Page 1

CBSA taking a breather

Furry friends take a stroll in May

The

money

to help train

puppies

News

for their

Prison program

future lives as guide

A

dogs.

News Monday, March

8,

self-funded organization has

dissolved after 25 years.

Fundraiser raises

fulfills

5

dreams

57-year-old prisoner hopes college

program

will

lead to better

life.

News 3

6

Conestoga College, Kitchener

2004

36th Year

— No. 9

Strike averted With only six hours to spare a deal was struck By JEFF

A

MORLEY

was struck between and OPSF.U late

deal

colleges

Tuesday

to avert a strike

college

faculty,

the last

by 8,600 and

counsellors

librarians.

Walter local

president

Boettger,

237,

pleased.

is

“We

of

while

cent increase that will be retroac-

decreased by 23 per cent. Better

tive to Sept. .5

1.

2003.

An

per cent increase will

additional

workload allow

into

Another two per for September 2004, followed by a 1.8 per cent

time with students.

cent increase

The drug benefit plan remains unchanged. However, the college is no longer looking at the use of a

is set

increase in April 2005.

drug card. The college had wanted faculty to use the card

“We

are happy. We’re not

Boettger says he likes the salary

on the picket

increases and the improvements in (Photo by Jason Smith)

More than

1

,300 students signed the “Stop the Strike” petition

over three days. CSI held

Sanctuary

to raise

on Monday and Tuesday

rallies

in

on workload by manage-

attitude

ment. president of Tibbits, John Conestoga College, is also happy

the

awareness.

that the deal

we had

Students support

to

group was ture.”

attending a rally on

The

and 2

1

by (CSI), was

organized

event,

in

very excited that stu-

definitely

dents are engaged in this activity.

I’m

really

happy about what we've

Inc.

conjunction with

rallies

w'as

to

make their way to Queen’s Park on March 8 where group representawould hand over the petitions government and

across the province, as called for

tives

by the College Student Alliance (CSA). The CSA governs Ontario’s

to the provincial

colleges as the provincial student

Ontario’s college students will be

make

The goal of the

rally

was

make

to

collective bargaining.

students aware of the importance

Although a

of the strike and to allow students and faculty alike to speak out and

Falconer said

be heard by the community and government. rally acted as a catalyst for

students to be heard, both inside the schools and in Ontario’s parlia-

Many

strike rally

Luc

seems

the

support

the

one

the

topic

The

of a

the strike

courtesy of a Conestoga student DJ, free juice, free Timbits as well as

various raffles and giveaways. Falconer,

CSI

CSA was looking to commore than 15,000 signatures in

Falconer also said he believes

Conestoga was well

received.

“Overall, we’re really impressed

with the amount of student support

we’ve had

needs and for once everyis

a

think most students agree on, like

it’s

everyone’s working

together to try to solve the problem.”

for the petition

ing the rally.

The support proved that students were aware of the damage a strike could have caused. very important for the col-

lege to put on an event like this,”

Geoff Cain, another secondyear police foundations student. said

“As much

just a couple of days.

at

it

getting involved. This

“It’s

president,

said the

support

“It

natures added to the petitions dur-

full

CSA,

process and more, including music

pile

second-year student.

of book-

about CSI, the

Justin

a

The positive attitude students had was reflected in the number of sig-

with information tables lets

so

the

like the college is getting the

is I

Perrault,

foundations

police

that

good cause. was a great idea,”

for a

provided students

strike.”

rally also

and agree

was

“I think the rally

the

would

CSA

and the

aged to make their way to Sanctuary and sign petitions at rally. The petitions urged Ontario government to ensure

not “lose any contact days as a

students at the rally said

they appreciate the efforts of CSI

said

province’s college students

was averted. was important that

strike it

students had a voice in the matter.

ment buildings. Conestoga students were encour-

result

that

the ones losing out in unsuccessful

association.

The

indication

clear

a

cam-

most of us would like not to go to class, the reality is a strike would really hurt us. We'd be losing out on the education we pay for, and we’d potentially be losing even more as

to sit at

home and

money

in the

long run.”

at the

big pic-

also

an

advertising is

also

happy with the outcome. “I think it’s great. The main reason is there was no stoppage in school. So it was great for the students.” While Ronter had not seen the details of the contract at press time, overall it is

line.”

fair.

Teachers saw a pay increase of 7.3 per cent over the next two

when

pur-

chasing prescription drugs. The card only covered generic drugs

and did not account for any new drugs that would come on the mar-

Walter Boettger, local 237 OPSEUpresident

ket.

Furthermore, every college must instate a return -to- work policy for

“What

wanted to doors of the college open

Rentier,

he thinks

The CSA’s game plan

look

teacher with the college,

seen here.”

Conestoga Students held

March

Sanctuary.

in the

Joe

paign and sending a message to Queen’s Park.” he said. “We’re

did their part to "Stop the Strike,”

through.

to students.

‘Stop the Strike’ Students at Conestoga College

to

Management

keep the

By JASON SMITH

came

do as a management

management would more one-on-one

faculty

effect this April.

are

line.”

faculty

full-time

come

We’re not on the picket

happy.

has

years. Faculty received a three per

who

people

The recognition allowance also

increase

faculty

will

$700

$1,400 on April

to

1,

for

from 2005.

on long-term

are

dis-

The policy would enable

ability.

those with disabilities to return to

work

gradually.

Boettger

says

Boettger says those teachers who are in Step 20 of their pay grid for one year are entitled to the allowance. The allowance would then be paid out in increments over

Conestoga College already uses

one

also been selected to find

year.

The contentious

issue of

work-

load has been referred to a joint

Boettger explains that class sizes

have increased. Over the full-time

will allow

college

but the

them

A joint

new

contract

formulize the

making

insurance committee has

ways of more

benefits

retiree

affordable. strike

would have

affected 24

colleges across the province and

last five

approximately

students

The

have increased by 43 per cent.

to

policy.

A

task force.

years

this practice,

last, strike

lasted

20 days.

1

80,000 students. in 1989 and

was


Page 2

— SPOKE, March

News

2004

8,

Now deep thoughts

Kwinter to talk at banquet

...with Conestoga College

Minister of

By JENNIFER

(Random questions answered 6y random students

possess?

HOWDEN

Chris Ecklund, owner of Canada

security administra-

and police foundations banquet has a new keynote speaker, after the initial speaker backed out tion

due

to business reasons.

Monte Kwinter will speak at the banquet on March 27 at Bingeman Park in Kitchener.

“i

am

the most likeable

person known to man.” Scott Foster

Kwinter is the minister of community safety and corrections and has been asked to speak about recent legislative changes impacting on police and private sector

with the choice of

"We

are very

Monte,” he

security

new

is

speaker.

honoured

said.

“He

is

to

have

the ideal

is

MPP

gov-

of Kitchener

also a speaker.

Ecklund, a Conestoga graduate, was to donate a trip for two anywhere in Canada the airline WestJel Hies. He was also going to donate weekend accommodations for two at the four-diamond Sheraton Fallsview Hotel and Conference Centre in Niagara Falls.

A number

delivering their successful year presentations.

On look at

somebody and know what they are really thinking.”

Amy Power

third-

However, a

and

their voices

ing,

they

sometimes delivered

stutter-

their

PowerPoint presentations in front of about 40 students and faculty members. Four judges graded

be raffled

ability to

when

I

am

say

‘no’

drunk.”

response has been good. It is being held to not only unite old classmates but to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the law and security program.

sent

to

Also, a letter was

to

couple.

still

waiting

Fundraising events have been

Any

additional

from the hotel. correspondence with Spoke, Ecklund expressed surprise

less

with the turn of events.

cation and job training.

for a response

e-mail

In

make

local charity that provides

project. This way, teachers can give students approval and students have enough time to com-

especially

if

something should go wrong. "Time and availability of parts can change your project so you can repropose it,” said Finda Elliott, the

representative

class

youth with health care, edu-

that you’ve tried to

for

the

Presentations

to describe

handed in at the end of the school year. For the first time ever, stu-

create

their

problems

what they’ve done to project and fix any

that could arise.

"If a part doesn’t

work

at the

included

projects

keted, then that’s great.”

Students are given $75 each

buy ing

to

parts, but the rest of the fundis

up

them.

to

“Either

it’s

out of your

own

pock-

or you go to corporate sponsors,”

Some for a

students can do a project

company.

their project for If

end

said

broadband connection, wireless intercom systems, free airtime communications and MP3 wireless headphones. “The hope is that everybody’s project works at the end of the year,” said Elliott. “If it can be mar-

said Elliott.

sented their projects that will be

it,”

for

have.”

Students have to keep a lab book

fix

Elliott.

their

project,

a

home-

the grade

the beginning of the year for

the

raised

donated to R.O.O.F,

be

will

puter engineering technology pro-

Conestoga College pre-

money

from .auctions and the banquet

et

at

1,000 tickets are

held throughout the year.

Sheraton Fallsview

the

A total of

being sold.

Graduating students from the telecommunications engineering technology program and the com-

dents in the software engineering

Nathan Supelak

off.

total

of 2,500 letters were sent out to alumni, and organizers say the

Tickets are $60 each or $100 per

was

letter

A

administration programs.

computer engineering technology program. “You can’t change the entire project but you can modify it so that what you have in April matches what you said you'd

gram

have the

avail-

WestJet explaining the situation and WestJet sent a $3,900 prize to

plete

Feb. 19, their hands shaking

them.

“I

no longer

Students have to write a proposal

of engineering stu-

Correspondence to get clarificafrom Ecklund were ignored. The banquet is open to both past and present students of the police foundations and law and security

are no longer available.

at

ability to

is

able for the banquet, his donations

HASSON

dents went out to celebrate after

prizes.

tion

Hotel. Organizers are assis-

to

sons.”

sent

By D AWN

have the

was unable

attend because of “business rea-

Students

“1

Douglas,

and our alumni.” John Maloy, parliamentary ernment and the

Chris Donnelly

speaker and no longer donating

to

candidate to speak to our students

Centre,

human sponge.”

keynote speaker but, accord-

ing

happy

tant to the minister of interal

the

inal

was

Inc.,

Since Ecklund

Don Douglas, law and tions co-ordinator, said he

am

“That’s news to me,” he wrote about his no longer being the guest

enforcement. administration and police founda-

“I

the orig-

Process Service

The law and

What superhuman power do you

community safety and corrections new keynote speaker

Elliott’s group did Bruce Power Corp.

engineering students

project,

they

don’t

fail

the

graduate.

technician program at the Waterloo

of the year then

Luckily, Elliott said the presenta-

campus

umented

tions

also took part.

it

at least you've docand the teacher knows

went

really well.

can serve my man’s every need and still have time for big beer Wednesday.” Morgan Slotsvee

“I

“Iron lungs, liver of gold.”

Nathan Brown

(Photo by Carla Sandham)

Watch your 'mile

Conestoga,

you could 6e our next respondent!

The balmy temperatures on

K-W

sidewalks.

last

weekend made

for

step!

an early spring thaw, leaving small ponds

of

water


News

SPOKE, March

Prison program helps

2004

8,

— Page 3

dreams

fulfill

By PETR CIHACEK program when

Starting a college

you are

57-year-old prisoner

a

dreams and guts what Pearl Tay lor

takes colossal

and

that's exactly

has.

“I’m

very

Taylor,

courageous,”

cheerful,

a

says

dark-skinned

woman

w'ith a big heart and body who’s doing time at Kitchener’s Grand Valley Institution for women. Last month, Taylor enrolled in

for change/employment, a 12-week Conestoga College program designed to help inmates plan their life, work and career options.

focus

“I

thought

I’m glad

week

first

give

I'd

that

I

"The good about

felt really

I

a shot and

it

did.” she says.

myself, even though I'm in prison."

Taylor hopes the program will improve her communication skills and give her a better understanding of people's personalities. Once she released at the end of the year,

is

these skills might help her realize

something she’s been dreaming about since she came

to Canada from Jamaica in 1970. "I want to work for a travel agency and, with the help of my

my own

family, to start

And do

to

she

(Photo by Petr Cihacek)

agency.”

sure that will be easy

is

as she

experienced

is

in trav-

and her friend ow ns a travagency in Brampton where she

hopes

Pearl Taylor, 57,

1998

for importation of

marijuana but

el sales

police station every month,

el

she did for seven months.

would work opening her

for five years before

own

business.

Taylor has been in the prison for four months. She’s is hoping to be released to a halfway house in six

After three years of hiding, she

was

thick line behind her troubling past.

Institution.

was

arrested for violation of parole

and went back

“My

here (in prison) in

first

which

"Then I had major family problems and I didn’t report,” she says. “I was scared to go back and I never came back for three years.”

months and to be completely free in December. Then she can make a “I

open her own

to

Grand Valley

to the

family thinks

prison and that

shouldn’t be

I

should have a

is

agency

travel

now

after

she

is

was

Institution. Taylor

arrested

in

serving time for violation of parole.

and I cry too.” According to Taylor, being in touch with family is what makes prison

more

bearable. don’t have family support and they are sad,” she says. “I usually support those people. I life in

released from the Grand Valley

“Some people

people are

harmony.”

in

at

Her classmates described Taylor as friendly, truthful and courageous. “She's very young for her age,” said one of them. Taylor and her nine classmates will graduate from the program and

them that God loves them and so do I.” According to Dianne Murphy,

certificate as she has already taken

who

a

tell

focus

the

facilitates

change/employment

for

program,

get their college certificates

will

April

2.

And

won’t be her

it

first

number of other courses and

studying became a big part of her

When

4:30 p.m.

go out but we have unit by 10 p.m.”

The

it’s

to

clear

we can

be back

in the

students have their classes in

the big central building that looks like a school rather than a mini-

mum

and medium security prison.

The institution’s offices are in same building. Inmates live

the in

small units scattered behind a high

topped with barbed wire where everyone has her own room with a small bed and a TV. fence

1998 for importation of marijua-

in

“I spent seven and then I was released to the halfway house.” After that, she was fully released on the condition she will report to a

second chance,” says the grandmother of three, her usually cheery

Taylor’s kindness

voice suddenly drowned in

mom.”

a.m. and they finish usually at 3 or

explains Taylor. “I usually stay

“She is the peacekeeper,” says Murphy. “She loves when other

4 p.m.,” she says. “Then we go to our units and have an official count

my room

na,”

she

months

says.

here

I

sad-

“They miss me a lot. Sometimes they cry on the phone ness.

why

is

inmates

Maximum- security offenders By AIMEE

WILSON

Strategy, as

Kitchener’s for

Institute

Grand Valley Women (GVI) will

factors.

soon be housing maximum-securi-

Joliett,

ty offenders.

N.S. and Edmonton, Alta.

According to Marion Evans, a team leader with GVI, the maximum-security unit will be ready within the next two months.

The new

unit will be designed

women’s faciliholds minimum-

within the regional ty that currently

security

and medium-security

pris-

oners.

As of

Sept.

1999,

3,

Lawrence

General

Solicitor

when

MacAulay announced

plans

to

women

needing

maximum

security

from

either the

Prison for

Women

in

those

transfer

from men's

institutions into region-

facilities,

al

women

Kingston or

approximately

65

required specific intensive

In the said. "I

news

release,

have no doubt

MacAulay that,

given

the security and other changes to

made, the existing regional women’s facilities will be able to assume these responsibilities.” The Intensive Intervention be

Truro,

Kitchener,

The second was

Institute its

own

in the facilities to accommodate approximately 35 women

The construction of

mental health problems.

Environment houses additional $5 million.

2001, the designs and con-

were underway and

struction

December

of

Structured

Living

houses were

in

year

that

the

approximately $12 million. Living Structured

The

in

Environment

for the

total

will

cost an

annual operating cost

program

at all

imprisonments. the numbers have

1997

Since

that there are

Contrary to what costs

women

than

it

four facilities

will be approximately $9.3 million, it

cost to

Women

In 1998-99,

it

male offender

25, 2003 the Saskatchewan

at

Penitentiary closed. fourth factor

Prison for

which occurred

The

secure

Institution

was

Women

to close the

in

Kingston,

unit

opened

Jan.

at

16,

for

Women

at

Edmonton

institution.

In 1977, the Parliamentary Sub-

Committee Penitentiary

Report on the System in Canada said

it was “unfit women.”

much

for bears,

maximum

securi-

year, the average

and a chance

less

to take responsibility

for their lives.

The

institution did

not have the necessary programs

and rehabilitation facilities that were needed. As a result, the Prison for Women was closed and the four regional facilities, including GVI, were designed.

Grand

Valley

Institute

for

Women, which opened

38 jobs will be created. In 1999, according to a report from Correctional Service Canada,

offender in one of the four regional

continues to provide essential pro-

to the

news

1

855

women were

serving federal

sentences in Canada. in

facilities

was $1

13,

grams

610.

Therefore, the low numbers indicated that

it

was quite costly

to

keep the Prison for Women, and the units in the men’s institutions in operation for such a small number

that help

in an

environment more suitable

their

need while ensuring public

in

As of March 2002, according

to

1934. Since the 1930s, task forces

lution of the

an article written by Jane Laishes

and various other groups examined

Program."

safety,” said

for

Women

opened

in

offenders

“This strategy will ensure that women offenders can live

501 were on conditional release the community.

women. The Prison

1997

federal

2003

of

women

in

take control of their lives.

an institution and the remaining

Institution

Feb. 25, 2003.

in

the environment and setting of the

Nova

followed by the opening of the secure unit

men because of

cost a federal insti-

same

love dancing.”

annual cost to incarcerate a female

According

Of those, 354 were imprisoned

2000.

in

In the

I

release,

Saskatchewan, Quebec and Nova unit

tution

music or dance.

for a place with respect, support

believe,

$87,135 a year to imprison a

ty.

and

in

and read, watch TV, play

it

to

fewer numbers. Also, the requirement to provide women with treatment programs and services also adds to the existing cost.

tions.

On March

does

a unit,”

incarcerate

many

more money

in

After many interviews with women who were in the Prison for Women, many highlighted the need

in

prison.

the existing units in men’s institu-

women’s

more women

on conditional sentences than

men’s Scotia.

classi-

of federal

operate the Prison for

in

Health

under federal sentences which

The third was to close the women’s units currently located in institutions

Health,

women were

the

$2.3 million less than

operation.

new

units within the four facilities will

The

In

these

fied

shown

maintained.

is

cost

or

Mental

Services, 866

total

medium

minimum

from

“There are 10 people

Kitchener

in

outdoor exercise yard with

the

security with special needs and/or

classified as

start at 8

only made up four per cent of the

of

of supervision

level

“Our programs usually

Grand Valley premise. The unit will have

part

rate

specialized staff to ensure a high

construct

to

in

Kitchener will be located on a sepa-

houses

The

supervision and treatment.

Que.,

unit

prison routine.

be held

to

The maximum-security

has been called, has

it

The first was to modify and expand the existing four regional women’s facilities in several

in

her unit “look up to her like their

MacAuley

in the

to

news

release, adding, “It is a natural evo-

new Women Offender


Page 4

— SPOKE, March

8,

Commentary

2004

Strike prevented,

students happy At approximately 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March

2, col-

leges and the union representing faculty, librarians and counsellors came to an agreement and a province-wide strike

was

averted.

Full-time staff received approximately a seven and a half per cent increase in salary over the next two years, a promise that workload would be reviewed by a joint task force, an increase in their recognition allowance, an unchanged drug benefit plan and a return to work policy for people on

long-term disability. All of which teachers are happy with. However, the people who came out of this the happiest, is

the students.

With only a few months left to go in the year, a strike could have pushed back the semester, leaving thousands of students without summer jobs and places to live as well as preventing them from graduating. The last couple of months have been stressful for everyone and the question that remains is, could this have been settled without the threat of a strike?

OPSEU

officials think not, students have to extremity was necessary. Coming back from spring break, students did not know if they were going to finish off the week, let alone the

Although

wonder

if this

semester.

For graduating students, the future of leaving school and

moving on was looking

bleak.

Although no school year has been lost to a strike, in 1984, colleges went on strike for 24 days and in 1989, 20

Spring break expectations

days.

This time around, the union wanted a 3 per cent increase September 2003 and another 3 per cent in September 2004. As well, they wanted to receive a 1.5 per cent increase in April 2004 and another 1.5 per cent in April 2005. However, if a strike had happened, faculty could have lost more wages while on the picket line then they would potentially have gained through negotiated wage increases. With this agreement, they not only have a task force reviewing workload, but they received pay increases of three per cent, retroactive to September 1 2003, a .5 per cent increase in April 2004, a 2 per cent increase in September 2004, and a 1 .8 per cent increase in April 2005. in

,

Salary and workload were the two main issues dividing

two sides. Over the last five years full-time college students have increased by 43 per cent while full-time faculty has decreased by 23 per cent. Faculty is hoping the task force will reduce the workload, allowing for more one-on-one time with students. Although a strike has been averted this time around, in January, OPSEU's two-year contract will expire in 2005 and back to the tables they will go.

the

Hopefully next time around, a strike threat will not be necessary and students will be able to finish their year with no worries.

Letters are

Come

4 p.m.

20

Feb.

my

throwing on

was

I

The

shades and high-

it out of the parking lot, ready for a much-needed break

tailing

week

had

I

Wilson

initely far

I

was

def-

from enjoying a little R weekend of working

&

R. After a

at

my

part-time job

thought the

I

upcoming week would show me some good times. Monday morning had arrived. The sun was finally beaming down

my

face for the

about four months.

It

my

mentary with a

same

story

knew

I

spending

As

was

me

television docu-

friend.

It

was

the

Tuesday as we headed

east this time to Toronto to

do more

it

of

I

the break

I

really

sit

So,

my

resume, cover

and portfolio for

my

life

had spent

and found out they too

it

is

back

to the grind as

here and pound

away

at the

brainstorming

over

story

if

you were fortunate enough

one of those few who actual-

ly got a

chance

go south over the

to

break, don’t be offended

fast-

approaching internship and possi-

you a

ble career path.

just envious of

if I

dirty look in the halls.

your

give

I'm

tan.

Spoke

welcome

Is published and produced weekly by the Journalism

students of Conestoga College

Editor: Blake Gall

Spoke welcomes editor. Letters

letters to the

should be signed and include the

and telephone number contacted

No unsigned

name

of the writer. Writers will

be

for verification.

Editor:

Circulation Manager:

Lesley

Leachman

Jason Noe

Photo Editors: Halley McPolin, Valentina Rapoport, Jason Middleton

be published. Letters should be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter letters will

Address correspondence to: Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

Editor,

N2G 4M4

Faculty Adviser: Christina Jonas

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke @.conestogac. on. ca

for publication.

The

Spoke Online

Advertising Manager: Carrie Hoto Production Managers: Petr Cihacek. Kate VandeVen

Dr.,

Web

site:

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors

not necessarily reflect the views of in

advertising

beyond the amount paid

acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed: a Letters must not contain any libellous statements.

to the editor are subject to

I

friends over

ideas for Spoke.

I

to be

rest

I

wasn't alone though.

I

many of my

And now I

of

around updating letter

and the

wish

ing week.

consisted of scurrying

started freaking out

week

had no plan

I still

were actually reading during read-

grad-

I

was being responsible

college spring break doing

know

keys,

Realizing

the

last

talked to

with a friend.

two months once

I

on school work.

all

it

week ticked away I actually had some time to think about my future and where 1 was going to be uated.

I

decided to look

the

the

and

I

community

something other than catching up

and had a great two days

was

drove west along the 401 to

film part of

work

at the bright side

in the next

enjoying the sun’s rays blinding I

my

After two days of straight project

for the

preparing myself for the

ahead of me,

filming.

time in

beautiful day of the year

as

Opinion

first

first

work

Although

found myself doing

ed errands on the break,

consisted of

newspaper.

in

school work and other school-relat-

on

freelance

officially

arrived.

But when

week

back to my hometown to family and do my weekend of

visit

Aimee

from the daily stresses of school.

Reading

of the

rest

travelling

MS Word

Conestoga College. for file

the space. Letters

would be

helpful.


CBSA By

taking

is

DAWN HASSON

Students in the school of business at

Conestoga College should pre-

pare to be disappointed.

The

Computer and

Students Association

Business

(CBSA)

is

taking a breather for now. "It's It’s

it’s

not there,"

said Frank Mensink, the dean of the school of business.

At the beginning of the year, the

CBSA

had only three active execu-

members. According to Mensink. this made hard to keep the student organi-

tive

it

zation going.

“Of those

three, there were only were actually here and in an actual program." said Mensink. "1 guess there wasn’t any interest on the part of students to keep it

two

that

going.”

build

past

raise funds.

separate and independent of CSI

"Biz bashes were really there not only to bring students together but

and there has been some conflict between the two organizations because there wasn't the co-operation that should happen between

also as a formal

said

momentum

without "going "It's not a

in

it

was

difficult to

for Lie organization

and taking

over."

good idea anyway

or administration

faculty

involved

in

to

for

be

a student organization

way of

raising

funds to offset the cost of other

CBSA

the

had,”

said

Mensink.

The awards banquet was

is

CBSA

the

started

in

Also,

1979

that the

open

labs arc here,

real reason for signifi-

by

fundraising

a

Mensink hopes interest

part of CSI,”

Mensink

for keeping the price for the

student

at

a reasonable level,” said

The

organization

also dissolved due to scheduling

other than as a mentoring type,"

conflicts with

said Mensink.

Inc. (CSI).

Conestoga Students

is

in

to rekindle stu-

the

organization

he said.

will

Miller,

be meeting with vice-president

activities,

and

of

Justin

Falconer, president of CSI, to see if

student-run

in

and he would like to have an awards banquet. “1 would like to see a resurrection of some form of CBSA in the future, but probably one that is a

Ethan

Mensink.

the

no longer a part of the school of

student

awards

dissolved

information technology, which

organization other than as a basis

banquet

said

who were in computer program are now

dent

for student use.

CBSA

the

computer equipment for the business lab. However, that function was no longer needed after the college developed open computer labs

no

— Page 5

was very much

because students

business.

"Now

CBSA

organizations,”

because students and staff in the school of business wanted to buy

there’s

2004

thing that’s happened in the

student

the

major activity the student organization organized over the last few years.

The

"One

8,

Mensink.

other

cant

Mensink also

SPOKE, March

The CBSA was self-funded and organized biz bashes every year to

activities

not officially discontinued.

kind of there but

News a breather for now

they can collaborate on events in

the future.

He hopes to hold an awards banquet this year with the help of CSI.

(Photo

by Lesley Leachman)

Shooting hoops! Tillerman, 6, takes advantage of the warm sunshine in Waterloo Park. Temperatures in the region reached 8 C last week.

Cody

CLASSIFIEDS CAMP WAYNE FOR GIRLS Children’s sleep-away camp. Northeast Pennsylvania, June 18 August 15, 2004. If you love children and want to have a GREAT summer we need female staff as Directors and Instructors for: Tennis, Swimming, (W.S.I. preferred) Golf, Gymnastics, Cheerleading,

Drama, Camping/Nature, High and

Low

Ropes, team Sports,

Waterskiing. Sailing, Ceramics, Silkscreen, Printmaking, Batik, Jewelery, Calligraphy, Photography, Sculpture, Guitar, Aerobics, Self-defense, Video, Piano. Other positions: Administrative/Driver. Nurses (RN’s and nursing student). On campus interviews March 20. Call 1-800-279-3019 or apply online at

www.campwayneforgirls.com.

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT Crew, weekends, Easter Weekend and full time during the summer months. The season ends Thanksgiving Weekend. For more information call: 884-5650. Erbsville Kartway, Waterloo requires people for

(Photo by Carrie Hoto)

Falconer returns as president be returning as president of the CSI for the 2004-2005 academic and Scott Ingram-Cotton also ran for president.

Justin Falconer (centre)

Ethan

Miller (left)

will

year.

Grounds maintenance and Concession Stand

it’s

Pit

starting

com CANADA S BIGGEST JOB

SITE

FOR STUDENTS

Conestoga College and workopolisCampus.com have joined forces to make your job search a whole lot easier. Whether your looking for part-time, summer, graduate employment, or volunteer work, we have postings for all types of availible positions. We even post jobs exclusively for Conestoga students. All you need to do is sign up at workopolisCampus.com and enter the Conestoga password; availible in the Career Services Office upstairs in the Student Client Services Building,

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workopolisCampusx K.kukobt w&srn io*

fi

Conestoga College

^


Page 6

— SPOKE, March

8,

News

2004

(Photo by Michelle Taylor)

a

It's

day for dog guides

fiin-fllled

BY MICHELLE TAYLOR

Walk

Dog

Weeks before

in

walk they

collect-

Guides. Last May, people and their

ed pledges so that someone

in their

dog or hearing-ear dog. The Kitchener- Waterloo walk is

community could enjoy

a

dog

dedicated to Rita Francois and her

people came anyway. People and

dogs made their way to Waterloo Park to enjoy a day of fun. food and

their lour-legged furry friends.

exercise.

Kitchener- Waterloo

started out as a rainy day. but

It

It

was

the

second

annual

They

for

the

guide as a companion.

managed

Participants

all

came

for a

good cause.

cial-skills

udei walk

in

: ;

with your

taxes walk out with your

monc _

member

make

died

now

If

the participants

have

and prizes, but there

stay

try to

ing

of

mom. She

walk

the

are

takes in puppies that are

expected to become dog guides and

it

wasn’t just to

money, but to raise awareness as well." Both Perreault and Ziegler say awareness about dog guides is

them until they are about 10 months old. The walk exists in order to raise money to help train these dogs for their future lives as dog guides.

events

“We

about the program.

The more people know

important.

about their cause and what dog guides are capable

of,

the

more

they will be willing to volunteer

tire

an important part

Anyone

dog

Perreault.

at

the

“So

it

is

welcome

to

come and

store. If

you want

to volunteer, contact

Mary Lou Perreault at 742-5280. The committee does not have a website set up just yet, but they

hope

and Ziegler.

year.

guides: a canine-vision dog, spe-

the walk,” says Perreault.

you

bull

you don’t have to have a dog to participate. Pledge forms can be picked up at your local vet or pet

The puppies will eventually become one of three types of dog

If

says

be noticeable.”

will

of the walk, according to Perreault volunteers to

at the

blown-up

big

a part of (the walk).”

“We’re looking for help out the day of

29

entrance,”

at

and help educate others

Volunteers

Westmount Road

entrance. “This year there will be a

to 12

be

May

on

raises

have such a love for these pup-

will take

place at Waterloo Park in Waterloo

not only about rais-

raise

a foster

pies,” she says. “It’s just great to

track.

money. “When we

started this

committee is

on

The five-kilometre walk She says

was asked

member

is

spending their time getting pledges and spending their time (at the walk),” she says. "I just want it to be good.”

is

be a

it

“(Participants)

ble.”

to

be an

because they got behind in the schedule last year because of problems with the agility. This year they want to

an event as possi-

the

will not

show. Perreault says

agility

as big of

Ziegler

they are

This year there will be a contest

chair of the

committee.

know what

doing.

of the

“We it

the

ing out prizes, or just making sure

after

expects this year’s walk to be even better than last year’s.

On

responsible for registration, hand-

committee,

because she

w

part of the planning itself.

Clementine her mother and she is

kept

enough money to sponsor a dog in the community. Melody Ziegler, a

your time on walk or you can be

the day of the

Francois’s daughter. She

Perreault

they reach that figure, they will

you can volun-

day of the walk you could be

KWalk for Dog Guides Committee has set a goal of $20,000.

to volunteer

teer a couple hours of

is

the

year,

Clementine.

Mary Lou

over $1

raise just

This

dog

special-skills to

want

to have one running by next However, they can be reached

by e-mail at www.kwwalkfordogguides@hotmail.com.

call 1 -800-HRBLOCK

or visit hrblock.ca

H&R BLOCK (Photo by Michelle Taylor)

This Alaskan malamute puppy took part in its first Walk will take place on May 29 at Waterloo Park in Waterloo.

for

Dog Guides

last

May. This year’s walk


News

Objects

8,

2004

— Page 7

the mirror

in

may be a

SPOKE, March

dumber

lot

than they appear By JASON MIDDLETON

speeding twice. I'm more aware of

my

speed.

Sometimes wonder if tailgaters (at least, that's what I'll call them in print. have I

Forget coffee.

My

I

eye-opener on a

Monday morning is me all the way down

who tailgates Homer Watson Boulevard.

the idiot

do not enjoy being so close to the car me that not only can 1 hear the argument the driver and his wife are having, blit also can choose a side. I

1

think

my

ize

how

Tailgating

behind

I

another unprintable

rearview mirror should be rela-

may

name

dangerous is

1

really use) real-

their

driving

is.

a leading cause of crashes.

The website Smart Motorist recommends drivers have a distance of at least lined sec-

onds between them and the car

in front

of

them.

The three-second

rule requires a driver to

be

select a fixed object, such as a sign or tree,

According to Dr. Leon James in an article posted at the Smart Motorist website, www.smartmotorist.com, Americans driving family and economy cars are half as

on the road ahead and count slowly to three. The website says if you reach the fixed object before completing the count to three you are following too closely. At night, in heavy traffic and during bad weather, they recommend doubling the

beled to say, “objects in the mirror

angrier and closer than they appear.”

compared SUVs.

likely to tailgate

to those

who

drive sports car and Tailgating

is

time to six seconds for additional safety.

following too closely to the

In

Waterloo Region there are approxi-

vehicle in front of you and

1

mately 9,000 reportable collisions annually.

my

per cent of males

Since 1998 there has been a 30 per cent increase of collisions in the region.

3 per cent of both males and females driving family and econocars tailgate.

And 23

and 20 per cent of females driving sports cars tailgate.

Topping the

women who

drive

tailgating

SUVs,

elite

are

as 25 per cent are

guilty of the aggressive driving behaviour. It

expect butt.

bugs

really

me

me when

Another problem

sight

my

My

As someone w ho has been

on

ticketed for

speed

Seeing vehicles travelling 100 km/h down

Homer Watson Boulevard

these tailgaters

to speed because they are

I've noticed is the

people travel on the roads.

on

my

everyday drive

question

is,

is

a

common (Photo by Jason Middleton)

to the college.

Road rage and

where are the speed

traps?

tailgating are

all

issues that Conestoga students deal with on their

drive to the college.

WSl

(Photo by Kate Vandeven)

(Photo by Jeff Mortey)

beach

You’re awfully chirpy today! Chickadees hang out by a feeding station in Starky’s Loop, a conservation area south of Guelph. The chirp "chick-a-dee-dee" of the black-capped chickadee is one of the most complex vocalizations in the animal kingdom.

Life is short, (ret

an

Ain’t life a Carla Black, Lisa Nosal, Kevin Wilson and Scott Rawlings enjoy the sun and pool in Daytona Beach during spring break. Over .

1

,400

students from across Canada were

in

Daytona.

extension -

Live longer with daily physical activity, healthy eating and following your doctor’s advice.

MmoMtrmM www.porti cipoctkw com .


— SPOKE, March

Page 8

8,

News

2004

Counsellor finds work rewarding DARREN SMITH

By

Sometimes anxiety or symptoms Providing guidance to students

with disabilities

rewarding work

is

for a counsellor at the

Doon cam-

pus of Conestoga College.

When

college 12 years ago she

work as a counsellor employment preparation pro-

on contract in the

ing disability.

have to

some of

pull apart

the student’s history to figure out

came to the was hired

Kelly Nixon

of depression can look like a learn-

“We

to

grams. This position lasted a year

what the cause If

is,”

said Nixon.

a learning disability

ed after

and accommodations

ware,

result of stress.

suspect-

is

go

this testing then they

forward with a formal psycho-educational assessment to pinpoint the

for

tests.

“Her knowledge now is being measured and not her difficulties,” Nixon. “Situations like this keep me going in this field.” At times counselling can be emosaid

tionally

demanding and she

finds

it

a constant effort to not take things

home.

Some

student issues are troubling

they

and some of the situations are quite sad but she is reminded of the fact

offices.

require and providing support are

that the students are at the college,

Although the contract work was full-time, Nixon became a permanent employee of the college five years ago. While on contract she was often unsure if funding would

part of her responsibilities.

which tells her how great their spirit is on the inside as they keep

point where they have accepted

be available.

able to

at

which time she applied

position

“I

for a

the disability services

in

would have

thinking the

my

bags packed

was

position

over,"

more

said Nixon, "but they found

cause of the learning

difficulties.

Getting students

help

Some

students

the

may

not be at the

them In these cases Nixon is assist them with coping

the disability as being with for life.

strategies.

“Students kind of set the stage for

me,” she said. “I then suggest I think might help them the

options

funding."

At the Doon campus there are three full-time disability counsel-

In the past

many people with

dis-

abilities

She

finding there are options available

makes

accommodation

arrangements for students needing additional time

screens

on

students

and pre-

tests

who may have

learning difficulties.

Through

a series of tests counsel-

lors are able to

determine

if

a stu-

dent has a learning disability and additional

requires

help.

It

is

important for counsellors to deter-

mine related

if

is

conscious of keeping

up through exercise,

talking with fellow employees, and

having other interests on the go. She finds people in her profession

need keep

to find

that getting an edu-

was impossible.

cation

Many mature

people with dis-

coming back

to school are

ways

to

keep fresh and

their batteries charged.

of the key survival skills for

is to have outside and interests, she said. “I don’t want to get tired of helping people, that's what I really

the counsellor

activities

enjoy doing.” Students wanting to get into

this

might not been there when they were first in school.

type of work require a master's

Nixon finds this rewarding. She has a student who will grad-

selling area.

uate in April and' has watched this

issues concerning people with dis-

student go from having significant

abilities

difficulties in her courses to

said.

that

being

success

A

in the

knowledge of human

would be an

asset

counrights

(Photo by Darren Smith)

Nixon Kelly Nixon

came

through

some of

the assessments used

and how

in

has been working as a counsellor

colleges

them would

are

counselling, learning

a disability

or as

the

adaptive

mmmmwa

Complete Your — Degree at the University of Guelph- Humber ~

technology and

the

soft-

to interpret

in disability

servic-

es for the past 1 1 years. She was involved in creating the new course for native studies called In and Out of Time, Balancing Communities. She says doing things outside of counselling is something that helps her cope on the job.

She added some familiarity with

quite successful.

This

degree and practicums

difficulties

learning to

found

abilities

now

Nixon

her energy

One

best.”

and one working three days a week. Nixon works with about 140 students who have various disabilities. lors

going.

also be helpful.

--

~

INFORMATION DAY

-

March 28

LEARN MORE* DO MORE EARLY CHILDHOOD FAMILY AND COMMUNITY SOCIAL SERVICES JUSTICE STUDIES AND POLICE FOUNDATIONS MEDIA STUDIES

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www.guelphhumber.ca


News

Two new DAWN HASSON

By

chairs are settling "When

came back was lookwork in the college system at a few select colleges and Conestoga was actually number 1

I

ing for

The two new chairs of

the

school of business are enjoying their

new

Brian role

at

1

Sept. 8.

people

the

I've

nice

really

all

met have been

and easy

to

work

with.”

Harvey came to the college after working as an academic supervisor in the Middle East for various information technology, educational technology and business programs.

He was

a teacher there

currently

resides

Peterborough, but, during the school week, he lives in an apartment in the Preston area of Cambridge. He plans to move to Kitchener within the next few months. Harvey praises the students and

program co-ordinators

the

in the

thefts

still

minutes to change vehicles and

"We

concern for security services

at

Head of

security A1 Hunter said

vehicle theft

has been continuing on

campus with people

stealing vehi-

cles for joyriding,

leges of technology.

in

here and

sit

need to.” Faye McKay, at Conestoga

College on Sept. 15.

McKay

said she

McKay

as the students she's seen so

"The faculty here

interested in

education, but

program supervision.

dents.”

an

done

manager.

educational 1

do: that's what I've

for the last 15 years,”

McKay

at the

Saskatchewan

of Applied Science and (SI AST) for 16 years at

the branch in Saskatoon.

experience and

in

they care about the stu-

The school of business needs two number Harvey workload

of students and programs.

McKay

have

split the

reported stolen from a Sunfire vehicle in Lot 5

on Feb.

13.

There was

entry' into the vehi-

Students are asked to report any

How

necting certain wires

lots to security services.

ate

think there

I

it

would

side

more

is

These guys

that.

that

don't

to

it

than

thought out-

all

into the cookie-

fit

mould of an everyday citiThey have this energy, a spark can light a room on fire. Their

through

"like

spits

wheat

a

wild

field."

fire

When

you're in the vicinity of people like

you're

this

motivated,

discouraging, to say the

it's

when

their spark fizzles out.

like they've hit the harsh sense

seeing the world as an

-

unfair, cruel place

(2B04)

toll

are,

knows how

will

take

most

how

I've

spirited,

have ever

I

true leader in every sense;

enough determination

make

to

a

believer out of the biggest cynic

and enough driving force to start a '57 Chevy in the dead of the winter. It's shocking what impact one person can make in your life. Making you truly believe anything is possible; knowing your power goes far beyond the size of your body. Taking a less than stellar uation and turning

it

into

sit-

an excit-

ing challenge. Finding the silver

by muttering a silly anecmake someone laugh, or by just taking time to say hi you Just

can

lift spirits.

shown me a lot of success comes from failure and he's made He's

me

see mistakes are just stepping

stones. falter

learned

I've

if

you

don't

probably because you

it's

stuck in the pothole of dwelling on

looked up to

vivacious and

your faux pas.

Dream big. And be passionate. You really never know whose life you are changing and whose life you are impacting.

women

celebrate

By VALENTINA RAPOPORT

IWD. March 7-March 12: U of W's Womyn's Centre will co-ordinate a variety of on-campus events to our of *

March 8 marks another year for Women's Day (IWD). In 1908, more than 15,000 women

International

marched in New York to protest for shorter working hours, better wages and the right to vote. By 1911. IWD also became a marked day for women in Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland, where more than one million men and

of

raise

awareness for IWD. For 888-4567 ext. 3457

details contact *

March

Library

8:

at

The Kitchener Public

85 Queen

hold a free Ginette social

*

at

8:

noon by of

faculty

WLU. A

will also be

March

N., will

St.

at

Lafreniere,

work

mentary

gathered to protest for the

lecture

short docu-

shown.

The Zonta Club,

at

signed in San Francisco, standing up

1266 Walper Terrace Hotel in the crystal ballroom, will have guest speaker Flora Macdonald. There is

for gender equality as a fundamental

a

of

women.

In

Charter of United Nations

right.

Meksula

A

don't take chances. Just don't get

them and knows how

.

Facilitator- Jennifer

met.

everyone

in

week

strong-willed person

great they

far their talents

A day to

rights

Workshop

because

This past year

.

th

most of

greater

women

March 8

like

important they are.

BY

available beginning the

.

it.

around them knows

be selected from submitted timetables.

is

.

lose their

the

and sign up

.

But when they optimism it takes an even

us already see

of your timetable

Opinion

dote you can

too.

of reality

SING UP FOR “Calling it Quits”, Bringing an End to Smoking Workshop

Hoto

world

It's

Are you considering quitting smoking? Are you starting to prepare to quit? Have you already quit and want to stay smoke-free?

Carrie

lining in the rubbish.

So

This “four session” group

the necessary requirements.

change the world and they can make you see you can change the

least,

ARE YOU DOING THE FOLLOWING:

you're

They know they can

charged.

will

chairs are current

reviewing the school of busi ness programs to see if they meet

cre-

outside the box.

-

eccentricity

hours

the students success

sitting

electricity and make light? Obviously these guys are geniuses.

zen.

Common

make

to

ful.”

Thomas

if

cutter

Friday March 5

do

know by con-

did Edison

suspicious behaviour in the parking

Smoking?

STUDENT SERVICES

we can

dark?

in the

They

register

aboul

all

think the

still

would we be

1879,

in

But

To

“It's

student success and what

discover the world was

round, would people

around

bring a copy

McKay.

said

at,”

Christopher Columbus never

If

set sail to

ing spots available.

Quitting

same

the

are

a concern Think outside the box Edison didn't invent the lightbulb

was

“The problems

all

More than 3,000 vehicles are on campus each day with 3,300 park-

player

said she hasn

dents yet.

of programs, dealing with prob-

which have recently been Chrysler minivans and Dodge Caravans, have been caught on camera. Videotapes have been handed over to Waterloo Regional Police.

CD

McKay

However,

ly

Earth was square? Or,

recently, a

chairs are also responsible

run into any trouble with the stu

Their duties include planning programs, evaluating the content

cle.

Most

other

for talking to students if there arc

The two new

in half.

eras for any suspicious behaviour."

only takes the thieves about

and

regardless of which school you're

no sign of forced

thefts,

programs

institutions.

quali-

chairs because of the large

and

said.

She worked

how

impressed with

how much

“I'm

as

disciplinary problems.

am

fied they are, not just in terms of

was

programs

in

well as relationships between the

The

far.

are great,” said

McKay. "I

lems that arise college's

praises the faculty as well

the job because she enjoys doing

That's what

for

various col-

at

always monitoring the security cam-

The

Conestoga College.

are

come

The second chair, new role

Technology

enjoyable.

I

talk if they

new job so

five

remain a

invitation to

know who

McKay worked

Prior to that,

seven years overseas

— Page 9

2004

8,

Conestoga

in at

1

they have an open

that

Institute

drive away," Hunter said.

Vehicle-related

and

school of business for making his

Vehicle-related theft

"It

in

“I've tried to get into the class-

RYAN CONNELL

am

started her

as well.

By

chair, so at least they

list.”

Harvey

the

students in the programs that

down and

"This has been a wonderful job so far,” said Harvey. "Virtually

rooms and introduce myself to

my list,” said Harvey. "In terms of high-quality colleges, Conestoga was very high on my

or 2 on

positions.

Harvey started his new Conestoga College on

SPOKE, March

One of

their

1945

the

(UN ) was

goals was to

advance the status of women worldwide. In 1977 IWD was established in writing

by the UN.

Here are some events taking place locally during March 8 to 1 2 in hon-

$25 charge

that will include hors

d'oeuvres by local dining establish-

ments. * March

8:

you

can

http://www.cjsf.bc.ca for a

visit

full

day

of on-air female performers based out of a B.C. radio station.


Page 10

— SPOKE, March

8,

2004

The nomination packages for the Conestoga Students Inc. Board of Directors will be available in the CSI office.

The nomination period

will

begin

March 1 5th and end March 22nd at noon.


Sports

SPOKE, March

— Page 11

2004

8,

March 9 trade deadline great for hockey fans By JEFF

exciting few

Hockey

League

even the playoffs.

Graphic design student Sabrina Mabey, 25, pours a drink from the Slush Puppie machine at the rec centre on Feb. 27.

weeks come

Hard-hitting lacrosse:

of the future

BY NICK HORTON open a few bags of

Chill the beer,

chips and invite your friends over

watch the sport of the 2 1 st cen-

to

Russ Cline, chairman of National Lacrosse League

and owner of the

"This tury,"

the

(NLL)

Philadelphia

Wings, believes lacrosse

game of

is

the,

ming moon-shots The

support.

of a recent home-and-

between

series

the

Wings and Toronto

Rock. a

little

optimistic, but in

Ontario, what else are you going to

Would you

prefer to watch the

come up

or Vince

short

Carter sulk on the bench?

NFL

The

into a

market

Headline

Sports

both

Sportsnet

pick

likewise.

Baseball isn't quite

and curling

dryer than

is

For a change,

the

of

people

Centre.

Lacrosse offers everything hock-

A

staple

of

its

and

popularity

the end to

is

Kitchener native and one of the

most dominant players

NLL,

in the

quickly

moved up

is

the rink, often

The 30-second

and

fast break.

isn’t a

course, the fighting the cake.

No

Rock.

For the former Kitchener-

players duke

notching short-handed goals

and leading the league

in

scoring

Doyle

In a recent radio interview,

on

ice

and skates,

out with their heads

up, fists high and the

crowd

roar-

It’s

no wonder Killian’s

Irish

Red

beer,

an official sponsor of the

NLL,

uses this clever jingle.

rowdy

Philadelphia fans, saying he once

"Delighted,” his good buddy said.

had a beer poured on his head

“Accept

penalty box. isn’t

on

the

in the

In this perspective,

it

extra

this

smack

whack back and one ...

and

later let’s

go

is

watching

in anticipation to

will

make

week

a

see

many

ago,

Ol ie Kolzig

big

names had already moved from

tling

when

their

As

disman-

Shortly

New

after,

Colorado, where he

is

probably playing

Toronto by now,

if

Bure,

in

not

York

longtime

son

No

doesn't

the

become

St.

the playoffs in

who

gets

dealt

on Tuesday, most

fans will

by the

be watching what has

the highlight of the

1

:

What

is

Stress?

Stress has become part of our everyday vocabulary.

let's

it

Why

write a

daily? Since stress

is

start with understanding.

Stress denotes the changes that we undergo as we experience and adjust to our continually changing environment. It has physical and emotional effects on us and can create positive or negative feelings. As a positive inf luence, stress creates anticipation and excitement and can

compel us to action (remember that clutch single that won the T-ball game for your team?). As a negative influence, stress can result in discomfort, anger and rejection, with health problems such as

headaches, upset stomach and insomnia.

Although almost everyone responds to some situations with a high

relationship), individuals respond differently to

become stressors for an

level

individual only

if

most

situations.

These

they are construed as

threatening or dangerous. Most of us cringe at the thought of having to parachute

CONESTOGA MALL 747-1290

FAIRVIEW MALL

from an

airplane:

experience anxiety at the thought of presenting while

some

will

do anything to avoid

it,

in

front of a class, and

a few get totally turned on.

894-0770 on your Grad

10%

NHL

season each year.

Louis Blues.

Suit,

Prom

Suit,

Interview Suit, whatever the occasion

OFF

is

not to eliminate stress but to learn how to manage

even use

it

to help us.

from $149.00

STUDENT BEARER TO 10% OFF THE PURCHASE OF ANY REGULAR PRICED MERCHANDISE.

THIS ENTITLES THE

offer valid al above locations -

goal

The

one voucher per promotion

A Message from Student

Services

or

NHL

COUNSELLOR'S CORNER: Stress and Stress Management Part

a

year Alexei Kovalev and

matter

Hurricanes’ Jeff O’Neill are being at

at the

around

a miracle to get in this year.

Blue Jackets’ Geoff Sanderson and

looked

are a per-

any of these years, and would need

few days.

Columbus and Carolina

in

to

Carter, and this year Jagr

They haven’t made

Dallas and

in a

last

Anson

many teams and

has been sought by

cannot turn

it

Finals.

team. In 2002 they acquired Paval

Gonchar

well, Capital Sergei

Cup

example of how trades

deadline

to deal goaltender

After another disappointing sea-

they dealt star forward

Jaromir Jagr to the

fect

would back up David Aebischer.

hopeless teams to contenders.

Washington began

to

and made

7 of the Stanley

The New York Rangers

once again

Washington Capitals, who

might be looking

if

a big trade.

this list

the deadline,

some find it a challenge. Most of us avoid contact with snakes. Others keep them as pets. Most of us

raise a red!”

too different from hockey.

more exciting than

Nothing

As of

Game

of stress (death of a loved one, birth of a child, beginning or ending a

“Forgive that stick to the head!”

commented

deadline.

trade

the

after

your team

at

the

Rob

Thomas,

Niedermayer and Sandis Ozolinsh

this

pen.

is

Ducks

Mighty

Steve

ing.

is

as familiar as cutting the lawn.

it

the icing

is

longer burdened by

awkwardness of

the

balls,

Of

constant disruption.

backbone of the Toronto

Waterloo Brave, scooping up loose

in late April, it’s sure not to

The Anaheim acquired

and some which might never hap-

misunderstood and mismanaged,

After an errant shot or offensive

the

is

be

back of your

Phil

round

lost in the first

of the playoffs.

already be

fighting.

shot-clock keeps offences honest a

many rumours

still

column on stress when everyone deals with

championships, the Rock.

Doyle,

There are

end action, a shot clock, and “real”

on a

“Popeye”

Housley, and

going around of possible trades,

At the lop of the

Doug

Nolan,

ly marketable.

Ontario can watch a team that wins

Colin

mind

is at

Owen

Gilmour, Glen Wesley and

fans.

hockey

deals.

Maple Leafs

the

suit

miscue, the Indian rubber ball

Dennis Miller Live.

hockey

from the

acquired

defence by

their

coiik.1

Rock

Air Canada

the

hence, marketability,

has wrapped up and the

If

TV

who

Bay buffed up

to

always

that

the last

until

teams involved

the

if

season

Last

up

CTV

and up

games, while 15,000 fans, sans Fill

weeks

is

Burke from Phoenix and Tampa

complete by the time you read

these last

will benefit

acquiring Darryl Sydor.

they

pieces

be dealt, or

Sean

offs will be out of luck.

Rangers.

ey has to offer, yet refined and vast-

watch?

Leafs

the

is,

room, but growing

little

and laptop.

Maybe

for the Blue Jays.

Toronto Rock squeeze a winning

he said on Fox Sports during 2

the

for

of the matter

fact

that has

Philadelphia

here

was scrambling

and exciting product

the future.

is

win since Doug

Argos and Joe Carter was slam-

a sport for the 21st cen-

Game home

CFL

meaningful professional

a

Flutic

Lacrosse.

tury.

attitude to a province that hasn’t

sports franchise

missing

the

acquired

they

some of which might

for

champions, bring a winning

seen

end tomorrow.

produce the most compelling

Nonetheless, the Rock, four-time

NLL

to an

when

lem

need for a deep run into the play-

It's

game

NHL trade

the

At 3 p.m. teams attempting secure

a

It’s

second you never know

they solved their goaltender prob-

and

and the past few busy

deadline,

to Detroit.

More

Game

the trade deadline

so interesting

The Philadelphia Flyers hope

season.

What makes

sent to

Ottawa, and Robert Lang was dealt

the National

than the All Star

thrilling

(Photo by Jennifer Howden)

weeks of

was

Capital Peter Bondra

could possibly be the most

It

Mmmmmm Slushie

HEUCHERT

it

and


Page 12

— SPOKE, March

8,

2004

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