Issuu on Google+

.

Rugby team goes

SilverCity’s ticket prices lower

An evening

for the gold

Condors are gearing up

is

some tough games Ontario

at the

little bit

movies

cheaper.

T4

Entertainment

for

in

getting a

Disabled students face barriers Disability services tries to create

finals.

a

campus

free of barriers.

News Monday, October

Conestoga College, Kitchener

2004

18,

36th Year

6|

— No. 20

College

embraces

new

logo

By DESIREE FINHERT

Webb, w ho wanted thing

out with the old and

It’s

new

with

in

Conestoga College. After 15 years of donning the blue and red shield, the college has a new logo to go with its new image. Conestoga College president. the

at

easily

someand

to create

recognizable

acceptable to everyone

in the col-

lege community.

After four months on the project,

Webb

the

said

new logo

looks

classy.

the kind of logo that will

“It’s

she said, adding

John Tibbits, said the college want-

last,”

ed a new logo

on clothes for staff and students. “It won’t date itself for a long time, which was one of our stipulations.” Manager of public relations, John

change

to reflect the

in the school.

“The college itself into a

said

“A

Tibbits.

thought

it

transforming

is

polytechnic college,"

of people

lot

was time

for a crisper

logo.”

The board of governors wanted

a .sophisticated tag line and logo, w hich would reflect the college as institute of technology and advanced learning (ITAL) and its college status as Ontario’s No.

an

1

C

giant letter

sectioned into

three pieces looks like an Arabian

moon with

crescent

was involved

process and said

italicized

it

w'ears well

early in the

will take a while

for the single C to be recognized as Conestoga. “It’s simple, but bold,” said Sawicki. “I think it’s an excellent branding tool that will become associated with the college.”

The

single

C which

is

commonly

in gold, is also avail-

reproduced

for the last six years.

The

Sawicki,

it

able in black, blue or red.

It

is

already being used on letterhead, envelopes, business cards and col-

accents rounding out the image.

lege publications, like the student

The words “Conestoga, connect

guide.

life

and learning,” are paired with

the single

“Eventually, replace

letter.

Quarry Communications, in

tions

Waterloo, to help with the process. Canadian30-year-old The owned company, located in Allen

He

The

enlisted

college

Integrated

Square, on King

responsible

for

Street,

the

is

logos

also

of

all

you

will

see

it

of the existing applica-

of the current logo," said

Sawicki. said

it

will take a year to 15

months before the complete.

transition

should

“People

is

give

time for the transition to take place. It’s not an overnight process.”

Research in Motion, Sprint Canada United Way, FedEx and Inc., Nortel Networks.

The college has not changed the signs inside or outside any of the

Director of the president’s office and corporate secretary, Helena Webb, acted as the liaison between

“However, they will have to be replaced within a year or so, or

the

president,

the

board,

senior

management, students and Quarry. Webb aided Quarry in researching the new tag line and logo, which was created after extensive input from full- and part-time student surveys and alumni at each of the campuses. The creative team also

included

several

of

Conestoga’s graphic design graduates.

“The work on the logo was

fun,

but also a big responsibility,” said

c

fall colours management students, get distracted by business Andre Nguyen and Laura Schnarr, second-year 1 Oct. on E-wing the outside the fall leaves while studying

Enjoying the

CSI helps students By JENNIFER

college's four campuses.

no point in having a new logo.” said Webb. She said the college is being prudent about these replacements

there’s

because of

its deficit.

Several cuts

college budget have been to decrease the deficit includ-

ing cutting class hours, delaying program starts and not renewing part-time teaching contracts.

The college is asking staff and students to use up old stationary before requesting stock with the

new

look.

Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) is it easier and safer for stu-

Life

and Learning

and palaces. Discounts

are also offered

by

shops,

hotels, theatres,

vehicle

rental

restaurants,

dents to travel abroad.

agencies and transportation compa-

On

Oct. 25, International Student

Exchange (ISE) cards will be available in the CSI offices for just $10. an international recognized worldwide. It

The ISE card ID is

that is

is

currently issued in

more than 50

countries around the world.

There are three versions of the ISE card. The first is for faculty, the second is for students of any age and the third is for youths

between the ages of 12 and 26. “The card offers discounts and

more prepared and I think that’s great,” said Judy Dusick, CSI general manager. The card was created as a way to

try they are

Connect

castles

making

deals as well as safety benefits so when students go out of the coun-

CONESTOGA

cent off of entrance fees to muse-

ums,

to the

made

HOWDEN

help those

who

Cardholders

money. discounted

travel save

receive

rates at international locations just

by showing

their cards.

Discounts include 10 to 50 per

nies.

Discounted tickets are avail-

able to concerts, operas and adventure experiences.

ISE guarantees

all

of

its

dis-

counts. If a cardholder does not receive a discount on a location listed on the website they will receive double their money back.

For a

list

visit the

of discounted locations at www.ise-

ISE website

many

also

comes with

benefits.

Cardholders receive $2,000 US in basic medical coverage from

Worldwide Assistance. They also receive up to $5,000 US in evacuation coverage in case they get stranded and need to be rescued and they receive S2,000 US in airbankruptcy protection in the event that an airline goes bankrupt and the cardholder is left stranded. There is also a toll-free emerline

gency hotline that can be accessed 24 hours a day and can be called from anywhere in the world. The hotline number is found on the back of each ISE card and 24 different languages are spoken by the

Worldwide Assistance representatives. The hotline can be used for needs as well as medical and legal emergencies.

travel assistance

Any

student

who

is

interested in

ISE card can go down to the CSI office and purchase one. “They just have to come here and present their student card and $10

the

and

card.ca

The ISE card

abroad

travel

we do

the rest,” said Dusick.

take their picture and present them with their cards on the spot.

“We

Now

that’s serv ice.”

Each ISE card is valid for one full year from the date of purchase. All ISE cards must be activated in order to be valid. Cardholders can go to www.isecard.ca

activate

to

their

cards.

who have not acticard may not be ^ble

Cardholders vated their

of the benefits that with the ISE card.

to receive all

come


Page 2

— SPOKE, October

18,

News

2004

Now deep thoughts ...with Random

‘Sex-pert’ gears

Conestoga College

questions answered by

What movie

students up for sex

random students

Josey Vogels also dispels many myths

best describes By

your

life right

ALEXANDRA MASTRONARDI held to raise

now?

After two bees have intercourse the

male bee's genitals

fall

off and

That

everything’s kind of

crazy right

now and

my

I

cloth-

Brett Bakker, second-

year graphic design

“The Notebook,

More

favourite part

the dif-

than 40 students gathered

is all

the free

enjoy writing but

it’s

a

solo, behind-the-scenes activity.

1

“I also

Sanctuary on Oct. 5 for sex

love going out and meeting people

advice and myth busters from the

and talking to students and I’m lucky because I get to do all of

in the

“sex-perl."

that.”

sex issues since she started a sex

column back in 1994. The sex-pert said her background is in journalism and she was working for a newspaper when she was asked to come up with a weekly

“Conestoga’s a tough crowd because people sitting in couches are a bit

by the

had been writing about women’s issues and to me sex because

I

bridges.”

Liz Callaghan, first-year

felt

It is

I

lack.”

very important to talk to stu-

dents about sex because they are at

“Chasing

Liberty,

because I’m trying to find where fit in society and what my I

next goal

is.”

Mandy Goemans, first-year human services foundation

sexually, said Vogels.

“I think

my

presentation

is

really

important and it’s integral to have that audience participation.” The show began with a contest where students from the audience

age,” she said.

ing herself nine orgasms over six

were selected to go on stage and blow up a condom until it popped. The winner of the contest received a how-to guide on dating.

The masturbating event was

Vogels presented a slide show

Vogels currently holds the record for Canada’s top masturbator, giv-

hours.

to

“Know

sense but to sex,

municate “It’s

just

it

thy self.”

and com-

really simple I

think

know your

when limits

it

and

so you can com-

to others,”

she said.

amazing how many of us don’t even let ourselves

explore.”

Connie Vanderknyff, student,

ing

said

19, a nurs-

she

thought

Vogels was hilarious and had an

awesome time watching

her show.

“I learned that there is so

many

different kinds of dildos out there

and challenge people’s belief system and some of the myths around sex. I think it’s important to do that at a young “I tend to try

is

seems

know your body Vogels said her best shows are

involved,” she said.

weren’t talking about sex and

First.

Vogels said the most important

comes

foundation in terms of who they are

talking

we

was a big

Comes

sex columnist

the ones

about feminism and equality that

"Male ejaculation does not clear up your skin girls.” Towards the end of the show Vogels had students volunteer to come on stage for another contest. The volunteers had to pul a condom on a cucumber with their mouth. The first to successfully put it on received a copy of Vogels book She

mon

an age where they are building a

“Even though we were

nursing

one rumour.

Josey Vogels,

where she has a real interaction with the crowd because when the crowd is into the show and excited it’s a good time. “Conestoga’s a tough crowd because people sitting in couches are a bit too laid back and it’s easy for them to just sit there and not get

really being explored," she said.

to practise safe sex.

and revealing the truth about popular sex rumours. Vogels made a point of clarifying

thing

too laid back.”

how

tips

“It

sex was like a frontier that wasn’t

High,

all

sex toys," she said.

“I liked the idea of writing about

motto: never burn your

“How

Vogels said she enjoys

"My

outlining

sex

column.

I’m very indecilive

one of the many sex by sex-columnist

Vogels has been writing about

ing.”

because sive and

just

offered

Josey Vogels.

just can’t get the blood-

stains out of

is

tidbits

for breast can-

ferent aspects of her job.

he bleeds to death.

“Zombie, because

money

cer.

and not every one works the same you have to find one that is right for you, but my mother would never approve,” she for every person,

said.

Those

interested in learning

more

about Josey Vogels or her advice on sex can visit www.joseyvogels.com or

purchase one of her several

books.

because the

two characters go to college and succeed and think that’s what is going I

to

happen

to me.”

Karamishev, firstyear electronic engineer Nikita

technician

“Erin Brockovich,

because I’m trying to balance kids, school, homework and commuting from Stratford everyday.” Sherri Moore, first-year

human

services founda-

tion

Times at Ridgemont High, because I’m cool enough to be like Sean Penn.” Craig Needles, secondyear broadcasting “Fast

(Photo by Jennifer Howden)

In

Smile Conestoga, you could be our next respondent.

the

spirit of

giving

Moore Pathammavong, a customer service representative

at student residence, shows off some of the food collected for the Waterloo regional food bank. At least four bins of food were collected.


News

SPOKE, October

Cambridge campus gets make new

Students socialize and By DENISE

MULLER

geared towards women over the age of 19 who are unemployed. It

cool because everybrought something,” said Charlene Westover, 22. “I’m excit-

career training.

loped) potatoes.”

Soon the tables were covered with mashed and scalloped pota-

already planned the next luncheon.

for

its

get to

students to socialize and to

know each

other.

This year the Cambridge cam-

pus held the potluck Thanksgiving-style lunch for the students Oct.

8.

There was a sign-up sheet in the campus's lunchroom, for students

down

to write

their

cooked vegetables, buns and and margarine, gravy and cranberry sauce and, of course, the crispy, brown turkey. toes,

croissants, cheese

The top of another peared under

all

disap-

table

the desserts.

“It’s

one way

for

students

to socialize with

one

from year to year. At 11:30 a.m.. women from the Focus for Change program started to flow into the lunchroom,

unwrapping and heating up

the

dishes they brought for the luncheon, Filling the room with those familiar Thanksgiving smells.

The Focus

for

Change program

is

that

her

has

class

Another Focus for Change dent said

way

a nice

it’s

stu-

to

get

everyone together. "It’s a good idea, everyone's here working together.” said Bernadette

programs co-ordinator By noon, everything was ready and the dishes and cutlery were waiting to be used. More students started to file into the

little

lunch-

room.

A the

Focus

for

students

Change student

said

allowed to go home after they are done with lunch and everything is cleaned up.

She said

it’s

group is a nice bunch of women. “For a lot of us, it’s a big chalsaid.

Susan Garlick,

She said the students decide

varies

said

(scal-

lenge to be here everyday,” she

another on campus.”

pus."

The number of luncheons

She

my

try

The 36-year-old said it's a nice break and the Focus for Change

grams co-ordinator. “It's one way for students to socialize with one another on cam-

when to have the luncheons, adding they have them at Christmas and throughout the year.

ed to have someone

Maj.

names and what

they wanted to contribute to the luncheon, said Susan Garlick, pro-

stuffed

"I think it's

offered a Thanksgiving luncheon

develop not only also gives them

but

— Page 3

one

helps

women

2004

friends at Thanksgiving luncheon

The Conestoga College Cambridge campus once again

themselves,

18,

are

a special day for the

students.

Maj said she moved to Cambridge from Toronto three months ago. She said she was glad someone mentioned the program to her, because Cambridge was a new city and she didn’t know what to do.

Maj

want

said the students

to

do

a cultural theme for their Christmas luncheon. She said she is already

looking forward to bringing perogies.

When

how

asked

the food was,

unanimous answer from everyone was, “Awesome!” the

(Photo by Denise Muller)

Students at Conestoga College’s Cambridge campus enjoy an early Thanksgiving luncheon at the campus on Oct. 8.

Survivor Conestoga creates a buzz By PAIGE HILTON

It

was held Oct. 7

room Students

at

Survivor Conestoga

did not have to compete for

immu-

through gruelling

tribal

nity,

sit

councils or scrounge for food and water.

The jungle-themed workshop taught seven groups of eight to 10

about the rec centre, abuse and safe relationships, banking, sexual health, boundaries, security services and substudents

stance abuse.

for

in

the blue

rity

international

students

knows she

Canada. One English language studies student from Bosnia said she had fun at the workshop and the session about abuse stood out. adjusting to

"It's

a

life in

little bit

country,”

Maja

different than

Kljucic

“Nobody can touch you or

hit

my

said.

you,

so you can just go to the police and tell

them, so that’s good.”

Kljucic said she also appreciated the information presented

by secu-

because

services is

now

she

secure at school day

and night. Another student from English language studies who has been here for only three weeks said he plans to use the rec centre for ing, but also

news about “I

body

build-

found out some bad

tennis.

heard that the

gym

is

free,”

Aryan Ghassemi. “I wanted to ask them if there was any place that we could play tennis, and now I know that there is no place that we

court,

tive

dents got a

"We had

lot

the posithe stu-

the addition this year,

First time, from the rec cenand that worked out really well because I think people needed to get up and move a bit after they’d been in four or Five sessions," she

said.

More

having

a

outs and fact sheets at every station, as well as

phlets

than 65 students attended

workshop and were given hand-

on

condoms and pam-

sexually

transmitted

infections at the sexual health session.

Some

out of each session.

for the

the

not

was pleased with outcome and found

said she

tre,

said

can play.” Despite

Melanie Reed, co-ordinator of English language studies and master of ceremonies for the workshop,

students also

won

prizes

between the sessions, including Conestoga shirts, binders, gym bags and even a teddy bear. The workshop lasted two hours, from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. and each station was 10 to 12 minutes long. Students, staff and faculty headed outside after the workshop to enjoy a barbecue and some social time.

tennis

Ghassemi said he was

still

looking forward to using the rec centre and said he enjoyed the

workshop.

The event was a team staff in

effort

international

the

by

office.

Student Services and English lan-

guage

studies.

Faculty and staff hoped the work-

shop would provide students with valuable information about living in Canada and what is OK here compared to what may be accept-

able or not acceptable in their

own

culture. It

was

also an opportunity for stu-

dents to meet faculty and staff the college

who

they

may

W^AC

THE FOURTH ANNUAL

WATERLOO FESTIVAL FOR ANIMATED CINEMA

at

not meet

Features and short films from

otherwise, like counsellors and the

people

who work

conventional to experimental from

in security.

were taught how to write cheques and open Canadian bank accounts by a Canada Trust Students

Canada and around the world!

PRINCESS TWIN CINEMAS

representative.

Counsellors put on short skits to

WATERLOO GALAXY CINEMAS

OCTOBER 27-30

2004

teach students about abusive situations. students

(Photo by Paige Hilton)

Dianne Roedding, the public health nurse for Waterloo Region, explains the birds and the bees at Survivor Conestoga’s sexual health station.

played a quiz

game

drug and alcohol abuse, and were even given a quick aerobic workout at the stato learn facts about

tion focused

on the rec

centre.

WWW.WFAC.CA


5

Page 4

— SPOKE, October

Commentary

2004

18,

Throne speech leaves students out Out of

the cold

in

one paragraph was ded-

a 15-page throne speech, only

icated to post-secondary education. This leaves current students,

and ones headed to college and university in the next couple of empty-handed and out in the cold. During the election the Liberals promised to spend $8 billion to help colleges and universities, including a transfer payment to

years,

the provinces to only be used for post-secondary education.

However, not a single promise was kept. Prime Minister Paul Martin touched on a

lot

of areas in his

throne speech, including health care, child care, environmental issues and help for cities, to

name

a few.

However

the only scrap

for post-secondary education won’t even help students for 15 years, if not longer.

The Liberals announced

Bond that will sity. The bond

a plan to start a

Canada Learning

lighten the burden of going to college or univeris

designed to help low-income families save for

their child’s post-secondary education.

This bond was announced with good intentions, but with lowincome families having a hard enough time paying the bills and putting food on the table, it’s a little much to expect them to have money to be able to put away in the first place. This proposed bond also does nothing for the current problems facing post-secondary institutions and : i I The ° n| y scra P for P°St-secondthe students attending ary education won’t even help them, including stu;

and rising

dent debt

students for

1

just

all

sit at

education ranks on the government’s

list

of priori-

the

financial burdens currently faced

cause

many

to

by students are enough

avoid a post-secondary education.

message

want sent out that they are driving students away from college because they won't provide more financial assistance to students and make it Is this

one moment and imagine how

would

Thankfully, our society, culture

now

only present

your relationship does not meet the

Ormston

standards

really the

that the Liberals

more accessible? The Liberal government needs

point that equal rights reign

hearing into contentious constitutional issues surrounding

marriage,

I

through

the

to realize that by ignoring and abandoning post-secondary education and its students, they are alienating a whole generation of people. Students, and post-secondary education, are the future. Without us there will be no one to take all those jobs that will

bearing

become vacant

should

baby-boom generation retires. Although nothing was mentioned in the throne speech, that doesn't mean that there is still not a chance that Martin and the Liberals will come through on at least part of their campaign as the

find

it

same-sex

impossible to

television

flip

channels

forcing

“experts”

their

opinion the government not,

under any circum-

stance, have the

who

power

to dictate

whom. If the government can say who I can many, can marry

me what

promise, perhaps in the budget in February. This gives students, parents, staff and faculty more than three

they might as well

months

to lobby the government for more money for post-secondary education. We need to step up and make sure our needs are heard. We need to remind Martin and the Liberal government that they can’t forget about us and they can’t leave us buried under all this

tune into tonight and

debt.

and Mail’s online opinion poll to

eat

my 1

for dinner,

tell

what program

saddened

welcome

to part

to

admit

my

views

I

glanced

at the

To me, tude

is

this

narrow-minded

unacceptable and

theless,

if

there

letters to the

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be

editor. Letters

contacted

No unsigned

am

And

strongly believe

in, it is

ily if

in school, states

ination.

is

truly

is

meet the

question

why

the

in

same-sex

against

the

is

for

voted

marriage.

49 per cent of

everyone

Now

Do

know

fits

picket the

it is

bill.

time

to accept that families

dad

is

seldom and

breadwinner,

everyone

really cares about bread 1

think

all

Bunch

homosexual for just

is

is

-

not

And who anyway?

anyone can hope

a supportive family

only

the

mom

always the bread baker.

dare them to put themselves in

the shoes of a

dog and a white I

in

to those qualifi-

are changing.

else should be too? I

not

dad, son

In this, the 21st century,

poll

heterosexual,

Add

fence and no one

same? Do they think because are

bliss.

cations a

the case,

49 per cent of

the

mom,

and daughter living together

marriage even an issue ? I

defini-

anyhow? families I know do

ideal of a

domestic

the issue of same-sex

respondents

the

like

concerned

are

and when same-sex marriage

Most of the

all

everyone has equal

If that

why

groups,

tion of “family”

benefit of the law without discrim-

then

some

But who came up with the

equality.

we have

territories

accepted nationwide.

is

I

The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, which

of

half

about the implications for the fam-

not

one thing

is

the

for

is published and produced weekly by the journalism

Advertising Manager: Ryan Connell Production Managers: James Clark, Desiree Finhert

a thing of the past!

students of Conestoga College

Ormston

Spoke Online

Editor:

Circulation Manager:

Kristen

McMurphy Howden

Jennifer

for verification.

Photo Editors: Tim Murphy, Kate

be published. Letters should be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter

Battler

letters will

N2G 4M4

Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke @conestogac.on.ca

for publication.

Address correspondence to: The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

Dr.,

Web

site:

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors

not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College.

advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed: a MS Word file would be helpful. Letters must not contain any libelous statements.

to the editor are subject to

in

is

Brady

Spoke Editor: Jennifer

Spoke welcomes

I

country.

the

than

less

Catholic church,

atti-

even a gay-rights advocate; never-

they

Globe

not

is

support same-sex marriages.

man and woman.

they honestly believe that everyone

find that a startling

Letters are

how

to

are not that of a vast majority.

Recently.

across

Canada’s provinces and

favour

of the institution of marriage being reserved only for a

to

hair next week.

am

in

been taught about countless times

hardline views on me.

my

were

the 19,1 17 votes cast

without being bombarded by over-

In

found

be

Currently,

supreme in Canada. With the recent Supreme Court

therefore,

Opponents of gay wedlock can

Opinion

tory textbooks.

the

and,

worthy of legal recognition.

in his-

to

it

your soulmate,

Jennifer

systems have pro-

political

feel to find

only to be told by the government

back of the bus and homo-

However, we have not evolved

The

equality

not

sexuals were kept in the closet.

vances are

ties.

to

Once upon a time women were

embrace

gressed and these archaic obser-

goes to show

how low

to

allowed to vote, black people had to

and

years,

tuition fees.

This

Time


SPOKE, October

Conestoga Students

ANNUM

18,

2004

— Page 5

Inc. presents...

GENERA! MEETING

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 27th 5:30PM ~ ROOM 3(33 ~ DOON CAMPUS

WELCOME

AIL STUDENTS

VOICE YOUR OPINION

Conestoga STUDENTS INC

-Attention Students-

NATIONAL STUDENT LOANS SERVICE CENTRE

INTERNATIONAL

W

STUDENT EXCHANGE CARDS The ISE Card was created as a

Will have a representative at the Student Client Services

way

to help those

who were

traveling to be able to

save some money by receiving

Building

special discounted rates at

October 20th 9:30am

-

3:30pm

overseas locations simply by presenting their card!

October 27th 9:30am

-

3:30pm

NATIONAL STUDENT LOANS SERVICE CENTRE

AVAILABLE AT THE CSI OFFICE rIk®*

TALK ABOUT YOUR STUDENT LUAN

...

CARDS*

CARDS'


Page 6

— SPOKE, October

18,

News

2004

Students with

face barriers

disabilities By JANET MORRIS

will

be tedious getting from the

through experience of other students

school, but as it

and mostly what people tell me that I have learned about the challenges

Doug

disabled students face.” said Lyttle.

parking

At the present time, almost 10 per cent of the student population

at

with disability services, receiving

This

help with academic and physical

college.

He

accommodations, and more than half a dozen students rely on wheelchairs to navigate the campus. To

istration

-

help these students disability sende-

of services

relation to

Door

at

the

planning pro-

he was forced to make a

career change from a millwright and

breaking his neck

a work-

in

39-year-old student

his wheelchair to get

who relies mound the

pus

is

not too bad

when

the weather

nice. “I

presume when

the

snow Hies

it

WORK AND LEARNING Although students can derive positive benefits from working while they attend school, such as earning extra money, research indicates that there are several negative consequences for students who are employed more than 15 hours per week. Many studies* have shown that there is a correlation between the number of hours students spend on the job and their degree of success in terms of academic achievement.

Many students who are employed more than 15 hours per week

while

in

college

Kemp stand

how someone

in

wheelchair might have

a

larger

difficulties.

“The hallways can be congested when classes change and if it’s crowded and I'm trying to wheel by can be a bit tough," he said. Another problem Kemp said he noticed was down by the cafeteria. "The first day that I went down it

there I noticed on the one side they have the round-about (turnstile) you have to go through and I didn’t

know where the hell to myself, how do

to go. I

I

thought

get into this

cafeteria?”

Kemp ended through the

up having to go

in

exit.

He said he personally has not had any major problems with entrances as he

is fairly

mobile but there are

when she wheeled

challenges

who

her friend,

temporarily

is

in

a

wheelchair, around the campus.

“The problem area that stuck out most for her was the women’s

the

washroom

said he found the school to

lew spe-

Lyttle has encountered a cific

volunteer firelighter to a student after

has been with the college for

six years.

business admin-

in the

financial

be quite accessible, but could under-

is

3.

after

is

year

first

environment.

on

in

Kemp’s

is

related accident in 1998.

college said wheeling around cam-

button

gram

who

of Wingham.

and counselling in an attempt to fully integrate them into the college

A (Photo by Janet Morris)

lots clear

shouldn't be too bad,” said

Kemp

is

es offers a wide range

the position of the automatic door

long as they keep the

registered

Conestoga College

Doug Kemp demonstrates

lot into the

2A100

the

in

Door

just inside

3.

It

corridor,

has a handi-

capped access sign on the door but you can’t get in that way in a wheel-

“You don’t know' go to the other door and if you were new to the school you might not know there were two doors to chair,” Lyttle said.

to

enter the facility."

She said there

is

if

you go

to the other side

an automatic door but

“Even though

it

is

and turn the corner.

difficult to get in I

work here

I

hadn’t

noticed that you really need to go to

on the other side, wheeled my friend down there I fought with the door and thought it was supposed to be a disabled access entrance. If she had to do this on her own she wouldn’t have managed." The Conestoga College Sept. 2004 accessibility plan states that all identified doors have automatic the other door

because when

I

academic endeavours faced negative consequences directly due to their employment. These negative consequences included reduced time to study, missed assignments and lectures, not having sufficient time to do homework, having lower grades, having later bedtimes, which meant shorter sleeping times, which meant increased fatigue, resulting in more frequent episodes of falling asleep in class, and

some doors that are not accessible. “Door 2 isn’t accessible at all and at Door 3 the button to open the at the bottom of the ramp so you have to press it and get up there in

up the ramp they couldn’t find the button to open the automatic

more

time.”

door.

indicate that their

iate arrivals at school.

automatic door from the outside

Kemp

some

outcomes of working while attending school, please carefully evaluate the amount of time you spend on the job and what effect it truly having on your education. Despite

*

of the positive

is

Bernier, S. (1995). Youth Combining School and Work. Education Quarterly Review, 2,4. Canadian Social Trends. Winter (1994). Working Teens. Cheng, M. (1995) Issues Related lx* Student Part-time Work: What Did Research Find in the Toronto Situation and Other Contexts? Toronto Board of Education Research Department Stem, D. (1997). Learning and Earning: The Value of Working for Urban Students. ERIC Digest #128.

Ford,

J.

&

Bosworth, D. (1995, June). Part-time work and fuSMsme education. Studies in Higher Education, 20 (2),

187-203.

is

Student Services

Door

3

she tried to wheel her friend

turned around and realized

“I

Sanctuary can be difficult. “People move the couches around and I’m lower than most people so the people around me are not really

was

bottom of the ramp, so I had to wheel her down the ramp and hit the button, which was kind of

expecting someone to come up underneath them or bump into their

She said once they got up the ramp, the door opened towards them and they had to back up quickly to

feet, but

people have been generally

good,” he said. the beginning of the year

who were

ple

their

in a hurry

backpacks

at

when peo-

would leave

over the front of

all

bizarre to me.”

“When you opens

are exiting

Door 3

it

one door

correctly, so perhaps

for going out and

ing in

one door for comwould be more appropriate,”

said Lyttle.

have to kick the backpacks out

of the

it

at the

get out of the way.

The bookstore was a challenge

"I

for learning strategy assistance, visit the

Lyttle said she noticed at

when

said getting around in the

the store.

To make an appointment

openers.

way

a

little bit

to

work around

The

cost to purchase and install an

automatic

door

on an outside from $1,500 to

Office.

them,” he said.

entrance ranges

A Message from Learning Strategies

Su Lyttle, the computer technology consultant for disability services, says she is no expert on wheelchair

$3,000 and the cost for an inside door ranges from $1,500 to $1,800.

accessibility but she did design the

ings,

adaptive technology lab for students

pletely accessible.

Visit

our website http://wwwxonestoaac.on.ca/iSD/stserv/index.1so

with disabilities.

fair, few buildeven off campus, are com-

Lyttle said to be

However,

“I’m certainly not an authority on wheelchair accessibility. It’s only

disability services con-

tinues to strive to create a that is free

campus

of barriers.

Big craving. Small budget. A McDeal Everyday $169 |

plus tax

'f'".'

f

I At participating McDonald's' Restaurants |,

<5>20G4

McDanakFs Restaurants

of

nt

Canada. HotvaSd with an

Canada United. For the asdiska

'.

Sandwich

offers

may

vary by restaurant

i’m lovin’

it


News

College hosts

CSI

manufacturing

SPOKE, October

18,

2004

— Page 7

offers free services

Colour photocopying, laminating, scanning, binding

and

faxing services offered at

no cost

to

students

By STEPH BAULK

shindig

Conestoga Students its

made

Inc. has

office this year, in hopes

it

a

few changes

to

will better benefit the

students.

By MIKE

BORS

The discussion

Conestoga College’s ATS manufacturing facility was the site of a seminar Oct. 5 where officials discussed the importance of the manufacturing industry in the

topics were: skills

event

was

put

on

Many

interesting

industry

Canada’s Technology Triangle Inc., a local innovator in the manufacturing industry that markets Waterloo Region on the national and interna-

is

largest

points

were man-

copying,

times

services free to

1

larger

industry

new manufacturing complex

led

by

Dahlin, associate vice-presi-

dent of business development and

The main reason the event was was to shine fight on

held

separating into four groups and delv-

Conestoga’s new manufacturing centre and show the college’s contribution to the industry said Lind Fegan, manager of marketing and Canada’s at communications Technology Triangle. “The event was a great way to of focus demonstrate the

ing into working group discussions.

Conestoga,” said Fegan.

KW area. listened to a handful

of

introductions, including one by col-

lege president John Tibbits, before

late

all

and faxing

students for “educational putposes is

15 cents per

copy.

closing remarks and a tour of the Eric

scanning, binding

laminating,

Black and white photocopying

only.”

Dahlin

manager ofmarketing

The crowd

who were working

industry

from 99 to 200 was three

applied research.

the

a lot of students last year, particularly

the

Lind Fegan,

Many from the industry showed up as well a$ local politicians, bankers and representatives from Conestoga, showing their support for the manufacturing industry in

dents.

bound or laminated or get a colour overhead,” said Dusick. "So we decided to extend the hours to help them with that.” CSI has also made colour printing, colour photo-

The event ended with a recap of each group's main points, some

Canada ’s Technology Triangle

will be open and Saturdays

and growth in

growth.

and communications at

it

the

age

focus of Conestoga.”

16,

to 8 p.m.,

getting their projects finished couldn’t get something

than the aver-

demonstrate the

to

from 8 a.m.

in

1

“The event was a great

to Friday

"We found

1

way

Monday

near the end of the semester,

the

Canada

tional stage.

the office into a self-

from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Judy Dusick, the CSI's general manager, said everything is made easier for and more accessible to the stu-

raised such as the fact that the

by

CSI has changed

finance, international business; and

ufacturing

The

starters,

serve area, and starting on Oct.

municipal issues.

area.

For

and education; innovation and continuous improvement; services,

Dusick said a CSI machines so everything "At

this point in

staff is

member monitors

the

kept under control.

time the photocopier has an access

code on it so if they need a colour copy or a colour overhead our self-service staff will have to help them with that."

John Yungblut, student, said

it's

19, a second-year civil engineering wonderful that CSI has made every-

(Photo by Steph Baulk)

Edgar Xavier, 20, an electronics engineering

thing so accessible to students this year. "I like that

he said.

“It

especially

if

makes things so much more convenient,

telecommunications student, photocopies a black and white page for one of his classes on

you never carry change.”

Oct. 7.

I

can go

in

and use the machines for

free,”

""p

<MYV&n &

remembrance

In

of the

women who

died Dec, 6,

1989

at Ecole Polytechnique in Montreal

Deadline:

Nov.

12,

2004

Entries:

(Photo by Chantelle Timperley)

Hard

at

work

Ala Kader, a first-year woodworking student, works on the top

Current students of Conestoga. College may enter photographs promoting the theme, Positive Relationships, and all it encompasses, including reflections of support, kindness, harmony, peace

and

part of her pedestal table.

tolerance.

Fees:

None Prizes:

$150— $100—S50. Rules: All photographs must be the original work of the entrant. Each entrant may submit 2 photos.

Submit your

Judging will be based on the photograph’s emotional impact as well as composition, original-

Student Services

ity

and technical

"1

1.0%

Off

th

11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Foyer Inside Door #4 Deposit: $25.00

"Photography Contest,"

to;

Room2B04

quality.

and white or colour, and taken with a 35mm or digital camera, but must be submitted as 4” x 6” prints. All entries will become the property of the Women’s Resource Group and winning entries will be published in Spoke and announced on CJIQ. Entries can be black

Tuesday^ & Wednesday October 9 & 20th

entries, clearly labelled

All entries must include the student’s

name, student ID number, Program, e-mail address

andphone number.

Women’s Resource Group


Page 8

— SPOKE, October

18,

2004

'

W

1

.V

' :

CiOVER UNll'EO

Conestoga STUDENTS INC

sanctuary

19+ a^ji-Y


Feature

Kitchener’s mayor, Carl Zehr,

Parade-goers were treated to authentic costumes.

was among

the crowd of people

Photos by Tim Murphy

SPOKE, October

in

18,

2004

— Page 9

the parade.

About 10 clowns entertained the crowd.


— SPOKE, October

Page 10

18,

News

2004

International student enjoying By TIM

MURPHY

from

heard

she

people

that

Conestoga College was the best Every year, many students from

around

the

world

Conestoga College

come

to

to study, leav-

behind their family, friends,

ing

Ontario, which

those students

is

Leanne Chen, a second-year

old

who

Canada, she

said, is quite

different,” she said with a laugh.

Although she didn’t have a posi-

came here from China.

tive

Chen, a soft-spoken woman, said

she

student

She

here, her experiences at

was very

“When we have and

in

Chen her

helpful to her.

issues,

to solve them.”

said after she has finished

ELS

courses, she wants to take a

nursing program here

“Em

we can go

talk with them,” she said.

“They can help us

impression of Canada before

came

travelling

said the international educa-

tion office

there in

and

Ontario have changed her opinion.

similar to China. “It’s just food that's

English Language Studies (ELS)

college

the

she chose to

said.

Living 20-year-

why

come here. “My parents wanted me to come here to study more,” she

and familiar surroundings.

One of

is

in

at

the college.

enjoying studying here, and

the people are kind.

They make me

Canada and good."

feel

Chen

study permit before they can enter

knows some

said she

who have

dents

college

stu-

Canada.

Once

studied English at

they arrive, they are picked

Conestoga, then changed schools

up from the airport

afterwards to finish their studies.

driven

"After doing

made

they

they

so,

realized

a mistake,” she said.

Niagara

with

the

international education office.

The

works

office

make coming

to

try as

The

international education office

which often takes them

approved an application from a

stu-

a

CN Tower, and

Paramount Canada’s Wonderland.

The

must then secure

Niagara

to

games, the

Jacob’s Farmers Market,

St.

uncomplicated as possible.

After the college has received and

dent, the student

if

arranges activities for the students,

Falls, baseball

Conestoga from a foreign coun-

to

Housing

arrangements are also organized

to

and

Falls

Canada’s Wonderland

and

cost,

the student needs them.

She said she has travelled Toronto,

no

at

Conestoga.

to

international education office

also organizes social events for stu-

who

dents in residence

go home during

are unable to

the holidays.

College promotes

women

technology

in

(Photo by Tim Murphy)

Leanne Chen, 20,

is

By NICOLE DEAK

an ELS

ers base

student from China. said she came to Conestoga College because of positive recommendations from friends and family.

She

grams

at

Conestoga College have

had

historically

women

few

enrolled in them.

On

Sept.

Women

a

30,

on encour-

the college and focused

aging and supporting

women who

one of these pro-

are currently in

i

Approximately

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

|

students

per cent of

10

programs are

these

in

women.

i

of the following? Feel extreme anxiety when thinking about doing a presentation.

Find your palms sweat, your legs shake or your heart beats wildly before,

good record of

during or after a speech.

into these courses.

* j

said the college does not have a

Find your thoughts race and your mind blanks before or during a

“We

5

!

Select your progranVcourse/assignments to be “safe' from having to

make

a

women

attracting

are lucky

Risk low marks or failure

in

a course by not doing a speech. (that feel real at the time) to avoid

doing presentations.

women

fill

20

should be seeing numbers

Let others

Fear “making a

*

Befeve even/one

fool of

yourself

is fairly

in front

of teachers or peers.

calm but see yourself as a “wreck.”

Do

over.

chosen

their

be helpful because

to

“Don’t be

something you can get

it!”

Common

concerns raised

at the

job once students graduated and

some

The meeting consisted of an faculty

dents,

students

said

men would

that

they

wished

and alumni. Four

they

think that

were incompetent. Biederman, program co-

Julia

ordinator of civil engineering, said

needs to happen

that

is

for society to get rid of stereotypes.

“Women who

chose technology

more motivated

are

have

alumni attended the meeting and

your group “carry” the presentation.

to

to learn,” she said.

afraid, it’s

We

to succeed.

have a good work ethic and

to

keep ourselves organized.”

Biederman also spoke about why

informal discussion between stu-

Develop creative excuses or illnesses in

want

one change

if

closer to 50/50.”

speech. • j

“We

stick

men

“I find I

per cent of classes,” said Donald.

presentation, •

and information technology,

ing

to

of study.

they had been told ahead of time

John Donald, dean of engineer-

Do you do any

j

skill level.”

meeting were fears of not getting a

grams.

Public Speaking Anxiety

women

in at

on your

working with men and encourages

field

Technology meeting was held

it

Rodgers said she didn’t mind

Technology and engineering pro-

she

number of women

felt the

in

technology was so low. “This

offered advice, shared their experi-

issue

deeply rooted,"

is

ences and spoke words of encour-

said Biederman. “It goes back to

agement

primary school.

to

female students

the

Women

need to be

|

who

.

I

These are some signs you may be experiencing one of the most common anxieties, public speaking anxiety, it can be overcome using a planful approach involving: recognizing and altering negative thoughts; 2) relaxation and positive mental rehearsal techniques; and 3) practicing in low-risk situations and 1 )

;

then

in

Beata Rancourt, a

|

it

engineer-

to

promote

themselves to change society's perception of

are

|

women need

York, said

“It's

-

civil

gy

ing technologist for the Region of

situations with graduated levels of risk.

you course work, your well being, or your potential to perform as an employee are affected, is time to do something about it. Remember, avoidance actually 11

educated about careers

attended.

women

in the field.

a matter of

promoting

our

own

We

need

it,”

how (women)

be more positive.”

a faculty

mem-

ber in communication and liberal she has noticed the

said

studies,

women

lower numbers

is

currently completing

masters

her

of

entering these programs.

Townson

she said. “It’s

Rancourt graduated from

increases anxiety!

Townson,

Kerry'

technolo-

age.”

significantly

attitude that has to change. to

young

at a

in

Athabasca

through

University in Alberta, and plans on civil

doing her

final project oil

women

j

engineering

The

following resources are available to you at the college:

Speaking Anxiety group in the Student Services Office. Enroll in the Public Speaking option of the Anxiety and Personal Performance 2) (offered course as an elective in the Winter semester). 3) Read the Anxiety and Phobia Work b ook, Bourne (available at the LRC on the shelf and on reserve). This approach must be supplemented with practice in 1 )

Inquire about a Public

front of friends, family or classmates.

4)

Make an appointment

with a counsellor

in

Visit

Conestoga College

2002. She said she had no prob-

Student Services.

from Student Services our website htto://www. conesto g ac. on. ca/isp/stserv/index. iso

more women

for

enrolled

changes need

women

We make

are around.

Farah

Rodgers,

a

ticeship

student, in

been an issue for “It’s

said

a

when you

45 guys and three

Rodgers, “but employ-

to

happen

At the meeting,

questions,

in

elemen-

to

to

women were

also

be optimistic, ask be determined, to

have a positive attitude and to stick to

it

no matter what.

Biederman

women

her.

kind of strange

are in a class of girls,” said

being

technology has never

in

be

technology programs,

in

encouraged

mechanical

to

tary school.

the

workplace more positive.”

technician co-op diploma apprenin

order

lem getting a job and offered words

���The atmosphere changes when

She also said

technology.

in

of encouragement to students.

female

A Message

at

as

in

said

the

technology

future is

the

for

same

men.

“There will be good careers, there’s

no doubt about

it.”


News

SPOKE, October

18,

2004

— Page

11

(Photos by Ryan Connell)

Down

to the final two Human services student Sachi Keller, 19, and business management student Adam Fridenburg, 20, were selected as the final two at the CSI Idol competition on Oct. 13. Keller performed Impossible by Christina Aguilera and Fridenburg sang New York New York by Frank Sinatra. The two finalists will perform against each other at the CSI on Oct. 20.

Idol finale

Be

Volunteer work

resume

great addition to By CHANTELLE TIMPERLEY

who

Students

Students meet once a

and

are ambitious

seeking advancement opportunities

may want

to consider volun-

teer work.

Volunteering

beneficial

is

it

comes

to

job hunting.

to

when

teaches

It

how to develop skills, new challenges and gain

By RYAN CONNELL

for an

thing

who

when donating money

to

is

new

to

Conestoga and new

Canada. They provide informaabout

tion

and

school

the

culture.

Turner recommended the peer hosting program because

campus and

flexible.

on

is

it

Most

stu-

Volunteering

heightens confiin

meeting new people, helps

to

make

means of

contacts by

net-

working, improves health and instils It

a sense of value.

allows

students

get

to

own com-

support, develop their

munication

Employers

resumes.

are willing to

go

work on

that extra dis-

tance and are open to learning

new

things.

and a desire

shows

It

to

work

Melissa Turner,

initiative

has been a

time jobs, as well as other activi-

Turner said many of the

stu-

want

to

learn about other people’s cus-

Others just like to help

commu-

somehow.

It

who

are interested

in

year

volunteer

work.

A

Way

money

they

actually stays

community," she says.

college’s annual

up outside

at the college’s

Doon cam-

enhances the quali-

communities by help-

ing to fund various agencies such as

the

AIDS

Committee

of

and Area

(ACCKWA)

and the

all

walk away

make

with

a

students

of

sense

for

someone

will also

see

how much money

is

raised each day during the

paign.

Red paper

“We

money

is

is

being

cam-

added to the

at

the

same

still

community, and more people

need to know that they are out

when people need

letters

“I think

volunteer

work

is

an

she said. "I think employers are really looking for students

who

have gone that extra step to do other

things

beyond part-time

work.”

"That’s what those agencies do

and anybody who's used them has

always

uted to staff and faculty

at the col-

encouraging them to submit

donations to help Conestoga its

come

been

so

thankful,

and

was

there

almost surprised, that

it

and they never even knew about

them before,” she do

exist

says. “Well, they

and they get their funds

from United Way.”

goal.

or

who offer

do volunteer work.

“Most of our volunteers do because they want

to help

program - a support and

friendship

match

where

Conestoga students connect with

from another culture.

it

The Conestoga College United Way Campaign

some-

October 25

one and they enjoy meeting other peopld’,” she said.

“They want

get involved in the college

Turner talked about the peer

students

peer services to students their time to

Volunteer

opportunities

-

November

5,

2004

to

com-

WE'LL BE LOOKING FOR YOU!

munity.’’

and

information on them are posted in the

co-op and career services

department.

CONESTOGA

United W&y

Connect

of

Life

and Learning

assis-

tance.

as last year's so hope-

Pledge cards were also distrib-

closer to

in the

be able to beat the mark

again this year,” Watts says.

lege,

Watts says she thinks more people are starting to use the services

there for

collected.

kept our goal

United Way.

else.

Turner said reference

of the

to

thermometer chart

mmm mm usi

The

just an obligation, however.

(CSI)

Inc.

also be donating

will

its

fully we'll

Way

United Way. Conestoga Students

Halloween Bash on Oct. 28

benchmark

United

donating the profits from the meal

cover charge proceeds from

Nov.

ty of life in

food serve company, will be

ria's

A

kicks off Oct. 25 and runs until 5.

27 for $6. Chartwells, the cafete-

pus to accept donations to reach

chart as

campaign

in

on Oct.

to set

booth will be

Door 4

cafeteria

verbal references are available in

excellent addition to a resume,”

host

Dumfries.

lasagna lunch will be served

Doon campus

can turn out to be more than

they have done something good

this

Cambridge-North

and

A the

hours for their program.

responsibility and the feeling that

more students

that the

Cambridge, Kitchener, Waterloo

students need volunteer

six years, said

she sees

in their

The

Conestoga peer services administrator for nearly

remember

give to United

are busy with studies, part-

Some

are actually using

important for people

to

nity

Huron

Perth-

be posted nearby for passersby to

“It's really

ing because of time commitment.

experience can

hard.

who

need to be

They

in the

Region,

Guelph-Wellington,

large

become involved

that students

chairperson, says that people

United Way.

participate

Waterloo

Way

who

are also impressed

shows

of student affairs

and Conestoga College’s United

Way

College serves four United

the ones

Students often avoid volunteer-

toms.

of the

Conestoga

proper use.

to

regions:

However, Darcelle Watts, execu-

vice-president

donations.

put

little

other people and feel an urge to

see volunteer

It

much time and has

who do

Way.

to ensure the donations are being

the college's goal of $40,000.

conflict with school.

dents

to organiza-

also taking part to help generate

selfish when it comes to money because they’re

and community.

in the college

when they

and be involved

skills

It

ties.

involved with various causes they

tions like United

be considered

Other areas of the college are

zation also monitors the agencies

donating

classes or during lunch.

dence and self-esteem, helps

should

Canadian Red Cross. The organi-

does

dents are able to meet in between

face

not take

that

tive assistant for the office

students

work experience.

Selfishness normally isn't some-

hour with an international student

Canadian

students’ futures, especially

week

Way

selfish with United

Canada


— SPOKE, October

Page 12

Travel

2004

PETERSBURG

ST. By JENNIFER

18,

IS

A CITY

ORMSTON

more confident than

I,

was eager

to

explore our surroundings.

This

second

the

is

At

of

purl

of her summer vacation

tales

H

15

countries

in

mal and uninviting. But as we rounded the corner of a

European the

past,

my

Before

prepared

adequately

not

I

me

my

the first sign of the

It

was

clear

by the looks of aston-

my

church shared

of staggered

Steeples

of the building.

bling sights outside the small air-

looking for

1

such

was

area and

airport I

was

in a desolate

could see for miles

change cials

my

impression, as the

the

Regardless of the wonder before

me, the stench of manure from the horse-drawn carriages by the

to

made Ebenezer Scrooge seem

Across the

The first kind face my dad and 1 saw was that of our local guide, Alya Ignatieva, who would escort

Internet Cafe.

our group during our stay in the city. She paged a car and advised us

over.

my

The fountains

at Peterhof are

Great’s palaces,

is in

among

than being greeted

welcoming

at the hotel

valets

dressed

by in

and their clothes old and shabby. Instead of jubilant Finnish street

churlish security guards.

In

contrast, the Russians looked poor

performers,

police

stood on the

white

pressed

shirts

I

As

I

settled into

my

dingy hotel

roadside randomly stopping people

room,

in antiquated vehicles.

only to be confronted by images of

To add

to

my

trepidation, rather

street

As

sign

a

read

earlier,

I

1

decided to venture

walked into the smoke-filled air so thick it was difficult to breath, and asked the attendant, "May I use the computer?” “No, it’s down,” he replied

the most spectacular

in

room, the

tv Jennifer Ormstcn)

the world. Peterhof, one of Peter the

the background.

and black suits, was “warmly” received by large metal detectors and three

people.

visit

I

(Kioto

I

attractive

my

had not checked emails since arriving in Europe

days

to

and

to cut

short.

friendly by comparison.

scapes

me

church forced

offi-

spend the day sightseeing until we met the group for dinner. As with my drive from the airport into Helsinki, u'as startled by the view. This time, however, the sights before me were not of scenic land-

quickly

the vibrant building

tenorist.

around were dilapidated buildings and an archaic landing strip. Russian customs did little

which

the Spilled Blood, erected

concern for our personal

all

me

Frommer’s

trusty

Church of our Saviour on on the site of the bloody murder of Emperor Alexander II in 1881 by a

St.

Petersburg were quickly dashed and to

my

guide,

informed

The

heights

rummaged through my bag

travel

thoughts.

safety.

awe.

were topped with multicoloured onion-shaped domes. Mosaic panels depicting scenes from the New Testament surrounded the exterior

However, as our Finnair plane approached the runway, the trou-

changed

around the

that the tourists milling

I

dreams of an opulent

had ever seen

ishment and clicking of cameras

weeks.

My

I

before.

utes. During that time my thoughts were consumed by the uncertainty of meeting the tour group my father and would join for the next three

dissipated

The impressive

prevalent.

design unlike any

Finland,

window

my

amazement.

and uncommonly colourful church in front of me had a complex

turbulent

plane

potholes,

to

mistakenly presumed

I

would be

for

plane

from flight where I had spent a luxiourous few days wandering through lush parks and crowded squares, to St. Petersburg was pleasantly short: only 35 min-

The

Helsinki.

me was

splendor

prior experiences had

encountered as what descended into Russia.

turned

feelings

travelling throughout the continent:

with

riddled

street

1

considered myself well versed in

however,

me

forms

approxi-

visited

mately

left

Young men dressed in militia uniroamed the streets. The smell of gasoline mixed with vendor food made my stomach feel woozy. The buildings looked dis-

to

Europe. She has left Finland with her father to meet their tour group in St. Petersburg. Eastern

aving

our wanderings

first,

disappointed and nervous.

Jennifer’s travel series recounting

I

switched on the television

violence

bloodshed

and

in

Chechnya, where a bomb had killed

its

just

cent national

rampant

leader.

The BBC informed me, now a wary and scared traveller, that

rebels.

permeated through Russia. President Vladimir Putin had been reinaugurated the week before and his reign was fraught with problems, including high

cut

political unrest

unemployment rate. and Chechen

gruffly.

“When

crime

will

it

be working?”

I

inquired.

“How

Thankfully a knock at the door my viewing short. My dad,

the hell

would

I

know,” he

rudely responded.

poverty rates, a more than 20 per

.H> (Koto by Jennifer Qnrston)

Tourists

the

city.

may

climb to the top of the golden

The church,

built to

dome

hold 14,000 patrons,

at St. Isaac’s Cathedral for is

now

an unbeatable view

only used on special occasions.

of

The main stainway that glitter as

at Peterhof

you climb the

is

adorned with gilded carvings

stairs.


Travel

SPOKE, October

18,

2004

— Page 13

OF STRIKING CONTRASTS So back to the hotel we traipsed, happy to be in Russia, blit seriousquestioning the local attitude.

ly

That evening we met our group and tour guide for the first time. Joining us on our adventure were native New Yorkers John Hanks and Fran Condon, a couple in their 50s, and Massachusettsans Bob and Ursula Harper, a couple in their late 70s who had remark-

as the exterior, although

making

your way to the front door through the overbearing street vendors, selling everything from faux beaver-fur hats

made

poorly

to

knock-offs of handcrafted Russian

long curly

Matrushka dolls, was trickier than 1 had expected. However, once made my way through the immense doorway my patience was rewarded. Incandescent paintings and mosaics of moving biblical scenes framed in gold mouldings covered

red hair, uninhibited like her per-

the walls and ceilings, even into the

sonality.

highest recesses of the dome.

Our

able energy.

tour organizer.

Amber MedkitY. was woman in her 30s with

a

peppy

I

For better or for worse, the seven

The sound of high-heeled shoes

of us w'ould spend the next three

clanging against the marble floor

u'eeks together.

resounded

Our days

in St.

Petersburg were

busy with touring beginning early in the

morning and cultural events

running

late into the

evening.

As we emerged from Peterhof,

of

was clear we had heatwave of Helsinki

Peter the Great, the

left

palace

it

behind. I

1

1

touted

often

property,

as

the

Russian version of the French exquisite

fountains

at

Peterhof were a sight to behold. Dozens of glittering gilded bronze

with water cascading around them lined the hill up to the majestic yellow grand palace. Walking through the lavishly fursculptures

nished rooms of the grandiose cas-

imagined the royalty who had immense chambers, surrounded by rare artwork, marble statues and crystal chandeliers. Even the walls were decorated with elaborate mouldings, the windows shielded by velvet drapes and the floors covered with precious mar-

tle,

1

lived in these

wood arranged

ble and

in intricate

to

pinnacle of the arched roof,

wings open, a symbol of the Holy Spirit.

its

The cool

my

up

chill

air in the building sent a

was easy

fathom why pro-

to

duction of this marvellous building

40

lasted

all

saw

Through the windows,

a view of

the magnificent fountains,

known

Grand Cascade, could be

the

wonders and

treas-

soon realized the stark contrast between the rich and poor had left a permaures

I

nent

mark on me.

Petersburg,

in St.

I

As we drove down swanky boulevards, like the famous Nevsky Prospect, we passed ostentatious statues, stately museums and highend stores. The money that had

adorned with diamonds.

And

my

yet in

attire,

is

Of

many

the

attractions in

Petersburg, for me, the goldenSt.

streets in a jalopy,

the

it

breaks

my

it,”

said

heart.”

This forlorn woman’s poignant

was heart wrenching to hear and even harder to comprehend. The cruelness of some governmenstory

tal regimes made the tribulations of Canadian politics seemed as trivial as a passing cloud on an otherwise sunny day. It was with saddened spirits that our group parted ways with our brave guide and boarded the plane

Moscow. Only later,

lor

after

other local guides,

lucky

meeting several I

came

we were

to

to realize

become

acquainted with Alya.

She granted our group the

rare

life

in

St.

Petersburg from

the

inside.

(Photo by Jennifer Ormston)

Pick up a copy of next week’s

Spoke as Moscow.

Jennifer

arrives

in

My

father stopped for a photo with a thirsty horse outside the

colourful

Church

of

our Saviour on the Spilled Blood.

cized locals,

end,

stay

in

St.

had harshly critithe disposition of most but maybe 1 had judged

Petersburg,

I

unfairly.

came

with Alya

she confided

to an our small

in

group about her home welled

life.

Tears

her brown eyes as she

in

afford their

had

no

own

choice

place, thus they

but

to

despite a bitter divorce.

cohabit

She was

window of our small

communal living. The one shining light in her life has been her son. She set aside

which in my estimation required shock absorbers. I could masterpiece

see this architectural

hazy

the

air

for

what

into

every ruble she could spare to send him to university in the United

He

has earned a

seemed like miles. As we approached realized it was even grander than 1 had

arship to a school in Oregon, where

expected.

PhD

1

100

than

columns lined the attention to the

highest of

exterior,

dome

-

granite

drawing

the fourth

kind in the world.

its

of

red

saints

and

angels

States.

he

is

full

schol-

currently working towards his in

economics and holds two

part-time jobs. Sadly, they have not seen each

other in almost a decade.

Since he

left,

Alya has applied for go to the United

several visas to

adorned the roof.

States; however, the Russian gov-

once the leading Russian Orthodox cathedral, was turned into a museum under the

ernment has refused each application on the basis that she does not have enough savings and investments to ensure her return to St. Petersburg. It fears she would for-

Isaac’s,

Soviet regime.

The

do,

humble

one of the lucky ones though: many less fortunate families were forced

tour bus,

St.

I

appeared needy.

my

Throughout

them

in

was

Isaac’s Cathedral

the climax of the city tour.

Statues

not to think about

driving through graffiti-lined

with her ex-husband. Neither could

Petersburg

More

“I try

Alya. “If

assessment, the

average person, clad

a place with

at

countless photo opportunities for

through

Alya how she deals with the separation.

16,000 substantial

brown crooked teeth. She lived in a humble apartment

From

be kept apart for so long. She asked

Hermitage, one of the most famous museums, houses a vast collection of Russian treasures worth millions of dollars. One horse blanket I saw was even

Peterhof was limited

Our time

domed

her face.

The

began, her lips quivered, revealing

St.

down

shaken by this tragic tale, was unable to comprehend how a mother and son could

world’s

seen and in the distance, the Gulf

tourists.

slid

visibly

seemed outlandish.

of Finland was visible. as St.

Amber,

opportunity to catch a glimpse of

years.

Despite

Tears slowly

how

spine.

As our time

designs.

as the

looked up

I

see a dove suspended in the cupola

America.

been spent beautifying the city

Versailles.

The

ears.

dome

centre of the

It

had religiously studied the Weather Network for weeks prior to departing and all signs had indicated balmy weather. Hou'ever, as minute snowflakes sporadically fell from the sky, realized my wardrobe was inappropriate. With chattering teeth and frigid hands, wandered through the manicured gardens of this grand

my

in

stood directly beneath the

I

at the

the bus at

summer

the

As

what little money she has in her homeland to stay with her son in feit

inside

was

as

overwhelming

(Photo by Jennifer Ormston)

a popular tourist attraction on account of its unique architecture. Depending on what translation book you read, the church goes by different names including Church of the Redeemer, Resurrection Church and Church of the Bleeding Saviour.

The Church of our Saviour on the Spilled Blood

is


S

— SPOKE, October

Page 14

Entertainment

2004

18,

Moviegoers can buy more popcorn thanks to lower SilverCity prices By JASON

SONSER

Sept. 10. Sherbin said the prices will

remain where they are

Moviegoers

know

reason to raise them.

be pleased to

will

He added

that SilverCity’s ticket prices

success of the

Reducing the price of tickets from a high of $13.50 to $9.95 for

be

adult general admissions

is

will

porate

affairs

at it’s

$13.50,

Sherbin said although the imple-

mentation of the $9.95 admission

be seen

price has been attracting people,

as an exceptional value.

“$9.95

for

movie at SilverCity was weekend matinees were and weekday matinees

hope

that lowering the price will

admissions

general

takes the guesswork out of going to

that

implemented all across Canada, which has been successful in other

in the

The new admission

box office

price started

CLASSIFIED other

Programming idle some interested

some

clock

cycles

on

collaborating

in

innovative software ideas.'

Objective

is

a saleable app or

it'll

in

the

in

it’s

"I

theatre

has

been

prices.

gone down.

was a little expensive to begin with,” Todd said. “So lowering their prices is great, it will get more “It

people out.”

September 23 October 22

You have been questioning your

faith

want

to

the

and

beliefs.

you

If

be sure you're following path

right

look into other

options.

Taurus

w

the prices are sig-

get the

still

-

April 20

20

4

J

4f§||

October 23

November

You know what you want your

with

Scorpio

May

-

moment and

to

Seize

life.

your

tailor

do

this life

big

The opportunity

money

make

to

-

21

a

little

on the horizon. It won't be without cost to your social life but is well worth the extra

is

effort.

James Hammond, a second-year

relations student, said she thinks ticket

be a little more sensitive to the people around you who may have good ideas as well.

towards reaching that goal.

broadcasting thinks

SilverCity’s

on are controversial. Try

,

mean, you

compensate for the lowered admission prices. The pricing of snacks, for example, is based on the price given by the suppliers. Megan Todd, a second-year pubgreat that

too overbearing

to

Hewitt said she goes to Cineplex

seniors.

hit theatres.

/

-

only once

said he will

to

prices have

matthewevans@golden.net No attachments please.

to SilverCity,

have caught

because

21

expressing your views

a while.”

just like SilverCity,” Hewitt said.

it’s

look good on the resume.

basis

appealing movies

lic

an economically viable business. Share in equity. Worst case,

regular

a

screen and the great sound there,

changed

with

students

do go

Sherbin said none of the other

Computer

movies on

He

it's

many movies

March

III

issues that

because we don’t have that kind of finances while we’re going to school,” Hewitt said. “So when we

be able to evaluate the success of the new admission price once more

prices

Seeking

see

too high for students to go

that

people’s attention.

provinces.”

way

According to Cineplex Odeon and Galaxy Cinema’s website, ticket prices are $8.95 for general admission and $6.50 for children and

However, he said

plan

is

nificantly cheaper than SilverCity.

there haven’t been as

price

Libra

Aries

-3

You have been in

the

seen in “the past three or four years.”

2004

18,

lowered their prices, she prefers to

Odeon because

September has been one of worst Septembers SilverCity has

was

simplified

'AW

interesting that SilverCity has

this past

the movies,” Sherbin said. "It’s a

HgV

”1 think the pricing in SilverCity

the movies that

to theatres, they

second-year

a

go to Cineplex Odeon on Fairway Road.

accordingly.

$10.75 were $8.75.

said

SilverCity,

be evaluated and decisions will

made

sion to a

Sherbin, manager of cor-

even though attract people

price

Prior to Sept. 10, general admis-

an

attempt by SilverCity to bring more people to their theatres.

Andrew

new admission

Hewitt,

Krista

Week of Oct.

NjCM-;/

broadcasting student, said although it’s

as time progresses, the

have been lowered.

all

until there is

iPV Horoscope *!§(

is

it

lowered

its

student,

he

said

“cool” that SilverCity

Gemini

fijl

prices.

May

21

June 21

-

/Sfj? Sagittarius November 22

great.

I

think

it

was

the

money

W

|

\<qjpi

You and your

“It’s a great place to watch a movie, the seats are great, the sound is great, the screens are

had complaints about; it was a pricey to watch a movie.”

-

Jkjjfljjr

Cale Finn, a third-year broadcasting student, said his only complaint about SilverCity is their high friends are like

You can

crackers and cheese.

have them separately but not the

I

ing.

little

same

Try not

someone

if

to

just

it's

is

miss-

exclude anyone.

December 21

Generally you are a happy

person and

week you feel away from

this

Stay

successful.

self-admiration,

it’s

not some-

thing to brag about and you

should adjust your attitude

Cancer J*

June 22

T

-

July 22

lU Capricorn

r. J||y T

December 22

'

-

January 19

ON CAMPUS JOB FAIR! OCTOBER 26

Feeling a

E-WING 10:00

a.nt.

-

little

lonely? Perhaps

You

awesome,

looking

are

awesome and

generally

new pet is in order. It will keep you company and show you the

have a happy disposition.

value of taking care of something

stay

a

that

totally

is

dependent on you.

feeling

on

this

To

high you'll need to

keep on finding the positive

in

everything.

1:00 p.m.

© Bring your resume and meet with employers hiring for

Leo

if/

C/V

part-time and seasonal employment

July 23

-

Aquarius

J|k

January 20 February 18

August

22

/Visit Career Services and pick up an employer information booklet, or visit the

This

Career Services website to view/print a booklet.

week you

www.conestogac.on.ca/stserv/careef

i

the

“Campus

Bulletin

Board”

an updated

list

at

ww w

.

workopo

1 i

of employers.

Capital Paving

Choices Association

Com Dev

Express Personnel Services

Fed Ex Ground

Goodlife Fitness

Inc.

Municipality of Securitas

TNT

Virgo

U

Going Places Cruise Line Resort Hiring Agency

Arvato Services

drawn to your posKeep on smilin'!

You share Green Day's opinion and don't want to be an American Idiot. Here's how: stay in school, cancel your NRA membership and quit your fast-food diet.

sc a mpus .com for

Employers registered to-date include: •

feeling

notice and be itive spirit.

/Check

are

People will take

lighthearted.

Ltd.

February 19-

March 20

Baby Jo.

Property Maintenance

it’s you, according to Jo Stop obsessing over your

commitment

partner's

have

Volunteer Centre of

Pisces

'

&

Bayham

Canada

£3

-

August 23 September 22

you,

can't

him or her; one they want to be

who

a little trust in

you're the

It's

to

not

someone

you

that

stinks,

it's

around you. You quite put your finger on ... follow your nose, else

with.

Guelph/Wellington

Weber Supply Wellington Terrace for the

Aged

Home "**"*\^

Janet Morris

k_

K

is

a 2nd-year journalism

student in tune with the universe.


News

SPOKE, October

— Page 15

2004

18,

Former Blue Jay pitcher and television analyst dies By JON

YANEFF

The

Rogers

44-year-old

Sportsnet analyst was scheduled to

The Toronto Blue Jays baseball season

when

came

their

show

John Cerutti, unex-

His

vision analyst,

pectedly died.

game with comRob Faulds but he did not

call the Jays’ final

end Oct. 3 former pitcher and teleto a tragic

mentator up.

medical workers where his body

was found. Blue Jays president Paul Godfrey on the TSN website that

said

was believed

Cerutti

SkyDome

room was

hotel

to

searched by police and emergency

not suspected.

Cerutti’s career stats

Claudia, and their three children,

Cerutti

behind

leaves

Drafted 21st overall by

the Toronto Blue Jays

Toronto’s

After joining the Blue Jays in

Pitched six years

in

the

and spent six seasons with the club.

for the

Blue

The

Tigers

respectable 3.94 earned run aver-

Appeared

league •

in

229 major

games

in

won-loss

record

229 games with the Jays and

the Detroit Tigers.

From 1997-2002

Cerutti

was

Posted a 49-43 win-loss

record

seasons as the

lead

analyst

Cerutti

Had an 3.94 earned

run

for

Rogers Sportsnet.

was considered by many

to be an excellent pitcher

former Toronto

the

Blue Jays colour commentator for CBC before spending the last three

(Internet photo)

SkyDome

had a career with a

49-43

Blue Jay pitcher and commenwas found dead in his

relief pitcher

Jays and the Detroit

age

tator,

pick,

draft

1983 he helped win the American League East titles in '85 and ’89

major leagues

Cerutti,

was

native

first-round

21st overall, in 1981. in

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wife,

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The Albany, N.Y. •

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and an

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Blue Jays. Through his accom-

average

plishments he was an even better

hotel room.

(Photo

person.

Physical resources reaches

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Mark Harwood of physical resources repairs lights 1 at Conestoga College’s Doon campus on Oct. 5.

by James

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Page 16

— SPOKE, October

Sports

2004

18,

Rugby team hoping Would By KATE BATTLER

medal

dreaming of a gold the Ontario College is

at

(OCAA)

Association

Athleties

championship tournament, Oct. 30 and 3 Assistant coach Geoff Moskalyk says the team is hoping for a third1

place finish in the standings so they don't have to face the Seneca Sting the

in

missed the 2-point conversion kick for the fourth time in a row.

The Condors came try

like

to

Seneca went on

end up

third

and

play

Peter-

borough

in

it

showed by

*

the

round.”

first

says Moskalyk.

their

all

game and how they

on Oct.

5.

is

that

leading in

Moskalyk says game was prob-

The Condors scored

first

the first time

in

three

Seneca has not been a game. The Sting have

game

in

three years,

the

lost.

"There were some good runs,

good rucking, good tackling by the forwards and a good game overall," says Moskalyk. “The boys put all their heart into the game and it showed by how they played today.”

After conceding the hard-fought

at

OCAA championships.

best

the

team has played all year, even though

coach

against Seneca

leading to three straight victories the

called

against the Sting.

they

game

also not lost a

should

ably

with a kick to go up 3-0.

This

that

been

GeoffMoskalyk,

got off to a good start in their

espe-

obstruc-

have

the

assistant

calls,

for

tion,

played today.”

The Condors

years

win the game

to

30-8 but the Condors put up quite a fight considering the number of

“The boys put heart into the

the

score 20-8.

missed

would

really

making

version kick as well,

cially

"We

back

right

of their own. scored by Russel Wykes, but missed the con-

with a

first

round.

round

in first

To start off the second half Seneca scored another try but

The Conestoga Condors men's rugby team

Seneca

third-place finish to avoid

like

a gold rush

for

game

to No.-l

ranked Seneca, the

Seneca came back and proceeded to score three trys during the remainder of the first half, yet they failed on all three conversion kicks

Condors are hoping to pull out a win over the current secondranked team. the Mohawk

leaving the score at 15-3 to finish

Hespeler secondary Cambridge.

the first half.

Mountaineers, on Oct. 23

at

Jacob

school

in

(Photo by Kate Battler)

Mike

Seneca

Parkhili runs the bail against the

down by a Seneca

The

player.

Sting, Oct. 5, while

won

first-ranked Sting

teammate Matt Caudle gets taken

30-8.

Alternative leagues falter during lockout By

10 Manitou Dr <

Although an

,

sible

Tfitchener, Out.

— Monday —

void,

$4 domestic

pints

$2.50 burgers $5.00 burger and Blue

all

day

— $3 bottles

of

domestic beer

two the

fill

more

problems than anticipated. The World Hockey Association (WHA) and Original Stars Hockey League (OSHL) planned to give hockey fans another way to enjoy the game, but financial problems have already ensued. The was hoping to begin a

WHA

their

since

first

on

Nick Vaccaro attempted to transfer the trademark rights to an

WHA

successful

allow the

may

transaction

WHA

to

operate

this

before

$3.50 pints $5.99 fish & chips special

it

TV giveaway

pints of

domestic beer

every Saturday

nite!

Live classic rock entertainment every Friday

and Saturday Coming soon

nite (no cover)!

NTN and OBI

WHA season, one minimum

a.m. to 2 a.m. daily

six.

Quebec

City's

franchise.

$60

a ticket to see

NHL

the rejection of a $7. 5-mill ion

stated the league

US

contract offer by

14,

$ 20

hockey phenom, Sidney Crosby.

The last attempt ed from 1972 although

it

WHA last-

at the

to

1979.

may have

failed,

allow teams such as the Oilers,

Hartford

Winnipeg

Jets to

NHL once

The

WHA

it

it

was supposed

begin Oct.

to

NHL

OSHL 7.

,

games

after witnessing smaller

than anticipated preseason crowds.

At in

the Sept.

Barrie,

1

to begin Oct.

ticket prices to

.

OSHL

The

is

offering

non-

a

game

hockey with no two-line pass rule, no-touch icing, and line changes

However, on Sept. 2 1 OSHL president, Randy Gumbley, postponed all

was

and has lowered

did

folded.

The new

OSHL press release

defensive four-on-four

Edmonton

regular season.

Oct. 9, an

to six dif-

and

Whalers and merge with the

not the only

is

On

many average

mixed on

players

was

17-year-old

pool of the

league, since fans are paying $34 to

7 preseason opener

only 2,176 spectators

watched Toronto beat Detroit 163, and then on Sept. 20, a few hundred fans saw Boston defeat Montreal 14-1 1, in Brampton, Out. Such poor attendance may be 1

of

being made on-the-fly. Instead of

power plays, opposing teams were to be awarded penalty shots.

NHL players committed to OSHL include Dan Cloutier of

the the

Vancouver Canucks, Scott Gomez of the New Jersey Devils, Mike Comrie of

the

Phoenix

Smyth of

the

Ryan

Coyotes,

Edmonton

Oilers and

trophy winner. Andrew Raycroft of the Boston Bruins, as

Calder

60 other NHL players. and Although both the OSHL hope to fill in during the well as

WHA

NHL season,

the

OSHL

be the only place

in

North

locked-out

may

America where hockey fans can watch

NHL stars.

The

Nordiks, pulled out on Aug. 27

when

the

team could not meet

WHAT financial The Hamilton

1 1

of

Originally. Quebec, Hamilton and Dallas were also supposed to field teams for the league, but all three were forced to fold while everything was coming together.

the

requirements. franchise did not

have an arena to play

Open

another

Currently there are only five teams short of the league

$4

is

obstacle to overcome.

confirmed for the

Saturday

there

starts,

in relation to the talent

ferent teams.

alternative league to postpone their

Sept. 30, league co-founder

attributed to the high cost of tickets

Aside from the franchises backing out, another blow to the league

year's scheduled season, however,

Friday

not exist this year.

ice this year.

A

$3 bar shots

may

league that

rival

1979,

in

unidentified purchaser.

Thursday

most recent team to exit the league on Sept. 29 when Belfour and business partner, Rick Munro, decided they could not have a team in a

Dec. 26. Instead, the league has been in turmoil and will likely not get on the

On

Wednesday

pos-

is

but have experienced

folding

29 cent wings

lockout

leagues hoped to

60-game season,

$4.00 pints

Tuesday

NHL

an entire season,

for

upstart

894-4445

Sunday

BRENT GERHART

home games,

as they could not attain a secure

Copps Coliseum. The Dallas Americans, co-owned by Toronto Maple Leafs goaltender, Ed Bel four, became the lease with

Specials are available at the Kitchener location only

(Photo by Brent Gerhart)

The they

WHA hit

and

the ice

OSHL

ran into

in their

some

financial

inaugural seasons.

problems before


Digital Edition - October 18, 2004