Page 1

Crazy for

No booze

the Ukraine Reporter Jennifer

Ormston

moved by

is

for youth

Underage students are banned from the Sanctuary for some CSI events. News

Kyiv’s rich history

and breathtaking

Former MuchMusic VJ Master T talks about the projects he’s done recently.

architecture.

11,12

Travel

Monday, November

New

1

News 7

2004

,

2

Much

Life after

Conestoga College, Kitchener

36th Year

— No. 22

priority fee

nets college

$490,000 RYAN CONNELL

By

and

tive

CSI Conestoga College has added a

new

fee to students’ tuition

year

in

this

order to offer more servic-

es to the students.

each

also

with the priority fee

financially,

assisting in funding their advertis-

CSI plans

ing.

to

spend $10,000

in

advertising on Conestoga’s radio

The college decided that

what CSI can offer.” be benefitting

that’s

will

last

May

station

be

Spoke.

would

student

CJIQ

and

$15,000

in

required to pay a mandatory fee of $40 per semester or $80 per annum that would be collected as a stu-

got out of the business of funding

dent priority fee.

Falconer said.

“We have

advertising for

CSI

The

fee

is

part of a partnership

formed between the college and Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) to

how

decide

bring

to

and

life

support student success.

The

However, students

tising

vice-president

of

they had hoped to do for students

because of the lack of funds. "Despite the fact that the college

(Photo

it

will

be coming out of

fees that students also

CSI

Harris said the $25,000 in adver-

was a small amount

spective to how much they were helping with the fund. “It was simply something they (CSI) wanted, and for us it

($25,000) was a very minor thing,” he said.

The monetary support

traditionally provided peer sende-

that

we

think

fee.

many changes

year.

this

seen at the college

year such as CSI’s

space and

the

new

identification card

new

office

professional

system

that stu-

dents received.

donate $2,000

to

how

plans on

priority fee

many

things

he thinks the

should be spent.

the college that

skill

Some

centre at

would help

By ALEXANDRA MASTRONARDI

A

stu-

with writing, reading and

dispute between two students

living in residence lead to threats

weapon

involving a

earlier

this

semester.

A

going

McDonald

returned

the

to

Conestoga

Residence and Conference Centre after having a few drinks at the Toga Party held at

what

Cornelius, 21, said he

was

Cornelius coming again.

room

his

ombudsperson or extra

with writing alone, would go a

part-time

counsellors for Student Services.

An

executive director of Student

Services

is in

the process of being

hired through a hiring committee

and the expense of his or her hiring will be covered through the priority fee. The college will be assuming the entire expense of the position once cash flow is resumed.

CSI president

swearing

“He was

at

By DESIREE FINHERT

offered. “It takes

people and people cost

meetings Review.

to

discuss

meeting

at

ly

and

the voice of the students. it would be immature to management wouldn't know where to invest in the college,” Falconer said, “but I do think in the same way that it’s a one-sided perspective with management

“I think

say

looking

at

n’t hurt to

it wouldhave another perspec-

every thing, so

it’s

services,

end it’s staffed by professionals, and its not inexpensive.” he said. Despite the $500,000 deficit that the college

“It

it

experiencing, Harris

know who

‘You don’t

you’re mess-

ing with.’”

Cam

Sacret, a witness to the inci-

said

from

shoved

Cornelius

McDonald and

the situation esca-

“I think the

is

is

real-

a profile on the 25th,” said

“McDonald approached

The University of Guelph town

hall

town

the resi-

become involved in situations where someone’s safety is in jeopardy or if problems arise that cannot be controlled by residence staff. “This doesn’t happen often,” he said. The incident shouldn't have escalated

the

to

point

it

did,

said

Continued on Page 3

This

hall

is

due before the round-table

meeting and a round-table discussion on Oct. 29, 18 board mem-

discussion on Oct. 29

bers pulled out their post-second-

after the

ary review

workbooks and penis

a

70 people in the and Kitchener-

at

Wilfrid

Laurier University, only five days

board of governors’ meet-

ing.

“We knew

The round-table discussion

a review but

there

we

was going

didn’t

to

be

know what

private event for

format,” said Tibbits.

educational

But the board was positive. Board member John Keating said the review process was exciting. “The fact that the government, government, has the Liberal appointed Rae is amazing,” said Keating. “The first documents we see out of the Rae Commission

will

issues outlined in the post-second-

ary review workbook. Ten representatives from

Conestoga

will

be

versity.

regarding the Rae Review work-

can-

The general manager of

dence, John Kobylnik, said police

book.”

In preparation for the

Tibbits.

it

Cornelius.

Oct. 25.

and corporate secretary Helena Webb said the commission knew one meeting would be held at a uni-

not go into the operating budget.”

was

to police,

book. “It’s unfortunate we’re scrambling. We never thought we’d have to complete a work-

goes towards services that

enhance student success, so

to control

gave the other to us,” said Webb at the board of governors’ meeting on

Director of the president’s office

down.

came

Conestoga

to

meeting

on Nov. 24.

staff

who took a statement from both McDonald and made

us with a

Waterloo community to discuss the

Tibbits.

also be hosting a

Residence

the situation again and a call

cils.

whole process

an opportunity for us to give

them

really drunk.”

Cornelius.

there.

to

said the

pay

is

money cannot be used

Rae

Conestoga on Nov. 25

better for students, in the

public

the

College president John Tibbits thinks that the decision to hold the

tant

is spent is imporbecause they are considered

said.

“So, to be politically correct, they

Conestoga College will be hosting one of the town hall

the priority fee

how

my

with writing.”

an excellent one.

Falconer

opened

each other and making

money so it’s not ‘things’ that we’re talking about to make things

Justin

said their involvement about

“I

hall

threatening me, saying,

Rae Review coming

way in helping students overcome the problems they are having long

Harris said the college used to have a learning lab for a brief period that was successful and they need to consider bringing it back and expanding the services that it

we

the

and were pushing

each other around," he

returned

was just trying to threaten Cornelius. “It was still wrong and I am not trying to justify what I did,” he said. “I wasn't thinking and I was

my room

McDonald said he had just home from the Toga party and was on his. way to bed when he

lated

think this particular centre, starting

down

into

kept yelling and

Cornelius said they both started

such as a

“He came

and began yelling.

dent,

staff

I

steak knife hidden up his sleeve,” he said. "He was threatening to stab Cornelius in the throat.” McDonald said he was never planning on using the knife and that he

to control the situation

McDonald) came out of

door and saw a couple of kids including Cornelius and that's when the yelling started,” he said.

hiring additional

said.”

stumbling down the hallways knocking on random doors when all of a sudden a guy (Curtis

part-time tutor

creation of a student centre, and

until a

and sent the students to their rooms. McDonald said he was heading back to his room when he saw

heard the knocking.

one of the biggest problems that students have in college is the ability to write,” he said. “I

I

came

the college.

tutoring centre

“I think

said he didn’t recall

After hearing the yelling, staff

numeracy,

to tutor in various subjects.

‘I

race.’”

I am not racist at he said. “I was talking like a drunken idiot and I didn't mean

enhance student retention, working to centralize student services, a system to identify high-risk students who might be failing,

enhancing the by bringing in a on an ongoing basis

your

all,”

intended use,” including services

and

yelled at me,

to eliminate

making the racial comment few friends confirmed it.

dents

security services to the college, the

eat fish

“Just to be clear,

student

Devon

“He then

threats.

that the fee is being "envisioned as

to

I

res despite knife threat

in

am

this

Harris said he has a lot of his

own

of his plans include a

Harris said there are

the

peer services and they were

supposed

to

coming out of

Last year they donated $3,000

needs to be done,” Harris said. The fee has already helped with

Student stays

CSI

that

es will also be

all

When

Ashley Sheppard (left) and Connie Vanderknyff sing a song they wrote called When Eat Fish at the Musical Mocktails event at the residence Oct. 19. See Page 7 for additional photo. First-year students

in per-

into various services, there’s insuf-

funds to do

Mastronardi)

pay each

already invests millions of dollars

ficient

by Alexandra

will, in fact,

the priority fee rather than the

$490,000.

Conestoga's

secured

free of charge

be charged the cost of adver-

still

year.

student affairs Fred Harris said the college is underfunded and they haven't been able to do everything

station,”

and therefore, for the students free

beginning of September was 6,130 which means the student priority fee about should generate •

radio

of charge.”

tising, but

college's enrolment at the

and

paper

the

services

in

enhance student

that will

important that CSI

“I think it’s

attending. “It’s

an

open-book

referring

to

test,”

a

said

handout

with Conestoga’s official position

,

encourage me enormously." Continued on Page 3


Page 2

— SPOKE, November

1

,

News

2004

Now deep thoughts Conestoga College

...with Random

CSI

questions answered by

underage

restricts

students from events

random students

CONNELL

By RYAN

residence are underage, accounting for 40 per cent of the resi-

What

celebrity

do you look like?

Some

students are unhappy with

Conestoga Students decision

(CSI)

Inc.’s

make some of

to

their

events restricted to students 19 and over.

The choice was made

“Prince William,

because

what

that’s

all

my

friends say.”

Dan

Zybala, 19,

to restrict

underage drinking and to reduce congestion in the Sanctuary so that there would be less students turned away from attending the events. CSI will be alternating between making their events 19plus only and all ages. The Halloween blow-out bash was restricted to students who were 19 and over only. Eighteen-year-old Rob

advertising

Boomsma,

second-year marketing student, says he feels it’s disa

crimination

from an event "It’s simply people who because CSI’s

“Where’s Waldo

because

I

when

have been

and

and

19

concern wasn’t even

who were

couldn’t

18 and

get

in,”

looks.”

the people

who

Dan

was just about making more money

advertising

was

just about

could drink and

it

As of

Sept.

2003, there were

1,

5,943 full-time students enrolled

at

the college, with 17 per cent of the

population under the age of 19.

“I

look

like

George from

Seinfeld it’s

There were 6,130 enrolled in the college this year as of September 2004. Information won’t be

...

maybe

until sometime this November about how many under-

released

the glasses.”

age students are currently attending

John McMahon, 22,

human

the college.

Students

services

the

foundation

who

on campus at Residence and

live

Conestoga

Conference Centre are some of the most frequent students to attend CSI events because they live so close to the college. This year, approximately 205 students in

“Elaine from Seinfeld it’s

the

...

By JON YANEFF 1 7,

business management studies

Three business administration operations and materials manage-

Conestoga College relumed from San Diego,

ment

students

at

Calif. Oct. 18 after

winning schol-

Taye Diggs because have I

the

GQ

look.”

Abdulah Zamel,

consecutive

year

that

my

since look

Rob

I

longer hair but

cut

like

it

Tom

I

tend to Cruise.”

Trihey, 18,

broadcasting radio and television

Harrow

College

Clair

student

a

If

Windsor

in

caught drinking

is

underage, a copy of their student card is kept on file and they are banned from any events for about

underage students get an “x” on their hands.

Confederation

who

are 19

and over and couldn’t get in (because the Sanctuary was filled to capacity),”

she says.

“It’s a bal-

ancing act so

we thought we

would

time with 19 and

try

this

it

is

and see if we still get similar complaints from people standing in line and complaining about (underage students) taking up the like,

place.”

Boomsma

not

says

of the

all

underage students should be penalized because some students are not obeying the rules. He says CSI should be creating better methods to avoid underage drinking or

should

be heightening

security

way except

College

suggested

selling

cheaper tickets to the event in advance so that they could estimate how many students would be

and know how much

attending

in

same

the

they require students to

sign a waiver saying they won’t

drink underage. If the students do not pick up their identification

at

end of the evening, it is then assumed that they were drinking

the

underage.

Centennial College

and

Mohawk

require

all

College

Toronto Hamilton be legal

in in

students to

age to attend alcohol pub nights, with the exception of their entertainment events which have guests such as hypnotist Tony Lee. They do hold dry events that the underage students are able to attend.

Boomsma have fees

instead.

Boomsma

their

keeps students’ identification cards at the doors of their alcohol events.

Thunder Bay operates dating those students

at

alcohol events.

a month. At their all-ages events,

conference presentations and personal and professional development sessions. They met with

feels he should only pay a portion of his CSI he is not welcome at all of

to if

the events they hold.

“Why

should

be paying

I

for

somebody else to go to have a good time when I’m not even eligible to go?”

Boomsma

says.

speakers, networked with confer-

ence attendees and visited

they

and educational session

general

APICS

the

was also they serve as room

exposition.

It

assigned conference said

helped her grow professionally. “I

learned

a

new

trend

the

in

operations industry, radio frequen-

cy identification (RFID),” she said.

These systems are used

(www.apics.org). They

website

filled

out a

form that included a section that asked why they thought they should be chosen to attend. More than 80,000 individual and corporate

members

arc

affiliated

with APICS. They promote professional awareness

and develop and

agers in business, industry and the public sector.

During the conference Oct. 1013,

the

three

students

attended

members chapter

student

world. Conestoga’s

of the the

in

APICS

student

chapter.

management teacher who recommended Pattison. Harrow materials

and Donkersgoed all apply for the scholarship, said going to the international conference is a tremendous opportunity. “At the conference you have

or smart labels on book spines

best speakers in the field and

in

such at

a

Old Town San Diego trolley tour that went to different places throughout the historic gas

city,

lamp

it

including the

ly,"

said Lopers.

for positions.”

Mary Kitchener,

district.

Overall, the three students had a

Ann who

ent of a

side the classroom and to see

how

companies run,” said Harrow. “You get to meet professionals from around the world such as Italy. South Africa and India," said Pattison. “I definitely

recommend

a

2004 graduate at the

con-

named the recipi$500 US APICS Student

San Diego. of learning out-

of

Groothuis is

of the program, wasn’t ference but was

way

“The students can

make networking contacts across Canada and when job opportunities come up the students are thought of

great time at the conference and in

“It's a great

the

impacts the students professional-

local library.

about San Diego. They took the

APICS ’s

are active

items as the gas station speed pass

Donkersgoed originally applied the

all

largest

Tracey Lopers, an operations and experience

the

ference the students learned a lot

online on

students apply for the program.”

and Harrow Pattison, Donkersgoed are all in their final year of the program and, in addition to having academic success,

and

educate materials resource man-

Smile Conestoga, you could be our next respondent!

eligible

In addition to learning at the con-

the scholarship.

Pattison,

with

even

...”

Rob Boomsma.

Pattison

gram won

to look like Elvis

I’m not

sessions.

fifth

used

I

at

Conestoga students from the pro-

“I

“Why should be paying for somebody else to go to have a good time when

workshop

Societies Control (APICS) scholars. This was the

accounting

accommo-

St.

monitors

man-

Inventory

19,

underage drinking

dling

a matter also of

“It is

conference of APICS. the educa-

Karen Pattison, Ashley Harrow and Bonnie Donkersgoed each received a $350 US award, naming them American Production and

like

take different approaches to han-

to control the illegal drink-

ing.

necessary that

agement.

look

way

arships to the annual international

tional society for resources

“I

If the

Students win conference scholarships

hair.”

Becky Thorne,

the door.

at

CSI’s general manager Judy Dusick says they had to remove many students from the past Toga Party event who were drinking underage so they needed to find a

over to see what the turnout

the bar.”

higher price

Sanctuary reaches capacity, the rest of the people in line would be turned away because they didn’t jump to purchase tickets beforehand. Other colleges' student unions

plus events.

over,

says. “It

at

are

favouritism for the are

Boomsma

Silveira, 18,

from attending the 19-

second-year marketing student

because of his age.

about the people

under

blessed with good

population

restricted

excluded

he’s

who

dence’s

is required to monitor the underage drinking. Leftover tickets could then be purchased at a

security

Voluntary Service Award.

It

recog-

nizes that, while she was a student,

she was an active participant

in the

student chapter and in regional parent chapter activities, school organizations,

and

civic or

community

organizations.

i


.

News

SPOKE, November

1

2004

,

— Page 3

Education system ‘medieval’ Continued from Page 1 Former premier Bob Rae was commissioned by Premier Dalton McGuinty to do a post-secondary review after the May budget was released.

needs of the 21st century."

The

private round-table discus-

sion

is

town

hall

a precursor to the Nov. 25

meeting. There are a

of 17 scheduled town

total

meet-

hall

which began across Ontario beginning of October when a discussion paper. Higher Expectations for Higher Education, ings,

Conestoga has been labouring under a substantial deficit as a result of no increase in per-student funding, no funding for recently

at the

was

support staff contracts and chronic under funding. Conestoga’s deficit is cur-

released. Town hall meetings have already being held in Ottawa, Hamilton, Sudbury, Thunder Bay. North Bay and Niagara-on-thc-

rently $500,000.

Lake.

negotiated

and

teacher

The review

ondary education system will recommend changes both to structure and funding. Tibbits said colleges and universities arc feeling the

pinch and no

one would argue that the education system doesn't need more funding. ‘‘We have a vision and believe I

community and students best. And Rac has, in fact, pointed this out. The universithat vision serves the

how

ty vision is

best to serve the

institution.”

Tibbits

said

previous

meetings between Rac and Ontario college presidents have been very tense and have turned into shouting matches.

"The

battle

system needs

to

60s by

hall

findings and answer questions.

Ontario residents are being encouraged by the review board to attend the public meetings or submit their opinions by mail or email.

Conestoga Students

Inc.

president Justin Falconer

is

(CSI)

making

plans to transport students to and from the town hall meeting in

Guelph on Nov. 24. The town hall meeting on Nov. 25 will be held Recreation Centre.

The Rae Review

We

scheduled

is

was designed

ings and

participate

college and university,

in

fact

is

is

to

dark aged.” vision

increase a student’s ability to trans-

from a college to a university and have the university recognize credits gained at the college. "This system is honestly medieval. It does not reflect the fer

Student

in

all

on how

to

available

at

www.raereview.on.ca, or by calling 1-866-392-1261. The workbook

can be completed by anyone, and is available online. It can be filled out online, or a hard copy can be requested from Postsecondary Review Secretariat. 2 Bloor St. W., Ste. 700, Toronto, Ont.. 3R1 It can be returned by fax to 416323-6895 or mailed to the above

M4W

"It

stupid." he said.

Sports bar

"I’m sure he had his reasons for

what he did but

it

could have been

worse. Luckily no one got hurt."

McDonald

said he wrote a letter

of apology to Cornelius and they

met

in person and shook hands. "At the time I was just being stu-

pid. There's no problem or tension between us now," he said.

Cornelius said he

McDonald

is

suiprised that

removed from

wasn't

residence or

moved

to a different

floor.

"He

lives

down

right

from me. thought weird," he said. I

In

situations

that

the

hall

was kind of

such as this one,

where a student could be evicted, an incident report is completed and reviewed by residence staff and security

staff

at

the

college.

Through consultation with both

experience

the

Inc,"

he said.

"Eve been very pleased with my experience so far," he said, sitting in the office previously occupied by A1 Hunter, who retired in October.

the

situation,

school.

the

"I

attended two sessions so

far,"

Brown

away work involved with

shift

new

The SIU is a branch of the attorney general’s office that investigates cases where a person is killed or seriously injured,

member

of the

and a

force

police

is

involved.

was

said the position

ing, but involved a lot

of

interest-

travel.

“You get a page and are told to go to Napanee as soon as possible,’’ he said.

When

opened

at

in the health

and

position

a

Conestoga

May

in

safety office, he signed on.

Conestoga'

halls of

was

granted interviews with the centre forensics

science,

the

police

Brown

tem works

said, noting this sys-

better for investigations

into accidents

es

is

also address-

Brown said he regularly deals with CSI and Conestoga Residence and Conference Centre committees with good interaction. “It has been a very positive overall experience. You can feel the energy when you come into this

general

and safety

was

plan

Brown

I

started with

was

area,

to

the

incorporate

health and safety and security and

parking as one,” he said.

said

it’s

too soon to say

tough to really make a com-

mitment to any changes right now, you need to get a better idea of operations,” he said.

He said security will probably have more areas for growth coming

said he accepted the position

with the SIU, and worked there

bined under safety and security

dents.

Cold and

flu

bation, or the student

may

receive a

fine or a suspension.

said the

By JUSTIN BASTIN

more

is

hoping

interaction with

to

CSI

have

to pro-

vide a positive experience for stu-

nothing to sneeze at

With cold and us again

punishment can be confusing. "We're trying to correct something

the

it

flu

season upon

has become essential

measures protect themselves and others. students

that

take

Whether you’re healthy

as

a

are

still

measures you can take to

ensure optimal health. Trish Weiler, a nurse

at

health

said students are at a

“In

a

community

setting

it’s

without punishing the person," he

cially

up diseases, espewith colds and flus because

said.

they

are

that is not an accepted

The student

still

behaviour

has a program to

decisions,

it

doesn't

bad person," he

said.

make you

a

transmit-

and intermin-

clove form. Pills can be bought any pharmacy.

The

almost

at

ly runs

defence against the is, of course, to limit exposure to others while

peaks

sick.

The cold and

flu

season typical-

from October to April but December. This is danfor people writing gerous midterms and especially exams. As most students know, it is next in

best

spread of illness

who are home and rest,”

“People stay

sick

should

said Weiler.

ety of cold and flu medications on

“Taking time to let your body recoup is the best medicine.” There are certain symptoms to look for which let you know it’s time to get outside help for your

the market.

illness.

to impossible to obtain a decent

grade while battling a bad cold.

There

As an

easier to pick

respiratorily

travel

gle at large.” she said.

high risk of getting sick due to the nature of their living situation.

are

a high populace of

who

students

to

horse or just plain hoarse there

services,

whole concept of

“They (residence students) living with

ures,

is,

of course, a huge vari-

alternative to these

why

not try

some

meas-

natural

If

you have

a fever

above 38

Garlic, an herb found in

most

Flu shots will be available in

Room 2E04

from Nov. 16-18 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m and on Nov. 19 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Health

She also said students in residence are at the highest risk of infection because they tend to travel a lot and live with people

peoples’ kitchens,

range of infections such as a cold.

services

who

Garlic can

across from Student Services.

travel extensively.

is

anti-fungal

and anti-microbial meaning is

effective

at

that

it

helping a wide

be taken

in

C

or are having difficulty breathing

you should see a physician.

cold-fighting techniques?

ted,” she said.

pill

or

if

the security aspect of Conestoga.

up, and that he

He

it

the deficit the college faces.”

Now, rather than having two management level positions, security and health and safety are com-

tions unit (SILT),” he said.

because the offices

work so closely. “One of the issues

“It’s

“One of the reasons the health

I

areas,”

there will be any major changes to

student

and safety issues.

resumes, and

"We’ve found a lot of areas between heallh and safety and security that had overlapping

Insurance Board claims,

work placement, and general health

“I sent out

services.

building.” he said, adding he works with exceptional people.

However, he left after a cutback in hours, and began searching for another job.

face

His job entailed keeping track of of accidents, reports, dealing with Workplace Safety statistics

policing.

said the great thing about

code of conduct is a specific action by a student may be a criminal offence but the college can deal with it under the code. "It leaves it a lot more open to try to deal with the behaviour and not just punish the individual," he said. A student may be punished under the code of conduct in several different ways including a conduct agreement, which is a form of pro-

abide by the contract, he will be

Rob Brown, head of

the

of conduct panel meeting where it was decided he would be put on a behavioural contract. If he does not expelled, said

;

he

complete and a diploma to get and it's the job of the college to make that happen, said Brown. "People on occasion make bad

a student code

college

the

as an opportunity to get

said.

Brown

As a result of McDonald attended

with

position

have

at

V,

be watching the

will

the

He

college, and the special investiga-

monetary

strong input," he said.

policing

in

McDonald said under his conit recommends he take anger management and alcoholism counselling

He

security services.

2003, before taking a position Doon campus of Conestoga as health and safety co-ordinator.

es.

for

tract

made, Kobylnik said. "Everyone has input but the residence is college property so if the college wanted something to go a certain way, they would have is

OT

the

recreation centre

at the

'

until

ranging from uniformed work to crime scene investigation, is Conestoga’s head of safety and security servic-

from the

and from attending any licensed events held by Conestoga Students

residence and the college, a decision

banned from

MURPHY

opened up a few years ago with physical resources at the Waterloo campus of Conestoga, and he took

safety and security services. is

and

of safety

Conestoga College has a new head of security. Rob Brown, who has 25 years

A

counselling

"He

new head

at

address.

making threats

Continued from Page 1 was just two drunk kids being

»

(Photo by Tim Murphy)

the

is

By TIM

it

after

-

Security gets a

to

January.

in

instructions

are

Rob Brown

recommen-

a final report and

Davis, which

— .

Conestoga’s

at

The discussion paper, information on upcoming town hall meet-

think the

separate worlds with almost no transferability between

of Tibbits’

town

the

to explain the task force's

"We

created

Part

meetings

dations to the premier

be redesigned. Bill

advisory panel

be attending

be over the

will

think the system, that the

will

make

vision." said Tibbits.

in

A seven-member

of Ontario’s post-sec-

is

located in

Room 2B06


— SPOKE, November

Page 4

1

Commentary

2004

,

Hate shouldn’t be tolerated The president of

the

Canadian Islamic Congress (CIC), who offend-

ed many people with his comment about adult er

making

Israelis,

should consid-

a public apology.

Mohamed Elmasry

appeared on the Oct. 19 Michael Coren Show, an

Ontario current affairs show, as part of a panel discussion on terrorism

and said any

over the age of 18 was a legitimate target for

Israeli

Palestinian suicide

bombers because

adult Israelis are required to serve

in the military.

“They

are part of the Israeli army, even if they have civilian clothes,”

he said.

who is also a professor at the University of Waterloo, many people from the Jewish and Muslim communities who

Elmasry,

offended

were concerned

such a prominent figure would condone the

that

killing of civilians.

news

In a

Elmasry

release

and "misunderstood" and

insisted his

that

remarks were “regrettable”

he was just simply relaying the views of

most Palestinians, not his own personal

beliefs.

Critics find this hard to believe since he

made

similar

comments

in

an interview with the Globe and Mail.

“The use of

word

the

regrettable

is

shameful.

He was

clear in promot-

ing hate and supporting terrorism,” said Frank Dimant. executive vicepresident of a Jewish advocacy group, in an article in the National Post.

The offended groups

are dismissing the explanation as half-hearted

and insincere. They say

demanding

was not an

it

now

outright apology and are

he resign as the president of the CIC.

that

member of the Muslim Canadian Congress, comment “an act of cowardice” in the article.

Tarek Fatah, a founding called Elmasry ’s

"This

his terrible

‘Well,

blame of and he said,

offensive to the Palestinians that he has shifted the

is

mistake and immoral attitude towards Israelis

I’m not saying

this, this is a

sounds like Elmasry

it

Ed Morgan,

national president, is

suggesting

all

said

Palestinians sup-

port terrorism.

Perhaps Elmasry should have thought twice before making those

He

the president of a very influential

is

what he did could

those

comments because

it

of

terrorist activities.

rorism while

its

is

just not

some-

How

can the

CIC

that

CIC, said they adopted

does not permit any form

convincingly endorse anti-ter-

is

so adamant that his

comments do

not reflect his

views, then he should stand up and apologize to the Palestinians also

do not share

have their

own

Or, perhaps

He wrongfully spoke

that belief.

for them.

They

voices and they should be allowed to use them.

CIC’s reputation through the

someone who doesn’t

resign.

alienate a

group of people and go against his

own organization's policies. Hatred between people is bad enough and when someone, especially an influential leader like Elmasry, makes a hateful

comment,

it

department of the largest

corporation in the world, and

for I

I

am

love

Not pushing dogs into

am 20 years am not “a

I

many would

label

me.

jobs and

is

Why am and

getting a college educa-

punk? I

the

young children It’s

bane of the elderly

of

because

I

impressionable

alike?

have a

Yes, despite the fact tain a positive n’t include

Clearly for

try to

baggy jeans, chains and still

bagging

tests,

video

games, or supplying you with the

weekly news important the region,

I

to

my

next dose of heroin and

I

down

anybody would pierce replies, as

I

that’s

and telephone number contacted

name

of the writer. Writers will

and beating

book by

body

she

is

on the

is

amount

the

in

to dress

tattoo

their

body modifica-

about recognizing

inside, regardless of

of

impaled

metal

through their face.

the 1960s could provide.

So, the next time city

self

council, I’m quite regularly inter-

and the

preppy,

engage

This article

Doritos and the lamest $6 movie

acting

dress

to death,

the unique snowflake that every-

ring in her purchase of

While covering Waterloo

it

cover.

its

you

find your-

judging a person with a tattoo

or piercing, keep in mind, there’s

members of council mayor himself. Despite the

more

with

to

them

than

just

their

appearance.

weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College

be

Advertising Manager: Ryan Connell Production Managers: James Clark, Desiree Finhert

Ormston

Spoke Online

Editor:

Circulation Manager:

Kristen

Jennifer

McMurphy Howden

I

f li

for verification.

Photo Editors: Tim Murphy, Kate

No unsigned

letters will be published. be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter

Letters should

Address correspondence to: Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

Editor,

N2G 4M4

Battler

a

d

Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

n

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

for publication.

The

into the street

don’t judge a

similar to a snake, people are people.

why

their ears.

different,

am.

I

tion that turns their tongues into ones

to retort to this

question with an inquiry as to

have commit-

body.

Whether people choose

of a

to her shoulders.

I’m always quick

I

my

complete

in

Without dragging an old cliche

wrists, or

is published and produced

letters to the

should be signed and include the

who

change

com-

woman who reeks

Editor: Jennifer

editor. Letters

hear,

my

the

at

Spoke

welcome

Spoke welcomes

my

I’m regarded as a professional, and my self-expression doesn't

perfume, with earrings dragging

people in

must be beating up old

for

caught

I

at the atrocity

punk,

Oh, well

not studying

your

the question

is

ing from the

be feared.

to

when I’m

shock

combination of gin and dime-store

main-

image, which does-

have

mouth agape,

ted against

who judges my appearance, and who doesn’t. “Why would you do that to your-

her lobes

lip ring. I

once

lip ring,

traffic.

Working in retail and journalism, meet all types of people, young, old, wealthy, poor, famous, and unknown. But it’s amazing just

self?”

parents

me

respect

Honourable Herb Epp staring

The Waterloo Chronicle. teenage punk,” as

who

writer,

around, these

professional abilities as a journalist.

a reporter and photographer

old.

my mind

are people

retail I

budgeting formula professional

the

I,

wrap

can’t

the blue vest.

for

Letters are

in the electron-

people, stealing spoons to prepare

cannot and will not be tolerated.

a complicated

which

an employee

a handgun. I’m

He has already dragged the mud. Maybe it’s time for a new president,

Elmasry should

occasional inane question regarding

at

anybody label such an outstanding young man who holds down two

not the view of

leader says something that supports the very opposite?

Since Elmasry

own who

am

tion a

1

am.

Elmasry

is

thing he has the authority, to do. Valiante, national vice-president of the

I

But why, oh why, you ask, would

every Palestinian and speaking for every Palestinian

an anti-terrorist policy statement after 9/1

that

student

group and saying

affect people’s perception of Palestinians.

made

should not have

Wahida

I

I

"The explanation doesn’t seem satisfactory at all. He’s now saying he’s summed up the views of Palestinians, not his own. That doesn’t seem fair to the Palestinians.”

a journalism

Conestoga College.

ics

The Canadian Jewish Congress

remarks.

am

I

does he know?

in the article

How

widely-held Palestinian view.’

There are a few things

Dr.,

Web

site:

a

s

v

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke a

The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College. Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a MS Word file would be helpful. Letters must not contain any libelous statements.

o

a h d.


News

SPOKE, November

1,

2004

— Page 5

up

Majority of students lather

Although study shows proper techniques are not being used By

ALEXANDRA MASTRONARDI

This

to be

is

sure bacteria

is

A

carry hundreds of germs.

being washed away and not trailing

handle

your hands after going to the bathroom? Fifteen per cent of girls and 7 per cent of boys

up your arm, said Vanderknyff. "Also make sure hands do not come in contact, rinse your hands

tributors in public settings.

who

separately."

Do you wash

1

use the college washrooms

don’t.

Spoke

compiled the

staff

observing people

tics after

statis-

“Make sure

washrooms the week of Oct. 18. It was noted that 62 per cent of girls and 6 per cent of boys wash their

germs

really like to collect

there.”

hands using soap and water after

Connie Vanderkn yff,

facilities.

The remaining 23 per cent of and 22 per cent of boys rinse hands using only water.

girls

their

scary enough, the sur-

If that isn't

vey also shows

that

zero per cent of

sample washes

the

their

hands

using the proper germ-killing techniques.

Connie Vanderknyff, student

ing

19. a nurs-

was

college,

the

at

trained on proper hand washing techniques used in hospitals to protect doctors and nurses from microorganisms. Approach the sink and adjust the

recently

temperature of the water to luke

warm,

is

too hot or too cold

moistening

hands,

15 seconds.

Interlock

and rub the front, back and side of your palms, wrists and forearms five times, said the first-year nursing student. sure to also clean under

your fingernails, germs really

like,

to collect there,” she said.

When

ward motion

Many

public

washrooms today

offer toilet scat covers and automat-

sensor flushing and taps but few have touch-free automatic doors. ic

Vanderknyff said she has wit-

mits bacteria,” she said. is

It

important to avoid touching

tap and door handles because they

HANDWASHING FACTS More than 60 per cent of Conestoga students use soap and water after using the washroom • More than 20 per cent rinse with only water •

100 per cent don’t follow

proper germ-killing

techniques

away make a down-

rinsing soap

washrooms, including the students who didn’t wash their hands. Gross!

nessed students leaving the college

lath-

lingers

sure the water

made contact when exiting the

survey

your elbow and also use your elbow to dispense paper towel. Pat your hands dry, dispose of the paper towel and then use your elbow again to retrieve a fresh piece of paper towel to touch any door handles, said Vanderknyff. "The paper towel must be dry because a wet paper towel trans-

said.

er using plenty of friction for at

"Make

in the

with the handles

After rinsing, turn the tap off

with

wrists

and forearms, apply soap and 10 to

and bathrooms in the college, you have to come in contact with door handles. One hundred per cent of students Ironically, in order to enter

bathrooms without washing their hands properly or at all. With all the germs floating around it can be extremely dangerous. “It

would take only

three days for

a pandemic disease to affect the entire

is trailing in

off of your hands.

with

world, especially

air

travel,” she said.

"Now

that’s scary.”

Ashleigh Latimer,

19, said a lot

of students wash their hands but

most of them

just rinse with water.

“Some people walk

your hands,” she

will dry out

After

least

nursing student

said Vanderknyff.

"If the water it

clean

fingernails,

dis-

exit all the

observed

under your

1

using the college

to

the

in

door

one of the top germ

is

out without

washing their hands at all but they try to do it unnoticed,” she said. “Sometimes it’s hard to get to a sink.”

Whatever a person’s reason for not washing his or her hands, everyone in the public can suffer the conflus

and other

contagious diseases are

commonly

sequences.

Colds,

spread through contact

in

public

places.

So, the next time you use the washrooms, remember, something as simple as washing your hands can greatly reduce the risk of spreading germs around the college.

(Photo by Alexandra Mastronardi)

washroom isn’t the only time you should wash your hands. Experts recommend you also scrub up after handling money and before eating. After using the

Psychic offers glimpse

into future

students given answers that range from sarcastic to surprising By JEN

I

pressed.

Have you ever wanted to know what lies ahead of you? Who you’re going to marry?

gram

in

How many

if

complete your pro-

“He

college?

Allison

“I

where he Sanctuary answered any three questions students wanted to ask him. I was one

stage with Valkos.

on the waited and

As

I

watched him give other students their psychic readings,

I

noticed he

never asked to hold students’ hands or personal possessions to get a

sense of their energy. l

been

I

had never

to a psychic before but

didn't think Valkos

I

just

seemed very

professional.

During

my reading, Valkos, wear-

Simpell,

guess he’s

another

maybe

However, Leanne (Photo by Justin Bastin)

to get

else.” first-

if

she

for real, but

I

don’t know.”

of those students.

was able

anything

She also said she wasn’t sure

Valkos, a psychic entertainer,

I

me

believes him.

the

utes before

tell

have been guessed by

year public relations student, said she thought Valkos was too vague.

answered for free. Conestoga Students Inc. invited

waited in line for about 30 min-

Valkos and what

didn't really

someone

tions

I

in

her.

that couldn't

the opportunity to have their ques-

to

she believes

he said to

Many people have questions about their future and on Oct. 19 students at Conestoga College had

Dan

first-year public

Brenna Flynn, a

relations student, said she isn't sure

children you will have? Will you

successfully

my psychic reading. However, wasn't the only person unim-

with

GALHARDO

First-year journalism student Leanne Stelker gets her fortune from visited the Sanctuary on Oct. 19. ing

all

black,

was almost slouched

practically

danced around my compliments and

in his chair

questions with

to joke with

very broad answers. The three questions

and immediately began me. This set me at ease, because I was a little nervous that he might know what I was thinking

at the

moment.

During my reading, Valkos was very vague and never really

answered

my questions directly. He

Valkos were: Will

What

will I

do

I

asked I be successful?

after college? Will

there be any big surprises in

my

Valkos, a psychic that

didn’t give

me

any answers

any of you reading this couldme. He also gave me some answers as a joke that actually that

n’t give

scared

me

half to death.

They

defi-

were not answers a young girl like myself wanted to hear, since they were about an unplanned nitely

As

She said Valkos told her she was on the right path in her career. “I was pretty convinced,” she “He seemed to really know said. what he was doing.” ing.

pregnancy.

life?

He

Dan

Stelker, a first-

year journalism student, said she was pleased with her psychic read-

a result,

I

was disappointed

may be the real thing, but wouldn’t go to him for another reading. I think I’d rather wait and Valkos

I

see what

my

opposed

to

future holds for

me

as

going to some stranger

for answers.


— SPOKE, November

Page 6

1

News

2004

,

Conestoga’s got a star Business management student By STEPH BAULK

finals in

he was absolutely speechless after

London.

Adam

management

Conestoga College's

student,

good singer, but I think Sachi also had what it took to win the competi-

doing two different types of genres,

first

ever CSI

Sachi

Idol winner.

than 200 students crowded

when

into the

Sanctuary to watch the two

Franklin, then slowed

Idol finalists battle

first

place in the competition on

it

this

testants

CSI

event, the

two con-

sang two songs of their

hopes of impressing the judges and winning the grand prize of $500 of recording time at Cyber Audio Studios, a trip for two to Quebec City and a chance to reprechoice

sent

in

Conestoga

at

the

I

down

it

with

got a

Will Always

said.

had

other competitors in order to into the Idol final.

worth

it

But

for Fridenburg,

it

who

to

is

what

“I’ve

chance

Fridenburg said he plans to use his

time with Cyber

recording

Audio Studios

to

Torn Between,

who

take his band.

he has been

“I

apart in

everybody else’s eyes. Jiminez said she thought the event went really well.

was very surprised at the numwho were interested, since it was the first time we ever did this, but I was really happy with "I

ber of people

audience was really

Jiminez said she was not only happy with the participation of those

the fact that they did

involved in the competition but with

you just you want to

Idol said

be confident

to

if

real-

you can sing and you’re I think you should give it

if

a lot of respect, he said.

“I think the

good with

really respect

were coming from,” he said. Master T said he thought it was Fridenburg’s song choices that gave him the slight edge over

competition.

their first song.

Master

T

got on

stage and talked about what he

was

it was like MuchMusic. The VJ said it was hard to judge the competition coming into it at

doing now, and what

working (Photo by Steph Baulk)

the CSI Idol

for

the very end, but the judges did a

of the first-ever

good job paring two vocalists.

I

it

down

to the last

was surprised with it just shows we mature crowd of stu1

but

spirit,

have a really

dents this year.” it

was

really difficult

“There was so much talent," she said. “And honestly, going into it and right until the end, didn't

something

presenting

is

more unique,” said the was a really close com-

that’s a little it

and

that’s

the thing that

everyone has to understand.” He said he would definitely come back to Conestoga next year to help

judge the next CSI Idol

competition. “I think the Idol

final

good

Adam

petition

After the two finalists performed

“Personally, the

judging the competition right from,

a try.”

Conestoga.

audience participation as well.

tough to do what Adam did without a full band, and I think

VJ. “But

for the competition

she said.

Jiminez said

Keller.

confident,

at

where the performers

“It’s

with yourself as well,” he said.

speaker for the

ifi

anything else though,” he said.

him

set

it,”

Master T, a former MuchMusic video jockey (VJ), came to Conestoga as a guest judge and

i;

of every-

what

showed

dent

FjISEpiE;

in front

the intermission then

think that's

said Fridenburg. “It’s going to be

Nichole Jiminez, CSI events programmer, Steve Wagner, of Cyber Audio Studios, and Trudy Kowan, a dance teacher and stu-

Idol winner.

was probably more nervous

performance across the board,

never wavering," said Wagner.

College or university crowds are

The judges

CSI

a nice

from

he has given a consis-

traditionally tough crowds, but they

included

title

was

it

title.

lines, but

with some pretty catchy stuff,”

"But

on Oct. 20. Fridenburg took home the

his first

few

a

now and we’ve come up

istic

final

“I

body during

be a singer and performer. “I mean, you also have to be

in

was

change.

record a couple of their songs.

have

place

“He flubbed

time being a judge for a competition at a college so

was consistency

it

brought him the CSI Idol

tent

said this

about speaking

The new CSI

first

said

start to finish

with for about two years now, and

things started.”

out for

Steve Wagner,

T

that long.

Fridenburg’s performances that

in

Cyber Audio Studios

Master

tough to get a lot of songs recorded in the time we have, but at least we’ll get a demo out there and maybe send it out to a couple of producers or venues and get

it

board.”

to get

out there.”

it

But if he’s got the determination and the drive then I think he can be successful.”

performance across the

been with a band and

of this business and

spit out

haven't even been in

Wagner

“I’ve been with the boys for a

Fridenburg, 20, battles

he

start to finish

we’ve been practising and practic-

while

Adam

“From

a couple of years now,” he

for, for

all

said

up and

been looking

I’ve

takes a lot of determination,”

“It

I

has given us a consistent honoured

success.

the recording time.

ing, just looking for a

make

was

won

is

ing, said if he sticks with it he might have what it takes to be a big

he said. “Tve seen people chewed

but both were really great.”

second

places, she’s

of talent," he said. “I’m just

lot

"This

to audition,

and then compete against eight it

go

Fridenburg said he

it

finalists

for her to get

so happy to have won.”

ner of the competition.

end,

And even

think she’s going to

have

in the

The two

regional

tion. I

was Fridenburg who showed he was no loser, after it was announced he was the winBut

Oct. 20.

For

singing Respect by Aretha

Whitney Houston’s Love You.

out for

a

her stuff

Keller strutted

More CSI

"I think

to

is

thought they both had very

unique and distinct personalities,” he said. “They were obviously

the competition

offer when he sang Loser by Three Doors Down, and That’s Life by Frank Sinatra.

Fridenburg, a 20-year-old

"I

Idol winner

was over. I’m a good performer and

Fridenburg showed what he had business

CSI

first

just going to

competition

grow and keep

is

get-

and bigger and that’s something I would like to be a part of,” said Master T. Wagner, of Cyber Audio Studios, said as soon as he saw Fridenburg and Keller perform he knew they would be in the finals. “They have an amazing presting bigger

“Adam’s got a voice

ence,” he said. that projects ty shines

and Sachi’s personali-

through into her music.”

Wagner,

who

will

help

Fridenburg with his studio record-

the

start.

-I

know who would

win.”

Jiminez said since the event went so well this year CSI has decided to

make

it

an annual event.

“Next year I'm pretty sure we’ll have more people audition now

how it works,” we can only get

that they’ve seen

she said. “But

so I’m hoping to have more people participate so we can better,

have

groups

bigger

in

Nichole

Campus

said

regional

week of March,

held the third the

the

Idol competition will be

University

of

“I’ll

know

more information

give out

soon as

I

have

they’re

it,"

still

At parfciiBits McDonald':’ Restaurants in Canada. Not vaid with any other offer. Sandwich offers

ttSM McDonald's

working on

details.”

may

plus tax

vary by rsrtaurant

Restaurarts of Canada limited, for die exclusive use of McDonald's Restaurants of Canada limited

and

its

franchisees,

Pm

as

she said. “But

Big craving. Small budget. l

in

London.

Sill

Everyday

at

Western

|Pip Slip

A McDeaP

each

round.”

lovin’

it

1

the


News

Much By

RYAN CONNELL

and

wife

his

ried to for

One of Canada’s most wellknown VJs continues to leave his mark he's

in

today's pop culture, even

no longer standing

in front

if

of

the camera.

Tony Young, known by today’s youth as the dreadlocked Master T. has played an important role in opening Canada’s eyes to the world of urban music. Young was one of

MuchMusic’s tape operators go on

air as a

VJ

in

1990, where,

became the host and producer for shows such as RapCity. Da Mix and X-tendamix. Young visited Conestoga College as a guest judge for the CSI Idol competition on Oct. 20. Halfway through the competition. Young did he

a

later

half hour question-and-answer

period

with

the

audience

1

he has been mar-

5 years.

months after left, felt really depleted and exhausted but just had to pick myself back up and six

I

1

1

in

MuchMusic.

that’s

institute

College

in

for “x’

time," he said. his

Spice

ly asked r

him

for

prior

to

being interviewed.

However, he said

when meeting

his

most

her,

my

the

at

son was

two and her daughter was two," he

from

departure

to

music indus-

said during his speech to students in

“You could

the Sanctuary. a change in

really see

Madonna because when

experience

great

left,

I

months

felt really

after

I

depleted

for

me

because

she’s such a high-profile person.”

However, Young hasn't enjoyed of the interviews he has done

all

and exhausted but just had to pick myself back up and focus.” I

and remained at the station until August 200 when he bid farewell 1

such as

over the years.

“My least favourite had to be Mariah Carey because I have never seen anyone with so high mainte-

Tony Young,

nance,” he laughed. “Her manage-

former MuchMusic VJ

Mariah wanted me her and talk before the interview, and she has this thing where you can only shoot her on

a blow-out goodbye bash with

the then-pregnant

Lauryn Hill. Young said there are two very

'

you have kids, your life is not about you anymore, and I think it was a

“For six

his job at

artists

Janet

Eminem and the Girls, who specifical-

'Jackson,

time,

a year after graduating

performances from

made him pop-

artists like

over to a larger audience and

Hamilton for television

for

was

he

known After

to

memorable interview was with Madonna. “I think it was what crossed me

try.

Kitchener collegiate graduate went to Mohawk

VJ

a

that

what you've amount of

do

his favourite

being

was

to

to so many different genof music. His relaxed method of

mcHi

43-ycar-old

in

about

ular with

Moving to Kitchener from England when he was young, the

He landed

become a VJ. Young said one of

res

stay connected to the

his past at

interviews and a

interviewing artists

the

ment said

to sit

dif-

that

down with

ferent stories about his departure

In 2002. he signed with Virgin

from MuchMusic but he essentially felt the station was going through a transitional phase in seeking a younger audience. “It hurt at the time (when I left), because you've been there for 17

her ‘good side’ so she wouldn’t look at me straight on.” Since Young has left MuchMusic, he admitted he doesn’t watch the

years but that doesn't necessarily

Music Canada to release two Master T-branded compilation albums with reggae and urban vibes. More recently his company, Fullstedd Productions, produced and directed a Sean Paul DVD called Duttyology that was released

mean

in

August. Young has also pub-

because of his intelligence, confidence and his ability to handle him-

they can't get rid of

you" he

VJ

exposed

your

tions about himself

MuchMusic

high-profile

breakdown of 10 things

MuchMusic

MuchMusic, Young continued

broadcasting.

his

way that's

— Page 7

book written by artist Shaggy. The book includes some of

things

because been

for

2004

1,

to his

focus. It’s as if you’re going through a rebirthing process in a

Sanctuary, answering various ques-

and

word

for six

years before he ever had the chance to

"For

Much

after

life who

SPOKE, November

said.

lished

Leaving MuchMusic gave Young more time to spend with his family

ECW One

his

own biography from Much Master T:

Press called

VJ’s Journey, with the fore-

much anymore

station

favourite

VJ on

George

self.

the

but

station

his is

(Photo

Campanelli

predicts that will

VJ Rick

leave the station

Connell)

.

by the end of the

year, after being

ers

Since

Young

he’s said

MuchMusic,

left

he doesn't miss the

intensity of the job

and

that lie’s

very comfortable where he

now

is

right

enjoying the admir-

in his life,

he

still

“One of

there for 10 years.

Stroumboulopoulos

Young

By Ryan

Former MuchMusic VJ Tony Young, known by many as Master T, hasn’t stopped working in the music industry since he left the station in 2001 He has since produced two albums, a Sean Paul DVD, and has written his own biography. has.

the biggest things that

me when

kids say to to

me

is

that they

they walk up grew up watching

me,” Young smiled, “and

I

say to

them. 'Look, well you turned out alright.’”

Get cheap seats from the alumni By BRE NT

GERHART

"It raises a little bit

Williams, “but

The Alumni Association of Conestoga College is helping students, staff and alumni save money by selling discounted tickets. They include Cineplex and Galaxy theatre tickets, which cost $7.50 for adults and $5 for children, and Ontario Science Centre tickets, which cost $15 for adults, $1 1 for youth and seniors and $8 for children. Chicopee ski lift tickets will be available soon as well. Margie. Williams, development and alumni relations assistant, said the Chicopee Ski Hill tickets should be coming within the next

tickets

for as

$55 gate

They

little

during

as $29,

the

which

price.

also sold tickets for Ontario

Place and the African Lion Safari

over the summer.

at the

theme

Musical Mocktails event held

in

Williams said the money from ticket sales

c

a

i

l

i

goes into an alumni assoo n

Although the alumni association has sold tickets for many years, on Sept. 1 they hoped to start benefiting from their success by implementing a new source fee of 50 cents or $1 per ticket, depending on which is purchased.

ticket prices

“The

by $1.

theatres

now have

war going on

ticket

said

Williams,

ours,

it's

a

in

movie

we lowered

“so

little bit

a

the city,”

of a better deal

and from there it can go to sup-

than

port

bad weather increases the movie tickets. “It seems that if there was a crummy weekend, we would sell a lot of movie tickets on the Friday," said Williams, “but they do seem to

account

the

alum-

association

Williams

supports.

the

who

be pretty steady.”

has been with the

weather has

impacted

the

sales.

"The weather was this year," said

crummy “We did-

pretty

Williams.

have that many hot days, so people weren't dying to go to Ontario Place or Wonderland.” n’t

Williams said the Cineplex and Galaxy movie tickets have become the most popular item. “Wonderland used to be the ticket,” said popular most Williams, “but

Galaxy

I

movie

think

now

tickets

they’re year-round, and pretty

good

the

tickets,

Home Award

Williams,

unlike

said

sales of

and anything ni

was.”

Wonderland and Ontario Place

Welcome else the

it

Williams

2003, said she thinks ticket sales were higher last year and believes

the

First-year student Justin LeClair plays the Mario Bros,

commu-

Williams said the alumni associalowered their movie

tion recently

on different things.”

Last year Chicopee tickets cost $18 for a four-hour lift pass. The alumni association also Canada’s offered Paramount

w^s sometimes $25 cheaper than

song on the bongo drum residence on Oct. 19.

alumni and the college

nity to get a deal

alumni association since January

Wonderland

Bongo boy

of money,” said

mostly a service

few weeks.

summer

(Photo by Alexandra Mastronardi)

for

it's

deal.”

it’s

the

because you get a

The alumni association sold 459 Paramount Canada’s Wonderland Lion Safari Bingcman's Water Park tickets and 1,279 Galaxy and Cineplex tickets, for a total of tickets,

175 African

tickets, 18

1

,93

1

tickets this year.

Tickets can be purchased

Alumni Association

<at

the

office on the

second floor of the Student Client Services Building or the CSI office and can be paid for by cash a cheque made out to the Alumni Association of Conestoga

or

College. If students, staff or alumni have any questions they are asked to phone Margie Williams at 748-

5220

ext. 3463, or e-mail mwilliams@conestogac.on.ca.

at


:

Page 8

— SPOKE, November

1

,

2004

Conestoga Students

Inc. Presents...

Jamie Blyth From Televisions “The Bachelorette” with Trista

Thursday Nov. 4th 11:30am

-SANCTUARY'

SOUND TECHNICIAN/DISC JOCKEY The CSI requires a Part Time Sound Technician/D. J. from September 2004 to May 2005 to manage and maintain all Sound Equipment including the DJ Booth itself and operate the equipment during all CSI Events.

INTERNATIONAL

,

,

The hours vary according to an outlined events schedule but mainly take place Monday to Thursday 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. You will also be required Thursday nights at least once a month from 9:00 p.m. - 1:00 a.m. for CSI Pub Nights.

STUDENT EXCHANGE CARDS

,

Requirements •

Organized, flexible, & responsible

Computer

• •

Literate Prior experience with a sound board/mixer Working knowledge of different audio/video/data cables

& connectors •

Ability to hook up various A/V equipment including (but not limited to): microphones, CD/DVD players,

computer/network, power amps

The ISE Card was created as a

way

to help those

who were

traveling to be able to

save some money by receiving special discounted rates at

%

overseas locations simply by

Preferred Assets: • • • • •

Member

of A/V crew in high school Experience with a lighting board In Broadcasting or related field In Electronics Engineering or related field Experience as a DJ, sound tech, camera crew

presenting their card! ,

TV/Radio

station, etc... • • •

Able to neatly wrap cables so they don't end up in knots Ability to use a soldering iron Able to climb our ladder to aim lights, change bulbs,

change

If

gels, etc.

AVAILABLE AT THE CSI OFFICE

you are interested in this position please send your to Nichole Jiminez njiminez@conestogac.on.ca at the CSI office.

resume

-CABDSL

CARDS'

cards:


News

Bringing

SPOKE, November

1,

2004

— Page 9

warmth

people

to the

on the

street

Students hand out care packages to help the homeless this winter By JENNIFER

HOWDEN

one who wanted to donate items and by p.m. many people had 1

When

snow begins

the

to fall

most people head inside to avoid the cold. But what about those people who don’t have a place to go-

Christina Marshall, a secondyear broadcasting student, is determined to help those people.

Marshall,

has

23.

goes to show what you such a short amount of lime. You can have an idea, put it into motion and have so many people supporting it. It’s amaz“It just

can do

ter.

ing," Marshall said.

so cold.

I

show what in

amount

such a

of time.

can have an

You

let

idea, put

it

motion and have so

into

many people it.

supporting

amazing.”

It’s

don’t like standing

and freezing

outside

to

you can do

collecting blankets

is

and warm winter clothes to make care packages and then personally hand deliver the packages to the people living on the streets. “It kind of sucks out there and it's

goes

just

“It

short

Marshall

in

started

Warmth to help homeless warm this win-

Project: Pass the

keep the

already signed up.

(Photo by Jennifer Howden)

Marshall

alone

people stay

Marshall got the idea of handing

around

Toronto

with her People would come up to her asking for money but the concern that they would spend the money on unhealthy things stopped Marshall from giving

boyfriend

them

ing

last year.

Each care bundle

will

have

in

it

a jacket, a sweater or other articles of clothing

and a few cans of

food.

Marshall also plans on getting toothbrushes and toothpaste from the dollar store and adding them Instead of just handing the care packages out in a box, each package will come in a backpack made by Marshall. The backpacks will be made out of rope which,

year after three of her classmates

things with

decided to do a documentary on the homeless. Working on the

go,” she said.

documentary really opened their eyes to the problem and Marshall decided to put her idea into

supplies to dles

but

action.

make

20.

really

toOAYWAV C

according to Marshall,

is

an old

“This

way

they can take their

remembrance

In

The goal

is

to collect

make

enough

at least six

bun-

Marshall thinks they might even get enough supplies to

Nov.

This is not the first time Marshall has been involved with a charity project. She helped organ-

Fees:

thought that

maybe

idea that

I’ve

ize a toy drive for the Salvation

the

had could actually work. all

pitched

my

in,

come

idea could

Army which had more

always

to

If

little life.”

Christina Marshall,

“I

was inspired and thought

maybe

the

little

idea

that

that I’ve

always had could actually work,” she said. “If little

we

idea could

all

pitched

come

in,

my

to life.”

Her classmates were

all

for the

idea.

On Oct. 21, a sign-up sheet was posted outside the broadcasting classrooms

at

donated within the first week. She has also volunteered her time with the Girl Guides and helped pick up garbage. Marshall hopes to get in contact with Reaching Our Outdoor Friends (ROOF), a non-profit

committed

to

lunchtime for any-

care of the homeless this winter. Donations of old clothes, blankets,

hats,

mitts

Project: Pass the

dropped off

and food

for

Warmth can be

at the television stu-

Room 4B18. anyone has any suggestions of what to put in the care bundles or if they just want to get involved, dio in If

they can contact Marshall through

e-mail

at

12,

2004

reflections

of support, kindness, harmony, peace

tolerance.

None Prizes:

$150— $100—$50. Rules:

realm_37@hotmail.com.

must be the original work of the Each entrant may submit 2 photos.

All photographs

Submit your entries,

entrant.

“Photography Contest,”

based on the photograph’s Judging emotional impact as well as composition, originalwill be

the

well-being of homeless youth, to see how she can help them take

student

at Ecole Polytechnique in Montreal

than 600

toys

organization

second-year broadcasting

1989

Current students of Conestoga College may enter photographs promoting the theme, Positive Relationships, and all it encompasses, including

kets.

and

Dec. 6,

Entries:

and

inspired

women who died

Deadline:

help the better,” she said.

and second-

of the

them wherever they

ing in their old clothes and blan-

told her classmates

as well as the first-

we

rvamrp

hiker’s trick.

year broadcasters about her idea and asked them to help by bring-

little

0L<2A{)AVtC<l

(SoyfiZeArt

“There are more than six people living on the streets right now who can desperately use the packages and the more people we can

She quickly

was

to collect

this winter.

a blanket, a toque, a pair of mitts,

wanted to do was give them food and a blanket to keep them warm. "I mentioned to my boyfriend that I really wished I could just make up care packages and give them instead,” she said. That idea came up again this

“I

warm

to the bundle.

any.

What she

Pass the Warmth. Marshall hopes

Project:

sleeping out there,” she said. out the care packages while walk-

shows off some of the items donated to enough items to help at least six homeless

Christina Marshall, a second-year broadcasting student,

ity

and technical

quality.

and white or colour, and taken must be submitted as 4” x 6” prints. All entries will become the property of the Women’s Resource Group and winning entries will be published in Spoke and announced on CJIQ. Entries can be black

with a

35mm or digital camera, but

clearly labelled to:

Student Services

Room 2B04 All entries must include the student’s

name, student ID number, Program, e-mail address and phone number.

Women's Hesonree Group


Page 10

— SPOKE, November

1

,

2004

O t STU i

IVf Or^DA.'r

i

x r* DENTS r-\

r™

iv

i

TUESDAY MEPNESI7A V THUffSiJAY

3

®a

r

m

\

M

j® is Sss i

vi

fi' JL/ IS /VI

f® 'ku i

F=f?xc?A r

|^

<V;

11:30am

from tie

mt-mm umm

®AC0ELORETTE Witlt TRISTA

imms

S

COMBPlAn PETE zenA£H£P 11 50 AM SiHi fe?

:

mmmm

_

\

17 ®|

-'3,

W

fv

m

S '

SNA KB AND JOEY FROM SO'S

AAMO 0 O'S

i

THROW SACK wegK

:*:«

1 1

:

30AM

30

'


1

Travel

ORMSTON

communication next

rational

to

nealh the conservative long brown

impossible.

This

fourth

the

is

of

part

Jennifer's travel series recounting

of her summer vacation to

tales

When

Eastern Europe.

she

left off,

her tour group was departing from

Moscow.

I

coat and coke-bottle glasses

would have found scene

entire

comical

if

I

the

was

quite

say

would be an understatement

my mood was

Ukraine.

viewed

1

her

homeland.

During

in line.

the

drive to our

The

stop

first

she

official

spoke into a

Kyiv,

into

destinations,

from

Ukraine, nor was

I

about

my

1

cursed myself for forgetting

allergy pills, generally reserved

for Ontario’s

my

focus back to the

cathedral,

the

white and hunter

green building looked more like a

overly interest-

my

And.

if

lied

was

father

rattling

was disappointed

I

sound

the

currency.

you

neck, feeling

to smell the fresh scent of

my

where nearby.

although

on

until

I

did not recognize

I

of

the

instrument

was vaguely reminis-

it

cent of a harpsichord.

excess of $2,000 would be con-

fiscated.

its

pink

heard music faintly playing some-

Ukrainian law, cash

to

my

my

head.

about,

to declare their

and

the lush

shaded by

tightened

I

13

roof of course.

its

heavily

trees,

foliage

into the country.

Each person had

than a typical

the onset of a nasty cold brewing in

could have cost us our entry

According

home

pashmina around

1

the

again, customs proved to be

medications

ragweed season.

Turning

many

an obstacle for our tour group, one

in

With watery eyes and a runny

nose

Unable

that

hunted through

pointed to a blossoming chestnut

ed.

Once

I

As we wandered around

Chornobyl

much

While

purse for some tissues Larissa

premises,

the

know

my

like

nuclear disaster and chicken Kyiv, didn't

was overcome by a sneez-

I

gold domes on

Budapest and Prague.

Aside

1

house of worship, minus the

merely a stopover on route to more exciting

— Page

2004

,

large country'

sojourn as

this

Kyiv,

ing attack.

tree.

indifferent as our

descended

plane

to

pas-

about

sionate

had

been

not

woman,

a kind

surly It

1

A STOP WORTH MAKING

KYIV, By JENNIFER

SPOKE, November

We

on your

to

followed the melodious tunes

man

a clearing where an old

declaration form and unauthorized

with dishevelled ivory hair sat on a

medicine or money was found

park bench, his fingers plucking

one

of

frequent

the

through tourists’ luggage,

in

searches it

be seized immediately.

No one vast

in

sums of

we were

cash; however, with in

various age groups,

heavily

stocked

with

Fran Condon, a 50s.

was

New Yorker in her

the first to

She admitted pain

reliever.

walk the plank.

to carrying Vioxx, a

The

gruff officials

her to display the

forced

pills,

which they poured on the counter, rubbed between their fingers and

Although Fran

tried her best to

explain the necessity of the ication. the

Women

Larissa told us

decla-

al

ration

form

and

smugly

asked.

med-

language barrier made

crackling

m icrophone

“Do you any

gifts

from

I

was

slightly

I

to the bribery- attempt

don't

played

and

official,

have any friends I

dow Finally,

time more forcefully.

Ukraine,”

excitement,

said, “I

was

I

in the

said with wide eyes and

Our

local

early 60s, put

all-business

ground

guide,

Sviridova, a dour

an innocent smile. ‘Tve never even

burial

through,

member of the group

although each

been here before.”

monastery, which have served as a deceased monks for more than 700 years.

let

woman

Larissa in

her

on the facade of an

attitude,

but under-

I

gant,

my

peered from

to see a beautiful

church

1

unlike

the

win-

1th century

was

in the distance. It

coloured

experienced similar hassles.

ornate,

cathedrals

ele-

multi-

scattered

As we emerged from St.

was a

tradition-

by blind travelling min-

played strels.

The bandurist displayed deep emotion as he performed. With

hummed

his

the tunes

and swayed back and forth

to the

rhythm. After listening for a while, enjoying a break

from the quick pace our

group

was

placed

some crumpled hryvnya

keeping,

everyone

(Ukrainian currency) in his ban-

across Russia.

eager to see

it

the bus,

Sophia’s Cathedral,

one of the most famous

sites

in

dura case and then headed for the exit.

Continued on Page 12

(Photo by Jennifer Ormston)

are required to cover their heads before entering the

at the

had

Ukrainian bandura, historically

eyes closed he

As her voice hastened with

dumb

know what you mean."

“Are you sure?” said the this

front

foreign accent obscure.

confused

although not naive, so

the

seat of the bus, her

for

your Ukrainian friends?”

“1 don’t

even went so far as to smell.

caves

my

have

drugs.

I

never seen. reviewed

our group was carry ing

seven people

the strings of an instrument

would

for

Above, the breathtaking Assumption Cathedral is on the grounds of the monastery, Top photo, a musician at St. Sophia’s Cathedral enthralls passersby with his bandura playing.


— SPOKE, November

Page 12

1

Travel

2004

,

KYIV IS A HISTORY LOVER’S PARADISE Continued from Page 1 Near the church there was an obscure cement statue; the shape of a cross was hollowed at its centre and the silhouette of a body within a larger body filled the empty spaced was astounded when

were forced to make the journey we had embarked on, knowing

Larissa explained the significance

memory

of the monument, erected

each step they took brought them

one step closer

in

an

1932 to 1933. The Irish Potato Famine I had heard of, but this was new to

from

famine

artificial

From

afar

menorah

at

showed us where

forced

upon famine by restricting

a

Ukrainians access

the

my

again,

their

thereby killing

grain,

to

eyes welled with tears,

but this time

knew

I

it

was not

because of the chestnut blooms.

approximately seven million peo-

As my group trudged towards

ple.

snapped a few pictures Larissa herded the group back onto the bus. We were on a tight schedule and she clearly had no patience for my dawdling. An ancient

While

dating

immobile

my

were

women

our group

required to cover their (Photo by Jennifer Ormston)

ground and pray in the beauteous Assumption Cathedral. did not think the monastery’s

gender-discriminatory rules were fair, but I complied, eager to see what lurked in the caves.

we made

our way

shrouds

An

monks at

when

remains

wrapped

in

of

I

saw the

skeletal

and

skulls

hands

through the flickering candlelight.

When we

finally

re-emerged into

the open, the fresh air

come

relief

was

a wel-

from the musty cata-

combs.

The monastery

Liberty.

rupted sleep.

unbeat-

able views of the Dnieper River

clutching

stretched

a

My “We

My head cold began

in

my

I

and the

began to

to

the

lightheaded as

slightly

felt

ears,

I

very spot only a half century

down

residential area.

I

ing

bubble bath,

slipped into

I

heard

I

glanced

who

Instead of soaking in a bath though,

an hour to hear her say we were about to walk down the path more than 100,000 people took to their deaths during the Second World

War.

Instantly

my mind was

cleared of self-indulgent thoughts

lay in bed, rested

my

tired eyes

and contemplated how interesting my day had been.

My

thoughts turned to gratitude

had been granted many others had incomprehensible pain

for the security in life,

I

while so

endured and sorrow. I had a restless sleep

that night.

My

stomach tightened as Larissa recounted a tale of gruesome genocide. Jews, gypsies and others undesirable to the Third Reich

Pick up a copy of next week’s

Spoke

as

Jennifer

arrives

in

Budapest.

we

realized

middle of a

the sidewalk,

dull, run-

-

I

I felt

my

eyes water-

could not escape the dread-

ed chestnut trees!

the scent of lavender soap filling

Next

as

window and

in the

30,000 Jews

While the group reconvened on

daydream about returning where I envisioned

in a luxurious

was not enthused

of the

about allergies and head colds.

be making one more

were

I

hotel

the room.

will

out the

was

sinuses

the

Larissa say in a muffled voice.

bringing on an acute headache. I

from

bus’s microphone system.

long

after the

to take a debilitating toll

congestion

was abruptly cut

stop today at Babi Yar,”

was exhausted

day of touring.

fantasy

short by deafening static

shield

children below.

myself offered

my

My usually bubbly cohorts were somber as we retraced our steps back to the bus. Just as planned I spent the evening quietly in my room. I

warm flannel pajamas, snuggled under the sheets of my roomy kingsize bed and had a long, uninter-

I

my

memory

of Kyiv, in

and the imposing Mother Ukraine statue, which was vaguely reminiscent of New York’s Statue of

and sword instead of a torch, towered over Kyiv from a hill, guarding the

went down

chill

lost

Mother Ukraine, her hands out-

nearly every turn.

eerie

spine

lay

menorah stands by Babi Yar, a ravine outside their lives there during the Second World War.

giant

light

uneven rocks and through narrow twisted corridors. The remains of ancient

A

down

were our only

Candles source as

of birds and

ago.

heads.

Today, the monks reside above

chirping

the

in this

enter this sacred area

to

into the

echoed had trouble grasping the enormity of what had happened in

day in May because on the grounds of the monastery were caves where the monks originally had lived and, subsequently, where members of the brotherhood were buried;

rejoined

rustling of leaves underfoot

chilly

women were

I

down

ingly undisturbed and peaceful.

sporting scarves on that

all

the

heavy,

like

bricks. Curiosity finally

group, staring

As in

felt

leafy ravine that appeared surpris-

next on the itinerary.

Luckily the

legs

prevailed over fear and

was

1051,

to

my

gorge,

I

monastery,

the

Nazis ordered the prisoners to remove their clothes and jewelry before heading for the ravine. Once

an attempt to

erode Ukrainian nationalism, had

I

of the Jews

Larissa Stalin, in

could see a giant

I

the

fire.

me.

She said

brutal

end of the path in who had perished. Behind the religious symbol a forest concealed Babi Yar, the ravine in which the victims were shot by systematic machine-gun

mem-

in

ory of Ukrainian lives lost

their

to

demise.

Half-heartedly

my

I

turned

my

tion to Larissa for the first

atten-

time

in

(Photo by Jennifer Ormston) (Photo by Jennifer Ormston) St.

Sophia’s Cathedral

as a meeting place

is

the oldest church

for politicians

in Kyiv,

dating to 1037.

and was once a school and

The

library.

building

has also been used

Countless monks roam the grounds of Pecherskaya Lavra in Kyiv. “Pechera” means caves and “lavra” describes a large or significant monastery.


!

News

SPOKE, November

— Page 13

2004

1,

Learning more with learning groups Not

just for

struggling students By PAIGE HILTON

group and they can sit and listen," Turner said. “They might not have to be speaking up or putting in their

dents with the problems or con-

own

cerns they have with their courses.

ing process,” he said.

Haskett said he likes helping stu-

feedback, but just listening

and taking

what the group

in

“I know how frustrating it can be when there arc things you don’t

dis-

is

cussing.”

Peer-supported learning groups can be beneficial, not just for stuto

learning groups promote discussion and learn from reviewing and processing course material, Turner

study

pointed out, rather than students

dents struggling with a course, but for stronger students

brush up on some for an

exam.

asking

“What we’re to students is

dents

who need

skills or

who

trying to get across it

isn’t just

It's

for

anyone who just come and review the It’s

wants to

for

who

are struggling with

said, but students

one

is

of

in

Conestoga’s

tireless cafeteria

who

workers

orders throughout the day.

in the

course

who are may also

to go.

“What they can add to the group they do have a good understand-

brow

lift.

the

students think about

how

it’s

free!”

The format learning groups based on

the mate-

arc

very similar to those

is

in universities, Turner said, and have been successful with Conestoga students. Turner said peer services has col-

course can be learned

in their

rial

and

tage. That,

Turner said learning groups help

used

and what study techniques can work for them. Informal study groups with class-

leader with his or her schoolwork

attended

said.

as well.

we’re doing

trained peer tutor tate

is

is

years that has

a

shown

students

who

higher marks than their counter-

there to facili-

and share his or her own expe-

who

parts

chose not to go. a few percentages,

"Even by

riences within the course.

they’re doing better because they

Learning groups can help the

the it,

group. That's

why

so they can do bet-

alter-

Harley Haskett, a second-year

who

business administration and mar-

Peer-supported learning groups

may only need to review the w'ork, who prefer working and learning

keting student, said being a leader

of a learning group has helped him

began running the week of Oct. 4 and finish the week of Dec. 6. They

with a group.

with team-oriented work

“Some people do not want to make the commitment to work

courses.

with a tutor for a set period of time,

interesting challenge

it

them the

gives

flexibility to

as needed. (Others

may)

feel

in his

ter,”

own

also

will

run during

the

winter

semester.

thought

“I just

would be an

it

(because)

For the learning groups schedule,

more information about attending study groups or becoming a peer

it

more of an idea what it’s be a teacher, even though

gives you like to

said Turner.

I’m just here to

and study group leader, peer services in Room 2B04. tutor

facilitate the learn-

visit

Paige

bombarded by images media of beautiful, thin,

Girls are in

casually

attended learning groups achieved

is

they learn from the others in the

need a makeover, and I’m not talking about a nip and tuck or an eye-

talk

to figure out the

peer-supported learning groups

come

models

expertise,” she said.

try

what we're hoping will happen,” said Turner. "Everybody can learn from one another.” Learning groups are aimed at high-risk courses where there are a lot of requests for tutoring. Turner

so role

share their

and

it

which

or

Young women's

they can

about

lected data over the last couple of

so they’re

native to tutoring for students

than skin deep

more relaxed. “You can sit and

(about

adding their perspective on things,

course),

Study groups also act as an

Beauty more

suggestions

handle course material).

know

already

males or friends work, too. Turner said, but the added advantage of

(of the

ing

Duby

their

to

who

prised of people

“That’s probably the main advan-

is

repeatedly rings

each other, making the atmosphere

concept of the problem,” he said.

choose

Carol

(here to help guide,

the

course and

doing well

with that?

peer

and

of

services administrator.

Turner

like fries

how

said.

material,” said Melissa Turner, peer

a course will attend study groups.

Would you

give

lo

is

help

to

he

Although there is a certain level comfort in the relationship between a tutor and tutce, Haskett said study groups are usually com-

questions

“The leader

good

it’s

They have taken the course, they have some background in that

Students

(Photo by Justin Bastin)

understand, so

clarify that with people,”

leader answering them.

for stu-

are struggling.

everybody.

Peer-supported

arc a chance to

FINDING LIFE BALANCE

Hilton

women.

flawdess

These images are used in adverpromote alcohol, makeup and clothing, and condition young

break

women

great

Opinion

"In the vortex of process there are

no

Understanding

fixed points of view.

is

never a

tising to

life if It’s

zines

to think they can’t

enjoy

they don’t look a certain way.

teenage girls pub-

flipfull-

pounds over their ideal weight. don’t want to see pictures of

Cameron Diaz's

But what really hits home for me most is hearing my thin friends say they need to lose weight. There's

a

difference

between

wanting to be healthy and wanting to be thin. I think it’s important for

women fit,

on being healthy

to focus

a friend of

that’s

is,

not

Women everywhere

the

problem.

are getting this

idea that because they don’t look

packages.

of beautiful, suc-

out there

who

are

plus size

is

a 22-year-old

model vying

own words,

“the

first

to be, in her

black, plus

on the reality show America’s Next Top Model. On the Oct. 20 episode of the show Toccara said she wants to supermodel,'’

infinite

in

all

different

needs of work,

finite

things like time, energy, and thoughts with the

family, personal interests,

and the spontaneous; between

Mia

fixed schedules

and obligations. life

and

between the structured flexibility.

* the art of balancing achievements with relationships; balancing things with

Tyler, daughter

front

man

people; balancing 'getting' with 'being'.

Steven

LIFE BALANCE IS ESSENTIAL FOR SUCCESS, not only in academics but also in life.

Tyler.

Mia

a world-famous plus size

is

for Lane Bryant and it’s been said entire clothing lines have succeeded just by having her as

model

their spokesperson.

Queen

Latifah

is

a singer, model

and has been

in

the

entertainment business since

the

actress,

She has a contract with Cover Girl and has recently been in a few movies, including the blockbuster musical Chicago. She recently got a breast reduchealth

for

and

reasons

is

look and be,

women

like

Tyler and

They cessful

is

the “right"

think

I

more

about the Being orderly and organized helps combat anxiety, and

regular activities, you can be

study time you have available. you can earn the right to guilt free non-study time. Studying your whole life.

is

realistic

important, but

way

lo

To make an appointment

for learning strategy assistance, visit the

it's

not

Student Services

Office.

we need more

Toccara Jones, Mia

Queen

A Message from Learning Strategies

Latifah.

are intelligent, funny, suc-

women

and they prove

true beauty begins with is,

Once you have scheduled your

for her voluptuous figure.

In a society where young girls are so affected by the media, and what

son

Managing your time is one way to help balance your life. Time management is about making things happen, rather than having them happen to you. Since college work is a series of tasks, from short weekly assignments to long-term projects, to periodic exams, scheduling time helps you spread out the work so it's more balanced.

1980s.

early

they are told

certainly not skinny.

Toccara Jones

the art of balancing the

you’re a size 12. then

of Aerosmith

tion

lot

If

size four," said

known

women

*

...

you’re not any less beautiful than a

weight.

There are a

BALANCE IS

* the art of balancing attitudes and approaches to

“Beauty comes

perfect in a bikini they need to lose

cessful

LIFE

ing.

and

not bone skinny.

mine wants to start hitting the gym more often to get into shape, I'll support her. But the

size

determined and pas-

is

Mcluhan

Tyler and half-sister of actress Liv

cellulite!

the

fact

that’s a

She seems extremely comfortable in her own skin and will not let the stereotypes of what is considered beautiful keep her from succeed-

at

page ad for a liquid diet. It’s disgusting to watch entertainment shows and tabloids picking people apart because they weigh

If

Now

Marshall

young women

aimed

and being happy, and then ping to the next page to see a

and

Toccara

for

sionate about what she wants to do.

self

I

barriers.

discouraging to see maga-

lishing articles about being your-

five

down

example

point of view".

who

not what they look

that

a per-

like.

Visit

our website httD://www.conestoaac.on.ca/iSD/stserv/index.jsp


— SPOKE, November

Page 14

1

News

2004

,

Recycling for a better planet Students can

www.mysterynet.mb.ca/ if everyone on

Project,

recycle/facts. hlml,

do

Earth

their part

lived

Canadian, society would need

DEAK

the

been our brains since we were

This

lid.

instilled in

has

phrase

How many times

children.

school or

in

Rs? Conestoga College students were asked whether or not they recycled, an overwhelming 80

Guelph where

live in

guilty

feel

“I

it’s

not here because

stick to

I

it.

accounting and

I

because I’m in waste so much

would never

is

referring to

your everyday waste that Recycling

foundations student, said he feels

as a society,

accounting student, said he recycles. He has been doing it since he

extremely bad when he wastes

life

paper.

our natural resources, which

Shawn

was

“We

little.

“We work on ry,

a

Cottrill,

Simpsons’ theo-

the

whoever tops

off,

it

drops

it

trees.

more and more

I am going back side of all the sheets

a personal goal

of paper

number of garbage cans outweigh the number of recycling containers. “The school needs more recycla-

pop cans, news-

papers and glass bottles, the basic

most people recycle these

ble bins around the school,” said

days.

However, other items that are essential to recycling and making our world a better place are plastic, -steel, motor oil, conserving energy and using your common sense. Andy Zettl, a first-year law and

However, not

all

pus feel recycling

some

people on camis

important. In

students don’t even care

Zettl.

“Recycling

is

Sutherland,

Neil

recycle,”

recycling was annoying.

said

sometimes

“Well,

important for

our future, our country and our nat-

Sutherland said.

ural surroundings.”

annoying.

According

to

the

second-year

a

accounting student, said he thought

thing to do. I'd feel

didn’t

up more

Mystery Net

we

are

using up quickly. Recycling saves energy, our clean landfill space,

ft

water and

air,

more economy money.

also creates

The future of recycling depends on society’s dedication to the environment and the well-being of the planet.

First-year architecture construc-

If

“I

1

recycle,”

just

find

it

was picked then maybe I would

recycling

often,

tion

“Most people don’t care about

just a big waste.”

fact,

I

Recycling conserves

granted.

It’s

about recycling, or the environment.

if

we,

living

bins filled with recyclable material.

security student, said he recycles

“It’s the right

earth.

if

student, Andrea Diaz, said most people take recycling for

marketing student Nicola

because he wants to keep the envi-

guilty

not

Parkinson. "I always see garbage

first-year

ronment clean and healthy.

on

jobs and saves the

use,” said Arnold.

I

Students have also noticed that the

a force of habit."

Cottrill recycles

items

As

to use the

off,”

said Cottrill. ‘It’s

are killing

is

is a key element want to continue

first-year police

second-year

per cent said yes.

is

Wet/Dry System. In addition to blue and green coloured bags, clear bags have been implemented, which are filled with plasties, and the

recyclable.

paper,” Cottrill said.

James Arnold, a

I

just don’t recycle.”

The system Vyn raised

college wastes.

When

used to

tem,” the student said. “I’m glad

by students was the amount of paper the

summer camp were we

“I

and materials we currently use. Canadians waste more than 250 kilograms of waste in our homes

A common concern

told about the three

dent. said he didn’t recycle either.

they have a totally different sys-

all

every year.

public

in

Jeremy Vyn, a second-year business administration accounting stu-

the energy

and provide

lifestyle

Recycle, reduce, reuse and close

at

four Earths to maintain our

le'ast

By NICOLE

average

the

like

consider recycling more.”

the environment and think that will

last

forever,”

the

it

concerned

student said. “People feel like they

won't make a difference when they will.”

Diaz also said people need to take advantage of the resources available and that

we need

to take care

of them.

“We

We

(Photo by Nicole Deak)

what we have.

can’t abuse

need

all that

we

can get.”

Nelson Boddin, a second-year police foundations student, does his part to keep our environment clean.

CALVIN KLEIN RALPH LAUREN

NAUICA

...

..

..

j

JONES NEWYORK MEXX ADDIDAS REEBOK

LONDON FOG EVAN PI CONE ROOTS... ETC

•Jewelry

Jeans...

320 or

Sweaters...

$20

less

or less (Photo by Mike Bors)

Tops... 320 or less Pants...

$20 or

Amy

Name

Product!

leads kids

in

a sing-a-long at Conestoga’s early childhood education

Wee ones make Xmas

Winter Jackets ... $ 15 to $60

Brand

left)

centre.

less

2ioes...$2Q or less

Prn: ing is f or

Powell (second from

wishes

ii

By MIKE

BORS

who

Walker,

insisted his age

is

"big,”

hoping for

is

cake.

WHOLE SAlf

With Halloween behind us, it is now time two months of anticipation

V

attention to the

Christmas season. You can ponder

60 Frob lher Drive Water oo. ON (519) 886-2384 Unit #6,

1

Op en

to

Pub li c

Thur.-Sat. 12-7prn

Terms

-

“Cash Only”

to turn

our

that

the

is

tion centre, n’t take

flat

3, just started ballet

shoes to help her

Kitahna,

you want as to the gifts you would like to see under your tree. You can watch in agony as your bank account drops almost as much as it did at tuition time. But you can’t deny the fact that Christmas is, was, and always will be, for the young (or the young at heart). When asked what they wanted for Christmas, many of all

the preschoolers at Conestoga’s early childhood educa-

Xp

Hannah,

some

promptly replied with “presents.” But little minds to start racing.

it

did-

long for their

Owen, 3, said he wanted would name Cookie Man.

a black horsy which he

When

3, said

so she

in that

is

hoping for

category.

she would like the colour purple.

asked other questions about the seasons, the

wee ones were given even

greater opportunity to

let

their imaginations run wild.

When

so overweight.

how Santa fits down the chimney if he’s Adam, 2, said the big guy just rings the

doorbell

house.

asked at his

Kitahna said Santa is her best friend so she’s got the scoop on what happens if the reindeer get sick. “They just fly away,” she reveals.

As

to

how

old Santa

is,

both

Adam

and Walker

simultaneously said “A-B-C-D-E-F-G...” The jury still

out on this one.

is


Feature

The

Batman

real

SPOKE, November

an environmental hero

is

By CHANTELLE TIMPERLEY

When you these days,

it

vampire bats’ saliva breaks down blood clots and is better than any-

hear about

Batman

thing available

might not be

in refer-

patients.

ence to the super hero. be Ontario’s very

may

It

just

lor

The

heart

treating

University

Washington has started more within the last year.

own environmen-

on a quest

— Page 15

2004

1,

of

use

to

it

to

save bats.

is

the president

bats to determine the location of an

and founder of the Bat Research

object by sending out sound waves,

Foundation (BRF) based

and

hero,

tal

Jeff Bender, 36,

Echolocation

in Sarnia,

Ont.

The organization started in May after Bender came across an injured bat and took it in. He began researching bats and found that nothing was being done in Ontario to help them, and no protection

Volunteer work and membership

lead

him

A

on how

lot

of misinfor-

Another way

(Internet photo)

and founder

Jeff Bender, president

pri-

It

rare

is

working closely with and scientists. Ninetynine acres of land has been allocated to BRF by Sarnia's Dow Chemical plant, with talk of a possible collaboration with the University of Western Ontario. "They have one of the world's leading bat biologists and he's been

of

biologists

Bonnechcrc Escarpment

talking with our biologist in order

pelled.

and

to establish a partnership

research

centre.”

hopefully be

Dow Centre.” Dow wants BRF

to

said at

the

do work on

and has given the organithan SI. 000 for

more

The

research.

Clair

St.

Conservation Authority

in

Sarnia

is

also having the organization build a habitat

in

a cave in one of their

find

bat

together. The Cave and Niagara are two places in

living

in their natural

and that is where they run into problems with people ple’s attics,

In order for conservation

work

where the rainforests are being

person’s property,

said.

animal

or, if the

they’re

“If

to

your

in

attic

down

and

educated on the animals and have

living quarters, or if they’re

some of the common

property, in a tree or in a barn or a

myths

dis-

shed or somewhere,” he

The biggest myths come from

the

widespread beliefs that bats are blind, are vicious, can get tangled in people's hair and often carry rabies. Only one half of one per cent of

all

bats carry the disease,

are

ways

He

stated.

International.

bats are forced to

because they kill the insects the bats eat. And. there so

much

habitat loss

move

now

that

into peo-

that the

and out

in

at

similar to a bird house, except

placed higher off the ground and

more than 2,000

fit

clear that

it

if

mammal and

any

they

the least of any animal,”

humans

“Bats are not a threat

and what the health units should be doing is issuing warnings and statistics for all animals with rabies - not just bats.”

to

at

all,

What should ease

is

if

put people more at one bat has rabies in a

West Nile has become one of the more important ones recently. Although they eat the mosquitoes, they are dead-end carriers for the

They cannot

virus.

contract

it

or die

and are big contributors in helping control it. They can cat up to 1,200 mosquitoes per hour, and that

it,

main

not the

is

part of their

Bender said there with

evidence that

West Nile where

the spread of

has

confirmation

is

factual-based

become predominant

is

it

in areas

risk is

low for com-

contact with a rabid bat.

in

are

animals,”

he

warned. "The. same as any other wild animal, never approach it, never handle it and your chances of getting bit are nil dle

if

you don't han-

“We

where it begins America to where

track

North

he said.

spreads,”

upper-state

and

New

it

started

“It

York

in

in

1997 and

in

anything

wooded

spooky,

such

caves,

as

mansymbols of

areas and haunted

They

sions.

those areas have very low

all

bat populations.”

Lyme

are

one ticks

of the other benefits of bats

the -amount of

is

every night.

What

how

Bender

jobs

and stuff

it

lay

to

eat

damage

that

larva

less

said

that,”

like

think the

more we

get

push farther out, we're going

to

get a better response.”

Bender said he hopes the organization

progresses quickly

in

the

next five to 10 years. “If

we can go

out and find where

the roosts are, then the conserva-

authorities

close

will

those

they’re supposed to be."

Bender said the best way a difference

largely

are

beneficial

to

farmers for this reason. They are saving farmers more than one dollars

how much

year

every

crops alone. That

is

in

bil-

cash

not including

they save on using bat

Guano

is

fertilizer

for

all

to

make

the organiza-

group together for a compurpose and go all over the

world. “If

.

we can make

a difference for

our bats here, then we're ready to

go somewhere else.” BRF’s website can be found

at

http://clix.to/bcrc.

much

nitrogen and better to use

regular

is

tions to

mon

crops.

lion

to

“I

because

BAT FACTS

it

• Nearly 1,000 types of bats account for almost a quarter of

highlighting

including penicillin and antibiotics.

all

is

that bats

harmful

to his cause.

Although people have been misinformed for so long, they should know the importance of bats. They

many

teers,

very slow process getgoing because with volunthey have their careers and

“It’s still a

ting

Halloween

me

on

people's ignorance

serve

of recommendation

letters

produces better crops. There are more than 80 medicines that come out of guano,

a group of

tell

said,

moths they

they eat in their

weight of moths causes the moths

than

night,”

be given

“That alone will allow the bats to start reproducing at a normal rate and start coming back up to where

fleas.

pires.

out

gain field experience with

by mosquitoes,

and

in

came

BRF can

tracking and lagging, and will also

that is carried

as fertilizer.

only

with their communities and communicating with the organization by telephone or Internet. Students wanting to work with tive

areas off from the public,” he said.

higher

kids right in front of

be involved by getting interac-

still

tion

guano

had an adult

volunteers.

another serious

disease

Halloween and are often connected with traditional bad guys like vam“I

welcomes

is

They

because they are associated with

BRF

Volunteers from out-of-town can

out of this base in Sarnia and start

it.”

Bats also have a bad reputation

Building

online.

tions.

One

wild

lined with chicken

wire on the inside.

Bender.

the United States and into Canada,

to stay.

for the bats to get in

is

where there are low bat popula-

allow

it

and

out,

and references.

spread across the northern part of

“Bats

puiposes, both environ-

It

There are many plants that rely solely on bats because of the num-

also breaks

down and

There

is

one cave

in

the world

that has an albino fish that

go extinct without from bat guano.

Guano is

the

nutrients

also contains bacteria that

The

species.

Bats are the only

mammals

capable of self-propelled

flight.

would

being used to treat Alzheimer’s

disease.

mammal

detoxifies

industrial waste.

mentally and health-wise.

rehabilitated.

the

in

eases.

characteristics.

(Internet photo)

bat

roost, the rest of the roost will not

Bender advises people to avoid handling them when they are not knowledgeable of bats and their

brown myotis bats he

It

it.

work.

dawn

single

Bats eat insects that spread dis-

“They're the lowest carrier (of rabies) of

ing

little

bats in

it

seeds a night.”

“A

diet.

Although the

of the

by

is

bat house

Arizona desert will spread 60,000

cent of early reforestation,” Bender

from

unnecessary to run out and get

is

it

it

Pesticides have played a part in

made

has also

Bender

are endangered.

said, “there

people see them in their homes, that

spread

that bats

go

bats are able to

than bats.

no myth, however,

on your

night and they're fine.”

vaccinations.

is

A

plans can be found However, the money spent on bat boxes when purchased through the organization goes toward research and conservation

into the

manage them so

to

and the ones that do, die within 24 to 48 hours. Bender says more people die every' year from rabies contracted from domestic cats and dogs is

in Brazil

depleted, bats contribute to 96 per

they’re not getting

bat

been proven now

“It's

Bender advises people to leave bats alone if they are found on a

grow, people need to become more

killing bats off

Bender holds one

volunteer and

community

is

and

ber of seeds they spread.

killing them.

has to be moved, to do so safely.

working with the Organization for Bat Conservation out of the Cranbrook Institute for Science, The Canadian Wildlife Federation, and Bat Conservation also

natural

which can have millions

bats

It

is

their envi-

usually has open slots on the bot-

habitats.

parks.

BRF

to

Ontario to see bats

up

set

mimic to

the

in

tom of the box focused

is

rehabilitation,

zation

bat

is

can

Research Foundation, works on relocating bats from

of the Bat

the roof of a house.

colonies,

their land

design

is

putting up bat houses.

marily on conservation work and

“It will

to better

help out

now all we have here

jeopardy because

The organization

actual

and

for colleges

do

to

ronments.

mation about them."

Bender.

good thing

universities

mal,” said Bender. "Right

an

growth and

roosts, or for scientists to give tips

eight species of bats in

highly valuable and

is

to continue

bring bat populations back up.

to take action.

Ontario are

on

relied

“Canada’s Ministry of Natural Resources doesn’t consider bats to be a priority to be protected because they’re classified as a colony ani-

of pesticides and a

BRF

with

laws were in place.

in

being

currently

researched to help the blind.

2003

It

also

is

the process for

is

anti-coagulates from

Though

bats are long-lived

(they can live to be 34 years old),

they

reproduce

slowly

with only one pup per year.


— SPOKE, November

Page 16

1

,

Feature

2004

Race provides challenge and excitement By

consumed only with

A

fierce

onto

my

the starting

at

rain

my

stood

the

wind drove cold

unprotected skin as line

1

1

was about

that

to take

'

aline

was

enee

felt.

We

was my excitement.

I had been counting down the days to this race for nearly a month, ever since I saw it advertised on the website www.runwa-

I

felt

during high school cross-coun-

try

meets, and was definitely ready

for this race mentally, although

was another

my

(Photo by

A

runner completes the eighth annual Oktoberfest race

runners competed

very

Since hearing about the race

in

the event which raised

money

James

Clark)

Waterloo on Oct. 17. More than 1,300

in

for the

Grand River Hospital Foundation.

issue

altogether. I

had

resumed running two or three times a week. None of these runs were

long or very

compared

high school, but nans were a

fast,

workouts

to

Now,

nothing

three years after

my

last

weighed 20 pounds more and I had been living on a steady diet of beer and frozen

ran during

I

five-kilometre race,

at least these brief

start.

pizzas for the last month.

This race was going to be awe-

I

what

felt like

We

turned

of the excite-

in all

joined more than

I

1,300 run-

whom

nearly 800 of

were

the starting line at 9:25

at

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

College AlcohoUnventory

following College Alcohol Inventory

was developed

at the University of

Wisconsin-Eau

might be interesting for you to complete the inventory and then compare your score with the average scores that were recorded at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Clair. It

False

have drunk 5 or more drinks two weeks.

1.

1

in

a row

at least

once

in

the last

my

a.m.

The other 500 runners were competing

10-kilometre

the

in

were

despite

showing

that

both fun and

is

it

False

2.

1

have drunk

to intoxication at least

once

in

the last two weeks.

in races.

woman

chatted briefly to a

I

beside

me, but was honestly too nervous have drunk alone

True

False

3.

1

True

False

4.

1

the last 3 months.

in

to really concentrate.

All

have drunk alcohol

last

daily (at least

5 days of each week)

for the

month.

ure.

1

It

could think about was failhad been so long since I had

last run,

couldn't

I

remember how

go out or when to start to slow down. How embarrassing would it be if I went fast and was forced to walk, I wondered. All of a sudden the official yelled go. Runners immediately surged past the starting line that was much too narrow for the number of competitors, and raced out towards King Street. fast to

True

False

5.

J

have said or done something under the influence of alcohol

1

regret during the last 3 months.

True

False

have drunk during the last 3 months so that could do something that felt could not do as easily without alcohol talk, relax, be more outgoing).

6.

1

I

i

True

False

7.

I’ve

last

True

False

8.

True

False

9.

1

I

experienced a blackout (memory loss) while drinking 3 months.

have driven under the influence

of alcohol in the last

in

(i.e.

the

3 months.

True

True

have experienced withdrawal (shakes, sweats, flushed faced) after stopping drinking in the last 3 months.

10

False

False

to the effects of alcohol at

my tiptoes

My

drinking has

harmed my personal

relationships

in

the last 3

months. 12. During the last 3

False

In the

months,

1

have often drunk

in

larger

amounts

or over a longer period of time than intended.

my

retraced

at

rush

through the

steps, ran

students score 5 or below If an answer to any question or your

score concerns you, please consider talking to a

counsellor at Student Services. "If

Alcohol

is

causing you problems you have a problem with alcohol.”

who were

A Message

from Student Services

ww.conestoq ac.on.ca/isp/st serv/index.isp

http://w

had

so

felt

my name

again, yes, 21:14.

had placed 62nd out of a group of 782 runners. I walked out of the crowd and back to the arena floor where prizes were being awarded. 1 could only think about how I could have ran faster, how I should have pushed

myself when

was feeling so

I

relaxed.

soon found my stride ... my mind was clear, my legs felt great and could I

I

no longer

feel the rain.

Then thought back to something Lou Seguin. another competi1

that

tor in the five-kilometre race, said after seeing his time,

good

had

barely jogging.

This was horrible.

had gained

1

what felt like minutes on my time. shook off my error and dug in. had no other choice. I had a goal to I

Thankfully, the the race

my

first

kilometre of

was on King

Street and

1 soon found and started passing peo-

partly downhill. stride

felt great,

my mind was clear,

ple.

I

my

legs felt great and

I

could no

weather offered

the

harshest conditions he

*cvcr ran in

remember I

which was not

as he had hoped.

and

that

he would

this race for that reason.

thought about what he said and

realized

he was

right.

I

am

not

going toJook back on this race and think about how poor my time was. I

am

was

going to remember to run

down King

ing not cars,

how

Street

but puddles.

fun

am

I

when I stood at the starting and when I saw the finish felt

I

get the time that

it

dodg-

going to remember the excitement

So did

We

our website

it, I

I

He said some of the

longer feel the rain.

Visit

beside

into the race, but was caught behind what seemed like a wall of

was total

couldn’t believe

good, so confident. I moved closer to the sheets and read the numbers

as

achieve.

Add your scores on questions 1-12 (one point for each True answer). This is your severity score. The range is 0-12. 50% of UWEC students average score is 2.4. 84%ofUWEC

Then I saw was my time.

it

21:14. I

I

I

Score

name, beside

sensors and then tried to get back

kids

True

to get a better look at the

results taped to the wall.

me

to stop and go had not noticed two sensors on the ground and 1 had failed to run through them! 1

back!

1

11.

my

check

to

Just five steps into the race a vol-

unteer yelled

have missed school or work due least once in the last 3 months. 1

went

I

waited as other runners exam-

I

weather,

the

set up,

time.

my

event.

laughing

min-

pizza,

ined the sheets, and then stood on

stretches.

challenging to compete

True

some

with other runners and browsing through the booths that

Competitors were smiling and

O

20-minute goal.

gling

warm-up jog

after taking a brief

and completing Claire.

my

After eating

running the five-kilometre course,

True

a great race.

ment 1 failed to look at the clock showing my time. walked to the recreation centre as I caught my breath. The thought of my warm clothes and the food provided to the runners was now more important than seeing my time, which, 1 was confident, would be close to, if not lower, than

some! ners,

The

a tight

in

1

missed the surge of adrenaline

state

rounded the corner

Unfortunately,

terloo.com.

physical

starting to

onto Father David Bauer Drive, with approximately 200 metres to go. A couple of runners passed me, but that was all I was letting them away with. I started sprinting, the sound of the crowd filling me with energy. My final burst pushed me past the Finish line. I had done it!

1

I

The adrenmake its pres-

travelling.

pack, heading to a great finish to

were popping up in my mind, I would have no problem achieving my goal of completing the course near the 20-minutc mark. This, however, was going to be tough with the present weather conditions, which were less than ideal. However, if had one factor in my it

how

couldn’t believe

I

we were

fast

ran the race as fast as doubts

favour,

had been running with began

1

speed up.

to

Recreation Centre. I

dozen runners

the pack of about a

on a five-kilometre course that began at Conestoga Mall and ended -on Father David Bauer Drive, in front of the Waterloo Memorial If

was rapidly approaching and

tors,

with only a pair of run-

and shorts,

breath and my shoes hitting wet pavement.

off for the five-kilometre competi-

ning shoes and quick dry running shirt

the

Bridgeport Road West, the turn-

of the eighth

annua! Oktoberfest run.

Armed

I was sound of

per cent. For a few minutes

JAMES CLARK

I

line

was

I

passed Chapters, the univerand, ironically enough, sities

hoping for? No. But I did feel proud of myself for trying. Would I

McDonalds, but not one of these I was

do

buildings appealed to me.

locked

in

and ready

to give

100

it

again?

You

bet. In fact,

I

am

running

in

a five-kilometre race on

Nov. 28

in

Cambridge.


SPOKE, November

1

,

No line ups for campus

A simple financial aid program that works...

v

services...

Cutting edge technology

>

\

in

the classroom...

ISA

Real people answering

Excellent teachers with

small class

your questions...

sizes...

Voice your dream for PSE

i

Participate in the Ontario Colie for your

chance to wi

brought to you by

This opportunity

is

"Your Partners

Learning"

in

www.csaontario.org

i

2004

...

College Student Alliance

a

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Page 17


Page 18

— SPOKE, November

1

,

News

2004

make

Electronic gifts

Xmas

wish

Horoscope Week of Nov.

2004

1,

Libra

Aries

lists

aJj|

March

\

,

21

-

/

April 19

September 23 October 22

,

*^l!i

-

By DENISE MULLER

The Christmas season approaching and let

Like a brick wall you are too fast

is

almost time to

it’s

Santa know what you want

Stubborn as you be, you have a soft side as

hard to break.

may

this

long as

*- year.

the right buttons are

all

is

People can’t

misunder-

tell

if

you're

time thinking of ways to become

everyone

like

But your family has probably started prodding you for your wish list. not.

mind

gifted

mysterious or weird. Don't waste

pushed.

OK, maybe

If

Your stood.

else.

That's

way

too boring.

Taurus

you’re having problems decid.

what you want, stores like Future Shop or Radio Shack might ing

April 20

-

May

/J

20

Scorpio October 23

November

-

21

have the solution. Henry,

Neil

manager

store

Future Shop on 580 King

St.

at

N.

Waterloo, said newer technology

always a

hit

DVD sets

mirrors your mood.

is

with students.

The 35-year-old

DVD

players,

The weather and environment

in

have been

listed off

DVD

in

a

bit

of a

rut.

Grey

skies will clear up soon and you'll

portable

players,

players, laptops,

MP3

Lately you

be back to your cheery self again.

box

The horizon will always be disyou limit yourself to only reaching that far. Your sense of timing connects you to success; tant if

just a matter of

it's

when. You'll

be the one to steer that ship.

and gaming consoles as being

possible big sellers this Christmas

season.

Darren Campbell, manager at Radio Shack in Conestoga Mall, in Waterloo, said computer components and electronic toys are also

among

very popular

The

the big sellers in the past. is

not sure yet what

going to be the big draw

is

this year,

because he hasn’t had a lot of Christmas shoppers come to the store yet.

“Hopefully,

the

remote-

small,

controlled market again,” he said.

Campbell said a

lot

of students

are thinking practically, looking for

(Photo by Denise Muller)

Darren Campbell, 36, store manager at Radio Shack, shows off two remote-controlled cars that are expected to be the big seller this year for Christmas. around Christmas.” Campbell said the average purchase at Radio Shack is about

He

routers and network cables for their

$100.

computers.

after rebate,

“A their

lot

Henry

said routers are about

and

the

$39

remote-

little

colder outside. “Really, after the

first

the store

November 22 December 21

}

is

here.”

And

said students always need

from $20 to $100. Whatever you decide upon, you should go out and get it sooner,

der in the stores.

rather than

carries lots of stock,

said.

small TVs and the LCD TVs have been very popular. He said sometimes people don’t know what to get someone on their list, and a Future Shop gift card is

later.

the cost of purchases

always vary. Items range from a $7 CD plasma TV.

in

the

to a

store

$10,000

“You’d be blown away by what some people spend on their kids

T

What

passes as good

you barely tows the

for

line for

June 22

July 22

-

%^j|| Capricorn December 22 -

January 19

moment

Although the Future Shop always

Henry advises whatever you want now,

getting

it

same

the

feel

way. Integrity means doing the best at this

too

the

place

best

you

to put

for

the

in

next

Missy This trails

is

that

there'll

might be

More

like

on

fire.

your week to blaze the

and go

Keep

moment.

Elliot says you're really

really hot.

steam ahead.

full

confidence up

and

be no stoppin' ya!

late.

"If

“The store is packed. Standing room only,” he said. “I’m here walking around, ‘Excuse me, excuse me, excuse me.’” Henry said the traffic at Future Shop starts to increase once it gels

notice of your actions because others are.

said.

shohlder to shoul-

before the big rush, or

the store.

the best bet.

it’s

then things will get a

tight in

Cancer is

You and Oprah then

Campbell said things will start picking up in mid-November and little

mind cannot be

others.

snowfall

swamped),” he

A devious

excused by poor memory. Take

“There’s no looking back from

controlled cars can range anywhere

He added

Sagittarius

M

June 21

-

Have you been letting the magic eight ball make decisions for you? Put an end to that this instant. Everyone knows there's no truth to those things. You're ravaging your life.

when we kind of hang on (because

in

of kids do networking

dorms,” he

21

shoppers.

-36-year-old said routers and

said he

May

%

*

(

remote-controlled cars have been

He

Gemini

'

you wait

until

Christmas Eve,

you’ll be taking what’s leftover,”

Henry

said.

XX) early.”

After

open

all,

nobody

their presents

really

wants

to

Aquarius

Leo

"Do your shopping

^

July 23

4*^

'

-

January 20 February 18

August

22

on Christmas to

Open dreams

discover socks and underwear.

Cicero says to go through not

life

knowing what took place

before you child.

is

to forever

remain a

Learn from your mistakes

will bring them to and a stronger reality. Sharing your aspirations will have a positive effect on making your dreams come true. light

and mistakes of those around you.

ft

Virgo

^s9/'

August 23 September 22

You're only human. Beating up on yourself because of a few simple

You

mistakes

is

way

and with

that

too harsh.

something new comes growth and

are learning

Hi

S‘

pe

Vacation? Already? Yes! You need one and fast. This can be as simple as spending time by yourself for a couple of hours or taking the whole

week

off.

positive energy.

Janet Morris (Photo by Paige Hilton)

Getting carried First-year lifts

away

paramedic students Brian Dwyer and Jessie Bradley were being tested on

on Oct. 22.

their stretcher

-tLA-j.

is

a 2nd-year journalism

student in tune with the universe.


Entertainment

SPOKE, November

‘Surviving’ another holiday By MELISSA

HANCOCK

make an attempt

to redecorate while watching. Put another sofa

With no snow on the ground yet

was

movies

to the eye.

it

already here.

is

DreamWorks

got things started,

may have been

It

the stu-

way of avoiding the upcommovie competition,

dio’s

holiday

ing

however,

may

it

all.

Christmas,

Surviving

starring

soul

at

Drew Latham was

heart.

a

picture perfect sappy character.

Gandolfini did yet another great

job

at

not

a

being the tough guy. typecast

actor

director

please

then

wrong? However, he did a good job

be one of those

Drew Latham

(Affleck), a filthy

in his role

and

his character did

O’Hara seems choice

be

to

holiday

for

a

movies.

sounding

this is

He

who now

Christmas

Tom

$250,000

live there if

show him what a fam-

they agree to ily

realistic already

offers to pay

Valcos

to the

his

is all

about.

(Gandolfini) and Christine

(O'Hara) agree to act as Latham’s parents and be host to the holiday

cheer he

is

problems

for. However, up when the Valeo’s Alicia (Applegate)

searching

stir

daughter,

home

arrives

for the festivities.

The movie was a

cute attempt to

get viewers into the Christmas spirit,

but

trying

to

get

past Affleck's

annoyingly childlike role was the greater feat. A little over the top with

to that

Wonderful Time of the it

Jingle Bell

isn’t,

O

movie

will

holiday col-

Most Year - not

It’s

the

Christmas Tree,

Rock and so

on, were

There were some parts left open which was, surprisingly, a nice touch to the movie. Subtle hints of Latham’s loneliness were a great way to try and keep the audience interested. Latham’s massive apartment was close to empty and could leave viewers to

is

Gandolfini

time for

(left)

— Halloween?

and Ben

a touchdown tumbleweeds rolling between the rundown buildings.

the

As

faulty priorities off the field.

a

Panthers to the state championship, but

it

is

not the sports movie you

was on game night. In Odessa we see the highs and lows of this mentality. The coach is paid more than the principal, the it

would expect.

players get free food at the local

Lights, based on the book by H.G. Bissinger, starts at the beginning of pre-season and goes all the

diner and they

way

game, but along the way we find out what this game means for each of the men, well, boys really, playing it and for the town they live in. Odessa represents hundreds of small towns across America where football is life and a person would

their front

On

own

mother’s funeral

all

have big signs on

lawns announcing their

number and

to the last playoff

miss their

nice, but

can always somehow turn

out to be a disaster.

doesn’t have to be

when

coach

is

the

team

almost run out of

town

(residents put up about 20 for

sale

signs on his

lawn) and the

school comes under

man phones

a radio

when one call-in show

fire

and says the players are "doin’ too

much But

learnin' at that school.”

when game time comes

the

for

players,

there’s

the the

the

cocky running back Boobie Miles (Derek Luke) with an ego the size of Texas. But when he goes down career-ending

with

a

possible

injury

we

see his despair

when he

Affleck star

for

in

the

I

give this movie three out of five

stars.

hit

theatres Oct. 22, just

fans of the

Rounding out the team is tight end Brian Chaves (Jay Hernandez), the only player with good grades and any real hope of getting out of Odessa, and Chris Comer (Lee Thompson Young), the third-string running back who gets his shot when Miles goes down. This movie does a good job of

representing across

the

the

to the state

in’

but play football.”

When coach Gaines tells

the

team

Mike

five stars

because when you find

yourself cheering along with the

you know you’ve found a good movie. fans in the stands

YOU ANTICIPATED ON YOUR

MIDTERM EXAMS?

Winchell (Lucas Black) seems to cany this enormous burden all on his

own

while battling the demons

of living with and dealing with his sick mother.

Don

Billingsley

(Garrett

Hedlund), the hard-partying

tail-

back whose drunk and abusive father (a very good Tim McGraw in his first movie role) dangles his own state championship ring in his son's face and says at one point, “This is the only thing you're gonna have. It will carry you forever.”

(Internet photo)

moment

to

prepare

for the

Billy

Bob Thorton as coach

Gary Gaines Lights.

in

Friday Night

to

the

championship.

are in the business of protect-

ing this town,” quarterback

all

all

This movie deserves four out of

YOU MAY BENEFIT FROM WORKING WITH

NOW BEFORE YOUR FINAL

NOT TOO LATE!

APPLICATIONS ARE AVAILABLE IN STUDENT SERVICES ROOM 2B04 last

who hope

WERE YOU AS SUCCESSFUL AS

IT IS

(Internet photo)

young men

country

carry their towns’ dreams

way

in

game

EXAMS

championship.

all,

festive holiday season.

Surviving Christmas which

A TUTOR

state

in

movie gave a nice message that family, friends and laughter should always be the main ingredient in the

says to his uncle, “I can’t do noth-

“we

position.

the downside,

loses, the

if

The Permian Panthers take one

All

all.

(Internet photo)

James

on the field to revealing the problems of a community built on

Thorton, leads the 1988 Permian

is

supposed to be that special time of year where everyone is sweet and

it

after

for interpretation

bone-crunching, hard-hitting plays

Bob

against one another. Christmas

way

credits finally rolled.

window reading closed for game and you can almost see

Billy

season can turn family members

the thought that that

numerous attempts at rejecting Latham even though a love spark was assumed before the ending

Friday Night Lights goes from

powerful

the holiday

Applegate can always be counted on to add a little spice on screen and she did just that. It was amusing to watch her character Alicia’s

around again all is forgiven. Every store on Main Street has a sign in

Coach Gary Gaines, played by

how

the

By KATE BATTLER

quietly

did portray, in a dif-

a part of the holiday package.

all

witty

movie

Football

It

are

This movie does leave viewers with

good Her

her role in this movie.

home even though

childhood

isn’t it?

at his

the audience.

Family arguments, feuding parents and siblings and unexpected visitors

have

-

marketing executive, decides

going to spend Christmas

Even though Surviving Christmas was a little disappointing, it did make for some jolly chuckles from

a soft side which he played well.

family does not live there anymore

lie's

typically suitable for the movie.

ferent sort of way, for the

movie

me

prove

humour can always lighten most drab of films. Looking back on her days in Home Alone can also add to the appreciation of

rich

distracting

— Page 19

would

Christina Applegate and Catherine to

Latham

2004

If he’s

some

let's-make-a-holiday-movie-forthe-hell-of-it kind of movie.

was very

of classic songs.

quite yet

Ben Affleck, James Gandolfini, O’Hara, seemed

lonely, but

lection

there. Truly,

the point that

be a nice addition gestures and, predictably, a lonely

not prove to be a

clever tactic after

make

did

The soundtrack

opening Surviving Christmas on Oct. 22.

throw rug

there, a nice

and Halloween just over it’s hard to believe the time for Christmas

1,


.

Page 20

— SPOKE, November

1

,

Sports

2004

Molly (Bloom’s Irish <Pu6 10 Jvlanitou

(Dr.

0

-

Kitchener, Out.

894-4445

— Monday —

Sunday

$4 domestic

pints

$2.50 burgers $5.00 burger and Blue $4.00 pints

Tuesday

Wednesday Thursday Friday

29 cent wings

— $3 bottles

a ruck against

in

Saturday

Mohawk

day

domestic beer

$3 bar shots $3.50 pints $5.99 fish & chips special

(Photos by Jon Yaneff)

Conestoga College’s men’s rugby team fights for the ball

of

all

$4

pints of

domestic beer

College, Oct. 23 at Jacob

Hespeler Secondary School in Cambridge. Conestoga eventually

won

their final regular

sea-

son game 13-7. Left, two crazed Condors fans, aka Batman and Superman, run ontq the

field to

TV giveaway

every Saturday

nite!

Live classic rock entertainment every Friday

and Saturday Coming soon

nite (no cover)!

— MTU and QB1

congratu-

team on their victory. Conestoga is ranked third late the

Open

1 1

a.m. to 2 a.m. daily

going into the Ontario College Athletic Association finals

Oct.

30 and 31

on

Specials are available at the Kitchener location only

Digital Edition - November 01, 2004  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you