

approaches,

of

giving

charities begin

asking for contributions. People often feel more generous around the holiday season, and they tend to donate to charities

more than any other time of and families

year.

Friends

in

Conestoga’s college community have the opportunity to show their appreciation

for

the

by

school

donating to the annual fund. The annual fund was created by

development office as a way to raise money for the college on an the

annual basis. The fund gives people the chance to support the college in

many

different ways. Faculty, staff,

friends and alumni of are able to choose

Conestoga

where

con-

their

goes within the college.

tribution

Monica

Himmelman.

officer,

said donations to the annual fund are donor based.

“There are many areas you can designate your donation.”

Some

areas where contributions

can be made include student aid, campus expansions, the Learning Resource Centre and specific programs. Himmelman said she feels it is important that people who give donations to Conestoga have the confidence that their money will be

way

spent the

they want

it

be

to

was

college

co-ordinators are

not overlap with their fundraising.

Way

Historically, the United its

runs

as equipment, to specific programs.

spent.

throughout the year, the develop-

gifts are

tions,

and the development

recognized as donaoffice

Himmelman said whether money donation or a gift of every contribution

“The students and

a

it’s

kind,

appreciated.

is

benefit

directly,

of the whole

that’s the point

thing (annual fund).”

came from

After someone makes a donation, they are sent a letter thanking them

individuals and organizations with-

along with a tax

receipt.

If

the

development office approached the board of governors,

donor wishes, the development

the

executive committee,

for people donating gifts of kind.

and

staff,

and invited them

Himmelman

donations.

was pleased with

faculty to

even better

As

she

amount

the

it

the

does

office

to increase the

in

the

aware-

January 2005

issue of Connections, the

Conestoga

College alumni magazine. The magazine is sent to 37,000 alumni, and it encourages them to consider makdonation

making

is

The amount of

entirely

arrange presentations

Donors have the choice of being recognized in the annual donor report,

which appears

up

the

person

to the

contribution

a

receives thanks for their generosity.

Himmelman working

said

on

the

she enjoys annual fund

because she gets to see the positive impact the donations have on the students’ college experience.

love

“I

can do. it

Two graphic design students

(Conestoga

place

this

College), and

what

the contribution.

June

in the

issue of Connections. Thus, every-

ness of the fund, pledge sheets will

be included

will

one who makes

this year.

way

a

make

said

fund generated, and hopes

ing a donation.

Although donations are accepted

These

will write a tax receipt for the donor.

donate to a very worthwhile charity." The annual fund was created last year and raised about $20,000.

The

into

Aside from donating money, peo-

"We wouldn’t do any other fundraising in that period of time to take away from what people might

the donations

it

ple can also give gifts of kind, such

November. Himmelman said the development office respects the United Way's cause, and they did not want to interfere with it.

Most of

of the

the program’s budget.

week of

in the first

notified

donation, so they can build

fundraising campaign for two

weeks, ending

then created, and the program

is

finished, so they did

in the college.

alumni

and annual fund

relations

Christmas. They waited until the United Way campaign within the

believe in what

I

it

can see, every single day, does for students.” I

(Photo by Ryan Connell

Student Richard Gruetzman holds up two mason jars filled with candle wax that were for sale inside Door 4 on Nov. 1 5 and 1 6. There were many different scents for sale including gingersnap cookie, creme caramel, Christmas garland and hot apple pie. The event raised $350 for the college’s annual fund.

new Alumni

unveil

CORRECTIONS

logo

GERHART

"We made

Conestoga College isn’t the only one with a new logo. The Alumni

a circle to

show com-

munity and stability,” she said, "and we have the C’ as part of the

been used by the group since 1989 and was their first and only sym-

which

bol.

2001.

The new logo was not

Conestoga.”

$2,000 higher than its previous highest balance of $22,000 in is

thing.

Brett Tucker,

“The ‘A’ with the two extra branches (represents) the alumni association," she said. “The two

civil

about 50 people by its designers, third-year graphic design students,

Lyndsey Loiacono and Heather

branches stick out, which shows

uate of manufacturing technician-

McCann.

going out of the group.”

wood

products, presented 24

es.

alumni

year

students

officer,

Home

Association also has a

At

its

new

design.

annual general meeting, in

the guild room,

on Nov.

new logo was unveiled

the

10,

in front

of

McCann

the only thing that

Loiacono and McCann were not the only two who created a new

relations

logo.

said although she

Students

Matt

professor

in

Miller's third-year graphics design

were also given the task of

class

creating a fresh

new look

was not means some-

said the circle

Himmelman,

Monica

and annual fund

was not on

the

voting committee for selecting the

new

logo, she

the hard

was impressed with

work put

into the logos.

thing presented

the meeting.

at

Alumni association

1

the only

who

engineering

president,

graduated from

technology

in

987, and vice-president and treas-

urer,

Glenn Campbell, a 1984 grad-

with

a

first-

are given to selected

first-year students who have at least one parent who is a graduate of Conestoga College.

for the

alumni association.

Alumni

also to

be

McCann

received split

between

“Out of the 14 submissions,” she “12 of them were really

...

a

for

something that would stand the test of time.” Monica Himmelman, development and alumni relations officer

how the two McCann said

wanted to stay with the Conestoga logo but also give it a they

little

extra.

want

he

Welcome Home

Tucker said income allows

highlighted

like other logos in existence.

law and security student, by his mother, Kathryn Watson, and grandmother, Jean Magyar, both past graduates of Conestoga College, was presented with a Welcome Home

"We were new

look,”

looking for a fresh, she said.

“We were

looking for something that would stand the test of time.”

Himmelman

said

was

the

alumni

also looking for a

able.

“Hopefully people will get to see the symbol and go, that’s the alumni, that’s

The

what

that is,” she said.

association's old logo had

first-year

accompanied

to

the

is

United

who Way

was instead related to a raffle which tickets were sold. To clarify, the basket draw prizes were incentives for employees to return their for

pledge forms; the baskets did

Way

itself,

but to employees.

These baskets were not rafnor were tickets sold for them - a random draw of names from the returned pledge form database of employees was fled,

made

for these baskets.

sent to staff only, not students.

$24,000

net

the alumni associa-

The alumni

for bursaries

Other program areas did not parbecause they were not aware of it, since it was a staffticipate

only event. The CS1 was contact-

ed and did donate a

continue to increase the

amount of money

and

association's strength

numbers, said Tucker. "We want to be recognized as Conestoga alumni, and that’s what we need to support,” he said. “I’m sure you will be seeing us in the is

to

basket donations for the draw was

going to bring on new incentives this year, and we’re going to

sen because they already looked

The awards presentation was when David Watson, a

made pledges

in

it

of sharing the wealth, and we’re

awards.

at the college.

information relating to a

“The one way

to see

said.

Welcome Home award

year

association

explaining

really don’t

Himmelman said some of the candidates may have not been cho-

logo that would be easily recogniz-

When

This year, the

in

Also, a flyer asking for themed

account,”

tion

good.”

for

our

award recipients received a $250 cheque, to help them in their first

said,

created their logo,

did very well.” said

attempt to spend more money.”

a

them.

“We were looking fresh new look

Association

OF CONESTOGA

having their work

represent the association,

and Loiacono reward of $500

we

Campbell, “this year we stuck to our budget.” Although Campbell is satisfied with this year’s procedures, he said he does not want to see that much money in the alumni

“We

artistic skills.

In addition to

“This year

article

basket draw for employees

not go to the United

account.

In total. 28 students, forming 14 teams of two, participated in the six-day competition trying to impress the alumni association

with their

1

Welcome

award.

The awards

total

Way

Spoke on Nov. 8, incorrect information was published.

Some

The

income for this year (2003-2004) was $79,392, along with $76,260 in expenses, which added $3,1 3 to the alumni fund, as opposed to the 2002-2003 campaign, when income totalled $67,480, which was $11,315 less than the $78,795 spent on expens-

circle for

United

a

In

By BRENT

the

gift

draw on behalf of

basket to

the student

The student featured in the whose program donated a basket, saw the flyer in a staff member's office. Spoke apologizes for the errors. body.

article,

in

near future.”

Tucker said he

award.

ward

Aside from the awards and the new logo, the alumni association also discussed their success throughout 2004. This year, the alumni association’s net worth is at $24,000,

year.

to

the

rest

is

looking for-

of the college

the

Nov.

15

edition

of

of

chairperson

Conestoga

Student Inc.'s annual general

meeting in the story on the board of directors’ remuneration.

In

fact,

Olinski

is

the

chairperson of the board of

“2004-2005

will be an exciting going to be great” he said. “We have a great bunch of people on our executive and our

year,

In

Spoke, Jon Olinski was named

it’s

board.”

meetings.

directors

Falconer the

is

annual

Justin

the chairperson of

general

meeting.

Spoke apologizes for the

error.


CSI wasting

Is

money?

students’ Conestoga Students tors

Commentary

— SPOKE, November 22, 2004

Page 4

Inc.

(CSI)

now paying each of its board of direc-

is

an honorarium of $250 a month to compensate them for lost wages.

The

work fewer hours

directors said they

at their

part-time jobs

because they are busy doing CSI-related work instead.

That

is

$10,500 of students’ money, which they pay

the student activity fee, that

to

CSI through

going to compensate the directors as

is

volunteers.

The vice-president of student

activities will also

be receiving $2,550

for the year as compensation.

Before the directors were hired, they were told tion,

how many

rifices

it

was a volunteer

posi-

hours they were required to work each week and that sac-

would have

to

be made

in their

personal lives and at other jobs, in

order to do a job that would benefit thousands of students at the college.

For the most

part, the directors

would receive no recognition

for their

work, except for the personal satisfaction that they had bettered student life at

Conestoga College. board of directors were provided with

If the

now

upfront, how' can they

all

this

information

say that they should be compensated

because their position on the board cuts into their part-time jobs? w'ere not able to

work

number of hours

the

director, then they shouldn’t

they

If

be a

that are required to

‘I'M

have applied for the position to begin with.

A BIG BALL OF STRESS AND I'M ALL YOURS!'

amount of money for the work they do, what is the difference between being “compensated” and being paid a salary ? Can the directors’ positions still be considered If the directors are

when

volunteer

A

vote

receiving a token

they are being paid?

was held

at

al

to

general meeting was not advertised to students as a place to vote for

Only two people voted

in

person

at the

making important

meeting, one for and

In a society of ficult not to

commerce

more

However, the directors also distributed 52 proxies to students who signed over their vote to be used in the best interest of the students as

ful

goodies that

CSI found 52 students who didn’t care about their vote and let someone else vote for them. Of course, it was decided these votes would all be “yes” votes. Out of the 6.190 students that were enrolled as of September, 52 stu-

friends and family.

dents does not realistically represent the student body.

One hundred

peo-

ple doesn't even properly portray them. Five hundred students, maybe.

The job of the board of directors

is to

interact with the student

at the college. Is getting

com-

only 52

students to sign these proxies the best they could do? Is this what

we

should be compensating them for? that

any

student could go around the college and collect proxies from other students. If students didn't think the directors should be compensated,

they could have spent their lunch hour collecting 53 proxies from stu-

dents and the "no” votes would have overruled the “yes” votes.

from the sounds of

it.

Obviously, CSI does not always represent the stu-

dents' voice or opinion. If

CSI wants

to

keep the

trust

of the students,

it

should consider the vote passing the honorarium null and void and conduct another vote that involves a greater percentage of the student population. Is

using students’

money

to

pay directors to do volunteer work really

in the best interest of the students?

ing one of CSI’s proxies

somebody pensation?

in the

eyes and

if

Would you be

tell

them

that their

•V-

So

want to buy for myself. But and greed do not always go hand in hand. There are some selfish acts that I gifts

I

selfishness

deem necessary I

for

my

happiness.

want a good education. career.^ I

I

want a

want financial

A

It’s

but

a rather short Christmas

it’s

In a society driven

week and

by the work

what

I

will

list,

do for myself.

Unfortunately, the natural evolu-

from a good education

filling career

to a ful-

and financial security

the paycheque,

But

really,

we should

part-time,

your

for free in other areas.

Volunteering does

gnaw

into

free time, “real job” schedule

Once you have interned summer, you become a more

employers have trepidations

cation,

about hiring a person

knows

who

only

when

tive

the

employee

will be

will

with apprenticeship

those

and

immeasurable.

the classroom

be the

the workforce, not a mirror image.

nursing student would never

the pack.

in a hospital. Instead

that the

even

outside

if

your resume

stack.

Not

to

at the

mention

fill

is

career

enough

top of the

you with

self-gratification.

People often want to deal with

someone who

work

is

more

interested in

the job than the paycheque.

of just theory.

Is published and produced weekly by the Journalism students

for verification.

Editor:

Circulation Manager:

Photo Editors: Tim Murphy, Kate

be published. Letters should be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter

of Conestoga College

Ormston

Spoke Online

Kristen

McMurphy Howden

Jennifer

Battler

letters will

N2G 4M4

Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke @conestogac. on. ca

for publication.

Address correspondence to: The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

,

Dr.,

Web

site:

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors

not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College.

advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a MS Word file would be helpful. Letters must not contain any libelous statements.

to the editor are subject to

in

at

you’re volun-

Spoke Advertising Manager: Ryan Connell Production Managers: James Clark, Desiree Finhert

a

you a paid

of your

to put

classroom alone to

offer

first to

prospect, the selfless act

only a model of

is

for

attrac-

candidate for paying jobs.

teering

degrees are no different, because

A

is

position. But,

And

your

Often, the place you volunteered

the theory of the job; espe-

Editor: Jennifer

contacted

to

income, but the hands-on experi-

would prepare him or her

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be

employ you

minimum-wage pay-

presume

editor. Letters

the

labour, they will teach

it

not be so

ing the qualities that set you above

letters to the

an employer

will

chance

have free you a vast amount about the job. hoping to at

ence

paid.

in

a neces-

Volunteer positions are underrated.

succession.

vocation of choice.

is

Even with a post-secondary edu-

cially

eted entry-level position

Not only

tion.

of our time or greedy for a

selfish

are graduates.

volunteer position

jump

to a volunteer position.

cation can leave your resume lack-

welcome

may be

spare time and decide to dedicate

work doesn’t deserve com-

Spoke welcomes

No unsigned

it

for youths to tally their

difficult

doesn’t always happen in smooth

Sometimes a degree or diploma is not enough to get the highly cov-

different

sary partner to a classroom educa-

cheque.

security.

is

nies are in constant competition.

Just a college or university edu-

to a guilt trip like that.

v Letters are

spending money on

who, when shopping, can only find

hospital, engineering plant

because situations vary and compa-

their stocking

you? Could you look

a director approached

Nobody could say no

able to say no to sign-

fill

admit being a selfish youth,

I

tion

Did CSI. the voice of the students, make the students aware of this? Not

Every

and woodworking shop

interested in the delight-

than

rather

fulfilling

Something which most students were not made aware of was

practical experience.

This close to Christmas, people are

a whole. In other words,

medical students are given hours of

it’s dif-

be greedy.

one against the directors’ compensation.

munity and find out what they want

underrated

is

be compensated. The annu-

or against the compensation of the directors or for decisions.

Volunteering

CSI’s annual general meeting on Oct. 27 that

decided the board of directors deserved


1

News

SPOKE, November

22,

2004

— Page 5

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

we

Lest The

Ith

1

on the

minute of the Ith hour day of the 1th month.

we

Lest

Well, apparently

CSI

lege that CSI would have planned ahead and have everything set up well in advance for students to pay

for-

did, or

they just didn't care.

have many veterans

I

ily,

in

my

fam-

respects.

making Remembrance Day a

very important day

my

in

life.

It

Not

day when we should all take a moment and respect those who have done so much for our country.' am ashamed to say that go to a 1

far as

walked

1

I

in

a.m. Nothing.

and saw absolutely

in

nothing.

my

CSI was going

when,” and sure enough, CSI’s poorly planned event had technical problems.

ALEXANDRA MASTRONARDI

here and no one

is

like the pot

In the Nov.

Murphy his

1

issue of Spoke,

Tim

did this exact thing. article,

consider

he says people him to be a

respectable human.

I

am

puting any of his ly pointing

not disput-

am not dispoints. I am mere-

ing this point, actually

KJ Fuhrman, broadcasting student

people

recommend

he judges her by stating that she “Reeks of a combination of gin and dime-store perfume, with earrings dragging her lobes down to her shoulders.” For a guy who complains about people judging on appearances,

be pretty good

in it

that

he changes the

which he

criticizes.

reflects poorly

professionalism

upon

and maybe even

at

it

Criticizing a poor lady like to

who would

smell nice but can't afford

perfume, who wanted to have a drink of gin and tonic after a hard

day of work and wanted to eat Doritos while watching an old movie from the 1960s, doesn't seem like something a professional who supports self-expression would do.

himself. I personally hope for the best in Tim’s future; however, I strongly

Jim O'Donnell,

management

studies student

want to have a good time,” he said. “You guys rock at

ed, they just

Comedian Pete Zedlacher had more than 120 students attentive

Conestoga.”

Zedlacher joined Yuk Yuk's club in 2000 which gave

and roaring with laughter despite the laid-back atmosphere in the

comedy

Sanctuary.

him

the opportunity to participate

in a

Canadian Forces show-pack-

Zedlacher, a professional comic past

the

for

eight

per-

years,

formed a standup comedy routine college on Nov. 9. The Ontario native said he enjoys the energy created by standup comedy. at the

“When

came

I

room

into the

for the

loved

ed,” he said. "I love

hearing the laughs and

making that magic happen, if you want to call it magic.” The comedian said Conestoga can be a tough crowd because of the relaxed atmosphere and comfy couches. “It’s sit

so easy for students to just

down,

fall

asleep and ignore

the entertainment,” he said.

Zedlacher’s routine was geared toward young college students. He made fun of the rap-artist

Missy

Elliot

tossed in joke.

He

the

also

OSAP

and

occasional

and dirty

made harmless

jokes about random students

sit-

ting in the audience.

Zedlacher said he finds students across Ontario to be extremely liberal, but not politically correct.

“You don’t have

to play

it

safe

learn

Zedlacher said he loved the experience and would do it again in a heartbeat.

told a

in

of

Asia.

few jokes and a few laughs came and the whole atmosphere of the room was liftI

total

Skills

and who are eager

to

do

weli in college, but

do

not always

know what

to do.

seven shows across southwest

people were moping around and then

Canadian troops

Afghanistan and did a

Study

Many students are instinctive learners. They don’t often think about the ways in which they learn and study; they just do it and it works. But knowing how to learn and study efficiently does not come naturally to everyone. There are many students who want to

age tour in 2002. The tour per-

formed

COUNSELLOR S CORNER:

“The tive,”

soldiers ate it

it.

they just

and were so apprecia-

Sometimes students do not know how much to study or how to use their time wisely. They may not be able to read well enough for college-level material, and may experience difficulty with writing their ideas clearly. Absorbing and remembering information from lectures can also be difficult, especially if they are not familiar with the lecture style of teaching.

he said.

“I told the soldiers ‘No way, you guys got it backwards. T thank you for being here.'”

Ashleigh Latimer, 19, an early childhood education student, said she thought the comedian was really funny despite his foul language.

counted how' many times he word and by the end of the show he had used it 82 times,” she said. Dan Armchuk, 19, a computerprogramming student, said he “I

said the “F”

was not so impressed by the comedian's techniques.

“He seemed

To meet these challenges and

to

support students

of study.

It’s

really

skill

quest

for

academic success,

assistance. Students

who

work for them earn better grades with fewer hours not about how much you study, but how well.

have been taught study methods

that

When should you seek help with study skills? When you feel overwhelmed. When you want to reduce your study time. When you feel disorganized. When too many distractions interfere with your concentration. When you want to take better notes and read more effectively. When exams approach. Anytime!

to really look to

the audience for his jokes.” he

To make an appointment

said.

concerns,

Those interested in learning more about Zedlacher or attending his shows can visit his web-

A Message from Student Services

site at

in their

the Student Services Office offers learning and study

www.zedlacher.com.

Visit

visit

for learning

and study

skill

assistance and for other academic

the Student Services Office.

our website htto://www. conestoaac. on ca/iso/stserv/index. iso .

I

his

his intelligence.

After he expresses his objection

I

out a flaw in his method.

this

to her actions,

to

year.

believe

to yourself?”

Tim seems

guarantee of a better ceremony next

she asked Tim,

who seemed to be offended that woman judged his facial rings.

is

I

method

sometimes these people complain

It

what a wrongdoing

realize

“Why would you do

that

should

easily offend-

Within his statement he complains

point in the newspaper. However,

complain about.

I

they

criticize

about a lady.

calling the kettle black

I am in Conestoga and CSI. The pure and utter display of disrespect is unforgivable and would hope

as

it's

opinion, arguing a perfectly valid

In

By

go wrong,

will

You shouldn’t about other people doing things they do not like, but in doing so, they are doing the exact thing they

1

am not making demands, but I would highly appreciate an apology from CSI and a senior college official and the promise ... no ... the

college administration should

many

fellow classmates to pay our

they had a hit Canadian. TV show, so screw the veterans who died for our freedom, what do they need a poster for? have never been so ashamed in any group, organization or school

they have done.

As a broadcasting student, one of our main lessons when it comes to technology is, “It's not if something

Sometimes people express an

the couch

They might throw someon? I’m sorry, but CSI and

a poster because

thing

on a ceremony. When my class ended I bolted down to the Sanctuary with

However, that respect was trampled on by CSI’s horrible.

off

they have nothing

be ashamed of themselves.

teachers

to put

respects.

gets students

we know

and hanging up

tables

planned,."

the

heard from one of

I

that the

Comedian

mention

Remembrance Day ceremony

1

1

pool

the

posters.

Sure, the guys from Degrassi get

no one in CSI knew if anything was even going to happen. I went in and asked before making my way to the Sanctuary if any-

less.

In no way is that an excuse. They should have been in there hours before making sure everything was set up, shutting down

1

CSI show up

thing was planned. No one knew and someone said, “Oh, they might throw something on the PA but as

1

9.

seven minutes after

When I went to my morning class on the th, expected to see signs and posters saying there was a the Sanctuary at

(Photo by Alexandra Mastronardi)

until

to set anything up, not to

I

1

Comedian Pete Zedlacher jokingly curses students not laughing at his comedy routine in the Sanctuary on Nov.

was sadly mistaken.

I

a.m. did anyone from

is

a

school that could care

figured being a fairly large col-

I

1

Remembrance Day. get.

disrespectful display.

1

1th

I

forget: college/CSI did


Conestoga Students

All

Inc.

presents

students with children under the age of 15 simply

the...

come

into

CSI office (before Dec. 10th). List your child’s age and gender as well as a short list of suggestions for what your child might like for Christmas. A Christmas tag will be hung on the tree for them and when the gift is purchased, the Christmas tag and gift are returned to the CSI office for distribution the

to the appropriate

student and

GIFTS TO BE PICKED UP BEFORE

WE NEED YOUR

child.

DECEMBER

15th

HELP!

santa claus pana6e We need

volunteers on

anytime between participation,

6am

Sat November 27th -

5pm

for assembly,

and clean-up of the College

float.

See Nichole Jiminez at the CSI

Conestoga

CONESTOGA Connect

Life

office for details

and Learning I

STUDENTS INC

I


News

What’s with HANCOCK

By MELISSA

pany was unable

If you have walked the halls of Conestoga College then you may have wondered why there are so many blank television screens around the Doon campus. The Universities and Colleges

now

is

any

some

problems.

to financial

UCTV

TVs was

just for

would be provided by broadcasting and journalism students,” he said, “and maybe

“It raises the bar.”

cian

Tom

TVs

for the broadcasting students

to

try

to

active student life.”

Sam

communications specialist for Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI), said that if CSI had Egleston,

known

UCTV

the aggravation the

was going

service

have

wouldn’t

to cause,

had

they

TVs

the

installed in the first place.

UCTV show

is

paid by advertisers to

and uni-

their ads at college

campuses, Egleston and there was no fee charged versity

said,

to the

school or CSI for installation. All the

TVs

around the school

and all the hookup equipment is owned by UCTV, he said, so the

blank for a

Bilandzic hooked up the

The

Kitchener

UCTV was having technologproblems and couldn’t show

who

is

it,

they won’t

said

if

know how

you

about If

about

it,

thinking about

is

it,”

she said.

someone does

tell

you they

considering suicide it is important that you take them seriously and get them the help they need, she said. “A lot of people who died by com-

you

He

nice

tools

to

make

done.

Midterm

said the goal of having stu-

and graphic design courses into

stress

that

students as well.”

When

high school students

someone

most people,” she

someone

“Whether

on

it’s

display

to

their

venue or

that

he said, “we definitely want

an outlet for our students.”

Co-ordinator of the broadcasting program, Mike Thurnell, said. 'The more we can showcase, the

we

better off

broadcast, he said.

CSI has been very co-operative, he said, which is what they need.

Bilandzic said it would be nice to expand the presence of the broad-

broadcasting students will

casting program.

their

being

a small step,” he said,

“It’s

the

is

“it’s

first step.”

some is

also said that he hopes the

own

very

one day for

television

have station

of their work to be

all

aired.

broadcasting teacher

Television

He

look.”

regular broadcasting on

TVs

attempts

Several

UCTV

officials

contact

to

were made, but

were unavailable for com-

they

ment.

next semester.

of public speaking Conestoga considers new Toastmasters club By MIKE

is

BORS

orally in class.

“Most of

the stu-

knew quite well what not how to say it.”

said.

who

is

great

ing

Toastmasters because not only

skills.

but

Dewilde said she saw

this as a

opportunity

for

Some staff and students at Conestoga College are interested in starting a Toastmasters Club at

but

committing suicide you need to know you are not alone and there is hope. “Depression is treatable through medication and even counselling,” said Kraler. “Suicide is a permanent fix to something that can be

the school to help students better

marks.

understand the dynamics of speaking well in front of others.

dents, however, as

are thinking about

to say

There may soon be a new club in town where all the members strive to have impeccable speak-

depressed, one of those things could be extremely devastating.” If you are feeling depressed and

improve

be

students

the

will

speaking

their

able

to

abilities,

should also improve their

it

The club

will not

be just for stuDewilde said

the majority of people interested

“Most

knew

are expected to be college staff.

of the students

quite well

what

“They don’t have the turnover

to

say but not how to say

that students do,” she said.

said Kraler.

counsellor, go to Student Services,

organization

more of an “Like

suicide while drinking or on drugs,

Room

on the second floor in 2B04, and make an appointment to speak with someone.

helping people get over their fear of public speaking as well as

improving public speaking

topic of the day).

it is

someone you know

If you seems depressed or needs help, the

or

college has counselling available and an

it,”

it is

important not to dismiss them

I

Ongoing sadness, apathy Extreme mood changes, anger or temper Lack of interest in usual activities, personal appearance, possessions, socializing with

member ofTocistmaters

doctor.

located

Withdrawal, isolation

Significant

changes

in

relationships, difficulty

Preoccupation with death Destructive or risky behaviour

like

substance

abuse, reckless driving

Use of phrases such as “you’re better

off

without

Toastmasters

me” Change

Ambivalence, despondent outlook on

Changes

in

attitude

and

life

ideas, tunnel vision

The grammar-

then introduced (his or her

is

attempts to improve people’s lan-

job

is to

enhance vocabulary and to

listen

mistakes people

make

Kids Help Phone: 1-800-668-6868

guage skills. There are Toastmasters clubs in approximately 90 countries worldwide with seven clubs in the K-W

Parents Help Phone: 1-888-603-9100

area.

(there are

Youth Line: 745-9909 Let’s Talk Line (24 hours

Veronique Dewilde, a business student at the college, has been a

every meeting

WHERE TO GO FOR HELP Distress Line: 745-1166

for adults):

Cambridge: 623-5968 Cambridge Crisis Outreach Response: 744-1813 Cambridge Memorial Hospital Emergency Department: 621-2330 Grand River Hospital Crisis Clinic: 742-3611

member years,

of Toastmasters for four it was her idea to bring

and

the club to Conestoga. “I originally

my

joined to improve

English,” said Dewilde,

came

to

who

Canada from Belgium

introduce a

to typical

when

new word

to

they speak), the speakers

for the

meeting are introduced

up

to three

speakers

at

who

speak on various topics), and two people are then assigned to evaluate the speakers’ speeches.

They must have a minimum of 20 members before a club can be started at Conestoga.

There was a

five years ago.

Toastmasters

Nov.

Health Canada: www.hc.gc.ca

was shocked,” Dewilde said of the number of assignments she

Mental Health: www.mentalhealth.org www.ontsuicideprevention.com

received that had to be presented

“I

appetite or sleeping

in

in

ian

Information websites:

is an international with the goals of

Toastmasters

also

Kitchener: 745-8128

it.”

Veronique Delwilde,

services

on-campus

To make an appointment with a

she said.

Kraler also said if

are feeling

preventable.”

weren't getting the treatment they

friends

students

dents

mitting suicide were depressed, but

WARNING SIGNS

the

for

sions they could see what

general.

Haskell, a journalism print

someone you know says they want to commit

someone saying they

come

said.

to the college for informational ses-

said.

for

Dave

marks anymore,” he

needed for

indirect thing,” she said.

for future

real broadcasting.

that yes they are thinking

“But most times

promote

to

were

Get over your fear

“A break-up or bad grade in school might not seem like a big “But

way

capabilities

they’re (students) ready

and broadcast teacher, said he feels strongly about having something

not,”

“Some people use alcohol or drugs way to try to get away from

mize the under she

some

Both Seneca College and Sheridan College have had the same concept for a long time. a

Now

“Their work would not only be

work.

as a

to

it

for

too.”

just because they are high.

deal

things he said

eventually include the advertising

possible

at

all

Steve Parr said the target to have

dent content on the screens cannot

son

dates, weather, local traf-

and events are

“All content

used to promote the broad-

“We have

TVs’ streaming

The clubs usually meet once a week. At these meetings a chairperson gives an opening speech, the agenda is announced and someone is assigned to be the table topic master (the table topic master makes sure that everybody gets to speak in a meeting while a table topic is the

times the person will very directly

you

approach a

are

can do as a friend or family member to help. You have to ask the person if they are considering suicide, and sometell

someone

“If

to

committing suicide, it’s almost a relief when you ask because you are inviting that person to talk

about committing sui-

cide there are several things

suicide

are thinking about suicide often want to talk about it with someone,

know somebody who may be thinking

commit

because you asked them if they were going to,” she said. The counsellor said people who

counsellor in

a

TVs

out the act of committing suicide.” It is also important not to mini-

person to get help.

Services,

the

casting course and the college.

weren’t thinking about it. “But if someone wasn’t thinking

but don’t

Barb Kraler,

Bilandzic said he would like to see

to

watch.

“It’s

she said. “But it puts that pera higher risk to actually carry

of suicidal attempts, emotional problems, chronic illness or disability, addictions and perceived

Student

into pur-

problems, or as a self-medica-

about

failure.

CSI may look

said

their

sidering suicide including a history

inadequacy or

He

saw students stopping

said he

chasing the TVs.

tion,”

just

con-

we’re not, we’re impatient because

of the blank screens.”

they are considering suicide there a myth that you will plant the idea in their head even if they

is

one in every seven people. There are several risk factors involved with someone

is

depressed or they don’t see much of a future.” Kraler said if you ask someone if

According to the Waterloo Prevention Suicide Region Council, suicide is considered by

but

school.

Suicide prevention

cle accidents.

mad

could be upset or

explained. “If

Every year approximately 4,000 people commit suicide in Canada. It is the second leading cause of death for youth aged 10 to 24 years old, following motor vehi-

“We

announcements,” Bilandzic said, “and the broadcasting students could watch what they’re creating.” Upgrading the TV equipment around the school could eventually allow the students to do live broadcasts, he said, from anywhere in the

ical

By STEPH BAULK

great

Thanksgiving parade was aired throughout the halls and there were plans for more broadcasts. “Everything was working OK,” he said, “and then someone from UCTV came in and hooked the TVs back up to be blank again.” One of the biggest problems for the college and for CSI, he said, is they had to go along with whatever UCTV wanted because the TVs were their property. UCTV and CSI could have benefited from the broadcasting students having access to the TVs, he

college cannot use them.

However, Egleston said the com-

faculty

TVs were

out.

the concept stage, and tests of the

he would like to see on the TVs.

news headlines and

crucial

Last year, he said, was spent in

aired on the screens, Bilandzic

promote CSI events,” he said. a great idea and is what the students want to see.” Egleston said Conestoga is not the only school to be experiencing problems with UCTV right now.

mational sources such as weather, are

Thanksgiving parade

the

“It’s

while, he said, broadcasting techni-

that

a great venue for the stu-

“It’s

dents to take part in a real broad-

to

their website, "... additional infor-

information

going

of the

broadcasting program, he said.

— Page 7

cast,” Parr said.

When

be a

still

is

fic

sented to CSI by

ticker

TVs would

said the

it

closely with broadcasting students

overhead TVs last year purpose of displaying advertisements and as stated on

time,

well.

He

far

originally pre-

installed the

After the

tent.”

from CSI and so

port

was

for

the

progress without the help and sup-

venue for advertising CSI events and for broadcasting live events such as CSI Idol. “We would like to work very

casting students to have access to the blank

we could have backed them up with some of our own con-

content,

bankrupt, which

means the equipment may be removed and sold to pay creditors. The idea for Conestoga’s broad-

(UCTV)

Network

Television

due

time,

for quite

2004

22,

those blank TVs?

all

to broadcast

TVs

content on the

SPOKE, November

1

1

demo meeting

for

college

on

at

the

so that staff and students

could get an idea of just organization works.

how

the


Page 8

— SPOKE, November 22, 2004


News

Xmas

Ideal

SPOKE, November

2004

22,

— Page 9

presents easy to find

By JON YANEFF

Diebolt,

said

big sellers this

the

season will be the special,

The

season

holiday

is

right

ed edition of the

around the comer. Are you wondering what to give family or friends for this festive time

Diebolt

Fairview

the

everyone on your

year.

list.

series,

Gifts that are casino-related are

Men

always great for men.

is

are from

and clay poker chips

men of

all

to satis-

of different styles which are

from Mars, Brianne Jourdin, said

"Fuzzy dice with favourite team stuffers," sell

said Jourdin.

"We

also

(Photo by Jon Yaneff)

big gifts.”

The

As

store.

Showcase, also

on

Seen

TV

casino mer-

sells

chandise including

slot

machines

and a seven-in-one casino.

Showcase has a toy

both consoles. Half-life 2 and Halo 2

ular because families

Xbox while Gran

away from TV. Hopkins said CSI

only

are

for

Turismo 4

An

is

only for Playstation

associate,

2.

Boutique sales

Electronic

Matthew Truscello, said gaming consoles

of

new

all

ages will enjoy. Robo Sapien is an advanced robotic toy developed

will

by a NASA scientist which can perform 67 functions. Showcase manager Lisa Glover said women would enjoy the

"We’re selling a see-through crystal Xbox,” said Truscello. “It comes in a bundle pack with games Fable and Crimson Skies.” Truscello said Nintendo DS (dual

Miracle Bullet. “It helps prepare Glover.

blends,

"It

that kids

meals,”

said

whips, mixes,

Video games are always big with The Electronic Boutique

everyone.

has

several

new games for the Xbox gaming con-

Playstation 2 and

soles that should be

Need

on gamers’

gift

Speed Underground 2, World of Warcraft and Grand Theft Auto - San Andreas are for lists.

for

What By JENNIFER

The

arrival

editions to

be big

sellers.

screen) will also be big. This

chops, grinds and grates in seconds.”

is

TV Showcase,

Matt Lees, a sales associate at As Seen on

provides

some

possible

gift

ideas.

of the holiday season

apparent to visitors

at the

Homer

Watson House and Gallery from the moment they begin to climb up

new

system has wireless capabilities with a game play screen and a touch screen. Nintendo DS games are compatible with those of Game Boy Advance. Aside from video games, board games are always a great gift for the whole family.

Owner

of

Go

the

Game

Store,

Tupper Hopkins, said board games are becoming more and more pop-

better

ORMSTON

wooden

Scene

want

to get

game.

the

the different editions of

It,

Monopoly and Cranium

are

among

Hopkins said he had a part in crenew game. Worm Hole. He dealt with the distributing and hanating a

dling while Kitchener resident Pat

Cameron is The idea of

the

game’s designer.

the

game

move

is to

around the board answering questions based on different continents. If

you land on

worm

a

could request to

move

hole you

to another

is

the place to list

who

go for any-

loves music or

manager Nicole Godin number of DVDs and CDs

building,

it

appears Santa's

little

well

it

Go

the

Game

the Calendar

Store partners with

Club

to sell calendars

helpers

it

home

was

for Christmas.

the staff at

Grand

bears.

Marc Bauer

Store manager

said

bears are a unique gift because you can customize them with names and slogans. And if you have any children to their

Bev

for only $14.95.

book lovers on your list. Coles sales associate, Donna

for the

A

art,

10th

the

annual

artists

have

medium from

tion,

ranging

tery

and sculpture

in

pot-

to watercolour

who

work of

art in

addition to

the framing.

best gift

artwork

you can

is

probably the

give,” said

Tyo

with a grin, joking about her professional bias. “It’s special to be

able to give something that

is

orig-

tunity for

dents to

selection.

said Tiffani

Tyo, the gallery’s exhibition curator.

inal

an excellent oppor-

Conestoga College stucome in and purchase orig-

artwork

What

is

at

a great

an affordable price.

way

to

start

your

Christmas shopping!” Cards, costing $4 each, are the lowest-priced merchandise in the sale,

while framed paintings are

pricier.

According

to

Tyo,

pieces are worth

of art?

inal

more than $250,

“This show

chocolate

purchase a painting acquire an

and that also supports the local art community.” She recommends students who are interested in the exhibit, which will run until Dec. 12, should visit the gallery soon to ensure a good

costs

milk

foiled

more than

people

this exhibit,

"I think

sale.

of

snowmen.

including the frame, matte and

glass, could easily total

original

to the gallery for its cur-

bags

professionally framing any piece of

ornaments

exhibition:

gift

Eggett, a Laura Secord sales

associate, said they will also enjoy

reduced. For example, the cost of

$250. In

All items are for sale and nothing

some

house for the holiday season. The store also has a wide selection of

list.

Hallmark sales associate Sandra Robbins said she expects their Polar Express products to sell because the motion picture just came to theatres. With the purchase of a Hallmark card customers have the chance to buy a Polar Express

Accents in Cambridge, not elves, who donated their time and festive

and acrylic paintings.

to receive

features candles to decorate your

special person on your

than the

contributed pieces to the exhibi-

she would love on Christmas morning.

sonal cards and ornaments for that

Coles has a wide variety of books

sells.

This year 47 local

(Photo by Jennifer Ormston)

Geddes calendars will be among the most popular. Hallmark Gold Crown has sea-

Godin said a HMV gift card would be good to give if you’re not sure what to get someone. If you want to light up someone’s life, head to At Wicks End, which

Christmas.

In fact,

charming

new album Encore among dedicated fans.”

sings or barks along to Jingle Bells

how

Hopkins’s store to see

the historical

the lobby of this

sell

buy for, drop in to Laura Secord, which has Advent calendars to help little ones mark the days until

ribbon, to the wreath-adorned front

From

should

lantern water globe for $24.95. If

have already descended from the North Pole to help decorate

door.

Eminem’s

year.

Calendar Club sales associate, Susan Ceibel, said The Simpsons, dogs, cats, Avril Lavigne and Anne

customers buy any three cards they can purchase a Jingle Pals that

gift

staircase, past rail-

upcoming

“Shrek 2 and Spiderman 2 will do well,” said Godin. “Shania Twain's greatest hits album and

America or South America. Over the next couple of weeks Worm Hole will be tested in

Christmas show and

Exhibition curator Tiffani Tyo says

could be a poten-

it

continent, like Asia, Europe, North

ings lined with garland and golden

the old

for the

A

the best sellers.

rent

of the exhibit’s pottery

in the

will star

really

autographed sports memorabil-

ia for

books

will be top sellers.

stocking

for

three

The movie

HMV said a

great

be coming out

movies.

the holidays.

are

theatri-

first

one on your

sports stuff also sells well around

logos

expect-

challenger to the Harry Potter

HMV

Men

from

sales associate

is

A

franchise.

range from $399.95-$599.95.

A

Brett

Grotto,

Jim Carrey and tial

book of

111

and

of copies.

will

based on the

also have slot machines in a

variety

Grim

sell a lot

series Dec. 17.

keys for only $189.95 plus taxes.

II

Series of Unfortunate

release

cal

able hardcover carrying case with

They

A

Events, the

ed to

the

Snicket

Helquist’s

A

ages.

John’s

popular every

available.

Lemony

package chip set includes 500 clay chips, two decks of cards, five dice and a lockfy

is

This year the next in the Plunges into History Again,

Diebolt said

Mars has an assortment of gambling equipment. They sell poker tables

illustrat-

Code by

Uncle

said

Bathroom Reader

Park Mall have perfect gift ideas for

Vinci

Dan Brown and Stephen King’s The Park Tower VII.

of year?

Stores throughout

Da

many of

the

more than $250;

however, to be included in the show, their prices had to be

The show

is

displayed in if

constantly changing;

its

greater results this year thanks to a

campaign and

larger advertising

“We've got

decor or a unique painting mom or dad, it is wise to

a lot

more going on

gallery

is

conveniently locat-

Tuesdays

to

Sundays from 12

4:30 p.m.

come in and see the huge selection, maybe even on a weekly basis.”

Homer Watson House and

Last year’s

show was highly

and Tyo

is

suc-

expecting even

in

ed near the college’s Doon campus, at 1754 Old Mill Rd., and is open

for your

cessful

the

the house this Christmas.”

The

place.

you’re looking for some-

thing specific to match your sibling’s

painting by

oil

Sorina Takacs costs $65.

participation of 15 additional artists.

once pieces are sold other items are “So,

(Photo by Jennifer Ormston)

This untitled

To

find

visit its

out

website

more about at

to

the

Gallery,

www.homerwat-

son.on.ca or call 748-4377.


News

— SPOKE, November 22, 2004

Page 10

SCWI Money

will

help raise high school students’ interest

RICHMOND

By BENJAMIN

their respective curriculums, path-

ways School/College/Work

The Initiative

(SCWI) received double with

funding

its

$ -million

a

1

increase.

The

funding

was

allocation

Ontario budget. It will annualize to in 2005-2006.

to

build

is to

their

from

their

to

go

to support students

is

such a large increase

in

students

give

to

glimpse of college

college route.

plans to sustain the relationships

The mence

first

approach

The second approach

teacher

grams

preparation and staff development.

dents,

This approach

is

because

is

secondary education.

faculty.

and 72

it is

To achieve

the relationship

strengthen

SCWI

the

district

participate in the initiative. Earlier

faculty

20 colleges and 56 school

full

coverage

comrelat-

One

forming teams of secondary school teachers and

would address

specific curriculum concerns.

The

relationship

their

Phase 8 goals, the all 24 colleges school boards to

has invited

six to

to

is

college faculty that

who are often the people who pay for their children’s post-

considered to be a

from

is

ing to curriculum alignment.

of these activities

the parents of the stu-

to

used to build between secondary school teachers and college priority

promote pro-

also be held to further

life.

this year,

involved

got

SCWI. By getting

with

the

within

their

The teams consist of at two community colleges and

least

member

of the senior staff from

Business and community resource partners, training agencies and a representative from a Ministry of Education district are also included on the teams. Each team is eligible for up to $60,000 of the SCWI’s available funding. The money is used to cover the costs of projects, activities, meetings and forums that carry out and meet the objectives of

each

institution.

The teams

are expected to hold a

minimum of

opportunities and benefits for stu-

three regional forums and one major project involving high school teachers and college

dents.

faculty.

Phase

8, the

SCWI

aims to expand

Aside from colleges and school

SCWI

boards, the

aumber of

approach is to increase the promotion and marketing of college programs to secondary school students. College graduates

activities

the initiative.

the Ontario col-

all

leges and school boards involved in

third

SCWI regions.

three district school boards, with a

Parent information forums will

a

lege.

have the

and projects

activities

programs.

boards

risk of not graduating, but

funding, the provincial government

between colleges and high schools. The SCWI was formed in 1997, and has funded about 70 projects, that focused on aligning the cursecondary riculum taught at schools and colleges. By aligning

campuses

explaining specific college

tions

will

Phase 8. the co-management team, which directs the SCWI funding, has outlined three priority approaches to get students on the

SCWI

and student ambassadors will go to high schools and put on presenta-

by increasing their communication with one another. This will happen through visitations, ongoing interaction and secondary teacher internships at colleges. By improving communications between each other, teachers and college faculty will be able to share crucial information regarding the success of students from high school to col-

are at

and the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities. Thus, by giving the of Education

Another project the SCWI plans pursue in Phase 8 is to offer secondary school courses, taught by high school teachers, on college

these goals

potential to succeed in college. In

Ministry

pursuing post-secondary education

who

high priority for the

to college is a

in

to

The teachers and college

The main purpose of

in order to raise student inter-

Encouraging students

program objectives previous phases; howev-

they will also pursue additional

goals.

cation.

preparing to

focus on

er,

tems

is

that

new goals under Phase 8 of initiative. They will continue

leges and secondary school

est in pursuing post-secondary edu-

SCWI

increase, the

relationships between Ontario col-

sys-

for sec-

can be achieved with a college diploma. With their recent funding

on career opportunities

reach

$2 million

formed

to college are

ondary school students. The SCWI also educates students

approved by the government and announced as part of the 2004

The SCWI’s mandate

funding increased

will increase the

regional planning teams 1 1,

which of

will provide

the

initiative

throughout the province.

Regional

planning

teams

are

responsible for co-ordinating the

Teams can submit proposals to Frank Kelly, the SCWI project manager, by phone at 905-845or online at 4254, Frank_Kelly@opsoa.org. The proposals are judged by the co-management team and will be considered until

March

31, 2005.

Free massages offered to

By PAIGE HILTON Final exams are right around the comer and with them come a lot of

and worrying for students. Luckily for Conestoga students.

stress

Student Services has organized an Stress Free

a.m. until

:30 p.m.

1

“(Stress Free

Zone) offers a fun

activity for students to take care of

exam

themselves during

time,” said

Joan Magazine, a counsellor Student Services.

The event will massage

tered

reflexologist,

matherapy

as

feature

two

as

regis-

and a

therapists

well

in

Reflexology

is

a kind of

over two days in the past years.

Magazine

said,

but

this

year

Student Services could not secure a classroom for two days straight.

She encourages students to drop and predicts a good turnout. The most important thing about Stress Free Zone is not the event itself, Magazine said, but rather the message Student Services wants to in

convey

massage

She said it is key for students to eat and sleep properly and still have a little fun during exams. ‘Taking care of yourself is a cop-

usually on the hands and feet.

ing

It

is

nervous tension through

run on a drop-in basis, but

because of the high demand for massage therapy and reflexology, students must sign up

when

they

mechanism

to

manage

stress,”

said Magazine.

Handouts on Student Services and

stress

vided

comes from books, you have

to live a

lot".

Anonymous

There are strategies that will help you to be successful In college; some you may already know and others you may not have heard of. Did you know that studying doesn't always have to consist of reading and re-reading, OR, writing and re-writing? Here are 4 new ways to think about learning.

Type your notes Into Word after your lecture, add some charts, import some clipart, and be creative. When it comes time to review for an exam, you will actually be able to read your notes.

Use flash cards

new way.

you have colour coded your courses, then colour for each of your courses, and write the new vocabulary in the colour you have used to code that course. Better yet, find a study buddy and test each other using the cards.

code your

in a

flash cards as well.

If

Make up cards

to students.

the application of finger pressure,

that relieves

learning

Zone has been held

an aro-

station.

all

event.

Stress Free

Zone will be held in on Dec. 7 from 10:30

"Not

Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) is co-sponsoring the event along with Student Services and will provide funds for the guest experts. CSI also donates their popcorn machine and water cooler for the

event that can help.

Room 1B26

CREATIVE STUDYING

combat stress

management

at the

will

be pro-

event as well as

some

Create a chart with 3 columns. The first column is the "knowledge" column, the next is the "comprehension" column, and the last is the "examples" column. Start by writing new information that is to be remembered in the "knowledge" column. In the "comprehension" column write down everything you understand about the new learning, and in the "examples" column, find a real-life example of the concept. You will remember this content because you have just connected new learning to things you already know, and followed it up with an example, and that's how human memory works.

healthy snacks.

arrive.

lists. First, staple a few sheets of paper together and make 2 columns. In the first column write the new word, and in the second column write the meaning of the word. BUT, don't stop there, don't just write the textbook definition of the word, put it into your own words, and follow it with an example that makes sense.

Create vocabulary

If

you can put

it

into

your own words, and

find

an example, then you

will

remember

GET CREATIVE WITH YOUR LEARNING and THINK OUTSIDE THE BOX. Studying doesn't have to be a chore, IT CAN BE FUN. To make an appointment

for learning strategy assistance, visit the Student Services

Office.

A Message from Learning Strategies (Photo by Jennifer Howden)

Roll

Visit

up your sleeves

Landon Clarkson, an electronics engineering technician student, gets his blood pressure checked by practical nursing student Danielle McIntyre.

La

our website http://www. conestoaac. on. ca/isp/stserv/index. iso

it.


News

SPOKE, November

22,

2004

— Page 11

This club really likes anime By

JASON SONSER

shows, light-hearted ones dealing with a variety of different things.

(anime) animation Japanese seems to be more and more accessible nowadays. creeping onto SaturdayIt's morning television tor kids.

It

can

be found looming on the shelves of

even a club

The club has also shown darker anime series that are sometimes not

These could include costume conkaraoke contests and seminars. Leung said seminars are put on by some of the members of the club and

appropriate for youngsters.

express or teach different things.

“We. of course, will tell youngsters we’re showing bad stuff.” he said. "We do try to post our sched-

tests,

“We

typically run one set of

two contests every The first show is always

and

inars

semester.

we

at

ules online with warnings, in case

free,

the University of Waterloo dedicat-

parents are curious about the site or

of activity there, just for

the club and just look through

bers to see what the club

rental stores. There's

ed

to

called the

it.

(CTRL- A). summer of

Likes anime

Formed

Club That Really

in the

of the club

the goal

is

CTRL-A 1992,

to introduce

Sam Leung. ence student

computer

21, a

sci-

the University of

at

Waterloo and the president of the club,

said

Japanese

many

the

club

animation

promotes

as

well

as

other kinds of animation.

"Our objective is to bring anime to more and more people as it think becomes mainstream, and we've done a very good job at that,” Leung said. "The purpose of the club is to bring anime to as I

many people Leung,

as

we

who was

can.” also the presi-

dent of the club last

fall,

has held

various positions, including being the club's vice-president, treasurer,

and

secretary.

He said the club tries to please as many people as possible. “We show many different things,” Leung said. "We show comedic

puts on four shows per

term, usually spread about three

weeks term

people to anime.

it.”

$8

The first show of the and memberships arc

apart.

is free,

Memberships shows, or

are 'offered at the

to those

who

Leung

said the

club offers a first-year promotion

which allows membership for $7

to get a

for the

has their four shows

within the university’s three school

The

terms.

Mother Nature and her summer, you may want to keep a close eye on how much you spend while groThanks

to

Produce has been rising

in price

ripped

hurricanes four through the southern United States in the summer, leaving veggie sup-

after

plies scarce

A

and

Cincinnati

costly.

Enquirer article

(www.enquirer.com) said the crop suffering the most is tomatoes. Nearly half of Florida's tomato

"The seminars and

said the club

a volun-

is

runs on the

it

heart and souls of volunteers.”

He

in

bit

the last

year-and-a-half or so. "In the past, the president's job

show

has been to present the

terms

from

last

show," Leung said.

we've changed

that just a

vice-president

now

little.

it

sible as well.”

Students to the club.

puls on “basically

“Every president has done president’s

to interact a lot

Leung

a

but

is I

little

“We

strive to

show

a lot of

anime

activities

from time

to time,”

he

said.

as

supply has been wiped out and the

$3 a pound. According to the artimany restaurants are changing

cle,

recipes to

accommodate

the short-

ages, cutting tomato use back. article

stated that

Wendy’s

a

fulfill

a

and safety condi-

out by the university’s

administration.

The president between

facilitator

acts

the

Federation of Students and the

“In the winter time, if tomatoes 1 don't cringe,” said

are $45, Ouellette.

“Some people complain,

but they complain about anything

anyway.

It’s all

part of doing busi-

ness with veggies.”

Foodanddrinkeurope.com

said

Georgia and Alabama have had severe losses of their peanut and

Subway and

pecan crops, claiming crop losses at more than 50 per cent. Cotton

article said

Burger King are informing customers of the rising prices. Marcel Ouellette has been the owner of the local Subshack chain 16 years, and said all these problems can only be expected.

for

example. King of Bandits in our survey, and therefore we put it onto our main ’’For

Ho

num-

they

attributed this to the fact that

company

even

like,

if

means seeing

it

Leung said the KitchenerWaterloo community has been very kind to CTRL-A in the past, and

for the last cou-

a

said last term’s survey said

the stuff they’ve already seen.

anime has become more accessible. “CTRL-A was founded because, when it was made, anime was very hard to come by,” Ho said. "If you wanted animation from Japan, you would order it from Japan, and that's about it. It would be very for

this term,

people would like to see things

ber of memberships of the club has

uncommon

“Also

said.

Programmer Shirase was put on the roster because someone was willing to import it from Japan." Battle

like that too.”

gone down

Ho

roster,”

administrative,

memberships range from 15-yearold “highschoolers,”

all

the

way

“Without the help from the community. this club couldn’t be where is

it

today,”

The

Leung

said.

club’s website

is

located at

www.ctrl-a.org.

to

plants

were also

hit

hard.

Other

vegetables affected were peppers,

cucumbers, radishes, squash and zucchini.

eggplant,

Producenews.com released an

article

saying Florida also suffered

as

tremendously when its citrus crops, such as grapefruits and oranges, were ravaged. They had their smallest orange crop in a decade. California also experienced problems with too much rain and low temperatures, which played part in

its

much

were paying for

as they

before. Ouellette said students feel the ripple effect more because they are

straggling

and have

themselves spend than average

support

to

less to

adults.

own

“This

damaging crops.

is

where students and sen-

iors are affected

wary of the rising prices. Many buy their own groceries to avoid spending money on eating at restaurants, even though it’s not as convenient. For those who do dine out often, they might not be getting

more,” he said. “I

what happens is grocery will buy less of something

think

Students should be particulary

stores

that's expensive, but

they’re paying to

by buying less

more and they have

charge their customers more. In

the end,

who

**** IMPORTANT

it’s

always the consumer

pays.”

REMIND ER****

Application deadline to request tutoring Is

December

1,

2004

A tutor may be able to help

-

there

is still

time - don’t delay!

Applications available

in

Student Services

Room 2B04 (Photo by Chantelle Timperley)

Florida, the

canes

main source

for citrus fruits,

had

orange crop in a decade because of hurriitems such as tomatoes, peppers and cucumbers.

their lowest

that hit the state. Prices are also higher

for

to

30-year-olds or older.

raises price of produce

has held off on promoting a new chicken special with tomatoes. A

forbes.com

more

club

Jing did well

in

job

the

ing to obtain.

love run-

love speaking

term,

towards, and what people are will-

show

of crowds. The president’s

number of

as well as bring in a few different

1

I

the

front

9:30 p.m. or lOish. Shows generally run for around 1 6 hours or so.

fiscal

“and

said,

ning the show,

He

ognized club of the Federation of

set

more with

every

said

term based on what series have finished, what the surveys lean

me

president because that allowed

executive of the club, said the

an officially rec-

Ho

said the

decides what to show for the next

have fun along the way.” “I definitely enjoyed being vice-

ple of years.

tions

help

to

from time to time, run events that interests whoever is president, and

steadily

Students, the club must

initiative

with the show or to host the show

sents the club to the Federation of

said, as

shows the club comes from a survey we pul out at the end of every semester to see what people want to see.”

that

The

Students.”

Leung

very well,” Leung said. “It's also the

do today. which

Internet

the

makes anime so much more acces-

the president's job

late,

runs most of

also

on relevant information and regulations from the Federation of

the shows, and the president repre-

Leung

is

There’s

to pass

Kenneth Ho, 22, a fourth-year math business student at the university and the external relations

to the

“As of

Also,

tion.

itself,”

said the role of the president

has shifted quite a

licejise material as they

information gets to the federa-

cial

September to December, January to April, and May to August. Each show, Leung said, generally lasts from early Friday evening until later that night, and on Saturday from early afternoon until

The

cery shopping this winter.

is like,”

club and act as a person to run the

term.

fall

CTRL-A

new mem-

shows.”

Leung

to first-year students,

cost has nearly doubled, to close to tropical disasters over the

said.

last three

Rough weather By CHANTELLE TIMPERLEY

have any kind

try to not

contests are shuffled between the

attend the

Leung

general meetings.

them

so

teer-based club, “and

.

sem-

club, ensuring that necessary finan-


Page 12

Make MULLER

By DENISE

the Smart choice

new

There’s a

face on the auto

and

this year,

Actually,

it's

it’s

smart.

not just smart,

it’s

a

Smart. Smart is a division of DaimlerChrysler and is owned by

Mercedes-Benz. The company’s 40-horsepower, three-cylinder,

locks.

The mid-range

about $18,500 and comes with little more in the way of features except for some extra leather is

and a sunroof. The top-of-the-line Passion retails for $19,200 and

the Pure. Pulse and Passion range

Kitchener.

only manufacturing

Frank Mardian said the number

I

shorter than your average

it's

is

hatchback and therefore, is missing, what he called, the crumble zone. The crumble zone on a car starts at the end of both bumpers and moves inwards. This area is collapsible and absorbs the impact

from $19,500 up

to

built

own one

if

you’re

is.

The car

ally

be

geared

70 per cent average $1,127

generation of drivers.

to

insure the car for six months. That's quite a hefty

sum

for a car

All State Insurance Brokers did

not return calls requesting a quote.

Smartville, France, you're

in

out of luck until spring 2005.

Only

1,800 have been available for

retail

Canada since Oct.

within

they’re all

sold.

5,

Smartville

is

and the

and the nostalgia for it in North America seems to have caught them by surprise. Before running to your nearest site

Mercedes-Benz dealership to sign the waiting list, perhaps you should talk to

your insurance agent

Because the Smart recent

is

first.

such a

to the American most insurance brokers

addition

market, for

it

would cost a

to

geared

all

probably won’t even have a

solid steel frame,

it

supposed

is

towards students and the younger

of these toy-like cars,

from being seriously injured. So, w'here is the crumble zone on the Smart? “They (Smart) actually use the seat as the crumble zone,” said Mardian. Doesn't sound too safe, does it? Well,

said

that

to $22,200.

Unfortunately,

of an accident, preventing the driver

company

female with a clean

driving record and in school with a

some more storage space and some The logos on the car.

Cabriolet (convertible) versions of

thing that’s different about this car

the

21 -year-old

extra

a creation of the

is

No listing, no insurance quote. That was the case, at first, with State Farm Insurance Brokers. After one week, a representative of

really only offers air conditioning,

Swiss wristwatch manufacturer, Swatch Group, and MercedesBenz. Take Swatch. Mercedes and the word “art,” mash them all together and you have Smart. This tiny European car is one-ofa-kind and very safe, said a sales and leasing expert at Victoria Star Motors Inc. on Victoria Street in

two-seater car

•-

power

central

Pulse

market

News

— SPOKE, November 22, 2004

listing (Internet photo)

it

yet.

The Smart car

is

a three-cylinder, 40-horsepower, two-seater vehicle.

built with a

is

which

do more damage

will actu-

to the other

vehicle in an accident.

It

also has

metal seats with padding for com-

and

fort,

the car

steel joints for safety. If

an accident, the steel

is in

frame of the car and of the seat will absorb the impact, keeping the driver out of harm’s way.

The

side panels

on the car are the

only exterior parts that are colourful,

and they are

plastic.

Mardian

said the panels are rustproof, corro-

and 100 per cent

sion-free, dent-resistant, chip-

scratch-proof and

The unique

little

car also

rear-

is

(Internet photo)

(Internet photo)

The Smart

replaceable.

on Oct.

5,

Cabriolet

and

is

was released on

the North American market

sold by Mercedes-Benz.

The Smart’s

three-cylinder turbo diesel engine

trunk of the vehicle, under the cargo

wheel drive with the engine in the trunk, under the cargo floor. This way there is more weight over the wheels that are doing the driving,

the

a car

of

risk

it

is this size,

falling

over,”

in

the

floor.

oV

Western Sydney

you run

knowledge to

Bringing

said

Mardian. Both sets of wheels are actually positioned further apart from one

located

University of

giving them more traction.

“When

is

Grab a year

life

Down Under

of sunshine

another, and therefore stick out further than the actual car. This gives

the car more stability on the- road and especially in turns, even if it does look a little bulky.

looks like a football player,”

“It

he said.

The 799 cc turbo

diesel

Smart

can do about 26 kilometres per

and a

may

full

tank

at

litre

today's prices

only cost about $15.

The semi-automatic system may be a little weird for new owners, but

it's

quite straightforward, said

Mardian.

“You have "-dard

car,

to shift like in a stan-

but

it

doesn't

have a

clutch,” he said. "There’s a light in the

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Feature

Dog changes By KATE BATTLER

wanted to match for Kyle. they

Four years ago Kyle Vanderaar would run away from home, dart out into traffic, get easily frustrated

wander

or just

off.

Now, according to his mother Deb Vanderaar, he’s more social, less anxious and he hasn’t run away

What would bring about such

a

change? It’s simple. Raven. Raven is a National Service Dog

drastic

joined the Vanderaar family in

that

May

2001.

Kyle was 12 years old when the Vanderaars applied to the organization but a dog was not placed with

them until Kyle was 15. Vanderaar says the waiting period 18 months but is usually around they waited three years because

the

perfect

deaf and has autistic mild cerebral palsy (CP) and is mentally challenged. When Kyle would get frustrated he would just go, and you couldn’t Kyle,

1

8, is

tendencies,

just call

name because he

his

is

deaf, says Vanderaar.

Now

once.

find

have Raven

that they

in the

family they don’t have to worry

about that as much.

Raven

trained to listen to the

is

voice commands of Deb Vanderaar only, although her husband can take Raven for a walk when she is not working as a service dog. The most important voice command is stay. This helps to stop Kyle from darting off because Raven acts like an anchor when

SPOKE, November

family’s says Vanderaar.

Vanderaar says this has given Kyle much more independence. “He can walk 20 feet ahead of me now. don’t have to worry about him darting onto the road because

you can see his hand go to the dog. She really seems to have a calming effect on him.”

Raven

listens

my

to

voice

com-

mands.” Vanderaar says the family really noticed the impact Raven has had when Kyle went back to school. He has had a lot of change this year and change is not something he

Vanderaar says they used to have door between midnight and 6 a.m. so they could sleep because they were always so worto lock Kyle’s

Kyle would take taken

off once

and they

don’t have to lock his door any-

more because Raven

dog. great

a

It’s

sleeps with

organization

and

them,

says

we’re so grateful

Vanderaar,

off.

Since they have had Raven Kyle hasn’t

come and call on him but Raven is his buddy.” Vanderaar says her two other sons don’t give Raven attention because that would take away from her bond with Kyle. She is Kyle’s that will

"If he’s feeling a bit anxious

ried

— Page 13

life

they are tethered together.

I

2004

22,

to

can’t

I

imagine

life

without Raven. “She’s a great dog and she’s had an incredible impact on our fami-

more of the one-on-one contact that he was used to. He has kept obsess-

Vanderaar says Kyle has become more social since they have had Raven and she has become a buddy for him and a constant com-

ly” She’s changed our lives for sure, says Vanderaar, and the extra work taking care of the dog is worth it. “I see my son walking across a

ing about being independent and

panion.

parking

deals well with.

The

aid he has had for the last

three years year.

He

is

him

not with

has three

new

this

aids but no

where Raven comes in. She has had a soothing effect on him that’s

him.

“They have

this special

doesn’t really have a

lot

bond. He of friends

lot

or in the mall with a big

smile on his face and

worth

it

makes

it

all

it.”

(Photos by Kate Battler)

Raven has been a great addition to the Vanderaar family and has had a positive effect on son, Kyle. Above, Raven was placed with the family in May 2001 and accompanies Kyle everywhere he goes, except school. Left,

Service dogs help children By KATE BATTLER

beside you.

It’s

OK

not a big deal.”

Fowler says sometimes people you've been looking for a way to give back to the community, there is an organization just outside of town that is looking for help. National Service Dogs (NSD) trains dogs for people with disabilIf

ities

but they mostly

work

to place

dogs with autistic children. Heather Fowler, executive director and co-founder of NSD, says a puppy raiser is one type of volunteer the organization is looking for.

Puppy families eight raise

it

it’s

time to

home because

it

Connect

socialize the dog.

with

canine friends,” she says.

it.

Chris McArthur has raised three puppies since she became a puppy raiser four years ago. She says it doesn’t get easier to part with the

dogs every time but the results “It’s

it

makes

it

after

you see

worthwhile.

a very positive experience

know

dog helping some-

“They

to

can’t be isolated

from

Fowler encourages puppy raisers keep in contact with the family great

bond

is

formed between

Being a puppy only

way

and exercise the dogs,

McArthur decided to volunteer because she was looking to help

training at the centre, assist in the

NSD

newsletter, fundraising, and main-

train

at

and

it

for the next 18 months. raisers

attend obedience

help by training them at socializing the

They

also

home and

dog by taking

it

out

places like the mall, the movies

and restaurants. They could even be brought to school with you. says Fowler. "After the first couple of days the puppies just end up falling asleep

is

out somewhere. She picked

ule

is

NSD

taining

meet

just

lots

of people.

out an autistic child and their fami-

ly”

McArthur says it’s such a fun job but you have to be prepared to spend a fair bit of time with the dog

also uses volunteers to feed

office,

because of her great love for dogs and she wanted to help children. She says it’s busy but rewarding and it gives her an opportunity to “I love the fact that we’re helping

Way Campaign Committee

your sched-

you raised

puppy

United

just too busy, says Fowler.

that

the

behalf of Conestoga College’s

raiser is not the

to help out if

one.”

take

and Learning

a trainer and the family.”

who

that a

On

that receives their dog.

“A

Life

their

raisers are individuals or

great to

CONESTOGA

helps to better

give the dog back to the kennel for training they won’t be able to part

it's

classes with the dogs.

to

when

to have She says it is also another dog, or any other pet, in the

and

weeks and help

Puppy

are worried that

need

in

write the

assist with

articles

building

for

the

kennel and

grounds.

Fowler says

if

someone can volweek or

unteer a couple hours a

once in a while, NSD can always use the help. information on more For National Service Dog.f or volunteering go to www.nsd.on.ca.

for contributing to the

United Way.

Your support and generosity helped

make

this year’s

campaign a success!

on a daily basis. “You have some time every day

work with the dog.” McArthur says one benefit to puppy raising is that you can do it on your own time and it’s easy to work into your schedule. to

Fow'ler says the busier

Puppy

raisers take the puppies

when they are

eight

weeks

old.

the better because

dog ready.

it

you

are

helps get the

(Photo by Kate Battler)

NSD-trained dogs are placed with autistic children.

United Way SERVING KITCHENER WATERLOO Afd

U1« T

of

V/*

: .

v/itmot

90$ Wo«t r{l*h


Entertainment

— SPOKE, November 22, 2004

Page 14

Four Beatles albums

now By MIKE

available

Horoscope Week ofNov.

CD

on

Beatles’

March

able for the

first

are

now

April 19

CD

time on

in

they did

a

his-

it

The four-disc box-set is called The Capital Albums Volume and contains Meet the Beatles!. The Beatles Second Album. Something New. and Beatles '65. Each CD contains two versions in

mono

Beatlemania to a worldwide scale and also ushered in the “British Invasion.” where countless bands the

Britain,

Beatles at the

America by storm.

forefront, took

Back then the Beatles released albums in America through Capital Records. The records were different than those released in the U.K.

Paul McCartney, George Harrison, John Lennon and Ringo Starr of the

Beatles are

still

as popular as ever. records,” said Chris, a salesclerk at

ized worldwide, the British albums

last

were chosen, not the U.S. ones. Since that time there has been a lot of demand by Beatles fans to release the American albums on CD. This release does bring about the question:

how

relevant are four, 40-

year-old albums by a band that has-

35 years? age buys

n't existed for

“Every

Beatles

downtown Kitchener’s Records, who refused to

impact

is

the

NHL

lockout having

affecting us? There's

still

the

OHL,

and you can always watch ball hockey in the rec centre at Conestoga College. And you can get some friends together and have a game of hockey outside. But have you ever thought about

how

the lockout

may

be affecting lottery sales? How many of you have played Pro Line, and is it being affected? For those of you who don’t play Pro Line and have no clue as to what it is, let me give you a quick

rundown.

It’s

a lottery

game.

To play, you have to place a bet on the outcome of sporting events.

The

for a fork in the road.

October 23

every day and work two jobs to

them

pay for school. But your dedication and sense of direction will take you in the right direction.

to

it

Better

tell

first

said

It

could be devastating.

give his

name.

He

Gemini that

people really like

hearing the Beatles in

all sorts

May

21

Sagittarius

June 21

-

November 22 December 21

of dif-

ferent ways, referring to the stereo

and

mono

versions of each song.

“Listen to the music yourself and you’ll

Chris

understand.”

“What's not

The set $80 Cdn.

-

21

Encore

said.

to like?”

Snoop Dogg said to drop it like hot. If you have any intuition

around

will be priced at

Stop cryin' into your coffee.

down. Besides,

it's

You'll water

your bad reputation and gain loads of credibility,

you're going to need

at all you'll lose

by making the choice you

just

it

all

the caf-

you can get. You have tons of work to do and there is no end feine

is right.

in sight.

ticket sales

NHL

he

has

Capricorn

July 22

-

December 22

-

January 19

you

that?

It's

a

Can you smell wake up call and it has

honesty you can

been

right

under your nose the

friends and a long life

of happiness

keep living

is

in

in order.

If

beat your split personality and will

on

football until- football's over.”

said

June 22

A toast to

According to MacQueen, the most popular events in Pro Line are hockey and football, but football is more popular than hockey. "Hockey doesn’t take over from

MacQueen

Cancer

lockout

Pro Line. Most people play Lotto 6-49 and Super 7, he said.

on society? Other than the fact that many of us are going absolutely insane without hockey on TV, is it really

long as you keep your head up and

watch out

your longtime

break

to

sweetie?

The Beatles’ album catalogue was first released on CD in 1987, but since that release was standard-

not affected by So exactly how much of an

around so

It could be worse; you might have to scrape frost off your car

before they find out O.C. style.

Pro Line GALHARDO

down

having a

will turn

it

Were you seeing the yard perall summer and now you have

know

By JEN

week and

are

20

(Internet photo)

1964, the

You

Scorpio

May

-

son

mix.

same year John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr first hit North American shores. The year stands as a milestone in pop culture history as it brought

from

-

sunshine and happi-

isn't all

November

in the

albums were originally

released in

April 20

a newly re-

mastered stereo mix and one

Life ness.

Taurus

I

All four

^Jjr

If you're

again.

avail-

page booklet by famed Beatles torian Mark Lewison.

original

Libra September 23 October 22

-

once they'll do it having deja vous in your relationship you need to move on so you don't find yourself back in this same spot next week.

four North

four-disc box set that includes a 60-

of each song, one

21

BORS

first

American albums

2004

Aries

J)

If

The

22.

it

be smooth sailing from here

Wait

.

.

.

shhh

.

.

.

entire time. Finals are just

the

comer and you

are

around

known

to

procrastinate.

out.

not

noticed a change in sales for Pro

Line even

yet,

because people would not hockey until it

Vk

got well into the season.

July 23

is

when

we’ll notice a

change

Don't just stand there

Hockey

isn’t as

popular

in

many teams

may

Sales in Pro Line

Pro

Line as football because, in hockey, there are too

affected

greatly

with

to follow

lockout, but perhaps

As

more of a

it

not be

the

NHL

would take

were

football that

there are only 17

wasn't being played.

Pro Line’s

whereas months at a time. Plain and simple,

popularity plummets

opposed

to

football.

well,

weeks of football, hockey goes on for

football is easier for players in Pro

Line to follow.

January 20 February 18

August

in

sales.”

as

-

22

“Probably within three weeks or so

Aquarius

Leo

start betting in

is

hit if

it

when

football

“Pro Line goes down the

toilet in

Sure

stiff.

it's

frozen

cold, but that's

movement was

why

invented. Take 10

big steps in the right direction, that

ought to get you warmed up.

Once you've been bitten you are You need to give the newest love in your life more twice as shy. credit.

This

time

you'll

be

smarter about love and you won't get burned.

over.

the

summer,” MacQueen

said.

Virgo

sporting events that are includ-

Pisces

August 23 September 22

are hockey, American and Canadian professional football, American college football and basketball, baseball, golf, European

ed

Are they the right person for you? If you have to ask yourself this question the answer is no. Your best bet is to find someone

soccer and car racing.

To win you must correctly predict the outcome for three to six events. The minimum bet in Pro Line is $2 and the maximum is $100. In Canada, hockey is a big deal, and because of the NHL lockout,

new.

February 19

-

March 20

Eminem said to just lose it and go crazy, oh baby! Let loose and go wild. You need to get out my friend. No more jogging pants and letting yourself go. It'll do you good to meet someone new.

you would think lottery sales would be affected considering the betting in Pro Line, right?

“Pro Line makes up a very small percentage of lotto sales,” said

John MacQueen. a at

who guessed

five per cent

of

all

Basics that

sales are

(Photo by Jen Galhardo)

in

maybe from

is

a 2nd-year journalism

student in tune with the universe.

lottery retailer

Food

Charlie’s

Kitchener,

Janet Morris

Customers continue

NHL

lockout. Retail

buy Pro Line lottery tickets despite the sales have been unaffected by the dispute. to


SPOKE, November

22,

2004

— Page 15

Conestoga STUDENTS INC I

REPRESENTATION

STUDENT FORUM WEDNESDAY DEC. 1 2 PM PM SANCTUARY -

-

he

1

STEP TO THE MIC

SPEAK AND BE HEARD ACT1V1T1ES/E VENTS

AGENDA. DIRECTORS’ COMPENSATION DIRECTORS’ ACCOUNTABILITY

SANCTUARY UPGRADES STUDENT PRIORITY FEE DISCOOHTSHOPPIBOTHIP

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when travelling. DISCOUNT TRAVEL CARDS AVAILADLE AT THE CSI OFFICE.

MUST SlbM'DP HIS FEE

II

IS

TIE ESI OFFICE

SS.OD

-


— SPOKE, November 22, 2004

Page 16

Sports

PGA Tour comes By JON YANEFF

For the

first

time in his career

won

Mickelson championship. Phil

The 2004 Pro Golf Association (PGA; Tour season will be remembered as one

For the

Woods

ber

golfer.

1

of surprises. time

first

Tiger

Woods

full

since

1997

world’s num-

isn't the

to

though the than $5 million at tournaments. Woods may have been distracted after dating, then eventually marrying, his Swedish supermodel girlfriend, Elin Nordegren, Oct. 6.

Who

the world’s

is

number

1-

none other than Vijay Singh. No player had a year as consistent as Singh did. He dominated the PGA by winning nine Tour events and had 8 top 10 finishes in his 29 events. One of his nine victories included a major the PGA championship Championship. It is the second time he won the tournament since winning it in 1998. His other major championship came in 2000 when he won the Masters Tournament. Singh earned nearly $11 million this year, which is a single-season PGA Tour record. His total is approximately $6 million more ranked golfer?

It's

1

didn't have the excitement that his

2003 Masters Tournament victory had,

by winning Tournament

Nissan

He

at

Masters

year’s

this

Augusta National.

finished in the top

PGA

-

10

Tour's

in all

major

championships. Mickelson sits at number 3 on the PGA Tour’s money list with nearly $5.5 million this season.

Todd Hamilton looks to be a lock 2004 PGA Tour Rookie of

as the

the Year. In his first year

on the

PGA Tour, Hamilton won two PGA Tour events which included a

Though Weir’s year

S2.5 million.

acquired the coveted green jacket

four of the

number 2 even superstar earned more

fell

major Mickelson a

a surprising end

to defend his

he did

Open champion,

title

giving

as

him

PGA Tour victories so far. Weir finished sixth in the PGA Tour world rankings. Weir followed a poor season in 2002 with his breakthrough season last year where he won three tournaments. Though Weir didn’t pocket nearly as much as the $5 seven

million he will try to

made last come back

season, he strong next

year.

major championship, the British Open. Part of Hamilton’s success at the British Open can be attributed to his play overseas on the Japan Tour, where he has wins in his career. Hamilton sits at number 12 on the money list with nearly $3 1

1

million.

(Internet photo)

Mike Weir finished

sixth overall in the

PGA Tour world

(Internet photo)

Mike Weir Second-year

nursing

than his closest challenger, Ernie

Todd Gould

Els.

ried about Weir. “I

would

more

said he

like

is

to

student

not too wor-

see

consistently,”

“but, to finish

him play Gould,

said

tournaments

in the

top- 10 and not miss any cuts are

(Internet photo)

Todd Hamilton South African Retief Goosen also noise on the Tour by

made some

Open winning the U.S. Championship at Shinnecock Hills Golf Club in New York. Goosen also (Internet photo)

Els had a consistent year winning

PGA

Tour events as well as two victories on the European Tour. Els was also part of Europe’s Ryder Cup victory over the Americans where Europe defeated the U.S. 18 and a half to nine and a half.

three

won

16 events finishes.

Vijay Singh

rankings.

the U.S.

Open

in

2001. In

Goosen had nine top

He

also

won

-

10

the season’s

last PGA Tour tournament, the Tour Championship presented by Coca-Cola. I bet you’re wondering how well Canada's top golfers did. Everyone’s favourite, Brights Grove, Ont. native Mike Weir had a steady season winning more than

sometimes more important than the number of wins he has.” Stephen Ames, who recently became a Canadian citizen, captured his first PGA Tour victory of his career at the Cialis Western Open.

The Trinidad list,

Woods

than-stellar

is

not the player he used to be.

season by

his

PGA

ahead of Weir

Tour’s

who

the

last

Woods had a

less-

this year.

<

(Dr.

Kitchener, Ont.

fin-

894-4445

ished 14th. In

standard

10 Manitou

native finished the

season eighth on the

money

(Internet photo)

Tiger

official

PGA

event of the season, Jeff

Tour

Sluman

and Hank Kuehne defended their Franklin Templeton Shootout title by beating Justin Leonard and Steve Flesch Nov. 14. PGA Tour golfers will swing again in January when the 2005

— Monday —

Sunday

$4 domestic

pints

$2.50 burgers $5.00 burger and Blue

season will begin.

$4.00 pints

Tuesday

Wednesday Thursday Friday

29 cent wings

— $3 bottles

Saturday

of

$3 bar shots

all

day

domestic beer '

$3.50 pints $5.99 fish & chips special

$4

pints of

domestic beer

TV giveaway

every Saturday nite! Live classic rock entertainment every Friday and Saturday nite (no cover)!

Coming soon (Photo by Justin Bastin)

It’s all in Chirpy McTailfeathers, a Chickadee feeding

is

child’s

named by

1 1

a.m. to 2 a.m. daily

the landing

schoolchildren,

is

getting ready to eat sunflower

hand at the F.W.R. Dickson Conservation area, Nov. a great way to spend a Saturday during the winter.

seeds from a

Open

— NTN and QB1

14. Birdwatching

and

Specials are available at the Kitchener location only

Digital Edition - November 22, 2004  
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