Issuu on Google+

A

kick-start

Retired but not forgotten Bob Mclver has been with the college

to soccer The men’s and

since the beginning of the adventure.

women's teams

Feature

12

are optimistic

www.makeover

about 2004

CSI has revamped

season.

new

features, graphics

its

website with

and

information.

Sports 19

News

Monday, September 27, 2004

Conestoga College, Kitchener

36th Year

New new

8

— No. 17

centre,

opportunities

By MIKE

BORS

half of which are in Waterloo

ally,

Region.

A new Manufacturing and Automation Training Centre has opened in the ATS Engineering Complex at Conestoga College’s Doon campus. A partnership between the college, government and industries is responsible

for

the

Some 20 Conestoga students do ATS placements.

their co-ops at

The 1,858-square-metre project took approximately one year to finish.

The expansion, which will be used by about 500 students, has a

$1 1-million

machine shop and room

expansion.

Construction

began

Approximately

the

in

summer

300 more students

$1

1,858-square-metre

300 new students will be added by

of

2003.

1

-million

donation

2006 to diploma

Contributions

included $3.3-

Ontario

government

new

ATS Automation

SMC

Pneumatics,

CAMI

Automotive and ThyssenKrupp Budd Canada. ATS, a leader in factory automaConnell)

Toga, toga, toga! Bubblewrap and cow-patterned togas were some of the See Pages 10 and 1 1 for story and additional photos.

outfits at

the CSI Toga Party on Sept. 16.

manufacturing techthe diploma area (robotics and automation,, automated manufacturing, welding and robotics) and the apprenticeship area (machine tool builder and integrator). nologies),

The

official

launch ceremony

systems, contributed equipment with the forethought that the

for the centre took place

company and

mately 75 people, including

tion

by Ryan

are in the degree area (integrated

advanced

The remaining tab was split between Kuntz Electroplating, Rockwell Automation, Xerox,

(Photo

centre.

These programs

Tooling Systems.

Electralogics,

and

programs that will be taught in the

project

and more than $2 million from

degree,

apprenticeship

from

million the

for applied

research projects.

other manufacturers

The company curemploys 4,000 people glob-

on Sept. was attended by approxi-

16 and

are growing.

from

rently

automation industry.

many

manufacturing

the

and

Nursing program more accessible By CHANTELLE TIMPERLEY

The

announcement to

official

extend the Ontario primary health care nurse practitioner program to

Conestoga College was made Sept. 1 5 in the school’s Blue Room. Nurse practitioner students from the Kitchener. Waterloo and Guelph areas have had to travel to McMaster to

take

their

Now

courses.

universities that make up a consortium known as the Council of Ontario University Programs in Nursing. McMaster, Lakehead. Laurentian. Ottawa. Queens, Ryerson. Toronto. Western, Windsor and York are the universities

first

official

and lab time

at

Clinical

work will be done at Kitchener and Guelph medical practices. Catherine Tomp kins McMaster 's acting associate dean of nursing, said it has been heralded as one of the most successful collaborations ,

in the province.

“We are indeed proud of the work we have done and the level of trust, respect and collegialitv

that

has

developed with our partners here at Conestoga." she said. “McMaster

committed to offering acceptable programming for students. and this new partnership will allow students to study with University' is

McMaster faculty, learning within the community in which they live and

which they will work." The program has been in operation since 1995 and was developed, delivered and is operated by 10 in

with the College of

Nurses of Ontario.

Tompkins

said the

new

extension

will allow students to contribute to

the

community itself, bringing their practi-

tioners

health-care

Mohawk

College in offering

to study within

program

at

Conestoga, and an addi-

tional 13 are in the

program

at the

Hamilton campus.

The

one-year certificate program are pathophysiology , advanced health assessment, diagnostic reasoning, therapeutics and roles

and respon-

of nurse practitioners. At the end of the program is a

sibilities

week.

full

Tibbits

13-

time integrated practicum

before graduates go on to write the

extended class registration exam.

A

many

sees a big future for the partnership.

“We hope

this is only the

an

in

ongoing partnership,” John

Tibbits,

president

students

community, Conestoga and this

McMaster University

are

doing

a

regional

health care and

I

in their

com-

actually serving

goals of our program.”

made some announcements at the meeting regarding the program. The old program is being phased out in favour of moving to the graduate study program. The government is also supporting the move toward doubling the program’s seats. Currently it is a funded program for 75 seats and it hopes to have 50 seats running through the consortium by 2007 to 2008. “It will be a challenge to get there, but I'm very optimistic,” said Staples, “and there’s a lot of support and a lot of growth in the nurse Staples

1

community we

“In this

have

is

certainly

reputation

for

think this partner-

McMaster has been

their parts to ensure that graduates

ship with

from the Ontario primary health care nurse practitioner program will be well prepared to provide

fabulous partnership for this com-

practitioner

munity and for

this

country and across our province.”

said. “It’s nice to

hear another step

high-quality health care

in

in

this

region and to effectively contribute to the

five courses included in the

president of John Tibbits, Conestoga College, said he is excited by the announcement and that he

opportunity

tioner

enrolled for the one-year certificate

munities, so this

for nurse practi-

and students entering it must have their bachelor of health sciences (musing) degree and a minimum

70 per cent average. There are currently 317 students enrolled in all four years of the degree. Thirteen students have

be accessible to nurses

second step

either a full-time or part-time basis

he said. “It also has been one of the goals of the program to to that,”

directions.

“By providing an

the

development of other innovative

region.

and nursing degree. The program may be taken on

may

for

to

practices in the

and

Doon campus.

registration

started the part-

September 2001

the four-year bachelor of science

tutorials

requirement for nursing

nership with McMaster. Conestoga

in

McMaster and Conestoga have

Conestoga's

serve as the foundation

announcement

arranged for them to spend their classes,

schools have built together

minimum

grow ing expertise of nurse

involved.

The

baccalaureate in nursing will be the

community building

that will

ensure the sustainability of our public health-care system.’’ she said. “We hope th at this is only the

college,” he

building this very

with

partnership

a

a

important very,

very

important international player

in

Eric Staples, regional co-ordina-

sible educational opportunities for

health-care providers.”

tres in the area.

She said as the need for

all-level

nurse practitioners continues to grow-,

the

relationship

that

the

tor

students from this area, so

of sense

in

in

her clos-

ing remarks that she hopes the part-

nership

is

only the

first

of ongoing

“I think

it is

certainly a sign of the

strong will and strong collaborative

between Conestoga and McMaster University,” she said, “and having been there from relationship

the very early days along with Dr.

“We’ve always had a number of lot

Lois Gaspar, chair of Conestoga’s nursing program, said

opportunities for nurses in the area.

health care.”

of the nurse practitioner program, said it has been beneficial having good relationships with a number of community health cen-

second step in an ongoing partnership to provide outstanding, acces-

movement across our

it

made

a

terms of responding

Tompkins, we can attest to this strong relationship and want to see it continue and build.”


Page 2

News

— SPOKE, September 27, 2004

Now deep thoughts

Students leaving lockers

Storage room overflowing with thousands of dollars

...with Conestoga College

By TIM

had

to eat

for an entire year,

one type of food

what would

it

be?

“Chicken wings, because

Pogos this past week hasn't been going living off

abandoned

in

(Random questions answered by random students

If you

MURPHY

Books, papers, clothing and other personal belongings are just

some

of the items security staff find in

Dan Armchuck,

'

books and electronics

tools,

on it. The shelf is located in a storage room on campus, tilled with belongings found in old lockers. Schenk pointed to a hockey helmet and said it had been sitting on

more than

abandoned lockers each year at Conestoga College. Conestoga security guard Irv Schenk said there usually isn't anything unusual left in lockers,

the shelf for

although some belongings aban-

usually given to CS1. which gives

doned are rather expensive.

the

“What

I

can’t understand

is

why

people leave textbooks worth thou-

too well.”

full

sands of dollars,” he said, pointing to a large shelf

with stacks of books

three years.

"We have maybe 10 per cent what we gather claimed back.”

of he

said.

The books books

that aren’t

to

more needy students

Over

few years, at least have been lockers, to add to the

the past

found

in

stereos

clothing,

room.

1

Schenk said between 800 and ,000 locks are cut each year from

abandoned

lockers.

“We

normally don’t cut the locks until the (new) owner of the locker complains.” After a complaint, a notice

is

placed on the locker for two days, to give the

clear out

portable

gym

old binders and tools in the storage

claimed are

he said. six

eclectic collection of

former owner time

his

to

or her belongings.

After two days, the lock

is

cut and

the recovered items put in the stor-

age room.

Second-year computer programming

“Chunky soup because you have all your essential food groups

in

and a glass of milk!” Mat Bacon, First-year woodworking it

“I'd

eat bread

because you don't have to cook it.” Rebecca Zehr, First-year accounting

(Photo by Tim Murphy)

Conestoga security guard Irv Schenk shows off a full storage room containing books, clothing and tools that were left in lockers by students. Unclaimed items are usually donated to CSI or sit on the shelf for years at a time.

“Shepherd's pie because it goes great with tons of

Lots of interest

ketchup.”

Shaun

By MIKE

BORS

The new mechanical technician co-op apprenticeship diploma pro-

ning

gram was Sept.

can eat and work on my educa“Alphagetti so

tion at the

I

same

officially

13 at the

ATS

new program

post-secondary diploma programs.

Marin,

First-year financial plan-

in

launched on Engineering

Complex. The program takes the traditional apprenticeship programs that Conestoga has offered in the past and combines them with the twoyear technician programs and the

Someone registering into the program will be registered as an apprentice and a college diploma student. If a student

completes two years

Hans Zawanda, dean of trades and apprenticeship, said he was quite surprised that there was so

much interest in the program. “We started marketing our gram

in late April, early

said.

“We were somewhat

in school and three years of on-thejob training, they will graduate with a diploma, a certificate of

cerned that

apprenticeship and a certificate of

filled the class

qualification,

which

across the country.

is

transferable

we wouldn’t

pro-

May,” he con-

be able to

enough people into it. We with 45 students in the program and we have a waiting attract

list

of 17.”

time.”

Ryan Myette, First-year

LASA/police

foundations

“Chicken because everything tastes like chicken

anyways!” Steph Hand,

Second-year manage-

ment studies (Photo by Jennifer Ormston)

Smile Conestoga, you could 6e our neyt respondent!

Tearing This September’s hot weather

makes

down

driving to

the highway

Conestoga College by motorcycle a cool

option.


News

SPOKE, September

27,

2004

— Page 3

Protect yourself with immunization Vaccinations are especially important for students By JANET MORRIS

term care and personal support workers,”

Immunization works by introducing viruses or bacteria, via vaccination. to

an individual

to

produce an

immune response and

protection

against disease.

A

person

introduced

to

very

says Weiler.

moves down through ty

"Then it communi-

childhood education

early

to

the

workers.”

We have a variety of students from outside of Kitchener and a variety

of international

students,

small amounts of a particular bac-

says Weiler, so being familiar with

develop an immunity to organism.

Canadian standards and the American standards is important. “We are starting to become famil-

teria will

that foreign

safe.

Today’s vaccines are pure and Doctors believe that the benefits of immunization far outweigh

iar with universal standards. They're not always the same per

the risks.

country.

Vaccines are recommended to protect an individual from disease.

are written in other languages and

Conestoga college nurse, Trish Weiler, says keeping up-to-date immunization records is becoming crucial.

“Prior to SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome), the com-

Sometimes

the

records

so you

have to decipher them,” Weiler says.

Not everyone needs

have needepends on how well the individual has kept up on his or her injections to meet the Canadian immunization guidedles, says Weiler.

to

It all

munity as a whole didn't hold as to regulations regarding (immunization) and now the med-

serologies or a blood test to deter-

ical community is hyper vigilant about having immunization records

mine antibody levels so we're not over inoculating students,” Weiler

which creates a domino effect.” Conestoga College is holding immunization clinics for students

says.

lines.

tight

who

studying

are

involved

in

the

to

health

become sciences

community. need to meet placement and pro-

gram standards matched to the Canadian immunization guideParamedics have a stricter act, says Weiler. because they are the front-line workers and they deal with bodily fluids.

“Their requirements are pretty

and

comes down

it

to

The purpose of the clinic is to have a balance between what students need and what they are already

She

immunized

for,

says

extensive.

The

Bachelors of Science in Nursing and Registered Practical Nurses fall under that as well and (moving the hierarchy is) the long

-

(Photo by Janet Morris)

Jasmin

Wolff, 19, tries to relax while participating in the

College.

The nursing student says she

immunization

put

it

needles.

biological.

suppressed patients or patients

While there are other job hazards such as repetitive strain or back injuries from lifting and repetitive movement depending on what your job is, says Weiler, if you use the proper technique, you can general-

are on immuno-suppressant drugs

our best to screen people

and ask them as many questions as can,” says Weiler.

Nursing

students

working

in

placements can be asked for their immunization record at any time

depending on what course they are in/and need to carry it w'ith them at all

at Conestoga and helping oth-

into perspective

the

we

week

got into nursing because she loves people

students coming through, because not everyone loves getting try

clinic last

ers.

tries to

for

“We

lines.

down

“Oftentimes

Weiler.

Students involved in the clinics

precise

health-related fields

in

times.

She said

most important and nurses and any-

this is

for paramedics

one working

avoid

ly

in a hospital,

occupational

because

hazards can be

that.

“In a hospital you’re dealing with

something you maybe can’t see and you have to take every precaution.” Students are working in a field

where they can contract diseases and be in contact with immune

and may pass a disease on patients, says Weiler.

who

to their

“Our health science students, for the most part, by the time they

come through

immunization clinic, they’re the most up to date of the whole college,” Weiler the

says.

Students

contagious

not

are

themselves with anything and they

meet standards

that are far above of the general population.

that

“They are superior protected from

as far as being

some

diseases and knowing about protection and they learn that in their courses as well,” Weiler says.

More than 650 ticipate in the ics,

students will par-

immunization

clin-

one which took place the week

of Sept. 13, the other being held Sept. 27. A schedule for the next session is posted outside the health office in the B-wing.

Conestoga achievement award deadline today By JON YANEFF

no incompletes, on

the students have

failing grades or did not attends

Today

day students can apply for the Conestoga College Achievement Award. is

the last

written

thing has

“We

away

come

try to

the best

if

a stu-

sick or some-

up.

accommodate

we can because

cult being a student

students

it’s diffi-

because

Russell’s job

promotion

of

is

of achievement.

Russell said there are

what

want

eral

Conestoga

“If

to

someone is very close we good look at them. We

be

flexible for the students.”

tion. al

it should have read geneducation courses. Also,

the college does not have a lib-

In the event that fees are out-

standing the funds will be directed

eral arts

dent awards, bursaries and scholar-

to the student’s account.

The funds

In the

others in the

new

cannot be transferred or deferred. Successful candidates will be

achievement award

awards.

notified for the

The $500 achievement award is given to all students who demon-

after

need for academic merit. The students must have been registered into year one or year two of a ministry-approved program in the 2003-04 academic year and be promoted and registered into year

office

two or three of a ministry-approved diploma program this year. They must also have received an overall average of 85 per cent at the end of their previous academic year. The bursary can only be received if

Completed application forms, which can be picked up in the finan-

Nov.

Russell

said

the

financial

aid

works very closely with executive director of development and alumni relations, Ingrid Town. She is responsible for fundraising for the college, for

cial

including asking

major donations.

aid office, with

program, just courses.

same

edition, informa-

tion in an editorial

on the col-

lege’s deficit budget needs clarification.

deficit

17.

informa-

stated gener-

education programs face cuts.

ordinate activities to do with stu-

work with

incorrect

The headline

In fact,

ria.

20 edition of Spoke

contained

will take a

crite-

and headline about

story

the Sept.

some excep-

award and bursary

A

general education electives in

to cc- ordinate the

strate financial

financial aid services.

need including any exceptional costs that they may have and a copy of their record

CORRECTION

their financial

tions to the

college to develop criteria for

Groves

summary of

College has to offer. as well as co-

ships and to

financial aid office receptionist Val

for important information.

so

it’s

expensive,” she said.

Conestoga College

stu-

deadline could be flexible dent has been

assists second-year marketing student Ian Vilniskaitis, 20, with

For the achievement award

dents must be full-time and have

been a resident of Ontario for at least a full year. Students should provide a

co-ordinator of

Russell,

students to apply for these

all

opportunities and check their e-mail

of achievement.

student awards, said the Sept. 27

Vicki

(Photo by Jon Yaneff)

their record

Russell said she wants to encour-

age

Conestoga

is

running a

because the Liberal gov-

ernment froze tuition for two years and only reimbursed colleges for a portion of the increase they would have received freeze.

if

As

there hadn’t been a well, colleges didn’t

receive an increase in funding in

all

supporting

the

most recent budget, and

col-

leges have traditionally received

$2,000 less per student than uniand school boards.

documentation can be dropped off to

versities

Lisa Nequest in the financial aid/stu-

Spoke apologizes

dent awards office.

sion this

for any confu-

may have

caused.


Page 4

Commentary

— SPOKE, September 27, 2004

Tory

benefit

will

from Liberal On

put their hopes for a

Tory

is

man

the third

political future in the

hands of a new

to

the top of the party in three years, but

sit at

embrace a middle-of-the-road ideological stance.

the first to

is

more honest

John Tory.

leader,

he

lies

Sept. 18, members of the Ontario Progressive Conservative party

Cl

His predecessor, Mike Harris, resurrected the party from the dead

Common

with his tax-cutting

CAREER

Sense Revolution; Ernie Eves sent the

FAIR

party back to the grave, this time with a $5. 6-billion provincial deficit.

“common

Traces of the infamous

the right-wing conservative

MPP Jim Flaherty, mer finance

campaign pledges of Tory’s opponents.

mem-

one of the most conservative

caucus.

And MPP Frank identical

TOD AV

in

a two-time loser in the race for premier and a for-

minister, is considered

PC

bers of the

sense" agenda could be found

Klees, a former transportation minister, took the

hardline stance against abortion and same-sex rights as

Flaherty.

Tory's centrist approach, embracing abortion and same-sex marriage,

and calling for an end to wasteful government spending and improving

him

health care, led

narrow victory, with 54 per cent of the elec-

to a

came

in a close second with 46 per cent. With the next provincial election three years away, it seems Tory has

toral votes. Flaherty

enough time

back on

to get the conventionally ruling provincial party

track and back in Queen’s Park.

His competition

is

making

job easier by the day.

his

Since Premier Dalton McGuinty took over Ontario’s helm on Oct.

2,

2003, he has consistently done one thing effectively: break promises. In his

mandate he guaranteed not

to raise taxes. Subsequently, taxes

The days

of

June Cleaver are gone

rose.

He

also promised auto insurance rates

would go down within 90

And

he vowed to freeze hydro rates. Once again, he As Ontarians, we should demand better. We deserve Deceit and

lies are

we

not words

a rhubarb pie were once the high-

honesty.

lights

should associate with our elected

ing has already risen to 61 per cent

from 46 per cent

in April, accord-

Liberals are steering the

ing one

more than half of Ontarians believe province down the “wrong path."

also suggests

said.

“The one thing

- taught

to us

that

I

think will be a lesson that

and everybody

in the political

It

to

is

is

the

a last-

Mike

process by

McGuinty should have heeded you said you would do when you get into office.” This is smart advice, a little late for McGuinty but right Harris and a lesson Mr.

Tory

do what

Let’s face

it,

in

time for

in the footsteps in the

one area Harris

keeping his promises. the road

back

PC

to

party

sentiments

is

still

Queen’s Park will be

filled

prevail in

many

constituencies and low voter turnout in

members

how ambivalent many

of the

are.

whoppers McGuinty has dished

In his victory speech

Tory

said,

lied to. Especially not

and renouncing her own

Smith,

surname, w>as an accomplishment

on par with a university degree.

Now,

“For Dalton McGuinty, today marks

over a sink of dirty dishes or a laun-

matrimony,

dry basket of soiled baby clothes

on

their priority

I

know, myself

concept of such a binding contract,

people ponder the “what

without fear of being marked a

life.

of Sex

Letters are

and the City and

Bridget Jones, have illuminated a

outside

woman can

the

kitchen.

A

have a family and a

tion

and

has this trend affected

men?

women were

the

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be contacted

warms

ly,

and some

baking

that all

men

in a

will

fill

the

marriage happi-

women

will return to

pies.

meantime, our parents may

have to do without wedding photos

so eager to

for a while.

of Conestoga College

Ormston

Spoke Online

Advertising Manager: Ryan Connell Production Managers: James Clark,

Editor:

Circulation Manager:

Kristen

McMurphy Howden

Jennifer

Desiree Finhert

for verification.

Photo Editors: Tim Murphy, Kate

be published. Letters should be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter

Battler

letters will

Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke @conestogac:on.ca

for publication.

Address correspondence to: The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

N2G 4M4

Dr.,

Web site:

>

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College. Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a MS Word file would be helpful. Letters

must not contain any

libellous statements.

to

taking paternity

either.

domestic role

is published andproduced weekly by the journalism students

editor. Letters

No unsigned

men

some men

In the

Once,

to the

becoming house husbands

wouldn’t do

fathers.

How

say.

only after society

I’m not suggesting

of

husbands

mothers,

I

should pick up an apron. That

of daughters and potential

wives,

fads,

come back

and earning lower incomes.

they have affected a genera-

Editor: Jennifer

letters to

leave,

Most

ifs”

broth-

Spoke

welcome

Spoke welcomes

And

But

Still,

Girl-power role models, like the

their jobs.

all

will

the idea of

resent their

husbands or hate

my

years of being in the workforce.

second chance.

They don’t

love us.

no longer

idea of marriage, but only after

not that our mothers don’t

included, have soberly cast off the

heals

Women

might have done things

differently given a It’s

list.

Time

our double

Mothers sometimes lament

that they

we're

er-in-law queries.

have

marriage in

a

partner.

“What’s the solution?”

affect-

of the new millennium

putting an education, a career and

world

guess we'll just have to keep our fingers crossed.

But another role model has of

become

attractive

interested.

ed some of us so greatly our

become engrained

in

of an education and a career.

Unfortunately, career, or just a career.

helix.

lost their zest for

of

more confident

are

more

impressions

the days of June Cleaver

Women

cast

out.

the beginning of the end.” I

a Mrs. Joe

to the idea

the tables have

In doing so, they have

out of

spinster.

However, people don’t forget when they are the

Becoming

Many women facing an almost $ 10-million deficit, anti-conservative

the recent leadership race reveals just party’s

her M.R.S.

travelling higher

rule in

with obstacles.

The

suits

woman

Now

themselves, because of their pur-

Opinion

mother’s generation, the

highest aspiration a

have

appears Tory will follow

my

are gone.

embrace.

truly excelled:

Women

Finhert

The profession, of course, was In

made men shy

it

turned.

Desiree

of a young lady’s resume.

high school had, was to achieve

ing to a recent Ipsos-Reid poll.

Tory

wed.

commitment.

being a wife.

After being in office for only one year, McGuinty’s disapproval rat-

poll

elegant sense of style, charm-

lied.

representatives.

The

An

ing manners and the ability to bake

days. That didn’t happen.


SPOKE, September

C.

ONES TOGA, STUDEHTS

27,

2004

— Page 5

IHC.

MTH QUEEMSMOUtsi OCTOBEP?

T

TICKETS APE #IO AVAILABLE <§) THE CSI OEEICE

TPM DOORS OPEN ®A TTEHD MUST BE 19+ TO

Conestoga


News

— SPOKE, September 27, 2004

Page 6

Survivor Conestoga combines

education and fun for students By PAIGE HILTON

from the workshop

information

have follow-up time in the classroom. “Hopefully this will will

The second annual Survivor Conestoga health and safety workshop for international students will

open the door for further discussion,” she said.

who

will be running the

station focused

on boundaries, said

Bernard,

be held Oct. 7 to teach students

ways

responsible

to

with

deal

surrounding health, safety

issues

workshop

the

also help stu-

will

and finances, as well as help them

dents get acquainted with faculty

adjust to living in Canada.

and

Student Services, the internation-

and English language

office

al

make

which features eight main themes:

approach them

boundaries, abuse, safe sex, nutri-

said.

abuse, banking, security issues

campus and a

featuring

station

information about the

on

afterwards,

and the people

who

are facilitating

Student Services, who are the security people, who works in the rec centre, who works in health services and

know who

maybe some

dif-

Shawna Bernard, a counsellor

counsellors

the

who works office,”

increase in international students,

these issues ever

some

know where

have questions OK, what is accept-

students

in the until

international

said Bernard. “If any of

come

go

to

Bernard said the school is trying normalize the processes of

and not trying

but educate them. “I think the students from last year would say, ‘I learned a lot of

wonderful

information.

I

know about

sex education.

I

says they will be divided into eight

what

stations.

Between each

there will be

station,

draws for door

claim a prize, winning students have to state something they

learned

at

the

station

they

were just at. Each station will have handouts on the information provided, so the students can take the information home and refer to it later. Melanie Reed, co-ordinator of English language studies, said the workshop will provide a lot of useful information for students. It is being held in October to allow students to get through the initial rush

of the

month of school. few weeks of are hectic enough for

first

Reed

said the first

school

Canadian students. “For (international) students it’s even worse, because not only are they new to the

school,

country,

they’re

new

new

to

the

language and the culture. They’re dealing with all

to the

these things at once.”

By

waiting

until

the

Reed

do if I’m having difficulty, know where to go,’ and that’s to

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: Mature Students Post-secondary education is a journey of exploration; one that stretches comfort zones and embraces diverse ways of thinking and doing. Returning to school after years of being out in the workplace or raising a family can be intimidating, exhilarating, challenging, and

sometimes unsettling, and despite a wealth of life experience from work, home, or prior training, adults feel unsure of what is expected of them in the college environment.

It

vital

is

Bernard pointed community, it’s that

we

who

out.

“As a college important

really all

students on

includes

students

multicultural

and are

that

are

everyone,

for

reach out to

campus,

common

have a

to

theme of respect

re-learning and re-developing study and research

The workshop was a new idea year and Bernard said it was beneficial for students. “It was last

really successful last year

going

it’s

and we

who

event, as

it

is

=>

RSVP

for

more out of the workshop. also pointed out that the

truth

is,

FEEL APPREHENSIVE

ABOUT RETURNING TO

that most adults do very well

before, and they actually enjoy

if

not better than they did

it.

part of their orienta-

=>

THINK ABOUT WHY YOU ARE RETURNING.

=>

DO WHAT IS RIGHT FOR YOU.

Diploma students must register for the workshop with Samantha Murray, the manager of international education, in the internation-

office

KNOW THAT MOST ADULTS LEARNING. The

the

tion.

al

learning and study

uncertainties about returning to learning:

are enrolled in the

to

in

a willingness to utilize resources, and an openness to learn from peers.

Here are a few observations about mature students that might ease some of the

English language studies program

do not have

It can take time to adjust and an

be really suc-

to

cessful this year,” she said.

Students

skills.

important part of that adjustment includes developing competence skills,

diverse.”

think

Many mature students are apprehensive about returning to school and are concerned about how they will perform academically. Their challenges are different than those of younger students, including but not limited to: balancing parenthood and home life with school, and

on the ground floor of the

Don't be surprised

if you find reasons other than the ones you had anticipated to continue your learning.

what

Student Client Services Building students

have had a chance to settle in, they will absorb more information and get a lot

I

now know

j

really important,” she said.

prizes.

In order to

and Jlena

information,

to scare students,

dents to attend the workshop, and

groups and will rotate through the

Iran,

accessing things like counselling, doctors, or banking

stu-

left)

to

aged to stay until 7 p.m. for a barbecue and a chance to socialize with other students, faculty and Bernard expects 100 to 120

(Photo by Paige Hilton)

Mike Ma, from China, Bahareh Golnaraghi, from Pecoraro, from Switzerland, plan to attend the workshop on Oct. 7. International students (from

5:30 p.m., but students are encour-

staff.

up, they

to access the

resources.”

able behaviour.”

The workshop will be held blue room from 3:30 p.m.

are

in

the

in

with Student Services. “With the

is

lot

to teach internation-

ferences with Canadian culture,”

about what

them a

to give

to

she

of information on potential issues,

so that they get to is

interactive way,

said

"We're trying

will

students

for

the stations are staff at the college,

students in a fun way, in an

al

easier

it

recreation

centre.

“Our goal

workshop

these people at the

and healthy eating, substance

they

not meet otherwise. Meeting

studies have organized the event,

tion

who

staff at the college,

may

is

important to you and how

There

it will

is

best

no right way to do fit

your

life

this.

Think about

circumstances and goals.

(SCSB).

The deadline

for registration is

=>

Sept. 29 at 4:30 p.m. There will be

a sign-up

MAKE YOUR WELL BEING A PRIORITY.

Don't compromise on the things that

keep you physically, emotionally, and spiritually

well.

sheet available in the

Make

sure you build them into

your schedule.

international office.

=>

DISCUSS YOUR PLANS.

Think about how others

in

your

life

might support you.

Spoke can now Mature students are

be read online! For the latest college, entertainment and sports news, as well as games, puzzles,

weather and reference links, visit www. co n estog ac o n ca/s po ke .

.

also

sometimes concerned about

fitting in socially.

The Student

Services Office can help, either individually, or through the Mature Student Message Board by providing a place to meet and exchange ideas. For more information, contact the Student Services Office.

A Message from Student Services Visit

our website http://www. conestooac.on. ca/isp/stserv/index. iso


Women By DENISE

offered a

second chance

MULLER She said Murphy

its

students a

new

13, is

perspective

who

“She

started Sept.

women

tator,

said in

the

ductions on the very warming.

students

“By

and may be a bit lost but the program helps them find out

“She forces you

through the front door take

don’t

the

next

know what

in is

but

is.”

chit-

she said.

to,”

many people

need,

myself included.”

they want

step, it

“That’s what so

coming

The program runs once a year at Cambridge and Guelph cam-

they

the

Murphy

and all year long at the Waterloo campus. In Cambridge, puses,

said.

The program

is

divided into four

self development, where the students look at their needs, goals, communication skills and time management; career

development, where they look at how certain jobs are growing and

(Photo by Denise Muller)

Women

of the

gram

offered at the Cambridge,

is

Focus

for

Change program meet

distanced from themselves or isolated

from the

rest

of the world.

shrinking,

how much they pay, as well as going on tours, bringing in

“So, you’re a single mom, you’re responsible for this child, you’re

guest

coming back

and researching their options; and how to sell themselves, where they learn to do resumes, cover letters, and interviews. These three are followed by speakers,

two-week work placement of

their choice.

Murphy

to school,

and you

want to get a part-time job, then you better have a good handle on time

management,” said the 44-

year-old.

The program has been running 20 years, said Murphy, who has

for

said these categories are

necessary for the class because some of these women have been all

go from Monday

classes

categories;

a

name and you

chat with them.

to do.

“The whole point to

the second day you're call-

ing people by

about themselves and what they

want

enjoys what she does. making every effort to help

is

She said Murphy did all the introfirst day and it was

are

some of

15-month-

nice to have a

is

you, you don’t (always) get that.”

over

unemployed. Dianne Murphy, the group facili-

come

has a it

who

teacher

geared towards

the age of 19

who

Westover,

old daughter, said

for their future.

The program, which

a great teacher.

She’s a really cool, calm and collected person.”

campus, but Focus for Change sure gives

is

like her.

“I

The program may not be new at Conestoga College's Cambridge

been teaching

it

for 13.

Transportation and child care are the two main barriers that these

five

week

times a

to

improve

their job skills.

The

pro-

Guelph and Waterloo campuses.

women

cate during a graduation luncheon face, just to be able to

come

to class every day.

For this program. transportation and child care, along with tuition,

is

covered by

the Ministry of Training, Colleges

and Universities.

Murphy

said

she

of these admirable.

"They

finds

women

strength

times,

to Friday,

9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., and the program runs for 15 weeks. The students will graduate with a certifi-

are going through,

the

very

some-

some of the most horrendous

and yet they persevere. “They'll walk through that front

situations

door and

has been really nasty

life

to

them,

but

keep coming

they

through that front door.” she said. “It blows me away sometimes.” Charlene Westover, 22, and Nina Couto. 19, both students in Focus for Change, said the class and interesting.

fun

is

just before Christmas.

Before the program starts, there is an information session students are required to

go

students decide

if

This will help

to.

they should be in

the program.

“So,

guess Focus for Change

I

is

“There’s a lot of opportunities out there for us that we’re learning

kind of like putting on glasses to see what you hadn’t seen before, but it

about,” said Couto.

was always there,” said Murphy. The Cambridge campus is located at 1425 Bishop St. For more

who

Couto,

has a five-month-old

son, originally

came

to the college

academic upgrading, when she was told about Focus for Change.

for

information

623 - 4890

Murphy

contact

at

.

Alumni association works hard past and present students

for

By BRENT

GERHART

staff support for their

many

initia-

The

Alumni

Association

Conestoga College

make another school

of

prepared to

is

year, for past

and present students, one to remember. Since 1989 the alumni association has been a network of volunteers, committed to an active partnership

among

the

alumni,

community and the college. The association has about unteers

who

are advised

the

by a pres-

called

jobs was to create an alumni

and group of volun-

award

Distinction

Himmelman,

Conestoga’s development and alumni relations officer, was recruited by Wright and would soon after become founding president of the association in 1990. a she would hold until 1995.

continued working

with the association until 1997 and then something happened.

“What would you say

The

presence

at

of

at

the

is

the

as

in politics,”

many

ing

a

Christmas

has

spent plenty of her time liaising

with the association and providing

donation to the

gift tree to help less for-

tunate children's wishes

come

true

on Dec. 25. Other events the association holds through the year include SWACK day. which is sealed with alumni kisses, they sell carnations on Valentine’s Day and also support the student food bank. "A lot of ways that the alumni association

Himmelman

events such as ori-

pond party and mak-

financial

kind

ee of the college Oct. 28, 1998.

association also part-

ners with Conestoga Students Inc.

(CSI) for

of

supports students are

back

door,”

Himmelman. “You don’t

see

said it.”

She said the association is hoping alumni day in the cafeteria where graduates would be available and while people are eating

to host an

association has.”

ni

Another

idea

and

fruition

is

that

now

came

to

a recognizable

part of the association

is

the sale of

tickets. “It's

what we’re

for.” said

really

known

Himmelman.

Whether

it’s

Cineplex or Odeon

Chicopee lift tickets or Canada’s Wonderland tickets, they are what attract the attention theatre tickets,

of students.

The alumni association is hoping giving ways are enough to

its

attract

The alumni

The 1970 Conestoga graduate of social services became an employthen,

she said. “That’s one idea the alum-

having a big convocation by selling

as well

aware-

to just raise the

at least

association also helps pro-

tificates

“We want

ness of where you go after here,”

Alumnus and

program.

their

to

vide frames for diplomas and cer-

she said, “I crossed the floor.”

Since

has

there

level

entation, the

Himmelman

awarded

flowers.

appointed, one of Wright’s

teers.

title

who

the

Premier’s Award.

Monica

is

raising

is

Welcome

convocation through an

at

award

Originally, Mary Wright, a Conestoga 1986 graduate of the recreation and leisure program and current co-op and career services manager, became the first manager

association

(Photo by Jennifer Howden)

a first-year student

provincial

first

is not on fire Students wait outside residence on Sept. 14 after the fire alarm was pulled by a person who does not even live in residence.

Award, which

ident and vice-president.

When

roof

those initiatives

one parent who is a graduate of Conestoga College. Aside from the Welcome Home Award, the association also recognizes some of the outstanding grads

15 vol-

of alumni services.

The

One of

the funds to sponsor the

Home

lunches they could talk to

their

somebody who graduated from

tives.

students

some of

into

volunteering

their time to create

on-campus

more

activities.

“We’re always looking for volunteers,”

said

Himmelman.

"If

we

had student volunteers on campus, we could run more events because even though the volunteers at the alumni association are very' dedicated, they

all

work.”

want to get involved with the alumni association, they If students

are asked to contact Himmelman 748-5220, ext. 3459.

at

“Whatever the students would be no set concept of what could happen," interested in doing, there’s

Himmelman,

said

"as long as

it’s

legal.”

The alumni event

is

association’s

next

the annual general meeting

on Nov. 10. where the Welcome Home awards will be presented.


News

— SPOKE, September 27, 2004

Page 8

CSI website gets a

facelift

By RYAN CONNELL Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) is working hard this year to inform students of the services they offer

with

newly

of their

help

the

redesigned website.

The

w'ebsite

sporting

is

a

more

with

look

fresh

information and features to match address: website new www.conestogastudents.com.

their

CSI's communications specialist Egleston says the website was

Sam

badly in need of a makeover.

active,

lot

of preparation

and research went into all

really

make the w'ebsite interso we made it pretty extento

he says. "A

sive,”

we

around,

"This time

wanted

it

to

make

it

flow.”

The website’s

and lay-

esthetics

out were designed by Egleston.

He

then enlisted the help of third-year

computer programming

student

Jason Blamire to assist in the interportions of the website. Blamire did his co-op placement with CSI before being hired for the active

summer Blamire

complete

to

now on

is

the

site.

the board of

directors.

Egleston’s prior w'ebpage experi-

ence includes taking a course

at

web

design

Conestoga College. He

hopes to make the website visually pleasing for students by making

making

easy to navigate and

it

it

stand out. Interactive features to be

added to

the site this year include a carpooling sign-up page for students who may live far from campus and a

graduation photos sign-up page. link

to

the

A

new book exchange

(Photo by Ryan Connell)

Sam

Conestoga Students Inc.’s communications specialist CSI website at www.conestogastudents.com.

Egleston spent several months during the

summer

website.

The

on the

of

how

creating the

revamped

website where students can buy or is

“Part of a student’s tuition goes to

on the website: www.books4exchange.com. In addition to finding out what activities are happening at CSI this year from the activities calendar, students can go to the website which provides a lot more informa-

and they’re automatically covered by it unless they’re covered elsewhere,” he says. “So we figure it’s a pretty

tion about the services they offer.

year.”

sell their

also

used textbooks online

featured

Egleston says one of the biggest

added to the website comprehensive health plan features

is

the

infor-

mation.

since none of the infor-

mation was on the website

are

some

The website provides

all

the

forms that students need to claim any health care, dental, optometry or prescription drugs

website interactive.”

this

RICHMOND

the

new ones people seem

CSI communications specialist

want

students to get involved.

Clubs Day gave students the opportunity to learn about the

The process

for starting a

new

club begins by

filling

out the appli-

found in the CSI office in Room 1B21. Students are allowed to start their

own

clubs based on their per-

process involved in starting their

sonal interests, as long as

own clubs. The event was organized by

members of the club

Denise Payler, the CSI general manager’s assistant. After showing informative overheads regarding clubs and associations at the college,

Payler said several

inquired about starting

people

new clubs

of their own. “I think that we’re (CSI) going to have a good year as far as clubs go because of the old ones (clubs) and

all

of the

also invites students

who works behind

the

is

want to see a site and think

can easily be

done, but “It will

we

place’s health plans, they are also

directors and staff. CSI’s

able to

fill

is

out an opt-out form which

as

the

tions

program applied

curriculum.

the

“People from different courses might want to share their interest in

and get more people

involved.”

think we’re going to

have a good year as far as clubs go because of the old ones and the new ones people seem to want to start up.” Denise Payler,

CSI general manager assistant

Payler said getting involved in a people.

A

is

club

a great

may

way

to

limit the

ber of people involved in

it;

meet

num-

howevat

the

college.

Once

Activities

(STOGA).

it’s

been positive.”

ing them put the clubs together and knowing that they are involved in the college community.

think

“I

really important to

it’s

and incorporate something a

little

bit

(college

more life),

something

to

interesting into

it

so students can have

do

in

their

spare

time.”

CLASSIFIED GIRL GUIDES Yes - you can still be a Girl Guide! Link is a membership

expenditures for events.

option for

designated the task of increasing student awareness about clubs. It

Clubs can also be based on programs within the college. For example, Payler said a group of students from the police founda-

negative, but generally

the club has been approved,

and Trans-gender club (GBLT) the Students Together on

Group

some

CSI will provide a maximum of S800 to support the clubs with advertising, licensing and other During the summer, Payler was

ual

back

every event put on by the club

has to be open to everyone

Liberals, the Gay, Lesbian. Bi-sex-

and

that students are

are getting a lot of feedback

try

college club

er,

now

now,

Payler said she enjoys seeing the

last

Young

to

right

it

different ideas students have, help-

from

the

weeks

take a couple of

to start their

Optimists,

Fellowship,

to

club relating to the program’s

own

some of

of work

CSI clubs

the

joining

pre-existing associations

year such

bylaws

and policies are also being posted

interest in in

it

takes a lot

it

get the kinks out of

because

a student

that

that people

of things on the

scenes at CSI with pages providing

photos and small blurbs about the

If

lot

make changes.

president, vice-president, board of

are enrolled as

Conestoga College students at any campus. After a group of at least 10 students fill out the application, which includes a statement of purpose and proposed plan of operations, it is up to Payler to grant approval to the club. She said she received many applications for new clubs, which included a hip hop club, a dance club and a financial club.

fees that students

tion with the website

already cov-

“I

cation of approval, which can be

in

site.

Egleston says a large misconcep-

ered by their parents or their work-

expenses.

to start up.”

Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) held its first-ever Clubs Day in the Sanctuary on Sept. 13 to encourage

CSI

The website to find out

Christian

to

student can

under the health plan,

that course

By BENJAMIN

list

enrolled at the college have to pay.

Payler said students also showed

year

the

much coverage each addition to the

Sam Egleston,

enthusiasm

new associations

students hope to form

to

via

website also provides a receive

show

financial clubs

of the

wanted

last

health-care

Students Dance and

really

valuable resource for students to

know about

available

is

we make the

“This time around,

the health plan

was her idea to hold Clubs Day as a way to promote CSI’s involvement with the student clubs and to encourage students to join an ing club or start a

new

one.

exist-

women 8-30. To find more about Link contact Tamara Krebs at 893-6248 or tamarakrebs20@hotmail.com. 1

out

For information on volunteering with youth members contact Jenn

Wallage 588-4271 at mrswookieee@sympatico.ca.

or


News

SPOKE, September

27,

— Page 9

2004

Pepsi lovers have reason to cheer The By KRISTEN

MCMURPHY

grilled

cat has

expanded

salmon burger

$4.49

for

muffins, soups and snacks.

plus tax.

There’s good news for Conestoga Pepsi fans.

who saw no

Pepsi lovers,

sign of

last

brand of soft drink year, will no longer have to set-

tle

tor

their favourite

Kast says Pizza Pizza, available

Back by popular demand this year is the stir-fry, which is available in the main cafeteria on Mondays, Wednesdays and

pizza slice

Fridays.

cafeteria for

Coca-Cola products when

we

"This year

are offering a

says John

line,”

offer

because

products

of

the

in

certain

purchasing

is

the

still

With

is

most popular,

there and

it

keeps

freedom of choice.” Conestoga’s cafeteria services have expanded this year to satisfy

demand of

a growing student

“Overall,

A

meal special, such as lasagna

or shepherd’s pie,

is

being offered

may change depending on

the

A- wing of

the col-

lege.

An

on-the-go program will be launching next month, offering

pre-made specialty sandwiches be available

in the cooler.

Kast says the cafeteria options

“Last year we increased the number of days per week we offered

because

stir-fry

it

was very popular

with the students.”

The

vary.

wraps, salad bar plates

What

item

is

the

selection

ferent sizes,

better time than

of custom-made in three dif-

and a large selection of

now to

...

ORMSTON

“Plus, since I’m a night person

was a Conestoga College’s continuing education program provides stu-

members of

the

commu-

expand and embrace the con-

nity with the opportunity to

cept of lifelong learning.

From an

early age, people are

taught the ticket to the rest of their

go

and eventually to gain more knowledge and expertise by pursuing a college diploma or university degree, said to school

the director of continuing educaPiedra.

first step, but in order to advance and do the things you want to do, it is almost mandatory to continually upgrade your skills.” That is what lifelong learning is

all

about.

The

Conestoga College students who sign up for majority

of

continuing education programs, ranging in subject from general interest

and languages,

to business

and technology, are either trying to pick up a missed credit, pursuing a general interest or trying to

advance their careers or education. Second-year public relations student Connie

lot easier for

me

Coggan

enrolled in a

New

courses

are

continually

being introduced and booklets outlining

the

programs are put out

three times a year, in the

fall,

win-

and spring. The new programs are highlighted on the first couple of pages. This fall,

courses like the principles of

graphic

design,

and Christmas

shopping gifts, were

online craft

By JAMES CLARK Cancer

Breast

is

Month

and the Cancer

Breast

Foundation is kicking it off in grand fashion with the Run for

to

1

attracted

IJSl

region,” said Piedra.

Last year participants

courses, especially digital

and

imaging

and

media, are incredibly popular right now and fill up quickly. There is a lot of competition for

few spaces in these classes. Approximately 22,000 to 23,000 the

col-

lege’s

otherwise have had the opportunity

gram, see the school website at www.conestogac.on.ca, or pick up a copy of the continuing education booklet on campus.

continuing education pro-

RIM

at

attract

Park

nearly

at

10

M

K/W

tion

X y’

in

1950s.

Research also shows the risk of

who

developing breast cancer can be

reduced lifestyle.

by

living

healthy

a

FAST FACT

you would

more informaon the run

Where: RIM Park

in

visit

Waterloo

forthecure.com.

/

Another event that

raising

is

awareness

j

raised

.

v

a national level

When:

Oct. 3 at

10 a.m.

breast

for

%

$265,000.

On

According to the breast cancer foundation website, mortality rates from breast cancer are at their lowest levels since the

,500

www.cibcrun-

it

a.m.

though.

more than

If

:

www.breastofcananda.com or can be picked up at Whispering Cedars on Courtland Avenue. It is estimated that more than 21,000 Canadian women will develop breast cancer in 2004, and 5,400 will die from it. There is some good news

like to register or

feCjpr

2.000 run-

area

their

million dollars.

ners and raise $280,000.

the

be happy when they make

a quarter of a

raised

f;

Locally, the run will be held

1

participants

get

Organizers are expecting to

Heur

watch up for grabs along with the grand prize of a new Ford Focus ZX4 SE, which will be awarded to one lucky participant who has raised $1,500 or more. The run began in Toronto in 992 and

Cure on Oct. 3. A total of 40 communities are I participating from all across Canada, making the event the Sy largest single day national fundraising event for breast

There are shoes,

win.

jackets and a $3,000 Tag

the

The winter edition will become available in November. "The key is to sign up promptly when you receive your catalog, which is sent to most homes in the

photography

and a pink cotton bandana. There is still more incentive to go out and raise additional money.

gible

breast cancer October Awareness Canadian

will

T-shirt

cancer.

introduced.

Some

Pepsi and Coke lovers daily soft drink purchases.

The more money a participant raises the more prizes they are eli-

money for

“It was expensive; however, it was worth it to me because I place a high value on education.” The business mathematics course costs almost $250 and runs twice a week for two months.

(Photo by Ryan Connell)

Now

the run for cancer

in

Students can

cost.

her to take a subject she wouldn’t

relations classes.

"Sometimes we can make the improvements, sometimes we can't,” says Kast. "But at least we are made aware of what students want.”

the

people enrol in the college’s pro-

lic

behind the cash registers. Students can give feedback, suggestions and voice cafeteriarelated concerns anonymously. Kast responds to posted messages

help raise

Coggan ’s only objection was

grams annually. For more information on the

and taught her skills she frequently used in subsequent pub-

about a two-and-a-

it’s

Kast says. Kast encourages students to use the Let’s Talk message board, located in the main cafeteria

evening course,” she said.

the latter reason.

to take

of

last year’s prices,”

it

business mathematics course for

Continuing education allowed

prices

to take the

ter

"But what I think everyone ultimately discovers is, yes, that is the

the

Join

Jump-start your future By JENNIFER

in

within 48 hours.

cafeteria continues to offer a

daily

menu

student

interest.

Prices for these sandwiches will

Harvey’s newest

hike

half to three per cent increase over

on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Dan

for fee.

food.

and a deli bar are new additions to Dooners, the cafeteria

tion,

$1

services, there has been a slight but

Pitas

lives is to

a

this

necessary

population.

their skills

for

year’s improved food and other expansions in areas such as cafeteria cleaning

about the customers’

all

dents and

cafeteria

option

Students must make a purchase to use this service.

Pepsi drinkers happy," Kast says.

that will

pan

selection,

but the choice

in

personal

a

for $4.87 plus tax.

purchases

debit

Pepsi line.

located

offers

combo

provide a cash-back

products are still being offered along with the new

the

the

is

E-wing $3.99 plus tax. The the

in

Dooners and the main

past

Coca-Cola

"It's

combo

Dooners

agreements.

"Coke

a big hit with students.

says the best value

pizza

wasn't possible to

it

Pepsi

He

erage.

the

cafeteria’s food service director.

Kast says

ria. is still

includes a slice of pizza, bag of chips and a 20-ounce bev-

new

Kast,

Dooners and the E-wing cafete-

at

combo

they eat in the cafeteria. Pepsi

beverage selection

its

cancer t

h

is

e

organizers are hop-

Distance: one or

five kilometres

ing to raise $16.6 million.

Organizers say anybody can take part in the event by running or walking on either a one- or

Goal: $280,000

Number

release of

the

Breast of five-

kilometre route. Participants can pay a registra-

$35 to participate or $125 or more and take part

Canada calendar. The calendar, created by Guelph artist and entrepreneur Sue

now

tion fee of

Richards,

raise

of publication. The calendar

for free plus get a free collectible

available

is

on

in its fourth

the

year is

website

of partici-

pants: 2,000 •

Registration: $35

or raise

$125

or

more


Feature

— SPOKE, September 27, 2004

Page 10

“I'm loving

Students in bed sheets

“I’m loving

this,’

said.

“Drunk

Benn

the event turned

said

so

“I didn't think

By ALEXANDRA MASTRONARDI

ple

many

they were dressed

togas

in

year,

peo-

Many

some

see

event held on Sept. 16.

street clothes.

Students lined up

down

Many after

Toga

the col-

know where

Sanctuary’s capacity of

Ihe college, said the party ular event

at

a pop-

is

and reaches capacity

have to actually

tell

people

no

they’re not getting in because

one inside

leaving," he said.

is

Albasel said the Toga Party has

is

the

it

in the

year people

don’t have anything to do yet, especially first years,

where

to

go

wc would

who

don’t

know

in the city to party

rather

them come

and

here,”

them

tends to be a safer place for to drink

that's the

and hang out and

image we’re trying

to put

who were

into

the

party

able to get

seemed

to

enjoy

great

time

attend the

and come out

19, said

he had a

and would definitely

Toga Party next

it

easier at the door," she said.

Ignor said he would

several bars open.

more

“More bars would equalize the amount of people on the dance

Sanctuary. “It’s

like to see

air-conditioning

way too hot

in

the

in there."

to a real

is

also just a fun

way to get out and have fun, new people and get your

Due

from other places out

to the

other too.”

(Photo by Ryan Connell)

atmosphere portrayed

by the toga image, problems are

“For

far

between, said Albasel.

three

years

straight

drinking

we

haven’t had any major problems at the toga party and

it’s

just

been a

really fun event,” he said.

The

party

asked

was kept under

staff

for

control

and students were

proper

identification

Students under the legal drinking

and any non-alcoholic beverages

consumed were

in

separate

Adam

Smolinsko, 20, said he

come back

student

next year with

a whole group of people. “It’s

a good time and there's

enough people

in there to suit a

Smolinsko

bar

said

caught underage

he

was

also

happy with the DJ.

“The DJ

is

playing music that

everyone tends to go with so

it

works,” he said.

Tim Decgan,

erages.

Any

events.

type of scene,” he said.

before entering the Sanctuary.

they

is

from future

plans to

containers from the alcoholic bev-

themselves.

Karson Bcnn,

then

it

would have been 10 times

event,” he said.

age were given x’s on their hands,

out to them.”

Students

only $2

kind of a way for the

by event

he said. “It

It's

but if they would have promoted

years to shed the high school

few and

big event of the year.

first

“We’re so early

it.

of people

welcome back

like the official

friends

such a successful turnout because

like to

know about

was kind

it

lot

it’s killer.”

"The Toga Party

every year.

“We

is

“It’s

manager

students offered feed-

in

event for students.

into the event.

Albasel, bar

“When we all came

of a downer because a

Albasel said the Toga Party

370 was reached only a few hours

Maher

fact there

he said.

it’s at,”

“Toga’s rock,

Party.

students were refused entry

the

he

“People in a toga definitely

lege’s hallway waiting anxiously to

get into the

lines,

Kerry EUis. 19. said the

didn't

Smolinsko said there should be

to

wearing

people

in the Sanctuary to celebrate the

it,"

see next year.

said

18,

was disappointed

time, he

than 350 students gathered

it’s

amazing, I love

last

said.

it

although he was having a good

Conestoga’s 4th annual Toga Party.

More

Marin,

and create shorter

been advertised.

on things they would

Shaun

floor

toga parties.

said.

at

s

said.

“I should have came

would show up but

it

said.

was a cover charge should have

turned out pretty good,” he

They came, they conquered, and

awesome, he

pointed he missed out on previous

out better than he expected.

Toga Party

s

Matt Ignor. 20. said he was disap-

bed sheets.

in

girls

I’m halfway there.”

celebrate the

it. it

really, really cool,"

first

toga

it

(Photo by Ryan Connell)

21. said

was

for his

better than he

the Toga Party.

expected.

year.

Second-year public relations students Lindsay Seibel (left) and Cheryl Butler decked out in gold togas with vines and grapes for

(Photo by Ryan Connell)

The Sanctuary

attracted major

crowds

for the first

pub night bash

of the year.

Students

came dressed

out

in

togas for the night of good music and even better beer.


)

Feature

SPOKE, September

A

First-year recreation

and

Party

in

(left) gives third-year architectural engineering leopard print and cow-patterned togas at the Toga

leisure student Korri Ellis

little

leg while

dressed

in

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Page 11

(Photo by Ryan Connell) student shakes her booty for the crowd at the Toga Party.

(Photo by Ryan Connell)

(Photo by Ryan uonneuj

student Kevin Rogers a

2004

27,

Second-year graphic design student Lisa Walter (left) butts heads with first-year management studies student Laura Grubbe in their Aladdin and McDonaldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bed sheets.

the Sanctuary.

mm

1

i* t

As many students

partied inside the Sanctuary,

more students

impatiently waited outside to enter the

Toga

Party.

Some

students had to wait

in line for

Photo bv Rvan Connell

over a half hour.


Page 12

Feature

— SPOKE, September 27, 2004

Bob’s retirement adventure By DESIREE FINHERT registration,

pro-

gram development,

adult

tudent

S

learning:

we’ve taken

If

these tasks for granted,

it’s

because

they have always been orchestrated to perfection.

Someone has been handling items

these

Santa Claus with

like

— gloves, making a

list

kid

and checking

it

The meticulous preparation has been the work of Conestoga’s

twice.

former dean of

liberal

and media

studies.

Like Claus, a jovial

a fond-

spirit,

ness for youth and a white beard are

the

brought

Bob

features

school

to

although he’s

still

Mclver

each

more

day;

carrot on

top than snowy.

But unlike the mythical

who

saint,

continues year after year for

future generations,

it is

time for the

students to give up their toiling elf to retirement.

Mclver, 60, has been with the college from the onset. “It

was a whole new adventure,”

he recollects. "Colleges were brand new in Ontario. There was nothing

—between

university and high school.” During his 34 years at Conestoga, Mclver enjoyed an exotic experience. “Really it was an opportunity, afforded to me by the college, to travel

the

Mclver worked as a consultant in the United Arab Emirates where a college system was being implemented. Through the government, the college got a contract to work on developing an Arab college system using Ontario as a model. A small team worked long hours in the blistering sun and would spend their evenings in cool hotel rooms. But there was always a party.

New members

joining the

team would secretly bring booze into the. region where alcohol was prohibited.

One

evening,

when

were scarce, Mclver watched a colleague drink gin out of a cream pitcher. The whole team was without their families, working 12-hour

glasses

(Photo by Desiree Finhert)

world,” he grins, eyes

wide in reminiscence. "I’d never been outside North America before. It was a major thrill for me.”

Retired

dean

of liberal

and media

studies,

Bob

Mclver, 60, has

been

at

Conestoga College since the beginning

of the adventure.

never known his father without a

brick and concrete school

was an

Longtime friend Andy Clow, 60,

tain themselves.

beard.

“It was a big deal that you could take a cab, go out to dinner and come back again on S3.”

He doesn’t think his father will enjoy his retirement by relaxing; rather he will go back to work, and

oven without air-conditioners on a sunny afternoon. “We were all here working and it was very hot. Halfway through the

says Mclver always wanted to see the students at Conestoga succeed.

However, Mclver laments that month on site was the first time he’d ever been away from his wife Cheryl and their two sons

Mclver

afternoon,

days.

As

a

group they would enter-

the first

“I

was so

lonely,

it

made me

sick

sometimes.” In

the

office

agrees.

“I’m looking

at

as,

it

I’m taking

early retirement from the college,

was,” explains Buuke.

not from working.

Mclver says he was at a meeting Cambridge when the lights went out. He was on his way back to the

I

don’t have a

job right now.”

in

Despite his official retirement in he’s

light-hearted

August, Mclver has been popping

and level-headed, yet passionate about his family. A photo of his smiling one-year-old grandson dec-

favour the staff with roses.

orates his desk.

ies,

The younger Matthew Mclver, is

of

two

sons,

29, says his father

the pillar of the entire family.

“He’s the glue that holds us all together,” says Matthew, who has

Bob Mclver, he disapdidn’t know where he

We

peared.

back into the

office,

most recently

to

Christine Buuke, identifies this

behaviour as “typical “It

made me

Bob

“It

Mclver.”

think of what hap-

pened during the blackout two

Buuke begins to paint a of a humid August. The

mean,

that’s the

reason the col-

have students succeed. To get out the door with their diploma or certificate was important,” says Clow, retired a Conestoga faculty member, curis

here, to

rently teaching part-time business

and finance math

at the college.

idea struck him.

hotter than a firecracker,”

Mclver, thinking curiously

about the city’s power outage.

“I

“I

mean,

that’s the

thought I’d get everybody some

reason the college

D.Q. sandwiches. They were out of power too, so I got a whole box and it

didn’t cost

me

anything.”

is

Saint Nick

treats,

here, to have

Queen

After explaining the Dairy

years ago." picture

was

says

Conestoga’s chair of English stud-

when an

college

“I

lege

was pressed

students succeed.”

to

clarify the recent flower delivery;

Andy

Christmas being four months away.

“My wife is very good at reminding me when it’s Secretaries’ Week. only

I

remember

Christmas or

my

when

Clow,

part-time teacher

it’s

birthday,” he con-

glow in his cheek. For years he has been giving the office staff Bowers. fesses with a rosy

when

“So.

taries got

I

me

left, all

a

of the secre-

bouquet of flowers

with a

little note saying, ‘who’s going to get us flowers now?'”

In return,

Mclver gave out about

15 single roses to the secretaries.

He

in

administration

volunteers to

information

booth

is

don’t

I

in

sit

when

the

high

school students tour the college.

He

directs

lost

students during

final gift to the students in the

form

of a Mclver Bridging Bursary. will

league.

Mclver doesn’t have any ment plans, except that he’d

retire-

like to

return as a consultant.

The parameters

are

still

in

the

works and the faculty are sponsoring

it

as a retirement present.

ture

“There’s a great big world out there.”

orientation and will be leaving a

more than a year and

and Mclver as a strong defenceman on the Kitchener- Waterloo hockey

tions.

being

for

Old

are

man who

college

works with. “But one of the downsides of

Bob Mclver

retirees

get to see the students,” says the

at the

ple he

Administration assistant, Susana Brand, has worked with miss the flowers he brings the staff.

the

Clow handling rightwing

But perhaps there is a new advenon the horizon for one of our founding fathers and a jovial spirit. Seeing more of North America’s coastlines and photographing its lighthouses is one of his aspira-

says his time

has been great because of the peo-

(Photo by Desiree Finhert)

Together,

Timers,

And

like

parents

after

their

and Conestoga are saddened to see Mclver shuck his white gloves and join the outside world. But if we’re not naughty, maybe we’ll see him again. child’s graduation, the students

faculty of


Feature

Walking

SPOKE, September

27,

2004

— Page 13

a woman’s shoes

in

Mocha and Big Mike from 91.5 The Beat participate in Understanding Women Boot Camp to identify with

female listeners

GALHARDO

By JEN

As

a result, Henein has decided

them through Understanding Bool Camp so they can feel more at home with the female lis-

to put

Alright

you guys out

all

there,

do you understand women? If so, you might want to think again! In order to understand women you must walk in a woman’s shoes. That

is

Beat

exaetly trying to

is

what 91.5 The get two men to

do.

Women teners.

“Last week

women and lell

it

be

to

and get

I

dressed them up as

they understood

their

how

nylons and heels

in

makeup and

hair

done," said Henein.

“A

lot

think

and

of

men

it’s

bad

Mocha has also had his eyebrows waxed, his legs waxed and his underarms waxed, whereas Big Mike has had his legs shaved. According to Henein, if they

torturous.”

graduate after the eight-week pro-

Sandra Henein,

gram they

promotions director at 91.5 The Beat «

For eight weeks

will get to

go on

a date

with 10 lucky female listeners to the Flying Dog in Kitchener and

awarded plaques. “We’re whipping them

will gel

Mocha and Big

into

shape," she said.

Mike from the afternoon show must attend Understanding Women Boot Camp.

As for feedback from the listeners, Henein said she has had many calls from female listeners saying they

According to Sandra Henein. promotions director at 91.5 The Beal. Mocha and Big Mike always side with the males with comments like “how do we get into the Playboy mansion?” Henein constantly must remind Mocha and Big Mike they have female listeners and must relate to them. However, Mocha and Big Mike insist they understand

appreciate the boot

about guy topics. However, the feedback from the males is a little different. “A lot of the men think it's bad and torturous.” What else will Mocha and Big Mike have to endure during this camp? That’s up to Henein to decide and for anyone listening

women.

to the radio station to find out!

the

ECE

camp because Mocha and Big Mike talk

they feel

a

lot

(Photo by Jen Galhardo)

from Voila Salon and Spa, waxes Mocha’s eyebrows. Mocha and his co-host Big Mike from 91 .5 The Beat’s afternoon show have been undergoing some major changes to identify with their female audience. If they graduate from the program they will go on a date with 10 female listeners Holly,

welcome back and awards ceremony holds

GETTING ASSISTANCE "It's

The early childhood education program held their annual welcome back and awards ceremony

award by Morris.

Sept. 8 on the

Award.

playground of the

Doon child care centre. Wayne Morris, ECE co-ordinator and chair of community services, welcomed returning students, new students, faculty and guests.

Award winners included: 1. Manosi Saha - who won Donna McKenna Award. This award

presented

is

in

the

hon-

our of the former co-ordinator of the

program and

awarded to the ECE program who

student in the

has completed

is

year with

first

at

at least an A second field placement. Saha has been working at her academic potential and has proven

least a

B

average

average and

in the

she has the qualities important for

working with young children. Morris presented the award Melissa Bell -

who won

the

A1 Gmelin Award. This award recognizes interest in and commitment to children with differing abilities.

The award

is

in

honour of Mr.

who was an active member of the Preston Rotary Club,

Gmelin,

owner of Gmelin’s Flowers in Cambridge (Preston), and interested

in

working with children with

diverse abilities.

Bell

was presented

- who won

Cambridge

ECE

is selected by the members. To receive this award, Collins demonstrated characteristics of the Cambridge YWCA’s mission statement. She had high marks, primarily in field placement, and has a professional

Don't* wait

material

the

to accept anything but the best,

*

and has shown commitment to the ECE field. The award was presented by Judy Neufeld, chair of the ECE program advisory committee. 5. Cynthia Silver - who won the Imagine the Possibilities

until just

IT

more

new material builds on understand now will make future

before a test to get help because

difficult to

understand.

Ask questions

in class.

* Visit the instructor during office hours. * Ask friends, members of your study group, or classmates. * Check with Peer Services, 2B07 for free tutorials.

Check with Peer Services, 2B07 for Peer Supported Learning Groups. Go to Peer Services, 2B07, and ask for a tutor. * Be sure to get help when you need it. *

*

of Excellence.

Conestoga’s ECE faculty selects one outstanding student each year, and Paleczny met the requirements. She had high marks in all courses including field placement, strong interper-

WORKING WITH A TUTOR Tutors are coaches, not crutches. They encourage you, and give you hints as you need them. They do not do the work for you; however, they are there to help you figure out how to team for yourself. When working with your tutor,

attitude

have a

specific

list

of questions prepared in advance.

become dependent on your

To make an appointment tutor, visit the

Do not

for learning strategy assistance, or to inquire

Student Services Office.

Conestoga College’s ECE faculty, Suzanne Burns, director

as well as

child

services,

Cambridge

YWCA,

chose Silver based on her understanding of the Reggio Emilia cation.

A Message from Learning Strategies Visit

our website htto://www. conestoaac. on. ca/isn/stserv/index. iso

allow yourself to

tutor because they cannot take the

Award.

of

you very

Somerset Maugham

USE THE RESOURCES

The award was presented by Suzanne Bums, director of childcare services, YWCA of Cambridge. 4. Alisia Paleczny - who won

ECE Award

it".

previous sections, so anything you don't

faculty

philosophy of early childhood eduwith

GET HELP AS SOON AS YOU NEED

presentation.

the

you refuse

the

Student

This award

ECE

life; if

Often get

sonal skills, a consistent positive to

Saha. 2.

Lisa Collins

3.

YWCA

a funny thing about

exams

for you.

about getting a


.

Page 14

— SPOKE,

September

Where He

Have you ever wondered if the same $5, $10, or $20 bill has crossed your path twice? Have you ever wanted to know where your money goes once it's left your hands? There is a website that can answer these questions for you. Jeremy Mercer, 33, of Powell River, B.C., said he used to be curious about where his money went and to whom after he used it to purchase something. Mercer, a chemical engineer, said he came across the website www.whereswilly.com while surfing the web one day and immediately registered as a user on May 10 2001 .

.

Where’s Willy?, referring Wilfrid Laurier. the

to Sir

French-

first

Canadian prime minister, who

bill, is

you

to see

a website that allows

where your Canadian

bills go,

so

long as the next possessor partici-

needed

pates. All that is

tracking a

number

to start

the 10-character

bill is

on the back of the bill and the postal code of the person registering the bill on the site. A bill can be tracked even serial

that is

the person

if

not a registered

is

also has the bonus of having

he

said.

"My wife encourages and ports my hobby,” Mercer said, more than happy

she’s

In

as of Sept.

total,

The site-wide

statistics are also

on the homepage of Where’s Willy? for users and nonusers to see. As of Sept. 15 the number of total bills entered into the site was just over one million,

worth a total of $13.5 million. There were a total 73,419 registered users on the site. Mercer said every bill that goes through his hands gets marked.

“When

first started out,

I

number of bills was entering I would have had writer’s cramp by the end of the 1

month.

"Then

got an official Where’s

1

Willy? rubber stamp and

I stamped have created a template on Microsoft Word that

all

my

bills.

me

allows

Now,

I

to tape a bill to a piece

site,

per

hobby.

You may

see bills floating around

with whereswilly.com

stamped on them, he That

or

and you

it

off as a regular

bill will

have been regis-

shouldn’t shrug bill.

written

said,

on Where’s Willy? and it would be a shame to stop its journey. "Every dollar I spend, I spend in cash now,” he said, “and it has changed my spending totally tered

Mercer said when he tracking his bills

it

first

began

made him

real-

he registered,

ize that all the bills

he was also spending. He then became more conscious of how he

was spending those “After putting so realized

a

I

bills.

many

went through

cash,” he said. “So,

aware of what

it's

now

bills in,

that I

I

much

am more

actually being

he said,

is

that

optional for frequent

to use.

It

users to

make

is

a donation to the site

developer each month to help keep Where’s Willy up and running. For $9 per month it is worth it.

When

asked

or most

if

he had a favourite

memorable

replied that the top

out

in

mind

his

received

one

stands

that

hometown

his

in

Mercer

bill,

bill that is

he

of

Powell River, B.C.

made

its

registered

way

to

the

bill

it

Hawaii and then

eventually back to Ontario.

which is when your bill in their area, in all provinces and territories in Canada and there are only a total of seven users to achieve that. He’s also had hits in He’s had

someone

hits,

else registers

12 U.S. states.

“You’d be surprised

who

num90210 (the

at the

enter

TV

show) as

their postal

or zip

code,” Mercer said. “I’ve had about

totally free

it is

(Photo by Melissa Hancock)

you want to track your Canadian currency as www.whereswilly.com If

it

travels

around the world, then go

two dozen

One

up from

visitors of

illegal

is

dle out of them. That

is illegal.

comes to bills, it’s a litAs long as it’s not an advertisement and there are no marks on the face of whoever is on it

tle different.

the

bill,

it

not

is

illegal.

Where’s Willy?

bill

into a bank, there

is

culation

may

is

a chance

stop, so

I

If

a

deposited its cir-

advise peo-

ple to keep spending the bills in a

for By

in the

at

ing the

than 30 students gathered

basement of Conestoga’s in an attempt to win Canada’s Wonderland.

poker

res-

tick-

Dan Armchuck, 18, a computer programming student at Conestoga College, organized a Texas Hold 'em poker tournament for students

their postal or

zip code.”

Jeremy Mercer,

daily e-mails that

Armchuck said he poker this summer

started playing after a friend

of developer Where’s Willy?, launched his original site Where's George?, referring to George Washington, in Boston, Mass, in 1998. Where’s

Eskin.

George? was a site for tracking American currency. He states on his site that he had so many requests from Canadians wanting to

be able to track

their

currency

as well that he created another site just for that

purpose and launched

"It’s quite addictive,"

(Photo by James Clark)

Students eager of

driver’s worst nightmare to get their

cars exiting onto

pus.

Doon

weekend

were met with a line Conestoga’s Doon cam-

started

Valley Drive at

Armchuck,

user.

not just about entering now,” he said, “it’s a com-

“It’s bills

munity.”

Where’s Willy? users gather around the country, sometimes even on a monthly basis, Mercer said. It’s something that people can relate to and has been the foundation of

ed

a first-year resident

something he was looking forward to organizing. nitely

“I thought some people would have fun playing poker and I decid-

friendships. a

to

make

it

a tournament so

1

tickets

has been playing poker for a couple

could hand out prizes," he said.

of years

Tournament prizes included two passes to Canada’s Wonderland and the Conestoga Poker Hat, a hat made of tinfoil and cards awarded to the last player at the

to

now

but considers himself

be a horrible player.

“Whenever

I

play for

always end up losing,” he “I ran

really

money

a streak of luck tonight,

came

I

said. it

through.”

Runner-up Eric Leece, 19, a at Conestoga

table.

broadcasting student “It

was a tough

battle but

me

and outplayed me.”

College, said he played the best he could. “It

was

skilled

a tough battle but he out-

me

and outplayed me,” he

said.

Eric Leece,

“This guy’s a champ.”

Armchuck reminds

he said.

adviser (RA), said this was defi-

many

Mercer said he is proud to be part of something so unique.

residence play poker

broadcasting student

game.

in."

1

Hank

with an expensive poker set introto the

come

Mercer said he will continue to enter bills on the Where’s Willy? site and hopes to stay as the No.

whereswi/lv. com user

(Parkinson) out-skilled

living in residence.

duced him

site.

“Advertisements and the friends program help pay for the costs of running both sites," Eskin stated in a Sept. 18 e-mail. “Both sites are entirely run by me, although I have a few users help out with the

number of people who enter 90210 (the TV show) as

on Feb. 20, 2001. Both websites are a non-profit hobby for Eskin and any money he receives is spent on maintainit

Canada’s Wonderland

idence on Sept. 15 to try their hand

ets to

“You’d be surprised at the

in

ALEXANDRA MASTRONARDI

More

manner without taking

to the bank, if possible.”

deface coins,”

to

Mercer said. “There was a big problem when toonies first came out with people punching the mid-

“When

them

comes

Where’s Willy? is the question of whether they would be illegally defacing the bills if they wrote the website name on it. Mercer said he tells people that the site developer has spoken with a few banks to get the dos and don'ts of writing on legal tender. “It

natural

hits like that.”

question that always

Students

A

to

my

Another good thing about the

ber of people

spent on.”

through

it

looks better and

It

easier that way.”

lot

After he

habits.”

was

said, “but with the

He enters 300 month, calling

bills

I

whereswilly.com on each individual bill I entered.” he handwriting

it’s

interesting

bills

displayed

inkjet printer.

400

2004,

16,

since he joined in 2001

of paper and run

an

to spread the

Mercer had entered 13,240

For two years, Mercer has been the No. 1 user of Where's Willy?

it

sup-

“and

around.”

bills

user.

to

your Willy?

is

no debit transaction fees, or credit card interest to worry about paying,

is

printed on the Canadian $5

the world

in

HANCOCK

By MELISSA

News

2004

27,

will

Participants were given $5 poker chips and the first person obtain all the chips won.

Winner of

in

ments held monthly for students

to

living in residence.

Gary Parkinson, 18, a management student at Conestoga College, said he the tournament

students there

be poker and euchre tourna-

Students

how

interested

in

learning

to play are advised to arrive a

half-hour before posted tournament

time for lessons.


"

SPOKE, September

I

in

2004

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Page 15

Conestoga

PLEASE NDTE/CDRRECTIDN OUR APOLOGIES

27,

STUDENTS INC

I

for the typographical error

the student planner which advertises

black B white photocopying for free.

copies are

For

all

The

cents each.

.15

educational related needs,

we do

offer free binding, laminating, scanning, faxing,

and printing

We

of colour

pages for reports

apologize for any INCONVENIENCE THIS

MAY HAVE CAUSED.

CSI/CSA Involved

in

Education

Postsecondary Review Higher Expectations for Higher Education

UPDATE #1 September This

What

is

is

the

first in

14,

2004

a series of updates to interested individuals and organizations on the progress of the Postsecondary Review being undertaken by the Hon. Bob Rae, Advisor to the Premier and Minister

the Postsecondary Review?

The Postsecondary Review was announced by the Ontario government in Budget 2004 to review the design and funding of Ontario's postsecondary education system and recommend innovative ways in which our institutions can provide the best education to students and support Ontario's prosperity.

"We need

to focus individuals

on the opportunity for

and

all

Ontarians that high education represents, as well as the need for us to allow both and achieve, excellence. Bob Rae, Advisor to the Premier and Minister

institutions to aspire to,

Our Website The Postsecondary Review website, www.raereview.on.ca was launched on August 31. Look to it for information about the Review's objectives, deliverable and timelines, and details of the consultation process and schedule. The website also provides a Resource Room with links to research documents and information about current issues in postsecondary education - in Ontario, Canada and around the world. ,

We Want to

Hear from You

Rae will host a total of 16 public Town Hall meetings and a series of roundtable dialogues with key stakeholders over a period of 11 weeks. The Postsecondary Review is currently finalizing plans to visit institutions in and around the communities of Barrie, Guelph, Hamilton, Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, North Bay, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Sudbury, Thunder Bay, Toronto, and Windsor. Starting in early October, Mr.

one of the Review's Town Hall meetings, all Ontarians are invited to submit their ideas or answers to our questions by fax, mail or via the website. Our fax number is 416-323-6895. Our mailing address is Postsecondary Review, 2 Bloor Street West, Suite 700, Toronto, ON, M4W 3R1. The Rae Review's website address is www.raereview.on.ca. In addition to participating in


.

Entertainment

— SPOKE, September 27, 2004

Page 16

~

new

Exhibit gives

outlook

(iWk*

Horoscope *^§§1

f

Week of Sept. 27,2004

^4^

and

...

it

is

only a short walk

away Aries

.

March

||p5f By JENNIFER

ORMSTON

pieces

was created by

Borgers.

who

cut

on the walls of the Homer Watson House and Gallery. The juried Art of Cruickston exhibit is compiled of more than 50

take a walk

pieces in various

mediums

includ-

into

lot

from forests and lakes to cliffs and fauna can be

found.

The

Charitable Cruickston Research Reserve invited artists to walk the grounds and create art inspired by its beauty that is now

on display and for sale

at

the

Each painting reflects a unique perspective on the peaceful setting, from babbling rivers to the roots of fallen trees to reflections of

forests

students

on calm

Sunset

at

McDonald, was

taking

are

Taurus April 20

and said, ‘Oh, this place looks open to the public,’ so they pop in and take a look,” said Tyo.

The

gallery

is

Coming

this week to your sensyour desire for revenge. Your rival didn't backslab you on purpose so be mindful of your treatment towards them it, might be that they want to be friends.

near the college’s

es

Doon campus,

at 1754 Old Mill and is open Tuesdays to Sundays from 12 to 4:30 p.m. This

Rd.,

exhibit runs until Oct. 3 is

1

To

learn

Cruickston Reserve,

is

more

about the Charitable Research

go

to

The award-winning painting, A Competent Guide, has sold for $895 since the exhibit, Art of

-

21

Who is most important to you? Reduce complexity and wasted effort on relationships that are bogging you down. You don’t have time to lavish away.

Gemini May

21

Sagittarius

/#J?

June 21

-

November 22 December 21

1207

Cruickston, opened.

www.cruickston.com.

Norma

by

On

the

picture.

It

is

a scale

from one

to

1

0 your

an eight. Not too

Inconsistency and gaps in your routine are ravaging your

mood.

ous and not none existent. It’s all about how you are looking at it.

Embrace

it

A

priorities

love

staff.

life is

good

seri-

fit.

all level

come

the disarray and

out in the end.

will

Set your

and organization

will

naturally.

just

incredible.”

Cancer

painting differs from others the show because it not as

The in

October 23

(

a suggested $3 dona-

tion.

was simple. love McDonald’s style,” she “You can actually see the sun in

Scorpio

./% 20

class

the choice

setting

May

-

November

For Tiffani Tyo, exhibition cura“I

in

last.

the recipient of the

given by the gallery’s

said.

it

the

coveted Curator’s Choice Award

tor,

make

Never stop reviewing and improving yourself. Sit back on your heels and your potential will be passed by. It happened to you last week, didn't it?

Cruickston, a stunning

painting

acrylic

dense

lakes.

a hurry so

“A lot of them say they were walking by on their way to or from

Entrance

gallery.

-

would recognize in the pieces.” Conestoga Gradually, more time to stop by the gallery.

thing

will

enjoy them more. You are not

of places they

College

limestone

the side.

from each other and you

through Cruickston,

"There arc a

September 23 October 22

4^

Separate your favourite things

first

visit the gallery.

ing watercolours, acrylics and oil

Cruickston is 913 acres pf landscape where every-

j

Have your bacon on

Tyo recommends students

Libra

X

-

it

into a canvas.

and then

21

took a digital picture,

paintings.

diverse

{

Kelly

500 pieces and wove

Paintings of Cambridge’s picturesque Cruickston reserve by gifted Canadian artists are now hanging

it

artist

-pf

j;

J,

June 22

Capricorn

Jlj.

July 22

-

December 22

-

Chandra Erlendson, education co-ordinator and prodetailed, said

grammer "It

A old

for the gallery.

Say

possesses a romantic quality.”

man

traipsing

covered

hill

down

yes. Don't wait in vein.

If

they want forgiveness you need

soft pastel piece depicting an

a snow-

to

received the Juror's

bow down. You

can't

Choice Award.

go on

mistakes

letting other people's

Put yourself second to others and your luck will change.

hang over your head.

A

Competent Guide, this work by Vicki Brophy resembles Titled

You win some you lose some. You happen to be a loser. It comes from your innate ability to make other people squeamish.

the distinct landscape style of the

renowned

Canadian Seven painters.

One of

the exhibit’s

Group

(Photo by Jennifer Ormston)

of

and wide the college’s Doon campus.

Art lovers travel from far

most unique

to

to

see renowned

exhibits

-

dose

Aquarius

Leo

ffh

July 23

-

August

llllf

22

Your opinion in gold.

is

worth

its

j

weight

Stand your ground on the

tough decision you'll have to make. No one's opinion is more important than your

January 20 February 18

..

own

right

Don't longer.

pant

in

sit

in

the

Become your

shadows any

an active particilife.

Five

for

Fighting says you only have 100 years to

live.

now.

Virgo

Of

August 23 September 22

The journey of 1,000 miles starts

with a stop at the gas sta-

tion.

Remember, even

est

of details

is

Be careful around open flame, Someone is trying to blow smoke

the small-

up your ass. Watch out for people

essential to reach-

trying to steal your thunder for

ing your larger goals.

their

Janet Morris

is

own means.

a 2nd-year journalism

student in tune with the universe. (Photo by Jennifer Ormston)

Have you passed by this building and wondered what is? Students are welcome view the Homer Watson House and Gallery’s latest masterpieces. it

to

come

in

and


Entertainment

Stag Shop reveals hot By JUSTIN BASTIN Ron Jeremy and Ed out

turned

for

lingerie

Marshall

Hall

in

Sock

the

new

of their

unveiling

Coquette

of

line

Bingemans’ Kitchener, on

at

star

and

saucy sock were two of the hundreds, mostly couples,

who

spent a

cold Saturday night indoors sur-

rounded by the hot fashions and products of the Stag Shop.

Once the

pleasure tools as well as her

inside,

couples could

many product

visit

displays featur-

ing such items as the

Ron Jeremy

Suction Ice Dong, a life-size repli-

famous member

ca of Jeremy’s

2004

— Page 17

line of lingerie

designed to be frozen before use

added sensation. Sportsbeet Bondage Bedsheet was demonstrated on stage and featured four moveable for

The

new

book Tickle His Pickle, your hands on guide to penis pleasing. Jeremy performed a comedy roucracking jokes

tine,

about male and Canadians’ sexual

genetalia

Sept. 18.

The legendary porn

27,

Sadie Allison was also on handpromoting her Tickle Kitty line of

Stag Shop’s

the

new

SPOKE, September

habits.

The highlight of the night was show where male and

the fashion

female models strutted down the runway wearing the latest fashions from Coquette, Blaque and Zakk. Outfits ranged from nurse uniforms to silk boxers to domi-

black

natrix-style

leather

body

suits.

To close the evening four ripped male models came out dancing and strutting

Back

to

Street

Boys

music, waving light sticks and busting moves to the delighted

of your lover’s legs and arms while

screams of the audience. For more information on products and events visit www.stagshop.com

dominating them.

or www.ticklckitty.com.

Velcro straps for easy positioning

'i

TfitTStiOsor

Of

“Tickle Voir Tencj"

'Toy Gasnvj" to

Her Ulejt s*ok

"Tickle His Pickle”

Sadie Allison

(Photo by Justin Bastin)

(Photo by Justin Bastin)

Sadie Allison

(right)

was

at the event,

A model shows

promoting her book Tickle

His Pickle.

fills in

By MELISSA

approximately 100 students in the Sanctuary on Sept. 14.

Comedian Nikki Payne was

orig-

scheduled to perform but

make

it

were people already waiting in the Sanctuary for Payne, and she didn’t want to cancel. Quigly joked about everything from drugs to feminists to sexual there

Comedian Chris Quigly rushed to Conestoga College on a moment’s notice to entertain

because her

flight

was delayed.

and will

I

think future events

be

this quality

and

18,

a first-year

marketing student, said she thought Quigly was interesting but didn’t

would go see him again. he was really that

funny,” she said.

thought Quigly was pretty

dent,

“This was a good event, and

second-year computer

think

future

quality

programmer/analyst student

Nichole

Jiminez,

Conestoga

Students Inc. events programmer,

I

events will be this

time

first

the

at

and events co1

5 inter-

view.

She said

on

tickets are

sale for

$60.57 each, however she couldn’t say how many tickets were still available.

hard to say what type of

audience we'll have," Asselstine said. “All

I

could say

is

we

a rock audience of ages

expect

30 and

up.” will begin at 8 p.m.

For information about tickets 519-578-1570.

call

and higher," said Bretz.

Jayson Phillips, 24, in practical nursing, said Quigly had some

funny parts, but some of it was just your average puns. Phillips said he probably wouldn't go see him

said

she had to make a choice between cancelling the show or

again.

calling in another

him, unless

comedian. Jiminez said she decided to bring in another entertainer because

assistant

The concert

again.

Joey Bretz,

the

perform

will

Centre, Brenda Asselstine, exec-

“It's

Joey Bretz, 19, a second-year computer programmer/analyst stu-

good and he would go see him

higher.”

be

will

utive

think she

was a good event

This

Cooper

ordinator, said in a Sept.

Sarah McLean,

at

Sept. 30.

and nothing

at others.

be

will

Kitchener’s Centre in the Square

favours, eliciting laughs at times

“I didn’t think

“This

Stag Shop’s newest styles during the fashion show, which was the

HANCOCK

Cooper

Alice

By STEPH BAULK

inally

of the

Cooper

Alice

a moment’s notice

couldn't

one

highlight of the night.

Comedian at

off

“I

wouldn’t leave class to see

class,”

pay

he

it

was a

said.

really horrible

“But

I

wouldn’t

to see him, that’s for sure.”

(Internet photo)

Shock rocker Alice Cooper, known for songs like School’s Out and Welcome to My Nightmare,

on Sept. 30 the Square.

will

be

at the

in

Kitchener

Centre

in

will

rock Kitchener


Page 18

Sports

— SPOKE, September 27, 2004

Mr.

3000

strikes out with fans By JASON It

may

be

SONSER

my own

rot,ten luck,

but

seems have the uncanny ability to choose the most predictable of movies in the box office. Though the plot seemed to flow it

I

much

with too

predictability even

comedy, Mr. 3000 starring Bernie Mac evened it out with a few of life’s finer lessons. That is, if you're even considering any sort of deeper thought during something like a sports comedy. The movie starts out with Mac’s for a sports

lead

(Internet photo)

Stan Ross, played by Bernie Mac, wants to keep the ball he got even tries to take away from the youngster who caught it.

his 3,000th hit off of

so bad, he

it

Athletics Yard *

ijt:

Ross

bringing

now

After rigorous training, the

47-year-old

Ross plays

game back with

his

first

the Brewers, cocky

as ever, without a single

hit.

This

continues in the second game, and

ing 3,000 career hits. Being the extremely arrogant, egocentric player that he is, he resigns from the Brewers immediately after the game. Throughout his career with the Brewers, Ross seemingly amplifies his already unappealing personality by showing absolutely no team spirit, being extremely miserable to the rest of the Brewers’ roster, and worst of all, giving the media an extremely hard time. Heck, he even stole his recordmaking ball from a young fan. Nine years later, however, the statistics people for Major League Baseball looked back at Mr. 3000’s records, and they concluded that he’s actually Mr. 2997. That’s right, there was an error in Ross’s stats, and he’s missing three hits. The predictability, of course, rolls on like a steamroller.

the third, and a few

who

by opening a

spent his time wisely strip mall, decides for

own

egotistical reasons to

his very

go back

into the majors

those extra three

Volleyball, Soccer

in

Brewers’ player Stan Ross, reach-

Ross,

New and Used Hockey, Baseball,

Milwaukee

character,

no hesitation back.

and get

hits.

Seen as a way to draw a bigger audience to a seemingly weak Brewers team, the team owner uses this as an opportunity, and shows

games

after

Obviously Ross has lost his knack for batting. So much so that that.

by the

last

game of

the Brewers'

season, he’s hit twice out of 58 attempts.

After a

season of personality

modifications and becoming more

of a team player, Ross, and the

Brewers, have a chance of getting into third spot.

The

catch

is,

the

Brewers have to win their final game. By the end of the ninth, and with a runner on second base, Ross steps up to the plate with a welldeserved chance to legally achieve 3,000 hits. I don’t want to give away the ending, so you’ll have to pay to see what happens. Add in a romance plot, which made little sense, between Ross and an ESPN~~ reporter he knew from his past, and a few bar scenes which don’t really advance the plot, and you’ve got the essence that is Mr. 3000. I

give this movie a rating of 3/5,

and that’s being generous because I’m a fan of comedy and a fan of baseball. It’s fairly decent if you can see it for less than $10 and want a quick laugh.

and

Miscellaneous Clothing juipment.

Thursday September 30 1 2:00noon - 5:00pm (Photo by Kate Battler)

at the Rec. Centre

Soccer season kicks into high gear The

players take practice shots

warm-ups, Sept.

16.

among

other things during


6

Sports

Soccer teams looking By KATE BATTLER The Conestoga College men’s

I’m looking forward

to

it."

under their belt and

and ready to go.

will be here

games already games lined up

The men's team is off to a good start with two wins during exhibiand 2. tion games on Sept. Coach Geoff Johnstone says so far the team looks really good but until they get into league games, 1

it’s

1

1

On

on campus.

women’s

the

side of things.

Coach Rebecca Miller says will

improve on

While the team

about six

lost

graduation,

to

they

have

of the top 10 high scorers of

will be Steph Ouellette.

1

in

OCAA

all

history during his

time with the Condors.

Johnstone believes the team has players taken from the 55 to 60

who

tried out, that's not surpris-

still

six that are returning.

Miller says

it

is

good base

a

build on and a solid

to

start.

She says the team has a lot of good rookies coming out with a lot of talent and she thinks it will strengthen the team.

“The players we

are adding will

we were

give us the depth which

missing

last year,"

The team

will

says Miller.

have a roster of

1

or 17 players when all is said and done. This year the captain will be Christine

Gomes and

During

the assistant

exhibition

on

play

and 12 the team tied the first game, only to lose on penalty kicks, and lost the second game. "Although the games didn’t go Sept.

a lot of depth this year and with 25

and

last year’s 1, 5

2 record.

worry for the upcoming season has been goaltending because all of last year’s goalies had graduated, including Dino Vukmanovic, who was a vital part of the team. However, after shut-outs of 3 to 0 and to 0 during the exhibition tournament, Johnstone thinks the two rookie goalies he has this year are looking fairly good. The other big loss suffered was the graduation of team high scorer Bojan Djokovic, who became one Johnstone’s biggest

this

year’s team looks pretty strong and

players

hard to say.

time

1

1

ing.

well the girls played strong, espe-

The team captain this year is veteran Marc Ribeiro and the two assistant captains are Victor Nobre

cially considering

and Rariy Rooke. Johnstone says the team

next on Sept. 29 here

great this year and

improve records

worked well together. "They seem like a really good bunch of guys to work with and

The men’s soccer team plays Humber on Sept. 28 followed by Sheridan on Sept. 30. Both games

exhibition

to

spirit is

members have

lot

of the

girls,"

we

didn’t have a

says Miller.

The women’s team plays Humber and

at the

college

Cambrian on Oct.

at

3

(Photo by Kate Battle)

in

Rookie Erin Motheral warms up

Sudbury.

for practice

Fans angry that lockout By NICOLE DEAK

and, during the

same

rejected six separate

Local hockey fans were

hit

hard

als that

period, had

NHL

propos-

would have modernized economic system.

the

when National Hockey League Commissioner Gary Bettman

league’s

announced an indefinite lockout for the 2004-2005 hockey sea-

we owe

achieve an economic system that

son.

will

On

Bettman said

it

result

and

to

in

hockey’s

fans

into the 21st century.”

affordable

to

ticket

make any kind of proposal

and the NHL’s owners are united

at a

ship had refused for

more than

prices

never before, determined to

like

do everything humanly possible to bring hockey’s economic system

Hockey

stand here today to say that

a

15,

press conference, that union leader-

year to

“1

competitive franchises,” said Bettman. "The very future of our game is at stake

Sept.

stable,

fans were not surprised

by Bettman’s statement, as the lockout was basically signed and sealed. Fans were just waiting for the inevitable to be delivered. “Why do we have to screw something up that has been working for years,” said Teah Jay Crew, a second-year electronics engineer technologist.

“A salary cap is not a bad idea but work it out so we, the fans, can watch hockey.”

The the

CBA

was working

way

the

was

it

However, lose

as

the

years

NHL

pro-

continued

more money and

to

span

in the

of 10 years under the old lost $1.8 billion.

CBA,

because the league’s Levitt Report, done by a former U.S. Securities

and Exchange Commissioner, is supposed to reflect the league’s losses over the last 10 years. But,

(Photo by Nicole Deak)

This hockey fan got his last

Cup

became

before the lockout by attending the of Hockey gold medal game, Sept. 14. The lockout fix

official on Sept. 15 when the Collective Bargaining Agreement came to an end.

National

Hockey

League

access

the

own

NHLPA

numbers, but the

lie.

said Yungblut.

we

“Basically,

are told to be true

no

NHL

to

felt

shots with chasers.

The

OSHL

is all

would

er since the lockout.

“There is always juniors, the World Hockey Association might be starting up and the Original Stars Hockey

League, (OSHL)” said Yungblut. "The hockey is not going to be the

same caliber as

the

NHL,

but

100

OSHL

it

is still

has signed more than

players

Fischer,

expected to

is

last the

duration of the lockout and players

were not required

to sign

any con-

Nathan Dempster, a second-year engineering student, said he

Dan

Mike Bryan and Dave

including Cloutier,

McCabe, Stephan

Yelle

the

lockout, but

fence regarding the is

interested in the

other leagues that are popping up.

“I’m frustrated because there won’t be much of a season,” he said, “but

am making

I

plans to see

four-on-four hockey in Kitchener^

and Guelph.” Dempster went on to say thought the

that he

OSHL was a great idea,

not only for the fans, but also for the players. “It’ll

be a party for the players,"

said Dempster.

“It

will

keep the

players busy and in shape. They’ll

have a good time.”

The

OSHL

will

consist of

six-

teams with roughly 1 players per team and will act as the main source of hockey for avid fans, considering games in Europe will not be televised in Canada. 1

there

full

records over five years ago, and has

it

be no shortage of hockey due to new leagues that have come togeth-

was given

financial

is

watch and

I’m angry at the fact that over money.”

played by skilled players.”

NHL’s

disputes

I’m personally angry that

there will be

The

association to

its

dis-

putes the losses.

The

the

(NHLPA)

Players Association

penalties will be taken as penalty

was on

a

will con-

of four-on-four hockey, no centre-ice red line, no touch icing and sist

2002-2003 NHL season of more than $270 million. Levitt offered twice to meet with the union to answer any questions they had, but the union declined. The NHL

that,”

OSHL

Andreychuk. The

civil

Yungblut said he

John Yungblut, a second-year civil engineering student and dedicated fan, said he was confused

the

Report

result of the Levitt

everything the

money

revealed a significant loss in the

conduct

16.

tract.

league has a certain set of accurate

place for

intended to work.

gressed

iations.

was extended for various

in

business reasons and also because it

had the Levitt Report for more than six months. The Levitt Report was the product of a year-long, super audit. Arthur Levitt was given access to every possible financial figure and revenue stream for all 30 clubs and all of their related affil-

The

on the goalie Sept.

over

to last for only six sea-

was

sons, but

balls

union repeatedly to audit of teams economics, but they never accepted the offer. “I am confused because the

10 years. Originally the

last

some

by kicking

is

invited

Bargaining

Collective

Agreement (CBA) was

World

— Page 19

really

and women’s soccer teams are underway with tryouts, practices

and

SPOKE, September 27 2004

^

Under National

the

old

CBA,

four

Hockey Leagues went

Pittsburgh, Ottawa, bankruptBuffalo and Los Angeles. “We (the NHL) do apologize to

our millions of fans and the thousands of people who earn theiT^ depending on our livelihood

game,” said Bettman. “It's time to move forward with a system that works for everyone.”


Page 20

Sports

— SPOKE, September 27, 2004

Europeans embarrass Americans on home Cup

18-9 Ryder

loss

is

worst ever for Americans

By KATE BATTLER Outplayed, outgamed or outma-

how you look Americans were simply outdone hy the Europeans at this year’s Ryder Cup. With a stunning 18-9 rout, the led captain Europeans, by Bernhard Langer, embarrassed the Americans on their home turf at Oakland Hills in Michigan. Going into the final day of play on Sept. 19, the Europeans had an 11-5 lead with 12 points up for noeuvred, no matter at

(Internet photo)

Montgomerie, on Sept. 19 helped Europeans.

Westwood and

The Americans

matches early on but could not keep pace with the Europeans.

Colin

Tiger

to clinch the victory for the

ily

Woods

beating

led in five

did his part by eas-

Casey but

Paul

his

teammates couldn’t overcome the momentum the Europeans had built up in the past two days. The Europeans had clinched the

history of the

victory early in the day with wins

play was adopted in 1979.

by Sergio Garcia, Darren Clarke, and Colin Lee Westwood

The Americans have handed out some pretty big losses in the past years though, including two 10point differentials in 1947 and

Montgomerie. Anything after was just icing on the cake.

that

After a dismal start on Friday,

Ryder Cup. However, the Europeans also lost by the same margin in 1981, their worst loss since the

new format of

1975, a 14-point difference in 1963

with the lone victory coming from

and a stunning 23

Chris

DiMarco and Jay Haas, the Americans were down by five

tory in 1967.

points.

While the Americans lead the tournament by going 24-7-2 overall, the Europeans have won four of

On

Saturday they fared a

little

came up short. The Europeans won the day 4 1/2 to 3 better but

still

1/2 setting the stage for the singles

showdown. This was the worst loss ever by an American team in the 77-year

1/2 to 8 1/2 vic-

the last five contests and seven of

the last 10.

When

teams meet next in Club in Ireland the Europeans will by far be the clear

2006

at

the

The

K

favourite.

mommy can

At this price, call

the

grabs during the singles matches.

Sergio Garcia, the youngest player on the European team, was instrumental in the Europeans winning the Ryder Cup. His win,

along with those of Darren Clarke, Lee

it

turf

whenever she wants. You sissy. (Internet photo)

Tiger

Woods shows

his

frustration with the score.

(Internet photo)

Jay Haas, 50, oldest player

is

in

the second

Ryder Cup

history.

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(Internet photo)

Stewart Cink leads the 2006

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Digital Edition - September 27, 2004