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Women

Brighten up

your

There is lots of support for Waterloo Region women in need.

life

Grab your paint and palette and head to Homer Watson House and Gallery for

in Crisis

European tour opens student’s eyes to the wonders of eastern Europe.

Helsinki

a workshop.

Tuesday, October 12, 2004

Conestoga College, Kitchener

36th Year

— No. 19

Larger offices

make CSI more

of

a presence By

RYAN CONNELL

reserve

to

order to work on

in

group, projects.

Conestoga Students has expanded

(CSI)

Inc.

office space at the

its

college in order to create a greater

presence and increase awareness.

CSI president

Falconer

Justin

says by expanding their offices on

campus, students will realize how important and helpful they are. "Our goal is to increase our presence and our physical location at the college by trying to gobble up more and more space whenever we can,” Falconer says. ‘"People don t necessarily complain about the rec centre fee that is in their tuition because see

they

We

re sort

physical presence. its of trying to do the same.”

The college approved the CSI s rooms 1B21

request to expand into

1B23,

and

door

next

the

to

The

Sanctuary, at no extra expense.

rooms have been transformed into a Falconer says the new office space was also required to handle the growth that CSI was experienc-

programmer

new

events

year and the composition

this

munications specialist added last year.

"CSI has grown more past year than

space,

it

has

in the past

we needed and the new CSI

sev-

extra office

allows us to also work more comfortably,” he says. A new self-serve function has

been added

this year, offering free

their student leaders

says.

The

cost for the renovations has

been estimated at $35,000 and is coming from CSI s capital development fund. The staff and the president s offices were furnished with mostly recycled furniture

from

which weren

year, as well as

t

some of

free last

the reno-

vation costs.

was refurnished with desks

and other supplementary supplies at a cost

of approximately $3,500. was painted

directors office

bright yellow to encourage an energetic atmosphere. The directors

computers were provided free of charge by the college through the technology fee agreement. Falconer says he'hopes to expand presence more

s

The

self-serve

also

has

longer hours this year. It is now open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday

and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. beginning Oct 16. CSI s office inside the Sanctuary

to Friday

being used with the space being converted into a larger office is

still

for

the

president and

a

private

office for the eight board of directors so they can work on student

atmosphere

themed

ovated

in

Falconer

high-

"Other than the

no other place

library, there is

to go.”

Falconer says the board of directo distribute

upcoming weeks, asking how important quiet study space is to them for their academic success was

if it

would

actually be used

if it

offered.

"We

re trying to get

some gener-

feedback from the students about what they think, and then we re al

going to take it to the college,” Falconer says. Dusick compares each students net cost for the total renovations of the ly

new CSI

offices to approximate-

one report binding and one scan-

ning,

now

free,

at the

old cost of

$1.80.

at

Conestoga.”

control. Story

on Page

3.

Enrolment up by 4.5 per cent from dents being admitted has decreased

By DESIREE FINHERT

1

the

and

the circus

architectural engineering student, juggles three ball-hockey balls that yard sale. Jeff Jonesy, wearing the hockey gloves that he bought,

he purchased at the rec centre laughs as his friend tries not to lose

five-question survey to students in

dents over the course of their stay

for students

Danno Twomey, a second-year

a four- to

old office so

CSI clubs can meet or

It’s

chairs, coffee tables,

being ren-

still

s

with

and just generally a nice, quiet place where people can go to read and study,” he

backed

"This is an example of the way in which our directors believe in giving back as much as we can to stu-

leadership issues.

A meeting room is

in the future,

and will question students to see if they want more quiet study areas. "I would like to offer quiet study areas that are like a Chapters-

.

area

while the directors

last year,

office

tors plan

services,

and

being interrupted by the day-to-day operations of the CSI office,” she

desk receptionist this year when the services went self-serve. They used the money saved from the receptionist s salary to recover some of the costs of the

more

discuss issues and ideas without

says.

front

a

"This enables students to drop by

and meet

colour photocopies, binding, laminating and overheads. CSI decided not to renew the contract of their full-time

in

private setting.

CSI

in staff this

so

years,

eral

board of directors

their

The

larger office for full-time staff.

ing in staffing, with a

CSI s general manager Judy Dusick says they added the directors space in order to facilitate the need for students to interact with

.5

the

last

school

year and up about

of engineering

information technology

per cent.

is

cent, with about

,688 stu-

student

two per

while many increased other Ontario colleges enrolment

applications increased about eight per cent and admittance increased

dents in

decreased.

about two per cent. Vice-president of student affairs, Fred Harris, presented the report to

and biotechnology is up about 1.5 per cent, and has approximately

Conestoga Colleges enrolment this

Out

of

24

year,

colleges

province, Conestoga

is

in

the

one of eight

However, Conestoga

s

1

The school of health communication services

total.

sciences,

1,698 students.

There

about a four per cent

board and said the college s increase is due to its solid reputacollege in the tion as the No.

increase in first-year students and a decrease of about 12 per cent in

province.

third-year students, due to the nurs-

over last year, for a total of approximately 6,130 full-time post-sec-

snowball effect,” said Harris. “When something is good it

ing diploma program being phased out, and the last class of students

ondary students. The enrolment report was discussed at a Conestoga board of governors meeting on Sept. 27.

attracts

had an increase. Conestoga s enrolment report for the fall semester shows enrolment

that

was up approximately

4.5 per cent

According to the report, the number of people applying to programs in Ontario s colleges has dropped five per cent and the number of stu-

the

1

“It s

a

is

At Conestoga, enrolment in the school of liberal and media studies

from- that program graduating in June 2003. This means there was no third-year class in 2004.

has increased about 15 per cent, for a total of approximately 881 students. The school of business is up about five per cent, with approxi-

ond-year enrolment, up about 13 per cent due to an influx of secondyear students from last year s dou-

more people.”

mately 1,863 students

in total,

and

The

greatest increase

ble cohort.

is

in sec-


Page 2

News

— SPOKE, October 12„ 2004

Pay

Now deep thoughts ...with Conestoga College Random

questions answered by random students

What

is

the

most ridiculous

for directors HOWD EN

By JE NN IF ER

Conestoga Students

Inc.

(CSI)

how

I

of

I

Roman

Delicart, sec-

ond-year public relations

sure

required to spend five hours a

week CSI offices. These five hours take away from time they could be spending at part-time jobs. The remuneration would reimburse the directors for those lost wages and for the hard work they put into rep-

comparing CSI

in the

determine how much the directors should be given. Currently, 22 out of 30 college student^ associations pay their directors, ranging from $4.08 at Sir Sanford Fleming in Peterborough to $31.35 an hour at Confederation

president,

is

to recognize the strug-

and investing

to

do a week. Falconer

associations

in

these

to

is

student

to

Thunder Bay. is comparing

Falconer

lation of Conestoga, the size

popuof CSI

recognizing the work that directors

and the size of CSI’s surplus

other colleges’ to determine a fair

their

part-time jobs, class

time.

amount

There is a tremendous time on these people.”

strain

directors.

their

to give

to

been deter-

to

mem-

trying to be

deciding

on the amount of the monthly remuneration, and will be consulting the student population.

Besides reimbursing the direclost wages, CSI also hopes this money will encourage more tors’

students to

become involved

in the

future.

“We

don’t want to prohibit stu-

dents from being involved with stu-

dent leadership because they can’t said Judy Dusick, CSI manager. “We want to make sure students can get involved without it costing them

afford

it,”

general

their part-time jobs.”

not about the money. That’s

“It’s

not

why I’m

Wismer, last

here,”

director. “I

said Jessica

was on (CSI)

year without getting paid.

about taking a big

hit to

It’s

your rev-

CSI

many

is

planning on asking as

students as possible for their

opinion.

Falconer and the directors hope

reimburse the

students understand and that they

is

taking a close

regarding lost wages.

at the student 'associations at

“Our students have part-time

Windsor and Algonquin College in Ottawa because they most closely resem-

jobs, they sell shoes and pour ice

look St.

Clair College in

ble CSI.

Like CSI, Algonquin has one and seven directors and they pay their president, one vice-president

Falconer said CSI proposed

is

when

can relate to the directors’ problem

In particular, he

The directors are Nelofer Ahmed, Leanne Bird, Jason Blamire,

Falconer said CSI as fair as possible

enues.” the

do despite

mined.

posed

a

the college stu-

expected

CSI

will receive has not yet

It

compiled

all

tion for the directors. Directors are

Justin Falconer,

Amit Rajput and Jessica Wismer. The exact amount the directors

look.

of

list

budget.

looking into a monthly remunera-

is

Dariusz Czajkowski, Matt Jackson,

“The goth

this year’s

includes information on how much they pay their directors, how many directors they have and how many hours the directors are

homework and

are wearing.”

was not in has Falconer

However, CSI may change

This

the time,” said Falconer. “It’s about

Derek Murphy, year firefighter

because director remu-

neration

detailed

The money

out of the organiza-

dent associations in Ontario that

“We want

girls

come

a volun-

to the college.

gle of going to school

“Those stupid leather mukluk boots that

have to

tion’s surplus

Then they

information gets

this

resenting the students.

“Those turtlenecks with no sleeves. It s kind of an oxymoron.” Bogdan Soica, secondyear public relations

they give the

if

will

that.

them.”

themselves,

proposal the green light

between the They go out and ask the students what they want and how they think the col-

teer job.

Want to know know? m one

it

students and the college.

back

goals.

fund

directors act as a link

make

“People who waste their time on unattainable

to

provide funding, forcing the CSI to

lege can be improved.

trend you ve noticed lately?

However, the college refused

lege.

proposed

$550

bers be reimbursed $225 a month,

directors

which they hoped would come in the form of an honorarium from the col-

hours a week.

pay

a St.

month

for

10

Clair does not

cream cones. They understand the of juggling work with school and other commitments,”

difficulty

Falconer said.

Students with concerns about remuneration or any other school issue are invited to stop by the directors’ office in the Sanctuary to air their views.

their directors.

first-

s sup-

be original but everyone seems to copy it.”

to

Kristal Brail, first-year office administration

executive

“Mullets,

because they

re

(Photo by Melissa Hancock)

ugly.”

Brianne Armstrong, firstyear early childhood edu-

Faking paramedic students practise College on Oct. 1. First-year

stretcher-lifting

it

techniques outside Door 5

at

Conestoga

cation

K-W

Oktoberfest invades By MIKE Oktoberfest

“Those that

really long shirts

make people

like

look

they re wearing

Everett,

second-

year broadcasting

back Oct. 8-16 and

Conestoga College students should be out enjoying

dresses.”

James

is

BORS

With 18

it.

official festhailen loca-

people from all over the world can come and enjoy a little Bavarian fun. Here are a few of the better-known places to whet your tions,

palate.

The Alpine Club will have Sunday, Monday and the last Saturday as kids’ afternoons and Tuesday to Friday they will have dances. Tickets are $1 Friday and Saturday and $7 for the rest of the week. 1

SmiCe Conestoga you coufd be our next respondent! ,

Bingemans’ Jodler Haus has matinees Oct. 12-14 featuring Walter Ostanek & his polka band. Patrons will also enjoy an Oktoberfest luncheon buffet and authentic dance groups, special guests and keg tapping. Tickets are $34.75.

Bingemans’ Marshall Hall offers George Kash & the Oktoberfest Express for their ninth year, as well as traditional Oktoberfest food, schnapps bar, games and entertainment. Tickets range from $8 to $16.50, depending on the day. Kitchener Memorial Auditorium will have university nights on Oct. 14 and 15 for Wilfrid Laurier and

Waterloo respectively. Oktoberfest Haus (also known as Lions Club) features an

the

Oktoberfest lunch every day and

weekends. on the Admission is free during the day and $6 Friday and Saturday. The Schwaben Club in Kitchener will feature dancers and two live parties

bands every day. Tickets range from $5 to $25 depending on the day. The Transylvania Club in Kitchener will have local dance clubs performing and boasts their pigtails to

be true Bavarian delica-

$6 to $20. For more information or

cies. Tickets are

visit

www.oktoberfest.ca.

tickets,


News

SPOKE, October

Rec centre

12,

2004

— Page 3

one

hits

out of the park for student athletes By KATE BATTLER

Ford says the weather was a large how well the yard sale

factor in

The

rec centre held

first-ever

its

barbecue and yard sale

money

to

raise

for student athletic scholar-

ships on Sept. 30.

way

to

“It's been great today; couldn’t ask lor a better day weather-wise. II

With all the used equipment that had been building up in storage over the last six years, it was a perfect

did.

raise

money

for the

scholarships as well as give students some great deals on used

had been raining

it

we would have done Ford

says

don’t think

I

so well."

anything

that they probably go back into storage until enough equipment has been gathered up for the next yard sale.

don’t

will

sell

equipment.

Marlene Ford,

the athletic direc-

tor at the recreation centre, says

was a good way

it

to help out the stu-

dents and give them some good products at a cheap price.

"Everybody has seemed really happy with the prices, especially

“Everybody has seemed really happy with the prices, especially the

used hockey equipment.” Marlene Ford,

the used

hockey equipment.” last year’s hockey team members even came and purchased the pants they wore during the 2003-2004 season. Although the college no longer has a hockey team, not all the hockey equipment was put up for

Some

o„~ „ Second-year advertising student Be.cky Miller says her experience working Wellington Flight Centre has boosted her resume J

..

.

.

,

(rriuiu

uy

ivienssa

,

at the

Hancock)

Waterloo-

Work term helps students take By MELISSA

HANCOCK

had more substance when she got to apply them to the marketing plan

Getting hands-on experience

is

more

beneficial than just reading

about

it

in a textbook.

ble of doing.

This past summer, Reyner said,

two of her students applied

work term

was actually doing something.” Bugdal said she now has a better picture in her mind as to what her desired field of work is all about.

through

better than other schools’ aviation

Becky Miller and Victoria Bugdal, worked together on

centre

located

is

at

By doing

in

the various analysis and

The

objective

“I

and

allowed

me

to test

marketing plan was to help raise awareness of the aviation program,

after

wanted

to build

that’s exactly

I

the waters.” Victoria Bugdal,

second-year advertising student

glad that

program may have. “Why go to Conestoga?” Bugdal asked. “Conestoga is one of the only colleges that has two separate locations; the school and the flight centre. Conestoga’s also one of the only colleges where graduates come out with a general arts and science diploma on top of their

Bugdal said their work ethic flowed together nicely and she would do it all again. She said for a future career, she’s not sure what she wants to do, but after having the work experience at

what our students have.” She said she hopes to have more

clients for her students to

work

for

both internally and externally.

Reyner

is

also co-ordinator of the

public relations program and said a potential client for her students this

year

is

the Canadian

Automobile

Sport Clubs (CASC). ing student, said she

a lot of research on other schools,

pilot’s licence.

Bugdal, a second-year advertisfelt

her ideas

women’s

By MIKE

BORS

The main building at the Doon campus regulates temperature on a

Chief Engineer Tim Schill said Day and Thanksgiving weekends used to be the dates for the changeovers but now they just go by the weather. This means that students may want to think about wearing cooler

two-pipe system.

clothing underneath

Conestoga College

will be turn-

ing the heat on in classrooms over the next week, literally.

To

heat the building, the chilled

warmer weeks

for the first couple of

water in the pipes, used to cool the building in the warmer months,

they find

must be heated. The whole process can take more

hot year-round because

than a

week because

heated too fast

it

if

the water

will cause

is

damage

to the pipes.

it

clothes in

case

too hot inside.

A-wing is was not accommodate all the

Schill also said that the

designed to

it

excess heat from the computers, so students

may want

to dress accord-

ingly.

learned.”

people applying to the aviation

that’s

soccer,

and rugby. There is also one available for golf and one for badminton.

did,” she

ing and strategy,” she said, “and

they’ve learned.

women’s

fastball

“The term experiential learning really sums up the entire advertising program. We’re learning and then applying what we’ve

“Advertising takes creative think-

for the students to see

There are two each for men’s soccer,

my resume

what

Bugdal said she and her partner were able to come up with the answers to the questions a lot of

way how much great

the 12 scholarships.

doing the work for

Another great part of the experience was that she got to work with Victoria, she said. “Everyone tends to sit with the same people in class. I had never worked with Vic before and I’m

Reyner said. Actually getting out and applying the knowledge the students learned in class was a

sale and barbecue approximately $1,000 for

said.

is

of the students’

now

dent

flight

where the college’s aviation students do their flight training.

analysing the

“There needs to be some sort of awareness for people,” she said. “People perceive flight clubs as snobby. We wanted to get away from that so people could see what’s actually behind the price of the program.”

the Waterloo

Breslau and

The yard raised

the flight centre.

“It

Regional Airport

By

years,” she says.

Miller said she feels more confi-

programs,” she said.

a marketing plan for the Waterloo-

Wellington Flight Centre. The

about.

is all

potential applicants.

analysis of industry trends,

that is offered

students,

know, before applying, what a pro-

gram

“We’re really happy with the way things have gone today. We’ll probably do a sale every couple of

the Victoria

people want to

tising student, said

athletic director

College turns up the heat

It is

there.”

An

soon.

a very unique program.”

allowed me to test the waters,” she said, “and see what all is out “It

few of the steps taken to develop the marketing plan, she said. “We had to find out why Conestoga’s aviation program is

more out of

something when the college starts up teams for extramural tournaments (competitions held off campus). Tryouts for a men’s and women’s team will be starting

program’s strengths and weaknesses, they were able to come up with information pamphlets for the flight centre to have available for

competitors and customers were a

helps students get

of the newer pieces were kept in case anyone needs

Miller, also a second-year adver-

she said, “like

to take

the program,” she said.

The

real,”

learning

the college’s advertising program. “It

more

experiential

the

in

“It felt I

Deborah Reyner, co-ordinator of the advertising program at Conestoga College, said she wants people to be more aware of her students’ work and what they’re capa-

part

for the flight centre.

Some

sale.

flight

knowledge than most schools.

of

“Conestoga’s aviation program offers more of a broad spectrum of

the

I

flight

wants

to

did.”

centre,

she

knows she

be on the creative side of

(Photo by Alexandra Mastronardi)

advertising.

Miller said she would like to get

involved in fashion or music once she’s

done school.

Get

fit

for free

Samira Qurbani, 19, fills out a form in the Sanctuary for her chance to win a membership to The Zone, a women’s fitness centre.


Page 4

— SPOKE, October

12,

Commentary

2004

Elementary schools no place for

junk food

Two thumbs up

to Minister of Education Gerard Kennedy food with little or no nutritional value from vending machines at public elementary schools. Kennedy made the announcement Sept. 29 prior to a cabinet meeting. It is time that children learned there are alternative snack choices to chocolate bars and potato chips. School boards were asked by Kennedy to voluntarily remove junk food by September of this year, but in many cases it wasn't done. So students are left alone to battle the temptation of the candy and manufacturers’ million-dollar advertising campaigns. Unfortunately, there is a hitch in Kennedy’s plan. There is no clear definition of what junk food is, making it hard for school boards to act on his demands. A ban on carbonated drinks in elementary schools was also made by the provincial Liberals in January 2004. Despite this, pop continues to be sold in elementary schools because it is the principal who makes the final decision. Kennedy said some vending machines are still in schools because some boards have contracts with companies that supply junk food, or they don’t want their students to leave the school premises to buy their snacks. Both parents and principals agree it is unsafe for students to leave the school property during school hours. In other cases, school board members maintain the sale of these foods is a source of revenue for the schools. This is not a valid argument since Kennedy invested $1.1 billion in education after being elected to government more than one year ago. The government is on the right track. With some preventive medicine, it will save money, since healthier eating leads to healthier people. It is a known fact that junk food can lead to obesity, which in turn can lead to diabetes, highblood pressure and coronary heart disease, which cost the government millions of dollars in health care. Surely a person that holds the position of principal must realize a child’s health is more important than a class trip

for banning

all

'

General Ed. takes a beating

There’s no need for laziness The other day

was waiting

I

on the

the elevator

for

rather

floor of

first

the college, balancing a drink and

place their

a full plate of food in one hand

and a stack of newspapers other.

Two

girls

it

in the

fourth floor.

The two

on the second

girls

them time,

leg or a hefty load to carry.

So why

device to get them up one flight

ical

I

It

blew

my

can appreciate a good elevator

mentary schools

big fans of elevators and ride them

offered at high schools. Kennedy said the ban will include high schools in the future, but wanted to focus on a younger age group first. This is a good start, but that is all it is. Children and parents should also be educated on how to make a sound

choice when choosing a snack or meal. It is an uphill battle against a problem that has been gaining steam for nearly two decades, and vehement political action and educated youth are the only way to combat it.

It’s

probably comes

down

to

My job

I

have

same

admit

thing

can’t quite figure out why.

Every elevator

at

Conestoga

located near a staircase.

don’t understand to wait

why

I

at

I

it

was

even have

is

to

move your

However, during the

just

rush hour

people

around for minutes

we

8 and 9 p.m.,

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be

editor. Letters

contacted

No unsigned

doing

customer

this to

come

is all

around

to

who

inside and

us. It’s ridIt’s

cream cone.

20 minutes

for an ice

Laziness

driving to the store,

is

instead of walking for two minutes.

All would like to see is a little more physical activity happening I

don't

out there in the world. I’m not

cream

suggesting everyone go out and

usually have between

run a marathon. Just

some people would

of stairs

is published andproduced weekly by the journalism students Editor: Jennifer

letters to the

told the next

first

try a

and see how

couple it

goes.

Spoke

welcome

Spoke welcomes

first

legs.

ice

would be

waiting in a drive-through lineup for

peo-

a brilliant invention.

You

I

ing the elevator up one floor.

Imagine: you don’t have to put up with other customers.

anyone ordered

insulted.

Laziness

We have

be the

says happy

pick out a cake herself.

more convenient than comI’ll

sorry, but if

little I

many

it

birthday cake through a speak-

tried

work.

Dairy Queen.

ing into the store.

noticed a couple of other perfectly healthy people doing the

a

a pretty glamorous one

is

a drive-through, which

pure

ple find

Since that experience,

I

laziness every time

looks like,”

it

through the

er because of laziness,

our legs

notice another characteristic of

- 1 work

laziness.

and

Heaven forbid we should break a

I

a possibility that these girls are

choose

Letters are

as the next person.

for pure enjoyment, but in reality it

my

riding the elevator.

from stimulated muscles.

ride as

junk food. They should also look at imposing guidelines for food

I’m

exercise they wouldn’t get from

in

me

speaker one day during the sum-

it’s

sweat or feel the burn

mind.

Kennedy must now put pressure on Premier Dalton McGuinty to create legislation making it illegal for ele-

much

what

told

mer. “As long as birthday on it.”

saving also a little bit of

it’s

woman

one

they

30 seconds.

stairs in

Besides the fact that

did they feel they needed a mechan-

when

for the elevator,

could take the

got off

floor.

Neither of the two had a broken

of stairs?

cake through the drive-through. “I don’t care

on end

of time.

lot

even had customers order a

I’ve

and pressed the button for the

to a fire station.

to sell

McMurphy

got in

I

into the store will prob-

ably save them a

Opinion came,

coming

that

were also waiting

finally

20

come into the store and order. They don’t realize

Kristen

for the elevator.

When

cars for

sit in line in their

minutes than

for verification.

Ormston

Spoke Online

Advertising Manager: Ryan Connell Production Managers: James Clark, Desiree Finhert

Editor:

Kristen

Circulation Manager:

Photo Editors: Tim Murphy, Kate

be published. Letters should be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter

of Conestoga College

McMurphy Howden

Jennifer

Battler

letters will

Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

for publication.

Address correspondence to: The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

N2G 4M4

,

Dr.,

Web site:

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors

are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be must not contain any libellous statements.

to the editor

Letters

not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College. advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters

in

clearly written or typed;

a

MS Word

file

would be

helpful.


News

SPOKE, October

OSAP smoothly Applications

runs online next year

apply early for students

Everything has been running smoothly so far in the financial aid office this year in regards to the

Ontario Student Assistance Program, better known as OSAP. According to Paul Matresky, a

program for stuwhich the fedgovernment funds 60 per cent in

is

a loans

Ontario

in

cent.

The loans

provided to stu-

are

loaned to the student.

$10 fee. Although everything has been running smoothly this year, there was a glitch a couple of weeks ago,

The

first

round of the CSI Idol

competitions got off to a good

start

Sanctuary on Sept. 29. More than 100 students piled into the Sanctuary to watch the first in the

round of performers show why they should be the CSI Idol. Steve Wagner, of Cyber Audio Studios, is one of the judges for the competition, and said he thinks the performers did really well.

“Considering they're

in, it

the

situation

takes a lot of guts to

on the stage and do what they’re doing,” he said. Wagner added there is some real talent at Conestoga and that there are certain people who may have what it takes to make it big. get up there

“It’s

a spark that’s in their eyes

you see right away,” he said Closed auditions took place in the Sanctuary on Sept. 27, where the judges narrowed the competithat

tors

down

to 10.

There were five performers in the round of competitions and five more will compete on Oct. 6. Four competitors in total, two from each group of competitors, will be chosen to move on to the semifinals on Oct. 13. first

CSI

Idol

finals

are set to take

Sachi Keller, 19, a es student,

came

human

servic-

in first at the

com-

petition on Sept. 29 and said she could only assume she did well

because she was the highest scorer in the event, but otherwise she wasn’t very impressed with her performance. “I’m pretty critical of myself,”

Adam

Fridenburg, 20, a business

management

student, got the sec-

ond highest score and said he did pretty well in the competition even though he wasn’t singing his favourite song and couldn’t really hear himself over the music.

will not

such a

at

figure.

start think-

ing

about budgeting for next semester since it will begin a week later than

normal.

Also, according to Matresky, a lot of students think their OSAP

money

students

College Student Assistance Fund (CCSAF) Bursary is also available for any student.

now

repayable award that is given to students based on their financial status.

OSAP

the threshold will

simply because

change the dollar

amounts.”

Matresky

students

to

OSAP,

CCSAF

The

This bursary

a Conestoga

Bursary

is

for

is

a

Fridenburg said he thinks he

make

assistance

come with second Forms are now available

semester. in the

Student Services office

how

also in the financial aid office in

Student

Client

Services

Building.

may

to the finals

judged.

“I’m

rock

a

and

singer,” he said.

sing

pop and

R&B

alternative

youi?

“I don’t really that well.

I

just

"HALLO VVE'EI H€ At) QUART EPS

don’t know.”

Another singer to move on to the semifinals was Andrea Brown, 19, a marketing student, who competed on Oct. 6. “I was pretty confident with the song I chose,” she said, which was Respect by Aretha Franklin.

Brown

said the other performers

week and

this

last

week

really well, especially Sachi,

she feels

CREATE

YOUE OWN COSTUMES

is

EG??

did

n

LESS

her main competition.

have some competiBrown. The fourth semifinalist was Matt

Ruiss, 22, a third-year broadcasting

MAIN STREET CAMBRIDGE 620-9719 KITCHENER 894-0628 I JM8 WEBER ST. E

[52

tion,” said

student.

•J

goodwill

who

“I definitely

in the

main building of Doon campus, or

depending on the competitors are being it

non-

with costs that

the

advises

will automatically

in their

said.

from

she said.

did

I

government

they arrived

for students.”

the

schools with the

the federal government loans $165 a week in OSAP per student. Next year they will increase this to $205 a week. “This will make more students

I’d like a

how

dent’s record. In addition to

all

that

This year, approximately 2,500 applied for OSAP and about 1,600 were successful. According to Matresky, right

all right,” he said. song that has a little more room to add a little more spunk so to say.” Fridenburg said after he heard Sachi singing he wasn’t surprised with second place. “After I heard her do some of those vocals and raising notes, I thought, my god, she’s won,” he

guess

“I

“But

tled to, but the

all had to be sent back which caused about a week’s delay

eligible for

place on Oct. 20, at which time judges will choose the winner. That person will receive $500 of recording time at Cyber Audio Studios, a trip for two to Quebec City and will go on to represent Conestoga College at the regional finals in March. Laura Gatea, 18, a business management student, was watching the competition and said she thought most of them did pretty good. “I’d probably say Adam was my favourite,” she said. “I think he and Sachi are going to go on.” Each competitor sang one song, which was chosen from a limited selection on a karaoke machine.

not a lot of information. Students will get a written response saying what they are enti-

so they

province for

STEPH BAULK

tion, but

wrong reference number on them

“There were some loans were issued right across

By

summer. According to Matresky, the government gives students informa-

show up bank account, but that’s not what happens. Students must pick up their loan every semester. If students do not need their loan, and they don’t pick it up, the loan will be returned at the end of the semester and taken off the stu-

says Matresky.

Conestoga students shine at the first CSI Idol

budget and figure out how they should save over the

their

much

Students should also

for a

6.

stu-

Matresky says students should always ask questions, especially about how they were assessed.

apply for OSAP. They can apply fill out a booklet

semifinals on Oct.

OSAP,

early for

These loans are based on the financial status of the student and only the needed amount of money

online for free, or

Idol

March or beginning of April.

of

By applying

explain

According to Matresky, there are two ways in which a student can

CSI

For 2005-2006, the online application will likely be online by the

dents while they are in school to help pay for educational costs.

is

to the

site becomes available online for the next academic year to apply.”

dents will be able to begin planning

eral

and Matt Ruiss, 22, advanced

always a good idea as soon

that

duced on time by the government this year, and everything so far has been uneventful.

of the loan while the Ontario government funds the other 40 per

19,

returning

end

OSAP

Andrea Brown,

s

It

as

OSAP,

in particular.

Conestoga College financial aid administrator, the loans were pro-

dents

(Photos by Ryan Connell)

year

this

may be

GALHARDO

By JEN

— Page 5

2004

12,


Page 6

— SPOKE, October

News

2004

12,

Career RICHMOND

By BENJAMIN

Roberta Sampson works campus recruitment team

The at

29.

she said the business

Park

The

in

was held Waterloo on Sept.

company

targeting

is

and industrial

students

“We

tion.

have opportunities

ment and finance.” Although Canadian Tire deals

explore career possibilities with

well-known organizations. Lisa Lamoureaux and her three classmates are from the criminal justice and public policy program at the University of Guelph. They are graduating from their program with honours in April; hence they

colleges across Canada,

decided to get an early perspective

review them," Sampson said.

primarily with university students

involved in co-op programs, they

do accept online resumes from lege students

“Any resumes

Much

like

them when they finish school. Lamoureaux said she and her fellow students were getting information on jobs related to law and security enforcement. “We're look-

Canada

hires

The

welcome

many

types of positions

will

Tire,

GE

university stu-

to apply,

GE hires a lot of

for graduate opportunities if

good

dif-

within

at

for both of us."

fit

it’s

GE Canada

management program (FMP) and technical leadership financial

program (TLP). Although most of the companies’ positions were geared toward university graduates, 339 students from Conestoga College were on hand at the Career Fair. Three students from the career development program at the college, called Focus for Change, were at the fair hoping it would help them make a

resources

and communications. Some of the other companies that participated in this year’s Career Fair were 3M Canada Company, American Express, Bell Canada, Canadian Tire Corporation, GE Canada, General Mills, IBM Canada Ltd. and Pepsi-QTG Canada.

career decision.

One of gram,

the students in the pro-

Charlene Westover,

(Photo by Benjamin Richmond)

a

currently hiring people for their

is

companies. For example. General Motors is offering university graduates career opportunities in such fields as manufacturing, engineering,

human

from

"We hire them at the co-op level, and then build them up, and then hopefully they'll come back to GE

their

product planning,

Canadian

more

in

we

the universities.

enforcement. More than 170 employers set up booths, and were fill

come

people through co-op programs

however, was far from

scouting students to

that

said although college students are

human

limited to jobs in law and security

ferent

col-

being

Boghoskhan, the university programs co-ordinator for GE Canada,

kind of stream."

fair,

in

dents than college students. Arlette

resources, family and social services, that

interested

hired.

of the job opportunities that await

ing into the police booths,

in

marketing, supply chain manage-

allowed students to

fair

the

at

engineers to join their organiza-

of study.

11th annual event

RIM

for the

Canadian Tire Corporation, and

Four aspiring security officers attended this year’s Career Fair to learn about job opportunities in their field

Fair offers job possibilities

said

Zynsy Churah, Melanie Campbell and Amy Power from the University of Guelph discuss career opportunities with Domenic Mammoli and an Intelligarde law enforcement officer at the 11th annual Career Fair at Waterloo’s RIM Park. Lisa Lamoureaux,

made their some of the career choices that interest them are marketing, human resources and nursalthough they haven’t decisions yet,

ing.

“We’re just looking around to see different jobs there are, what’s involved in them, and

what

what’s required for them.” Mary Wright, a co-op and career services manager at Conestoga College, said the Career Fair not

only benefits the students, but the

employers as well. “(The Career Fair) allows students to make connections for graduate employment, and from the employers’ perspective, to hire

new people onto

their staff.”

Wilfrid

Waterloo,

Laurier

University and Conestoga College.

The four schools

are in charge of

organizing the event, advertising

it

around the local area and signing up employers to be at the fair. Past participants of the fair were mailed invitations, and new participants were

Wright said the employers were pleased with the fair because they were able to meet a large number

able to register for the fair online.

of students. About 2,400 people attended the event, which was

Fair also put on a job fair that will

sponsored by the University of the University Guelph, of

The four sponsors of be held the

first

the Career

week of February

2005.

College ring a flashy badge of honour By DESI REE

FI

NHERT

for future alumni

may be

a college

On

After years of toiling over text-

Oct. 19 and 20 a sales repre-

books and cramming for exams, the end result feels slightly unrewarding. With graduation behind students, the paper diploma or

sentative

degree begs the question. “Is this all I get?”

off.

from Jostens

will set

up a

display featuring an assortment of

Door

For two days, selections will be 10 per cent

rings inside all

4.

approval

14 and 18 karat gold, silver, and Lustrium (silver plated nickel). Jostens customizes rings, offering birthstones, curriculum sym-

looks worthy of the all-nighters and

bols, or achiever side panels in tra-

OSAP

ditional,

in

an office, the seal of

College’s

debt one incurs.

But a flashy badge of graduation

JL

jostens

Tuesday;/ Off

„ U

styles.

feature.

for a Special

Traditional Lustrium, which

is

only

go Achiever 10K

available with a blue stone, and

up

to

$528

for the

ring.

There

will be

25 different selec-

on display

Manager of retail operations and campus services, Mary Andraza, said the rings come with a lifetime

you need it resized, they do no extra cost,” said Andraza. The next ring day is Feb. 8-9. Rings can also be ordered through

warranty card.

the bookstore

tions

in

October.

“So if there’s ever anything happens to the ring, if the stone

out or

that falls

if

that at

all

year.

For more information regarding Jostens' rings, call 1-800-563-7603.

Off

conservative

Jostens

is

fashion

or

also

offering

DESIGN your RING

-

www.jastens ca

|

Online

& Wednesday

October 2.0%

new

as a

$239

in 10,

Once properly framed and hung smartly

at

Men’s and women’s rings come

Well, not necessarily.

Conestoga

name engraving Prices start

ring.

-I

9 ,h & 20 th

11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p-m_

Foyer Inside Door #4 Deposit: $25.00

(Photo by Desiree Finhert)

Bookstore employee Tannis Gayler models the graduation rings at the bookstore, where orders are taken year around. Rings start at $239 for a Special Traditional Lustrium which is only available with a blue stone.


News

Make By JASON

SONSER

The learning resource centre has

made

recently to

show

easier for faculty

it

feature films in their class-

rooms.

the classroom

within

all

the copyright guidelines.”

The LRC has picked up licences from Criterion Pictures and Audio Cine Films Inc. that will allow faculty

it would be easier for faculty to simply acquire the videos that they needed through their own means and know that they could show

in

show

to

deemed

films

home-use only

really

tional tool,

for

a classroom set-

in

a

reach

all

good educait’s

a way to

kinds of learn-

ers,

licences acquired allow the

showing of films from the major

use

studios that both Criterion Pictures

and ACF represent. Those include major studios such as 20th Century Fox, Columbia Pictures, Lucas Films, Sony Pictures,

Alliance

DreamWorks Pictures,

SKG,

Atlantis,

Paramount

and Touchstone Pictures.

said

there

demand, with

is

far

the growth media in the

all

college, to use

“It's

Catherine Wilkins, director

way

good educational

to reach all kinds

of

once your demands increase, your cost-effective

it

would be

to

licences and open

it

really

have these up so that then

list,

so the rights

to

its

movies

to be acquired sepa-

rately.

tors usage.

the classroom.

show

a licence fee and the video in the

classroom.”

She said both Criterion Pictures and ACF hold agreements with a list

“(Faculty)

also

report use of used by students,” Wilkins said. "So, guess, basically, what you should do, if you're a

DVDs

videos or

1

"We would pay

learners, so faculty want to use it more,” Wilkins said. “We really found that what was happening,

costs increase;

LRC

Wilkins said faculty have always been interested in using video in

they could a really

of the

in the

room. tool; it's a

more.”

it

that

not be represented on either

the

class-

more

— Page 7

She also said there’s no limit on number of films that can be shown, but they have to be reported. Faculty have to fill out a weekly report, then the reports go to the licensing companies which moni-

to

"They've been able to do that because we would acquire rights on a usage basis for specific courses and specific titles," Wilkins said.

Catherine Wilkins, director of the

LRC,

so faculty want

company

distribution

may

would have

ting.

The

2004

they submit it. If they’re (the movies) from large distributors or producers, they’ll be on the lists. These two companies really carry most of the big producers.” Wilkins said there might be a

small “It’s

12,

a Blockbuster class

it

them

SPOKE, October

of different video producers.

“(Faculty) have to pick from an

agreed-upon list," Wilkins said. "They can go to the video store, and they can pick a movie or a video, and then come back, then

Misbehaving

in

member and you want

faculty

to

use a particular video in the class-

room, you should go and check if the producer of the video on the list.” Wilkins said it is important see

to is

to

note that this licence does not cover

anything taped off the television. "It doesn’t matter who produces them, you cannot tape off air and

show

it in the classroom,” Wilkins adding the cost of the licences based on full-time enrolment in

said, is

the college.

(Photo by Jason Sonser)

Catherine Wilkins, director of the LRC, is pleased with the fact that faculty can now show almost any film in their classroom.

residence has consequences

Not following the rules could get you expelled from the college By

ALEXANDRA MASTRONARDI

Students expelled from the college are

Students who misbehave in residence could not only be terminated from residence, but also expelled from the college. The Conestoga Residence and Conference Centre is a part of the college’s property and, therefore, the college’s policies are applied at the residence.

A1 Hunter, chief of security and parking services, said anything

impacting the reputation of the college or the safety of other people will have consequences. “The sanctions could be anything

from suspension to being expelled and if you’re expelled from the college

you’re automatically removed

from the residence,” he

said.

removed from the

dence because only full-time

resi-

stu-

she had no idea her behaviour in residence could affect her college

“Not is

the residence, the college

in

is

noti-

and that student is dealt with under the Student Code of Conduct, said Hunter. “Minor issues that occur in residence are dealt with by residence staff but the college is

and the issue

is

still

notified

documented

into

the student’s file,” he said.

Many

students in residence said

they were unaware of the policy connection between the college

and the residence. Ashley Sheppard, 19, an early childhood education student, said

that

ferently

or a criminal offence that occurs at

fied

friends were fined

$100 and

am

I

now

that

going to act I

know

certainly information

dif-

that, but I

will

it

keep

to being expelled

connected tinuation

and

the

if

college you’re automati-

your

unfair.

it’s

home

life,

Hunter said he realizes alcohol be a factor and students may not be using the best of judgment at times but all students should be aware that actions have conse-

may

and parking services

quences.

“Check out the Student Code of Conduct in the student procedure

Hanstke said he disagrees with the school’s policies.

“People’s behaviour

in

guide,

residence

it’s all

right there,” he said

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with school,”

interfere

“People like to drink here and

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college,” he said.

MONOPOLY*

their

things just happen.”

A! Hunter,

“I wasn’t doing anything wrong myself but I was caught in the presence of people who were breaking a few rules of residence and I was threatened with being kicked out of residence and the

with

she said.

removed from the residence.”

was threatened.

do

policies, but is

shouldn’t

academic con-

until his

same

“This

you’re expelled from the

cally

to

Ashleigh Latimer, 19, an early childhood education student, said because the residence is a part of the school it makes sense they have

“The sanctions could be anything from suspension

mind,” she said. “I’m sure none of my friends knew about this either.” Dave Hanstke, 22, a robotics student, said he wasn’t aware, the residence and college policies were

nothing

has

scholastic activities,” he said.

standing.

dents live there. In the event of a serious offence

“My

almost expelled.”

it


SPOKE, October

Page 8

News

2004

12,

Smokers

the cold

in

at Oktoberfest They're quite visible,” Schlueter

MULLER

By DENISE

said. if the smoking ban were he would never allow smok-

Even

Since the ban on smoking in pubplaces in Waterloo Region in 2000, smokers have been forced to

lifted,

leave their drinks behind and step

again.

outside during Oktoberfest. That may be about to change, said the president of the Concordia Club in

“I’m for the smoking ban 100 per cent and so is the board of directors

lic

ing in the building or the big tent

If you smoke, plan to wear your jacket and scarf this year at the club, because Schlueter said he’s

not going to get any heaters for the

smoking

tents.

“I don’t

(for the Oktoberfest committee).”

which

Kitchener.

want

to

make

it

any more

comfortable for you out there.” This year. Blue Rodeo will be performing at the Concordia Club, is

known

as

“home of

the

Oktoberfest,” on Oct. 13.

Werner Schlueter said he has

“At

this stage

it

looks like a total

with the Liquor Control Board to allow drinks in the smoking tents during the nine

sell-out,”

days of Oktoberfest (Oct. 8 to 16) at the Concordia Club. He and the

Forest Band, the Edelweiss Trio,

request

a

filed

club are

waiting for a response.

still

have a concern and that has to do with date-rape drugs,” Schlueter "I

said.

“The

leave

do not like to drinks, which they

ladies

their

By

law,

you cannot take your

drinks into the

washroom

either.

“If you're not allowed to take the

smoking

tent,

it

really

it

to

becomes

a spoiled drink,” he said.

The club has been very fortunate. “We’ve had no incidents because we have very heavy security.

(Photo by Denise Muller)

Regular events and entertainment at the club will include the Black

have never asked for an exemption, nor will we,” he said. The municipal tobacco law

"We

enforcement officer said exemptions to the smoking ban are no longer an option. they banned “So that,” said Ann Gibbons. there’s no smoking any place where the public has access.” Gibbons said in 2000, 10 tickets were issued at fest halls for smoking infractions during Oktoberfest, and just a few warnings in 2001 were “After two years,

shouldn't.”

he said.

given to people out of province.

Concordia Big Band, The Euro Connection and the Up Beats, along with several dance groups and an assortment of games. Tickets went on sale in May. the

Tickets for opening night (Oct. 8)

Saturday (Oct. 16) are already sold out. Other ticket prices are: Oct. 10 to Oct. 13, $8; except

and the

A cool day for some

the most of a cool day and check out the new farmers’ market on Oct. 2. The new market will run yearround every Saturday from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Kitchener residents

make

Students can

Blue Rodeo tickets, which are $43; Oct. 14, $13 and Oct. 9 and Oct. 15, $15. For more information, contact the Concordia Club at 745-

5617 or

at

www.concordiaclub.ca.

at Chillax

workshop. It’s

final

no surprise

exams

that

midterms and

are stressful times of stress dur-

ing the rest of the school year?

fall

2-004 -

-

BUSINESS/ CP/ CPA Harley

Day/ time Thursdays 12:30-1:30

Math 1

Andrea

Mondays 2:30-3:30

Financial Accounting 1

Harley

Fridays 9:30-10:30 Thursdays 1:30-2:30

Andrea

3E2S 2E16 3E25 3E27

Zone, a workshop held at the college around exam time with massage therapists, in tha't it is not focused on helping students prepare for exams. Chillax is more of a fun reminder to look after yourself all year round, said Magazine. “Each station will involve about

Course

Leader

1

Jeff

Day/ time Thursdays 1:30-2:30 Thursdays 2:30-3:30

Room 2E18 2E1S

Course

Jessica

Day/ time Tuesdays 2:30-3:30

Karsten

Wednesdays 2:30-3:30

Leader

I

& Statics j

Physics 1

EET (telecom)

1

Room 2A621 1D17

& CET Leader

Course

Math 1

Day/ time

Wednesdays 3:30-4:30

John

Room 2A618

PRACTICAL NURSING Course

A&P

Leader

Amanda

1

Day/ time

Mondays 1:30-2:30

Room 2D22

or just observe.”

“We’re going to do it by introducing some actual participatory relaxation

exercises

dents can try

it

“Then maybe this

so

on for

that

(they will) rec-

may be something

good for them to pursue on their own, or to come and talk to a counabout to get further success.” Student Services staff will be running three of the four stations at the workshop: deep breathing, sellor

guided imagery (a kind of visualization exercise used for relaxation) and progressive muscle relaxation. The fourth station will be run by a guest who will teach Sahaja Yoga,

AStP 1

Frances Michelle

Day/ time Tuesdays 11:30-12:30 Mondays 11:30-12:30

Room 3E37 3E14

ECE Course

Development 1

Leader Kristy

Room

Day/ time Wednesdays 10:30-11:30

3A620

Day/ time Tuesdays 12:30-1:30

2E26

GAS HO Course Chemistry and Biology

Leader Melissa

Room

th Learning groups begin the week of October 4* and end the week of December 6 *** Learning groups are FREE and there is no sign-up required to attend

it

Magazine said. “Students can actually, in a 45-minute period, try all the stations if they want to, There will be handouts provided each station with information about the relaxation techniques at

discussed, she added.

Deep son’s

relaxation decreases a per-

heart rate,

respiratory

rate,

blood pressure, skeletal and muscle tension, metabolic rate, oxygen consumption and improves their analytical thinking, Magazine quoted from the Anxiety and Phobia

written by Dr.

Above

Edmund

Workbook, Bourne.

J.

Magazine

all.

said

the

biggest benefit students will get

from Chillax

is

learning to take care

of themselves and knowing when

focused around meditation, rather than physical movement.

ability to function is

being

held on a drop-in basis, so students

Leader

very short, but

and how to relax. “Anxiety and stress, too much of it, affects your mind and your

can come by

Course

Child

stu-

size,” she

The Chillax workshop

B.Sc.N

it’s

ence,”

ognize that

CIVIL ENGINEERING

10 minutes,

introduces the idea of the experi-

recognize the need for deep relaxation, and to teach students to pay attention to their bodies, in terms

said.

Math

at

Chillax differs from Stress Free

Student Services, said the purpose of the workshop is to help students

of anxiety and stress management.

MET Math

|

Conestoga before, but Student from Services had attended a workshop of the same format that was suc-

someone

that

endless reading, and above all, making the grade. To help students combat their stress, a Chillax workshop is being held by Student Services on Oct. 1 5 from 1 1 :30 a.m. until 1 :30 p.m. Room 1B26, opposite the in

Joan Magazine, a counsellor

Room

said Chillax has never

at

cessful.

Sanctuary.

Leader

Magazine been held

Students worry about assignment essays, presentations,

deadlines,

^cmmve

workshop

By PAIGE HILTON

what about dealing with

Course

out

chill

last

the year for college students. But,

peep,

hot deals

what

it

Room 1B26

and see

has to offer. Students do not

have to register or pay for the

and think clearit can affect your body and your immune sysly,”

tem.

she said. “Also,

The other big

where they can get

benefit

Services.”

Story idea for Spoke? Advertisement? Let us

know

at ext.

is

help: Student

3691


Feature

Break the

SPOKE, October

the safety plan Egressy outlined are

giving the

How much

do you know about women and children? If you were in a situation where you needed help, would you know who to call or where to go? There are numerous shelters, crisis centres and support groups for women and their children in Guelph, Cambridge and Kitchener-

numbers

violence against

woman to,

women

“The sexual

in

sexual

(and)

assault,

itself

called

is

Marianne's Place and offers a temhome for women and their children who are suffering from any kind of violence or abuse. porary

The

shelter’s

dential

and

women

in

location

staff

there

is

confi-

support

preserving their safety

and comfort while staying

at

the

shelter.

As

many

the public educator for the

Egressy Guelph to speak

schools in to students, primavisits

young women, about the dangers of abuse and violence and what they can do to stay safe. Egressy has focused on educating students in Grade 6 on abuse, con-

rily

resolution,

planning,

safety

centres

in

students.

For students in grades 7 and 8, Egressy has focused on sexual harassment and body image workshops for young women, tying that into how it can affect personal relationships.

centre gets 300 calls

Women

month. from ages

on

OK,” she

“They may not be able abuse, but that’s to find out

coming

why

said.

to label

it

as

they’re here:

more information."

Egressy said

women who

some point

a

are

sexual

in their life

and they are now in a new place where they feel they are able to deal with

it.

might be because of sexual harassment in the workplace, it might be because of childhood sexual abuse and they may not have had any memories at one point and now they’re getting “It

another

she has a plan

that

in

A

a 10-year-old as well

was covered

woman

48-year-old Guelph

has accessed the crisis centre’s

services in the past said she never

thought she would need the shelter.

was 28 and

I

had twins

that

were a year old. I left the first time my husband beat me and I went to the shelter in Hamilton where they gave me a room. I stayed there one night and then went to live in Toronto,” said Josie Smith, who asked that her real name not be used to protect her prithat

of

fell into

terrified.

I

just

a bit of a trap of try-

what had

happened or examining anything,” “Nobody was talking about it; people were letting me remain silent.” Smith said she spent years saying she had to go to the shelter. “The second time I realized it’s not that you haye to go to a shelter, it’s that you have the option.” said Smith.

Egressy a

said,

woman who

when speaking with

is

unable to leave the

abusive situation for whatever reason, she always assesses the situa-

with her,

“The sexual assault centre is here to provide counselling and support

women who

have for experienced any form of sexual violence, including childhood sexual abuse.” Robin Egressy,

I

and receive some help,

who

is

now

teacher, said the second time she experienced such abuse, she was in

her second marriage and years

it

was 20

later.

“My husband threatened to beat me, and I went directly to the shelter in Guelph, which was full. They me

taxied

to

a

shelter

in

Galt,

where they had an extensive intake program which was very beneficial,” Smith said.

The

shelter gave her the option to

physical,

emotional,

may encourage

her to

“What at that

I

to get

the feeling of hiding in the shelter. You’re responsible right away

again to be out in the world doing things,” said Smith.

“When

I

was

in the first shelter

were a lot of women there had no plans to leave and they told you that, ‘I’m not going back

there that

out.’ It

was nice not

to see that the

second time around,” she

said.

would need

time

to

was struck that that was good thing: not being able

is

not aware of.

she return

“I

an abusive relationship. support

when you’re older, because women more likely to be left alone,”

arc

said Smith. “Just call the

Women

in Crisis

cen-

and ask to talk to somebody,” Smith wanted any woman who needs help to know. “Once you start

tre

talking about

it,

then you can realize

how

safe or unsafe

You

don’t actually have to go there

and

“Their kids have access to family counselling and

life decisions that you have be able to take care of yourself

to

you

really feel.

you can access servanytime of the day.”

live there,

ices

services

groups

called

Peaceful

Alternatives,

which

assists children

around what they had witnessed in an abusive home,” Egressy said. “Many, many of them are doing extremely well.” Egressy said she is enlightened when children recognize and approach her when she visits

CRISIS

CONTACTS

schools. “I see a lot

teenagers,

of the children,

who were

one point

now

been

in the

in time. First

same

Anselma House Crisis Line: (519) 742-5894 Business Line: (519) 741-9184

GUELPH Guelph-Wellington

Women

Crisis Crisis Line: (519) 836-5710 Toll Free: 1-800-265-7233 in

position,” Egressy

said.

of her

Centre

Crisis Line: (519) 571-8633 Business Line: (519) 571-0121

in the shelter

of all, they remember who I am. Second of all, they remember the shelter very well. Thirdly, they are doing extremely well, and mom has also at

KITCHENER K-W Sexual Assault

Marianne’s Place (519) 836-6831

Haven House

pieces of the relationship that she

$15.

ly

and I think it’s important for people to remember when they’re

in Crisis are still a big part

CAMBRIDGE

Toll

life.

“The follow-up group once

653-2422

Free: 1-800-410-4482

a

that call,

buy a phone card worth $5, $10 or a real-

the

older,

Crisis Line: (519)

“Depending on whether the answer to that was yes or no, I would have to assess it so that the children were not put in a position where they were not safe and neither was she,” said Egressy. She pointed out that the situation itself is very difficult, because there could be so many aspects and

do

“Some of

Women

I

it

when

support group) arc

immedi-

in

would find out if the children had witnessed anything, and if they had been victims of the abuse

a pre-school

young.

She said the services offered by

themselves.

Smith,

is

(in the

shelter,”

said she

public educator

in

women

choices

life

the

decisions.

and would offer to support her in making that call to see if they actually had space.” Egressy said if there were children involved, she might approach the situation a bit differently. She

make

make smart

to

would strongly encour-

danger,

whatever,

Smith stressed how important is

Smith, like the women Egressy mentioned, is on her own again and is working at a job she enjoys.

making any

age her to access Egressy said. “If she’s ate

through.”

in getting support

was much more

tion before

vacy.

in

bruises, she said.

ing not to think about

enced, she said.

who

was out of despera-

it

She had

there are all being really honest about how they’re trying to improve their selves, and coming to terms with what they’ve suffered

making call the crisis centre

Egressy pointed out that many women have been able to pick up the pieces and reclaim their lives. She said the centre has seen many women who have applied for housing, have been on social assistance to get back on their feet, and arc now out on their own and are no

time she went

first

as her twins, and

sort

to the sexual assault centre

may have experienced assault at

tion.

trauma or incident they experi-

al

1

treatment that they’re experiencing

doesn't feel

to a shelter

“I

its crisis

6 and up can access the services, and anyone under the age of 16 can access them if they bring a parent with them, Egressy said. “For women who are accessing the transitional support program, obviously they’re having difficulty in their relationship and are recognizing that there are some signs and that

Smith said the

support for that as well as the actu-

Egressy also works with women the crisis centre, and said the

line every

of

“If there’s a real safety concern

type presentations were added and Egressy said they were a big suc-

at

know

I

longer

In the past year, gender stereo-

among

one

is

women.

the area dedicated to helping

prejudice and racism.

cess

Guelph

Crisis administration office in

in

memories,” said Egressy. The women might be having nightmares or health problems related to what they had experienced, and they are looking for

“I

centre,

flict

(Photo by Paige Hilton)

Women

The

— Page 9

month means a lot to me,” said Smith. “The women who come

a person

shelter,

adult

There is also a transitional support program, which offers support groups, and individual support for women who have been or are currently in abusive relationships and have left the shelter. Egressy said. shelter

is

or go to the sexual assault centre or

here

sexual abuse,” said Robin Egressy.

The

there

if

a place

would have some reassurance

Once women

have experienced any form of sexual violence, including childhood sexual abuse, adult

go

is

said Egressy.

women who

for

woman

sure, if the

place in case things get volatile,”

provide counselling and support

to

and making

“I

Guelph. is

the

if

has a neighbour she can go

incident.

Crisis

assault centre

and

making sure she has

the kids can

described the three organizations available for

for the police, shelter,

has children, that there

that

in

important phone

access to a phone, asking

public educator at Guelph-

Women

woman

crisis centre,

Waterloo.

Wellington

2004

end the violence

silence,

By PAIGE HILTON

The

12,

that?

is

home?

Do

to focus

the immediacy.

I

Is

need

it

on

Can

Volunteers

NEEDED! Volunteers are needed for

VIP/CIP 2004 On Wednesday November 3rd and Thursday November 4th

safe for her

to think

about

trying to get her space at the shelter?” Egressy said. “If she’s in dan-

If interested contact

ger, if she returns, if she says ‘He’s

going to kill me,’ I would believe her and I would take what she’s saying very seriously, so that we could then put a plan in place.” . Egressy said a safety plan would

be put in place if the woman decided not to access shelter services at that time.

Some

of the important parts of

Herber Jaimes hjaimes@conestogac.on.ca or leave a message at

748-5220 x3279


Page 10

— SPOKE, October

12,

2004

Tickets are going fast

THIIHSDH OtTQBEH 11TH


Entertainment

SPOKE, October

12,

2004

— Page 11

You too might be a Van Gogh Conestoga College’s continuing education program can help ORMSTON

By JENNIFER

Manulife employee.

was evident from the laughter

It

and

resounding

chatter

the

in

Homer

Watson

Gallery’s

garden studio that an

unconventional

House

art class

and

was taking

place inside.

I

days were

with

filled

principles, the instructor taught her

eager pupils

the

fine

art

of

business

classes and writing papers; this

something

is

different.”

Anderson recommends

Instead of textbooks and steadfast

six

“I am enjoying it because it is not your typical school program. When went to university and college my

art class-

es for that reason.

“There are an awful

who

lot

of people

never picked up a paintbrush

breaking the rules of watercolour

through school and then they got

painting.

into high-tech jobs, or in the serv-

“What

the heck,

it’s

more fun

that

way,” said Marion Anderson, the

ice

industry

or

whatever,

and

wished they had taken visual

art

who teaches the medium to Conestoga

courses.”

College continuing education stu-

currently

dents.

enrolled in the class to get out of

charismatic

artist

basics of this

The objective of

the introductory

watercolour course

to give the

is

students a jump-start so they will

be

confident

classes, said

pursue

to

further

Anderson.

Amy

the

Nicks, an account manager

want them

here thinking, ‘Yeah,

do

So

far,

everything has met her

expectations.

can

I

my

ing, ‘Yeah,

During

I

can do

this.’”

six-week program,

the students will each create five

pieces of

lifes

still

Whether

including landscapes,

art,

and

designs.

floral

the students consider their

work masterpieces or

not, they will

have something to show for

at least

their efforts,

she said.

The pace of

it

in

who

took one of

her classes through the college and then followed her to other classes or workshops to gain further experience.

However, the student

most

who

lasting impression

left

the

was Tiina

hanging on the walls of the

is now Homer

Watson House and Gallery

in the

Price, an artist

whose work

Art of Cruickston exhibit.

the class

whelming, making

a mul-

of memorable experiences

the past.

to leave here think-

this

nice

wall,” she said.

Anderson said she has had

There are many

want them

have an

with Conestoga College students

watercolour instructor “I

to

maybe have one

piece to hang on

titude

Marion Anderson,

want

I

understanding of water-

colour and

this.’”

leave,

house and make some adult

“In the end

to leave

maternity

contact.

overall “I

on

not over-

is

the ideal set-

“Tiina’s

wall

and

work

is

I’m

on one

on

Anderson said with

ting for novices.

the

(Photo by Jennifer Ormston) fireplace

other,”

Stacy Dodds says she will most likely take a follow-up intermediate watercolour course after completing her continuing education program at the Homer Watson House and Gallery.

pride.

who missed the

At the beginning of the group’s

The beginner watercolour course

up a

costs $178.65, plus a supply kit fee

sion, a winter beginner course

of $145.

also being offered at the gallery

second class each student

set

workstation, keeping paints, brushes, little

cups of water and

toilet tis-

it

art materials are

most beginners, the

sue handy.

“But

Since

has to be the soft toilet

paper, not the

brown

stuff

used in

foreign to

kit

is

less

expensive than purchasing the supplies in art stores, said

Anderson.

For those

fall sesis

first

who have completed

course and are interested

pursuing the

medium can

still

for

the

the

intermediate

class,

cation program, visit the school’s

beginning on Oct. 27, for the same

website

price.

To

For more

through Conestoga College. Students

up

information on

the

Conestoga College continuing edu-

at

learn

www.conestogac.on.ca.

more about

Watson House and

the

Homer

Gallery,

go

to

www.homerwatson.on.ca.

in

sign

schools,” said Anderson. First the students

used the paint-

brush to disperse water across their art

paper; the toilet paper

to blot

was used

any excess water.

Then,

under

the

step-by-step

direction of Anderson, they

added

the paint in a fluid motion.

Two

hours later and voila, each one had created their

own

landscape depict-

ing a vivid sky with trees in the

foreground.

Although everyone was taught the

same technique, they produced

six,

one-of-a-kind pieces.

The students’ opinion of course so far love It

the

was unanimous: they

it.

is

involve

a pastime

work or

that

does not

sitting in front

of a

computer, said Stacy Dodds,

a

(Photo by Jennifer Ormston)

(Photo by Jennifer Ormston)

Watercolour

for

beginners

is

only

one

of several art

classes put on

at the gallery through the college’s continuing education

program.

Anderson (left) demonstrates watercolour her students on Sept. 29.

Art instructor Marion

techniques

to


Page 12

— SPOKE, October

Travel

2004

12,

TUDENT TRIP OF A ourselves to the time zone before

Helsinki a stop

joining

our

group

tour

in

St.

Petersburg, Russia.

worth making

(Photo by Jennifer Ormston)

large fountains.

park,

week journey throughout eastern Europe.

regularly surprised.

those in casual

with Jennifer embarking on a four-

1

things

The By JENNIFER

ORMSTON

my

My

grandmother’s tales of riding camels, eating sheep's eyes and monkey testicles and surviving an airport

bombing

me

keep

in Israel

used to

enthralled for hours.

hair pulled back with

inhaling

pins,

trip to

some

bobby

Rothman's, she of her latest

a

would recount

tales

exotic locale.

No

rocking chair Granny, she travelled to 109 countries during

seven continents and boldly ventured into Iran, India and Pakistan by herself. her lifetime, visited

all

when my

Consequently,

definitely

latter

experience

in

father

suggested a whirlwind jaunt

to

Eastern Europe this past summer,

could not pass up the chance to former Soviet-occupied countries including Russia, the Ukraine, I

visit

the country’s capital.

On

nearly

every

was

Helsinki, I

was not familiar. had ignorantly I

associated

Scandinavia with

more than

snow and

ice.

little

tion a tall

in

dispelled the second I stepped off the plane into a sweltering heat wave.

Helsinki was not part of our orig-

into

his

man wearing

a tuxedo

sang with a deep, baritone voice

and

I

in

my

decided to wander the hotel

was

divided and in the centre was the well-known Esplanadi Park where Tt

s

came

locals relaxed. to distinguish native

was easy

bags.

Senate Square,

Less than

where

block

a

h

t

white

church

e

bustling

dominated

Ma

the skyline.

r

k e

Square.

According

Here dozens of vendors set

ly

Cathedral

stench of dead

-

recognizable structures.

Built i

tourists with

in their

cam-

hands.

Unlike Canadian souvenir shops that brim with maple leaf and beaver-inspired merchandise, the Finnish shops stocked reindeer

mementos. However, unlike

picnic blankets or park benches, beneath long-standing statues of time-honoured heroes and beside

reindeer,

It

Canada where

not served as an entree,

is

reindeer

is

indicated the meat had not met his expectations. I

ter

admit curiosity got the betof me and I tried one bite; that will

was more than enough in

It

chewy

brisket

than

more

like a

a juicy

filet

mignon.

a delicacy in Finland.

reindeer encrusted with

in

matters worse,

my

father

make

was dying

struck by

how

the

After a long day of travel and a bit

we made our way

green

fields

he swallowed his

first

(Photo by Jennifer Ormston)

souvenirs and

crafts.

fish,

bite clearly

up to snapped

I

the

Ersin

became

to cap-

the

top,

agitated.

young all

lady,”

to see in

he

your film

said.

one

in

place.”

Then we began

to descend,

once

again weaving through the throngs

southern Ontario.”

of sunbathers and amateur photographers.

The next day we sought

As

moment from

ture

“Don’t use

to

G.W. Sundmans, a ScandinavianFrench restaurant, where my dad’s craving for reindeer was finally met. The look of aversion on his face as

sky.

“There are many things

and dense forests, reminded me of

cloudless

Helsinki

to taste this national specialty.

of sightseeing

statues of biblical

dozens of pictures, trying

of flourishing,

tradition,

Lapland. To

was

a combination

was disturbed by childhood memories of Rudolph, Comet, Vixen and their friends who, I

Finnish

Below them,

characters lined the edges of the

the landscape,

Bearnaise sauce.

according to resided nearby

and the large bronze crosses at their pinnacles.

structure, their faces pointing “I

of reindeer with

filet

milling around. As I slowly proceeded, my gaze lingered on the impressive green domes on top of the cathedral

tasted like beef, but

was on every menu: smoked

herbs and

immense Corinthian columns, can only be reached by climbing a steep flight of steps. My lengthy hike up was prolonged by my lack of athletic agility and the hundreds of people with

eras hanging around their necks and

maps clutched

early

the

in

yih century, this neo-

classical cathedral, lined

fish.

and souvenir

namely

one

is

of Finland’s most

of

shoppers were drawn to fresh produce and fish stands despite die pungent

crowd

breathtaking

Lutheran

The

craft

the

architectural-

majority

The

Ersin,

to

up booths

pany out of the United States. However, my dad figured we needed a few days to acclimatize

market square features colourful produce,

a

colossal

away we came upon

beaver

Helsinki’s

upon crowded

the

organized by Travcoa, a tour com-

itinerary that involved a trip

Within minutes we

district.

1

and hand-

Finns from tourists by their physical features: tall, blonde and thin. They gathered in small groups on

inal

park.

sneakers

city

streets.

The road outside our

many

outskirts of the

booths attracted a different

After checking into our hotel, father

nearby tree-lined

These notions were

blew

the other direc-

a

fountain on the

the

e

t

harbour.

a foreign tongue.

stop

a

1

girl

in

home

without

less people who made their way down crammed sidewalks. As I gazed through an open window, a robust man sporting a red,

plaid kilt expertly

puts her hands

not

did

attire

next to a busy

the Tsarist Empire. first

corner

Here a young

the

of people

musicians performed for the count-

polished flute;

Finland, a destination with which

street

through Esplanadi Park.

were fashion con scious, and even

leave

Helsinki.

During the 20-minute limousine ride from the Helsinki-Vantaa International Airport to our downtown hotel, my impression of Finland began to change. was struck by how the landscape, a combination of nourishing, green fields and dense forests, reminded me of southern Ontario. Despite plane delays disrupting my sleep for more than 24 hours, could not close my eyes for I even a second as we made our way into the heart of Helsinki,

Hungary, the Czech Republic and Finland, a country that gained independence from Russia at the fall of

Our

applied to

noticed

I

majority

1

Sitting at her kitchen table, her

snowy

I

Children love to run

As my father and I promenaded through the lush

have found many times, the looked forward to the most often disappointed me, and when my expectations were low, I was

As

This six-part travel series begins

LIFETIME

the guid-

Back

in the square,

Ersin took a

moment

to explain

ance of local tour guide Ersin Sola, a

the significance of a

Turkish-bom Finn,

dressed in a dated military uniform,

area’s highlights.

to

We

on a walking tour

show us

the

followed him

in the

downtown

his right

male

hand extended

statue,

in a concil-

iatory gesture.

(Photo by Jennifer Ormston)

Esplanadi Park

day and

a small place where locals converge, spending their time suntanning during the under the stars at night.

is

strolling


Travel

The imposing man was Tsar II and the statue was erected in honour of the kindness imperial Russia showed Finland during

19th century rule.

its

The

suddenly came

car

screeching halt

named

after

Sibelius

at

the

to

a

Park,

composer, and

Pride resonated in his voice as he spoke of the late Jean Sibelius, one of Finland’s most prominent

through unscathed out of respect

celebrities,

he said.

some

interesting

Finnish facts.

said

whose

The monument, stainless

their

gold”

“green

of

Finland.

For centuries the

econo-

country’s

my and

industry

In

the

‘There are

my

many

things

see in Helsinki young lady. Don’t use all your film in one place.” to

and paper. the

taste.

A

bust

of the

late icon sat

on a

rock to the right of the testimonial. Despite

my

aver-

sion to the ostentatious

structure,

the green

wooded

Ersin Solo,

park was the per-

local tour guide

fect place to stop

more recent

times,

contemporary suit

my

have been based in forestry

a

sculpture

in

forests

nickname as the

has

shape of organ pipes, did not

steel

made up 70 per cent of the country; hence

work

received international acclaim.

During the drive to our next stop,

He

and

econo-

breath

fresh Finnish

has embraced the electronic

The remainder of our

the air.

stay

in

(Photo by Jennifer Ormston)

and high-tech era, especially the

Helsinki involved more sightsee-

cellphone industry.

ing and eating, luckily not rein-

A

was surprised to learn Nokia is a small town in Central Finland;

deer though.

work

however, that fact explained why most Finns have mobile phones.

stop,

St.

father

and

But the past two decades have been hard on the Finnish economy.

group. The only information

I

The collapse of

— Page 13

Finland’s largest trade partner.

Even when Russia declared war Finland during the Second World War, the statue made it

Ersin spouted off

2004

Ersin helped us out of the vehicle.

on

for the past,

12,

AND LOW

INCLUDES HIGHS Alexander

SPOKE, October

the Soviet

Union

meant foreign countries began

to

trade again with Russia, formerly

I

bust of is

composer Jean

Sibelius sits on a rock beside a

monument dedicated

said to represent the growing nationalist sentiment

in

to his

life’s

work. His

Finland at the end of the 19th century.

kept thinking about our next

where my would meet our tour

Petersburg, I

we

had was two couples would join us, one from New York and one from Boston. I will confess, I was a little apprehensive.

And

so, following a surprisingly

pleasant four days in Scandinavia,

I

said “hey hey” (goodbye in-Finnish) to Helsinki, St.

and boarded a plane

Petersburg,

my

to

next adventure.

Pick up a copy of next weeks Spoke as Jennifer visits Russia.

(Photos by Jennifer Ormston) in 1852. It is one The famed Lutheran Cathedral was designed by C. L. Engel and constructed in Helsinki’s Senate Square, week, and It is open to the public seven days a inside. tour a take or stairs country. Tourists and Finns come to relax on the

of the is

most recognizable structures

free of charge.

in

the


Page 14

— SPOKE, October

12,

2004

SFSJtBfl •stum

nm h (raw inmur

srm a

mm

fir

mum nr mit imrtism, rsi

sirs,

mm

Conestoga

fir

mmsi

CONTACT JESSICA SNISMER OR LEANNE BIRO FOR DETAILS

§

JAIISMER0CONES T06AC.0N.CA LBIRD0CONES T06AC.0N.CA

FlIlEI llll IISK !i ill IEIII IEII

*5Mtn

mm mm umm r i«

t

^umiiir-liu

LASAGNA LUNCH sponsored by

Postseco ndzryReview

CHARTWELLS

Want

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 27th 11:00am

-

This

is

to speak

your chance to speak to government officials about post-secondary education.

1:00pm

MAIN CAFETERIA DOON -

Menu: -Lasagna-Garlic Bread-

-Nature Valley Granola Bar-

$6.00

and be heard?

-What's your vision of a learning province? -How would you improve the way the postsecondary system works?

-Do colleges and universities have too much, or too

little

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-Are the pathways from high school to college

and university clear enough? improving or deteriorating? -How do we best fund the system to ensure both opportunity and excellence? -Is quality

GUELPH CITY HALL NOV. 24th 7:30pm-9:30pm

All proceeds will be given to the

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News

SPOKE, October

12,

2004

— Page 15

Tongue piercings can be risky business They may lead to fatal infections, hepatitis, HIV and, most commonly, chipped teeth CLARK

By JAMES

the heart. This disease can be treat-

ed with antibiotics.

Most people would not associate tongue piercing with chipped teeth, recessed gums and nerve

a

But, that is exactly what could happen from wearing a tongue stud in your mouth. It could even be

worse.

According to an

2004

issue

of

B or C

or even

equipment is used. chipping a tooth remains the most common problem caused by tongue studs. Brooke Miersch, a former law and security administrations stuif

dirty

the

dent, said her dentist tells her to

take the stud out every time she

in

also places a person at risk of geta

HIV

fatal

infection

such

as

Ludwig’s angina or endocarditis.

“My

hates

dentist

“I

Tora Tattoos employee Ludwig's angina occurs when a that lets

bacteria into the bloodstream.

The

floor of the

mouth then could

ing the fluid caused by the infection.

Endocarditis also involves bacteentering

the

it,”

and

I

body through

a

wound. The bacteria then travel to the heart and infect the valves of

to

Conestoga College on

(left), senior account manager at RBC Royal Bank, joins college President John Tibbits (cenas he receives the cheque from Gus Kotsiomitis, sales and market manager at the bank.

Everest tre)

Tim Hortons By KRISTEN

at

Tora

MCMURPHY

A trip to Tim Hortons is part of many people’s daily routine. Most towns and cities across Canada have

she said.

and should only damage your teeth if you play with it too much. “We have a list of things people should do before and after they get their tongue pierced,” said

rules the school

three

or

four

one

least

at

Tim

He begs

Hortons. The

It

I

the

first

recommended

a person with

a

opened

store

in

In the past couple of years, the

Tim Hortons obsession

mouthwash

over the border into the United

after

each meal, have

cause the person to choke. “Overall they are fairly safe and shouldn't cause any problems,”

people like the store for its bagels, muffins and sandwiches, but there is no doubt it’s the coffee that appeals to early-morning cus-

Conestoga students Hortons inside Door 4

the

at

Tim

mornseems as

It

you

think

it

is

free

is

by

far supe-

beverages during their but

shifts,

many of them prefer in

line

to at

Hortons pay for

wait

Tim and their

There are always four kinds of Ritazza coffee to choose from in the cafeteria, including specialty coffees like French vanilla. The cafeteria even has a program where customers buy nine Ritazza

all

on the clothes they just buy be seen walking around

like the labels I

think

the stuff to

John

Kast,

services

too early

in

some people

Tim Hortons’

holding a

coffees and get their 10th for free,

but

cup.”

Conestoga’s

director,

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: You may

to differ, boasting that

coffee.

in the

ings and at lunch hour.

it’s

Kast says the cafeteria employees get

about the image,” says Debb Hohl, 22, a third-year marketing student at the college. “People see Tim Hortons as a label, wear.

tomers.

There’s usually a long line of

said Izumi.

just

stuff to

marketing student

“It’s

Some

mindset that

rior to the coffee at Tint Hortons.

has leaked

States.

this

able in the cafeteria

...

be seen walking around holding a Tim Hortons’ cup.” Debb Hohl,

Canadian icon.

a tongue piercing use an antiseptic regular dental check-ups and avoid eating sticky foods that could loosen the stud and potentially

some people

think

buy the

has been a success since 1964,

when

about the image

“It’s all

the

is

"They have

the best coffee,” Kast says.

the Ritazza brand of coffee avail-

the past decade.

Tim Hortons

with the store.

not

if

approximately 2,000 stores have popped up over of

majority

fused by the obsession people have

though people will wail patiently for a long period of time just to get their hands on one of those familiar brown paper cups of coffee.

Hamilton, Ont.

Izumi. It is

swell up and potentially block the airways. It can' be treated by drain-

ria

just eating dinner

Tattoos, said they are fairly safe

Chris Izumi,

mouth has an open wound

was

Chris Izumi, an employee

any problems.”

affiliated

Sept. 21 to be used towards improving and acquiring resources at the learning resource centre. Peter

said

it,”

Miersch, adding she has chipped one of her teeth because of the

accidentally bit

safe and shouldn’t cause

The RBC Foundation,

College lucky recipient with RBC Royal Bank, donated $20,000

gets a checkup.

stud.

“Overall they are fairly

(Photo submitted)

also the possibility of

General

article

Dentistry, getting an oral piercing

ting

is

However,

damage.

June

There

contracting hepatitis

little

will

Hortons regular where.

food

says he’s con-

persuade a Tim buy coffee else-

to

Procrastination

the semester to deal with procrastination, or are

just procrastinating?

Avoiding or putting off work which needs to be done can come in many forms. Some students ignore a certain task, hoping it will go away. Some underestimate how much work is actually involved in an assignment. Some see other activities as taking priority, like vacuuming your room instead of beginning to read that textbook chapter. An extra ten minutes of TV can eventually become the whole evening. Sometimes, students get “stuck” on one part of their project and don’t move on from there. procrastination, you first need to recognize what avoidance employ and whether you want to change it. Then you can try some you technique helpful approaches.

To overcome

dealing with procrastination is managing your time and planning. Effective planning is a key to achieving goals. Divide larger tasks into smaller steps which will seem more manageable. Set a deadline for each step.

An

essential element

Take breaks and

in

build in rewards.

Work with a

with your goals; perfectionism can get procrastinate! Talk to a counsellor. (Photo by

James

and follows the Health Canada

friend.

Be reasonable and

infection control guidelines.

A Message from Student Visit

realistic

the way. For further assistance, don’t

Clark)

Tongue studs are popular among people between the ages of 16 and 24. However, before rushing out to get your tongue pierced, students should make sure the establishment they choose is reputable

in

Services

our website httD://www.conestoaac.on.cafisp/stserv/index.isp


.

Page 16

— SPOKE, October

Boy ...

Entertainment

2004

12,

blues star at young age

is

By LEE ROGISTER

and a disarming smile who

les

looks like he'd be more at ease with

Most boys stood

teens

have

of their bedroom mir-

and played

ror

their

in

in front

air guitar, fantasiz-

ing an adoring audience howling

Jimmy Bowskill

for more.

just fantasizing, he’s living

Having

turned

just

isn't

it.

14

in

September, he’s been playing blues guitar in front of audiences since age

1

a

backpack over

skateboard

What you

Jeff

his guitar

when he

strides to

and jams on

in the ’50s.

A

audience.

a wide

to

of

lot

people

who never listened to blues will come to hear

Healy helped him get

Jimmy.”

Mel Brown, Downchild Blues Band and Colin Linden, to name a few. In March of this year. The Jimmy Bowskill Band won the Canadian

love and loss so convincingly

he looks like

baby teeth? spoke with him recently before his performance at the Registry Theatre on Frederick Street in Kitchener on Oct. 2. This past May, he travelled to France to open for Tommy Castro at the Bay-car Blues Festival, sharing the bill with Omar and the Howlers. Did he think the blues artists over there had a different sound than here? Not really, he felt his

it

was similar music, only some-

times

Teresa Bowskill,

Jimmy ’s mother

sister,

Stephanie.

he’ll

be

again,

Go

oration

who

Bowskill.

music legends Ronnie Hawkins and Gordon Lightfoot at the soldout Peterborough Flood Relief concert in

He

August.

travelled the

province with his band mates, Jerome Godboo on harp, A1 Cross on drums, and Alec Fraser on bass guitar, entertaining at more than 25

ahead, close your eyes and

They say seeing in

this case,

What you

is

Does

It

All,

favourites.

seeing isn’t enough.

see

a good-looking

is

boy with a baby

the

playful

one of

this

It’s

Willie

face, fading freck-

CD, Old

Soul,

is

an

writer’s

You could almost swear

August) has more than 50 per cent

Robert

original material, written in collab-

are

listening

inspired

the

to

movie

The

Crossroads.

But open your eyes again: they aren’t playing tricks on you. It really is a young, white boy from Bailieboro, (near Peterborough, Ont.), whose mom works at the local Quaker Oats company and whose dad, also a musician, works

Jimmy

shares the

same

one of

birth date

his idols, B.B.

was ever an argument for reincarnation theory, this young

If there

the

man

with

his

is

persuasive.

How

else could

someone so young sing about

pain.

Steve

father,

His dad gave him a boxed Robert Johnson’s music for a

set

of

gift at

an early age and he “just loved

it,”

he says.

His

father’s

interest

blues

in

music, his instruction on

how

to

play guitar and his help writing songs means they are very close, and continue to learn and hone their skills together.

“My

parents are very supportive

of me, I’m lucky

King. believing, but

first

hear when you first listen to Jimmy. His second CD, Soap Bars and Dog Ears (just released in

rendition of

Or

material.

(Sept. 16) as

September.

His

Fine, a cover of Jackie Wilson's

popular Southside Shuffle in

Blues sur

Festival

accurate description of what you

his

to

for Pepsi.

Credit

the

to 8

France

in

So

listen

events. They played the Montreal Jazz Festival in July as well as the in Port

paddle

From Nov. 2

performing

at

Johnson, the legendary blues singer with

fun thing he

to ride a

Seine.

ing.

stage

was

car on the beach with his younger

you

the

One

French.

in

did while there

Independent Music Awards competition for Favourite Blues Artist/Group. When his Grade 9 teacher at Peterborough Collegiate Vocational School asks, “What did you do for your summer vacation?” the answer is somewhat astound-

Jimmy shared

when

he’s ever lost are

all

I

an astounding vocal

is

Keyser,

de

and a

hand.

range that sounds like an old man plucked from the Mississippi Delta

He’s also played with

start.

Jack

hear

his shoulder

the front of the stage

impressive credentials for one so his

in his

“Jimmy appeals

1

His authentic style and mature sounding voice have earned him

young.

and other famous singers

with the help of Jeff Healy

I

guess,” says

Jimmy, demonstrating an awareness that most teen boys do not share an interest they are passionate about with either of their par-

His mother, Teresa,

ents.

who (Photo submitted)

organizes theatre tours for the band

with her husband, says,

“Jimmy

A

s

I

s

I feel I

am

Lightfoot.

daily

am

having trouble keeping up with

my

work

K My marks

listening

blues

music?

am

feeliitg

OF THESE STATEMENTS PEER SERVICES CAN HELP

WITH ONE-ON-ONE

TUTORING

TO BOOK AN APPOINTMENT VISIT STUDENT SERVICES 2B04

Hug You by John Lee Hooker and

will

Oct. 2 were treated to an intimate

the old Registry Theatre

at

setting

for a very

talented band.

were astonished by the range and power of Jimmy’s First-time listeners

a

powerful a cappella rendition of delta

Son

bluesman

House’s

Grinnin’ in Your Face.

You can tell, because that apprecomes through in his

ciation

When

The audience antics of talented

also enjoyed

the

harmonica player

Jerome Godboo, whose tall, wiry frame punctuated his solos with

want to miss! Speaking of future plans, when I asked Jimmy what other career would interest him if he couldn’t play, he laughed and said, “I could always play harp!” He is currently

Stephanie

like to play

enrolled in an integrated arts pro-

gram. Jimmy says he’s learned to read music, and loves his school. “It’s awesome! We have a lot of fun, you know.” He loves music and can’t imagine doing anything else.

non-stop energy.

Jimmy

isn’t the

in the family,

only talented one

however.

delighted

when she stepped up

Little sister

the

crowd mike

to the

with her lively and powerful rendi-

Sugar Blues, first recorded by Leona Williams in 1922. When Three O’clock by B.B. King turned into a non-stop half-hour showcase highlighting each band member’s tion of

talent,

they earned a well-deserved

standing ovation.

Even

a technical

be his

first

solo tour through-

out southern Ontario, covering 19 cities

from Windsor

to Ottawa.

It

more than 700,000 listeners to a young legend in the making. The Vinyl Cafe, with Stuart McLean, airs Saturday mornings on Radio Two and Sundays on Radio One. Also close to home, the band will be performing in Alymer at the Old Town Hall on Oct. 30 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $20 and available at The Prime Ingredient (519-765will introduce

asked what artist he with that he hasn’t already, without hesitation the answer is “B.B. King!” Now there’s a performance you wouldn’t

would

YOU CAN IDENTIFY WITH ONE OR MORE

voice as he covered such classics as

to see his

Hank Williams Sr. and Chet Atkins. Lately, he’s been spinning Bill Munroe and his Blue Grass Boys (a mandolin player) and Louis Jordon. Jimmy says he doesn’t own any CDs; his collection is all vinyl and old 78s. “I just love the music from that era!” he says.

reflect challenges I

who came

he joked around and then worked the sound effect into his song, making the audience laugh. Mark your calendars for Dec. 6, when he returns to Kitchener’s Centre in the Square with CBC’s Vinyl Cafe Christmas Tour. This

Blues fans

band

singing.

IF

to

Country, the real stuff from back in the ’50s, such as

struggling to understand course material

July

of people

not

if

in

blues will

lot

who never listened to come to hear Jimmy.” What does he listen to when he’s

may need a tutor

Bowskill plays the guitar at Jeff Healy’s jazz cafe

2004. At the young age of 14, he has already shared the stage with music legends Jeff Healy, Ronnie Hawkins and Gordon

appeals to a wide audience.

I

Jimmy

1234) and Campbell’s (519-773-3188).

Book

Store

Next stop? Japan, in April 2005. Yes sir, this young lad from Bailieboro is going places and you won’t want to miss him next time he’s in town!

difficulty

like

feedback hum through Jimmy’s microphone didn’t throw him off;

For more information check out the

website:

bowskill.com.

www.jimmy-


Entertainment

Skye’s the

By JANET MORRIS

The themes explored in her album are self-image, relation-

A 16-year-old Bolton resident released her first album for Capitol Records on Sept. 21. Skye Sweetnam's album. Noise from the Basement, was a flop in terms of sales, but a success when contributions to music for film and television are taken into consideration.

Her

single,

first

Billy

was

S..

year's film.

in last

How

One

will be featured in

Women's

Basketball

Association television advertisements this fall.

Sweetnam was

(Internet photo)

album

better than a college

“Sweetnam’s if

lyrics

are

straight from

as

if

it

were noise from a

album as think it was this

fresh

and original;

typical of

DAWN HASSON

By

Take a break from

other

all

teen-spirited

albums found by the

thousands

record stores.

Her

in

elementary

lyrics are

best

at

later

This

album

hopefully

only

in

Sweetnam's lyrics are written as from her diary and truly sound as if it were noise from a

of time to hone her writing, singing and performing skills.

her career.

She has

that dry old

current and entertaining.

Johansen is x)ne of the New York Times’s best-selling authors. Her latest book. Fatal Tide, is a thriller about a sea mystery that takes place on the Caribbean Island. A researcher named Melis Iris

tries to

discover the secrets

behind the mystery but she soon targeted

by

Johansen

is

savage

a

known

is

killer.

writing

for

are

cipher leads to a

they are treated as outcasts.

trail

of clues hid-

den in DaVinci's paintings. All four of Brown's novels were on the New York Times best-seller list. Another book I recommend is by the author who brought us 1990’s Circle of Friends. That novel also featured a movie by the same title which starred Minnie Driver and Chris O'Donnell. Maeve Binchy’s latest Nights of Rain and Stars is also a must-read. It

follows the

story'

of four troubled

who meet

Greek

excellent thriller novels.

strangers

For ladies looking for a romantic fix. I recommend Nicholas Sparks. His novel The Notebook is based on Sparks’ wife’s grandparents. It

ern after which a shocking tragedy

is

about two star-crossed

who were

forced

other at a very

Calhoun after

lives

to

young in

leave age.

lovers

each

Noah

North Carolina

finishing his service

in

the

Second World War. Allie Nelson, a rich socialite, is about to be married

she

when she discovers

the love

behind has finished rebuilding a house that meant so much to them all those years ago. A movie based on the book came out in June this past summer. It was also called The Notebook and it left

London

Ryan Gosling and Rachel McAdams. Everyone I know who has read The DaVinci Code by Dan Brown

starred

actors

has nothing but good things to say about it. Brown uses his character

in a

tav-

throws them together. Each character is running away from his or her old

homes and

lives until befriend-

ing each other helps to find the solutions to their problems.

Strange and Mr. Susanna Clarke, takes place centuries ago when magic still existed. The two central characters tear up England with their

Jonathon

Norrell, by

feats until their partnership turns to rivalry.

Stephen King has just come out with his

final

book

in

his

Dark

Tower

series. This one is definitelyworth a read. The series consists of seven books that follow the tale of a relentless quest by character Roland Deschain. For more information on the series, go to the web-

www.stephenking.com/

site,

introduced

Brown’s novel Angels and Demons, to write the DaVinci

chronicles the story of a group of

code. In the book, the police find a

boys

baffling cipher near the

body of a

bologist,

who was

first

in

body of an

very Scottish,

suspects

like

author.

its

who stumble upon

It

the stabbed

local barmaid.

The boys

— perfect

for a

“You pick up her album and you tell it has been totally manu-

can

factured,” said Rosenburg.

“She’s

on Lavigne’s coattails and she won’t go anyjust a little girl riding

where in the industry.” However, the accomplishment of being recorded by a major record label alone is hard to match. Most struggle for years to get a

artists

lots

of potential and

at

16, plenty

in

Sweetnam’s album is available major record stores and costs

$27.59, including tax.

be Capitol

this fall fiction,

and,

no conviction,

is

The

novel moves forward to the boys’ adult years,

where they are

still

haunted by the unsolved homicide. Jon Stewart, the host of the Emmy-award winning The Daily Show, has produced a must-read

America Guide

called

Citizen’s Inaction.

look

at

He

the

Book:

the to

delivers

A

Democracy a

hilarious

American government.

For anyone who watches the show, anything as relentless as this will be a grab. Paris Hilton fans should pick up Confessions of an Heiress: A Tongue-in-Chic Peek Behind the

Pose.

The fabulously

us dreamers how to live a glamorous life. The star of TV’s The Simple Life has written this tells

hardcover herself. The book of photos and

it

AUTHOR Of ARGILS

rich heiress

fame as well as the particulars of her pampered life. The final book of choice is by author Margaret Canadian Atwood. She has been around for more than 30 years, with her popular work The Edible Woman dating back to 1970. Her latest. Oryx and Crake, is a science fiction

There are many books reader.

The best

part

is

at the local library that

that they are

all

that turns out to be a bio-waste-

Snowman,

DI

M

& «&

would

satisfy

any

free.

9 CLARICA

MARKETING ASSISTANT NEEDED •

Booking appointments

Administrative work

Calling target markets

Developing new markets

$10/hour plus bonuses

novel about a near-future world land.

A?<0

(Internet photos)

is full

details her rise to

the book’s central

character, struggles to live on the

devastated planet as he recalls

DarkTower. Successful

crime writer Val McDermid is back with her latest. The Distant Echo. This book is

Robert Langdon, a Harvard sym-

considered

although there

Alicia

record deal.

This album could

Louvre museum. Langdon soon discovers the

elderly curator at the

textbook and read something more

Nemid

I

a novel for every reader including science romance, drama, thrillers and comedies

is

of

pre-teen Disney movie.

work Sweetnam may put out

basement.

in the steps

Avril Lavigne,”

19-year-old

and a bass guitar

basement.”

injury.

if straight

wannabe

Rosenburg said she thinks Sweetnam’s music sounds like pop music with an electric guitar

her diary and truly sound

Cuddle up with a good book There

“She’s following the next

video.”

written as

new

knee

Sweetnam’s songs

sounded predictable.

Rosenburg, of Cambridge. “This little girl is trying to be an in-yourface rocker with her guitar and attitude, but I can tell she’s manufactured just by the way she acts and shows herself off in her

serves as a prototype for any

to Spears’

aspiring musical artist said

thought

said

summer Onyx

it

stars

your song is in a Mandy Moore film you can expect to be labeled as a bubblegum-pop artist. Other music reviewers labeled If

but straightforward and honest.

hotel tour before

— Page 17

student would.

She was scheduled to open on the second leg of Britney Spears'

was cancelled due

An she

on the

a guest

30th episode of Music Television’s (MTV’s) Total Request Live and performed at the Ladies of the Video Music Awards concert this summer. Sept.

Skye Sweetnam’s debut album, Noise from the Basement, was a flop in terms of sales. However, her songs have been featured in many films including How to Deal with Mandy Moore.

to this

to

Sweetnam recorded the theme song for the television show Radio Free Roscoe and her song Number National

and sour friendships. She writes her own lyrics and it shows. Younger girls might relate

2004

Records’ attempt to simulate Avril Lavigne's success.

ships, skipping school, hypocrisy

Mandy Moore.

Deal, starring

12,

bubblegum pop

limit of typical

featured

SPOKE, October

how

the world fell apart.

There is something for everyone in each of these 10 books. There’s science fiction, romance, drama, some thrillers and some comedies. And remember, they are free at your local library.

Contact

Brian Wall, Financial Advisor

519 744-7325

ext.

220


Page 18

— SPOKE, October

12,

News

2004

Horoscope **|R|§

f,

Week of Oct.

11 ,2004

Aries

4

March v;

21

Libra

X

-

April 19

September 23October 22

4|P

Cleaning is something you need to slay on top of. Junk is starting to pile up and we're not talking just chip bags. Get a Swiffer.

You seem

always be

to

tination.

will

It

April 20

:

-

Scorpio

May

20

T "w

October 23 November 21

f

^

'

Pictures really

do

longer so

last

go ahead and take one with need

save you time

and money.

*

that

someone, you're going to

special

Try

be more decisive on your des-

to

Taurus -

1

in tran-

(no, not the shoe store).

sit

it.

Don't get caught up in the words that are being said. Find out what that certain someone is trying to say. They might need a coaxing.

little

%M

Gemini May

21

/Jpj® Sagittarius

June 21

-

*

November 22 December 21

}

(Submitted photo)

Oscar, voiced by Will Smith, tries to explain to Angie (Renee Zellweger) why he is hiding a shark named Lenny (Jack Black) in DreamWorks Animation’s computer-animated comedy A Shark’s Tale.

Your mind is in a constant state Seek out nature to provide some stability. Things will

Move over Nemo Star-studded cast By DENISE

MULLER

A Shark’s Tale really raised the reef in theatres on its opening night, Oct. 1 The

DreamWorks

star-studded

Animation computer-animated

movie kept its audience in stitches from the beginning through to the end, and even past the credits.

Make

sure to stick around bonus material during the

for the credits,

for an extra couple of laughs,

in

in

of flux.

flow after some time of reflection.

A

Shark’s Tale provides

make

Scorsese as Oscar’s boss Sykes. This movie was no Shrek and

dependent upon

no Finding Nemo thank goodness. Shark Tale was full of wit with a simple plotline that kept the viewer’s atten-

Some characters, such as Crazy Joe (David P. Smith) the crab, and Ernie (Ziggy Marley) and Bernie (Doug

E.

plugged in at all times. It didn’t need a complicated love triangle or story to pull on the heart-

dreads,

who

strings.

was funny.

definitely either,

tion

The animation with

little

was fabulous,

details like Oscar’s tail

being partly transparent, and the

some of

it

it

nor does

it

feel like a musical.

Doug),

cials.

No

The vibrant

reef

backdrop

gives

city to

the

a

brightly

coloured characters that retain an

uncanny resemblance

spots of dirt on

Oscar (Will Smith) is a little fish who ends up with shark-sized problems when he and his sensitive

and whales.

life

seats left in the theatre, the audience

shark friend, Lenny (Jack Black),

The soundtrack, which includes Car Wash performed by Christina Aguilera and Missy Eliott (who

fake Lenny’s death.

also

Other stars Zellweger as

include

Renee

Oscar’s friend Angie, Robert De Niro as Lenny’s father Don Lino, Angelina Jolie as the femme fatale Lola and Martin

make

a special appearance, in

Baby Got Back performed by Sir Mix-A-Lot and Lies & Rumors performed by D12, just to name a few, really works with the movie. The film is not at all fish

form),

-

July 22

Capricorn

<tjt

December 22

JfS’ '->£

-

Time

to

get

active!

You've

Mick Jagger

says your words

it

case you didn’t have enough.

the sharks

June 22

in a

commer-

matter what they said,

coral

m

Cancer

3

with

jellyfish

only appear once

while, were like comedic

nat-

career.

laughs

lots of

Your sense of wonder and is taking you places. Follow your instinct towards a new take on your ural curiosity

noticed a few extra pounds here

are written in stone

and

stone.

there.

you don't nip

If

it

in

...

a rolling

You have been gathering

the bud, things will start to add

no other opinions and

up.

leave you on your own.

will

it

to their real-

voices.

Although there were reaction to the

still

some

Leo

fP'x

movie couldn’t have

been any better. By the time the credits were rolling, the entire audience was applauding the movie. With an audience response like that, and sore abs, it’s hard not to give Shark Tale two fins up.

Aquarius

JgL

January 20 February 18

August 22

July 23

-

.

Can you even keep a

Candor and

plant

someone else? Absolutely, you just need the motivation and that's not far around the corner. alive let alone take care of

blesome situations

Maybe

this

time a

z

may

this

little

week.

white

lie

wouldn't hurt.

Virgo

ft

brutal honesty

not be the best approach to trou-

Pisces

August 23 September 22

February 19

-

March 20

"-v*

The skinny on your weight is you need to stop worrying about it. You are beautiful the way you are’, just eating healthy. that

-

November

5,

its

is on your mind, or sweet succulence of

mouthwatering flavour

is.

Don't overindulge although the urge

The Conestoga College United Way Campaign October 25

Chocolate at least the

is

there.

2004

WE'LL BE LOOKING FOR YOU! Janet Morris

is

a 2nd-year journalism

student in tune with the universe.

CONESTOGA

United Way

Connect

ol

Life

and Learning

Canada


Sports

SPOKE, October

2004

12,

— Page 19

I

Classic offers great matchups

Fall An By JON

exciting ending to the regular

YANEFF

again to break the curse of Babe Ruth that has haunted them since

Major League Baseball’s regular season has ended and the playoffs

have begun.

As with every

playoff time

is

sport,

what separates the

winners from the losers. it

is

who will win One thing we do

anyone’s guess as to

the World Series. know is there will be a new cham-

as

last

year's

winner,

Florida Marlins, have

and Pedro Martinez. posted a possible Cy Young year with a 21-6 won-loss record and a 3.26 earned run aver-

of

the

missed the

playoffs.

Schilling

age.

The Sox

AL MVP

lineup also includes

ties

ue his success into the playoffs the

David

Ortiz.

are back in

2002 World

good offensive lineup, with last year’s American League (AL) MVP. infielder Alex Rodriguez, and

MVP

candidate

left-fielder

Gary Sheffield. When the Yankees clinched the

AL

East division

title

they set a

team record with 241 home runs.

It

seventh division

a

is

their

title

in

row.

Series championship. This year the

West

champs'

division

roster

includes power-hitting right-fielder

Vladimir Guerrero, with 39 ted

home

who

led his

team

runs and 126 runs bat-

Their

their divisional

success by win-

ning their third straight

AL

central

title. The Twins have on starting pitcher Johan Santana who led his team with 20

into playoff victories.

Dodgers may do more than they’re expected

But

to.

105 victories makes the

Cardinals favourites playoffs.

a

was suspended by the team 26 without pay for the remainder of the season and the entire postseason for committing three public incidents of misconduct.

pitchers with at least 15 wins.

League (NL) the Atlanta Braves hope their 13th

starting pitcher Chris Carpenter for

Jose

Guillen,

straight

translate

East division into

title

will

World Series. Wright leads the a

The Cardinals

earned run average and he will look to finish his season with an impres-

ular season.

sive playolf run.

31,

The Houston Astros squeaked by

without

first round of the playoffs because he has a wrist injury. Carpenter had 15 wins with a 3.36 earned run average during the reg-

victories.

Jaret

be

will

the

Atlanta starting staff with a 3.28

wild card winners, the

in this year’s

Sept.

left-fielder,

Pitcher

AL

with

Louis

St.

The Cardinals have

relied

The

MLB

believe leading

I

division

Boston Red Sox, are trying once

If this

home-run champion, third baseman Adrian Bcltre, can contin-

remarkable offence with infielders Albert Pujols and Scott Rolen and centre-fielder Jim Edmonds leading the way. The Cardinals also have steady pitching with four

in.

In the National

The Minnesota Twins continued

Los

year’s

the playoffs since their

very

champs

West

left-fielder

York Yankees, onee again are a heavy favourite to win baseball’s post a

NL

Angeles Dodgers hope last year’s NL Cy Young winning closer, Eric Gagne, can convert save opportuni-

designated

The Anaheim Angels

The Yankees

this year's playoffs.

The

Manny Ramirez and hitter

coveted prize.

Roger Clemens and NL Cy Young candidate Roy Oswalt could make the Astros the surprise team

candidates’

New

Last year’s runner-up, the

post-season

San Francisco Giants in the NL wild card standing to make the playoffs. Future hall-of-fame pitcher

sists

for

the

Red Sox conof an outstanding pitching staff which includes team aces Curt year’s version of the

Schilling

With the playoffs under way,

pion,

trading the slugger in 1920. This

season builds hype

The

(Internet photo)

playoffs will conclude Oct. the

if

World Series goes seven

games.

one of the many offensive weapons on the St. Louis Cardinals. The team had the most wins during the regular season and is expected to do well in the playoffs. Scott Rolen

is

just

NHL

players may see a paycheque despite lockout

Injured By BRENT

GERHART

Roenick

determined unable to play he will begin receiving payment of his $7. 5-million US contract on Oct. 13. If

NHL lockout may not be setany time soon, but as of Oct. 13, the original regular season start date, some players may be getting The

tled

More

paid to not play hockey.

pay

The collective bargaining agreement (CBA) states if players have a hockey-related injury and do not

NHL

receive medical clearance

next regular season

is

when

the

scheduled to

begin, or any lime throughout the

season,

and are under contract,

they will be paid their

even

full salary,

no season. Not only does the hockey-related if

there

is

injury include the last

but

it

also extends

NHL to

whereas Hinote

concussions.

tiple

is

players

who may

season

receive

during the

injuries

for

include

last

Toronto

Maple Leafs wingers Owen Nolan and Alexander Mogilny, hip surgery on Sept. 27. Maple Leafs goaltender Ed Belfour (back) and fan favourite forward Tie Donti (hip) are two more players who could be paid on Oct. 13, since neither of them may (knee)

who had

season

Roenick

If

is

determined

cover the

World Cup of Hockey tournament, which finished on Sept. 14. According to a USA Today informal poll of team officials and player agents, representing all 30

unable to play he

will

US

contract.

be recovered from off-season surgery.

(Photo by Jennifer Ormston)

He’s going the distance Jason Bouchard carries the ball for the Toronto Blue Jays flag football team. The team won the game, improving their record to 2-0.

player

who now

is

making head-

is

Philadelphia

New

York Rangers goaltender

Dan Blackburn

also

may

not be

Flyers centre Jeremy Roenick.

physically ready for the Oct.

Although the 34-year-old passed his physical at the end of the season, he believes the Flyers' team doctors did not check him for postconcussion symptoms. Those symptoms Roenick claims to be suffering from kept him from playing for Team USA in the World Cup of Hockey.

deadline, as the former first-round

The 16-year

NHL veteran

visited

on Oct. 2 and 3 at McGill University to determine the severity of brain damage he has received from mula Montreal neurologist

and

Foote

were World Cup.

Liles

bone

Liles cracked a

his foot

in

but will not require surgery, ariS*

Foote suffered an elbow injury and underwent surgery on Sept. 29.

Other players in

who were

summer’s

this

include

Detroit’s

injured

World

Cup

Fischer,

Jiri

Boston’s Hal Gill, Calgary’s Jordan

Leopold

most

and

notably,

Vancouver’s Ed Jovanovski, who suffered a cracked rip and sprained medial collateral ligament in his right knee while playing for Team

pick

is

still

recovering from

13

left

shoulder surgery that kept him out all

of

last

season.

The Colorado Avalanche

Panthers

Florida

was recently reassigned to the American Hockey Panthers’ League (AHL) affiliate, the San Antonio Rampage. Until he

Weiss

is

healthy enough to plat^,

will initially receive his

will be

will receive an

NHL players

become healthy enough

NHL

was injured while playing in the league. However, upon his arrival in San Antonio he salary since he

forced to pay four of their players until they

forward*'

Stephen Weiss, may also get paid. Weiss, a former fourth-overall pick in the 2001 NHL entry draft, broke his ankle late last season and

of his $7. 5-million

Oct. 13 physical. right

Both

injured playing in the

-

teams, an estimated 35 players may not be ready to pass the

One

ders.

Canada.

begin receiving payment

NHL

lines

recovering from

is

off-season surgery on both shoul-

AHL

salary.

unable to pass their

physical will be paid their contract-

to pass their physicals.

ed salary twice a month

Forwards Dan Hinote and Peter Worrell and defencemen JohnMichael Liles and Adam Foote are being treated by team doctors. For the forwards, Worrell is recovering from knee surgery.

are

deemed

fit

until they

to play or the

NHL

lockout ends.

The NHL already cancelled all games scheduled for October, ancA— the lockout into the

new

is

expected to extend

year.


Page 20

— SPOKE, October

12,

News

2004

YMCA gives students a break By JUSTIN BASTIN Sponsored membership and new make the YMCA a good

facilities

place for students to get

Maw,

Julie

fit.

of

director

Communication and Information Cambridge’s Chaplin says the Y is set up to best accommodate people on a fixed income. “We want to make wellness as accessible to members of our comtechnology

Family

at

YMCA,

munity as possible,” she said. New equipment and subsidized have done just that. pricing Sponsored membership allows people to have some of their members’ dues paid, based on their needs, financial capabilities and commitment to using their membership at least twice a week. Candidates fill out a form and schedule an interview where it is decided whether they are

strates the leg extension,

the

vide proof of income and expenses

one month. Their membership

then subsidized with

ed by donations, the

money

is

provid-

YMCA and the

United Way. "If you're first

away from home

time and funds are a

for the

little tight,

don’t hesitate to call.” she said.

Maw

said

include as (Photo by Jon Yaneff)

A

solid

YMCA

College.

used

— Monday —

$4 domestic

fitness

tries

all

to

programs in

a

memberships can be across North America,

good news for students who travor want to continue using their membership when they go back

el

home

Sunday

YMCA

and extra activities as possible standard membership.

pass

Bryan Martin, quarterback for the Toronto Blue Jays and a thirdyear print and broadcast journalism student, drops back for a pass during the second week of intramural play at Conestoga

the

many

one

of

to visit.

demon-

many Technogym machines

in

Cambridge YMCA’s general members’ workout area.

For the student who has a bit cash lying around, the YMCA’s SmartKey system, located on the top floor of the new Healthy Development Centre, allows added privacy and convenience. For an extra $15 per month, members can have access to new equipment that makes use of SmartKey technology, a small key-shaped data card that contains the personalized settings of a specific user for every workout machine in that area. You simply insert the key into a slot on the machine of your choice and it instantly adjusts to fit your body and remembers your pre-programmed exercise routine. This workout area has both aerobic and strength machines and is more private, being tucked away from tiie main exercise rooms. It offers

ship. Applicants are required to pro-

for

of individual conditioning,

more

member-

for a sponsored

eligible

(Photo by Justin Bastin)

Chad Johnson, supervisor

people who might be more selfconscious an alternative to working out in the larger, busier areas. A cheaper alternative can be found at the college’s recreation centre. Programs such as boxercise and hip hop aerobics give students a fun

The gym mills,

six

way

to get in shape.

also houses five treadcross-trainers,

12 sta-

tionary bikes and one cross glider.

Students pay a mandatory recreation facilities fee that is included

membership is However, you must present

in their tuition, so free.

your student card. For information about the college’s recreation centre, call 7484214. Information on sponsored membership can be obtained by calling the

YMCA

at

743-5201 CKitchener)

or 621-3250 (Cambridge).

pints

$2.50 burgers $5.00 burger and Blue $4.00 pints

Tuesday

Wednesday Thursday Friday

29 cent wings

— $3 bottles

Saturday

of

all

day

domestic beer

$3 bar shots $3.50 pints $5.99 fish & chips special

$4

TV giveaway

pints of

domestic beer

every Saturday

nite!

Live classic rock entertainment every Friday

and Saturday Coming soon

nite (no cover)!

— NTN and QB1 (Photo by Kate Battler)

Open

11 a.m. to

2 a.m. daily

Showing them who’s the boss The men’s soccer team, which

Specials are available at the Kitchener location only

lost

7-0 to the Plumber Plawks on Sept. 28, got its first two wins now stands at 2-2-1 The next

against Sheridan Sept. 30, and Cambrian Oct. 3. Their record game will be in London against Fanshawe on Oct. 14.

.


Digital Edition - October 12, 2004