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Learn how to take a good picture From choosing the

beans help sick girl is raising money for

Jelly

Residence

a three-year-old

girl

with a brain tumour.

right film, to turning

your camera,

Condors lose 14-2

Michelle Taylor

shows us what

Monday, February

2,

Men’s hockey team annihilated by the Humber Hawks.

to do.

2004

Conestoga College, Kitchener

35 th Year

— No. 5

CSI spends students’

money on By CHRISTINA

BRAMBURGER

Julie

trip

Magon,

18, a first-year

genConestoga, says she thinks they deserve the eral business student at

Eleven members of Conestoga Students Inc. spent the

weekend

at

Talisman ski resort. But who paid the approximately $2,500 bill for this trip?

The

of

students

Conestoga

College, of course.

This wasn’t a vacation for the

retreat if they’re free, but thinks is

a

little

working hard

for

every three months

too much.

“Maybe

they could just have a

end of the year. with me to pay for

would

trip at the

It

be tine

that as a

thank you.”

board,

CSI president Justin Falconer argues. This is what CSI refers to as

CSI did not pay for any of the members’ activities or anything

an intensive policy weekend. That’s right; they even have a fancy name for it. Why? Because

they did on their spare time, says Falconer. “Mind you, we didn’t

give them a

they take one every three months. Students at the Doon campus pay

Falconer says the board worked past midnight on Friday, between

$90 every year

breakfast and lunch on Saturday, as well as after dinner until 11 p.m.

for the student asso-

ciation fee.

This fee goes toward

lot

of spare time.”

and the security staff and bartenders at pub nights. It also pays

They resumed work on Sunday between breakfast and lunch and then left to come back to Kitchener. People might think, “Talisman,

for the CSI’s donations to various

that’s expensive,” says Falconer.

ices

CSI

all

the serv-

offers, the staff they

have

college programs and initiatives.

Apparently,

it

pays for weekend

now

trips as well. “I think that right

that fee

does a variety of things,”

says Falconer.

Each member had accommodations and meals at Talisman, as well as transportation there and back paid for. The cost of a room at the resort was $109 per person per night. “They had their own private space to

stay in,” says Falconer, “their

own bed and

their

own room.”

“But you’re looking at $218 we on these people for three months of their volunteering.” Falconer says they checked out eight other locations and chose Talisman because it was the cheapest. Talisman is also a supporter of the activities calendar, so, according

“we’re working with

to Falconer,

tickets

for the ski

but only four of the

1 1

Falconer says

it’s

mem-

everyone’s schedules together to

“The other reason we go away because people go, ‘Oh,

I

have

is

end,” says Hellen Gianniotis, 19, a first-year ECE student at

However, falconer says memvolunteers,

“We

who

don’t

get

paid.

took them out and they

homework

left

home, they left their part-time job at home, they left their friends at home, they left their whole life at home. “And, yeah, we paid for their accommodations and meals and we got a lot of work done, so I’m very ' proud of them.” The board did rewrite the elections their

at

policy on their getaway, as well as

begin work on their priority “It

gives those people

who go

the

time to solely work on the work that

we had

at 5:30.

to

Conestoga. ing

is

that

“Know

that the

to do,” says Falconer.

new

centre

is at

the top of CSI’s priority

year, but first they

must find out

list

if the

cen-

go out and

start

it

off

to stay here.”

she thinks the

an excuse for the CSI

board to be able to go away. “Can’t they have the conferences around here somewhere?”

months ago when the board was supposed to have anothThree

er retreat, they stayed at the college

and only paid for the meals of the

members who Falconer

mean we’re going

to

Justin Falconer. to start talking

tantly, talking to students

CSI plans on looking

about

about

at the

it,

and more impor-

it.”

needs assessment of the

campus believe

by

the

CSI

are people that are volunteers.

They

give up everything in their lives to

work on behalf of students.”

this?”’

multi-purpose, and could include everything from a

“We need

to find out

need the student

if

centre,

the students if

student centre and then

they want the if

pharmacy, bookstore and breakout rooms for group projects, to restaurants and variety stores. One thought that CSI has is to condense all of student services into the student centre, including the

they’d be

registrar’s office, student services, disability services

willing to

pay

for

it.”

or anything that has to do with the service for stu-

Justin Falconer,

dents.

“Let’s put

CSIpresident

it

in

one building and

let’s

make

it

acces-

sible for everyone,” Falconer says.

Falconer says the possible student centre

is

probably

big and so important that you can’t rush it.” The CSI board has created a committee, lead by Charlene Genno, which will look into what the students would like to see in their own centre. “We’re assessing the past and present, which will help us build the future,” Genno says of the surveying “It’s so

process.

CSI done

is

looking

at

other schools to see what they have

for their surveys for student centres.

What

attended.

stands

need the student want the student centre and then if they’d be willing to pay for it.” CSI can’t give an exact figure of what the fee for the construction of the student centre would be. It is trying to readjust some of their other fees so the net change wouldn’t be so drastic, says Falconer. “Planning for the student centre really consists of going out, doing a needs assessment, seeing what students want and then coming back to them and saying, ‘This is the results of what you students want. This is what it will cost. Do you still want to go through with to find out if the students

centre; if they

Falconer and Genno say the student centre could be

they should have one.

three years away.

Gianniotis says retreat is just

what the students want.

“This doesn’t

meet-

weekend and book

board’s decision to go away. “These

list.

for the

Doon campus.

at the college’s

The student

looking into getting a stu-

to

Malinovice says. “They're basically going on a trip with my money.”

have

bers of the board of directors are

dent centre

Inc. is

centre and whether or not students on

organize meetings.

don’t get to go?”

I

“We need

Conestoga Students

“We want

hard to get

I have to go here. I do this.’ “By going away, they booked the whole weekend off. They didn’t just book the day off, so no one had to run out of the meeting early. “So, book off your whole week-

“How come

dents by the end of the semester.

building one or preparing for one,” says CSI president

lift

work

She thinks the CSI board .can accomplish just as much at the college without spending all that money.

BRAMBURGER

with free

says Vanja Malinovice. 19, a

first-

By CHRISTINA

tre is

hills,

student at Conestoga.

Do you want a student centre?

someone who supports us already.” Talisman provided the group

bers took advantage of them.

ECE

.

story.

spent

CSI also arranged to have meeting rooms and the other equipment that they needed for the weekend at no extra cost. “If you want to have all these meetings, you can stay in town,” year

(Photo by Ryan Connell)

Conestoga Students Inc. board director Scott Ingram-Cotton mocked the expression of a Homer Simpson poster during the Imaginus poster sale on Jan. 21 See Page 3 for additional photos and

the

CSI board wants to do is what could go

large scale of ideas for

collect a very in the student

centre and then give that to students, says Genno.

“But, before

ment has

we can do

anything, our

first

it would free up the space where they currentand the college would be able to have that space faculty offices, classrooms or even more storage

because ly are

for

space.

“We definitely want to make sure if we’re building something there is an inherent benefit to students.” Falconer and Genno agree that the research for the student centre is going to be a long process. It truly does consist of going out there and asking students what they would want in their own student centre, says Falconer.

assess-

of what the students’ needs are.” Genno would like to have the surveys out to the

This would also be a benefit to the rest of the campus because more space is needed. Falconer says he thinks college administration would support the centralization of those services

“I think if

we do go

through with

it,

students

would

see a centralized building built around every student’s

to be

stu-

need.”


Page 2

— SPOKE, February

2,

News

2004

Now deep thoughts ...%vith

Conestoga College

(Random questions answered 6y random students

What makes

a groundhog so

trustworthy?

(Photo by Bryan Martin)

a tangled up mess

It’s

Mark Imlau untangles wires in an attempt It has been an ongoing project.

Books

a new security system

to install

where

-

in

the

A

wing on Jan. 23.

go

to

besides the bookstore guaranteed to come the same day every ye Joel Gra

“It’s

B y RYAN With high

CONNE LL

tuition rates

and other

all

of their textbooks

semester.

a

BA

and

programs

A

text-

campus

good way

book

load,

to find text-

Some

ads conveniently have pull-

Conestoga Students

who might have

a textin their

where students are able

browse a selection of used

The

selection

is

to

text-

better than

used bookstores because the books

were used by previstudents taking Conestoga

are those that

College courses.

it

W., offers textbooks for a variety of

ting all of

departments such as technical and

and supplies in one place. the Tannis Gayler from Conestoga College Doon book-

CSI vice-president of student Ethan Miller said books on consignment is a great service activities

Conestoga students. “If seems to me that textbooks are

being recycled

at a faster rate than

ever before,” Miller said. to

make sense

a service like this.”

Manager Mark

science courses.

hard for bookwide selection of textbooks because book publishers are continuously updating their it’s

stores to carry a

information,

making older versions

outdated and hard to

He doesmoney for

pay students a lot of their textbooks because he doesn’t resell them at the original cover

no longer using a

“It just

for us to offer

and

ultimately the best outlet

comes

to conveniently get-

your required textbooks

she gets many comfrom students about the

said

store

plaints

bookstore’s high prices but she's not to blame. “(Profit)

sell.

n’t

margins here are so min-

imal just to keep the bookstore

Gayler said. “It’s not to gouge students or anything.” Gayler blamed the cost of textbooks on book publishers who are afloat,”

charge of setting the high

in

prices.

two

Publishers normally charge a high-

not the latest copy but good reference, we give them just a few bucks,” Pettigrew said. “We usually pay them $2 to $10 and sell them for $10 to $20.” Another used bookstore in

er cost for textbooks because there

rid

of

it,

old and it’s

if

they’re a year or

it’s

still

Kitchener

308 King

is

St.

the

W.

It

K-W

Bookstore,

also doesn’t spe-

cialize in textbooks, but

it

does

some engineering and English books. Most of the books are grated

for

you could 6e our neyt respondent!

is

when

textbook and they just want to get

trouble sell-

The organization offers book consignment service

seems

store

(CSI)

er bookstore prices.

ous

Conestoga College’s Doon book-

The Kitchener-based bookstore Casablanca Books, 146 King St.

“If students are

Inc.

ing their books or paying the high-

books.

relevant to a student’s pro-

price.

has an excellent alternative for stu-

office

still

name

and contact information.

dents

textbook sections, they

Pettigrew said

and straightforward advertisement posted on a bulletin board, which states what program textbooks are for sale, helps bring awareness and are continuously seen by students walking through the hallways. appealing

visually

tabs that include the seller’s

\Smile Conestoga,

price for just one textbook.

of stock.

their

sell

books.

decision.”

Another alternative is to visit used bookstores throughout Although Kitchener- Waterloo. most used bookstores do not fea-

gram.

as well as a

Stefanie Folkes

www.chapters.ca offers a variety of new textbooks for reasonable prices. The website presently offers free shipping on any orders over $39, which can most often be the

consignment. The student is mailed a cheque once the textbook sells, which can take a while.

at

may be

both buy and

the following semester’s

make a good

The Chapters bookstore website

spot for the textbooks they put on

provide excellent resources that

way to dispose of textbooks and make some money for

and they can

the

CSI does not pay students on

ture

are an ideal

clear

Students are always able to turn

able to turn to different alternatives

feel they shouldn’t

Bulletin boards around

is

for.

have to pay outrageous prices are

who

books.

mind

their

sell

Disadvantages with ordering books online can be the high cost of having to ship books through the mail, and also the books being out

to

their

of the more

used.

$1,500 for

Students

when they wake up

sort

chase textbooks, whether new or

such as integrated manufacturing.

“They’ve been asleep so long

is

popular stuff with us.”

ice.

engineering,

Vanessa Strickland

the English Lit

price to cover the costs of the serv-

include business programs, nursmarketing co-ops, computer

furry.”

“We do

to the Internet for resources to pur-

ing,

use they’re so cute and

said.

literature section, so

CSI adds an additional 10 per cent markup on top of the student’s

Programs that require a considerable amount of money be spent on textbooks

Tim Maxwell

have a strong

can add to the overwhelming debt

in

favourite animal.”

books

Hunter

College),”

they want to

to

is

to put their

college expenses, buying textbooks

accumulated by students. Depending on the program, students can pay anywhere from $15

“Because the groundhog

who wish

Students

used textbooks on consignment at CSI are able to choose how much

different

in

throughout the

Manager

sell

more

Wilfrid

King. They

may

print off four mil-

of his books, whereas with your textbook they print 4,000

Gayler

“The

smaller the print run, the more

sections

courses

University

their

lion copies

at

and

said.

it

costs.”

The bookstore

to

cover

to

for example,”

store.

Laurier

have

they

expenses such as publication costs and paying the author. “I always compare it to Stephen

inte-

Scott Hunter said most

relevant

such a small print run for them

and

text-

of the books that they specialize in are

is

that their

rent

also

guarantees

books are the most

cur-

for

the

editions

available

course and are not out-of-date. Textbook publishers such

Canada

as

and

University of Waterloo.

Thomson-Nelson

“I don’t know if we have a lot of textbooks that would be relevant to

Pearson Education wouldn’t comment on why their textbooks cost

any of the courses

so much.

(at

Conestoga


News

Posters By

RYAN CONNELL

The reproductions ranged

were given one last chance to brighten up their bedroom walls by attending the poster sale in the Sanctuary on Jan. 21. The sale offered more than ,500 Students

Justin Timberlake to Vincent

Gogh. Conestoga Students

Van

to

the its

quantity.

more Conestoga

sale tends to be

successful at

(CS1)

“The Imaginus poster sale tends be more successful at Conestoga

something about the students here

the students love posters," Miller

sellers this

it’s

noth-

semester included

posters of celebrities such as Justin

Timberlake,

Johnny

Depp,

and

Orlando Bloom from the Pirates of the Canbbean. The Tanya Chaikin

was also popular amongst both male and female stulesbian kiss poster

dents.

refill

them before coming to the college due to their busy travelling schedule. CSI makes a commission from

how much

is

is

unable to

made because

CS1

first

in

began holding the poster being 2000 after approached by Imaginus.

reproduc-

selling

and

tions of posters, prints

different

deals

takes a lot of work to and students benefited. Several students were hired to help with the event by advertising the poster sale around campus and also helping to set up and tear down the displays. They were privately paid by Imaginus. After their stop at Conestoga College, Imaginus moved on to other colleges and universities in set

event

makes

The event

CSI vice-president

across Canada,

Hot

a beehive of

don't think

I

didn’t have the opportunity to

Imaginus

ing short of saying that Conestoga

And

students

with other colleges and universities.

Miller,

students love their walls.”

“The place was

activity.

many

decorate their rooms halfway through the school to

Ethan

The warehouse-based poster company in Toronto travels to coluniversity campuses lege and

said.

looking

are

institutions.”

other post-second-

at

only because not as

disclose

student turnout to the one-day event.

ary institutions because there's just

lives

This semester’s event was one day

the event, but Miller

post-secondary

Ethan Miller, was happy with the

than they are

— Page 3

play were already sold out. Imaginus

vice-president of student activities,

to

2004

Several posters that were on dis-

“The Imaginus poster

than they are at other Inc.

2,

year.

reproductions of posters, prints and

everyone from

in price

$30 depending on location of the publisher and

1

portraits, featuring

up students’

light

from $3

SPOKE, February

portraits

up,

low prices as a way to bring drama and fine art to students. The company has been in business for

College,

29 years. Imaginus brought the poster sale

and McMaster University. The next poster sale at Conestoga

at

Conestoga students in September for a two-day event.

to

the

area,

Humber

College

including

Fanshawe

Mohawk

College,

College, York University,

is

expected to take place

in

(Photo by Christina Bramburger)

First-year mechanical engineering student, flips

September.

through

some

Dave Parsons,

18,

posters at the Imaginus poster sale.

Storm blasts region, closing college BY JEFF M ORLEY Conestoga College closed its last Tuesday for only the second time in the last 10 years. Weather was the culprit. The province was hit with a large

doors

winter storm that dumped approximately 30 centimetres of snow and made driving conditions haz-

The OPP reported about 700 accidents alone on Tuesday. ardous.

A1 Hunter, head of security, says college administration takes a number of factors into consideration

when

it

comes

celling classes.

to

Conestoga can-

The most important

sion-making process as well. With the heavy snowfall on Tuesday much of the snow had to be trucked off school property. With near empty parking lots, the area can be cleared

longer.

Hunter while

They also evaluate how much snow has fallen and how much snow will fall. However, Hunter also explains that snow removal plays an important part in the deci-

pointed

also

Monday evening and college

was

still

to

The school closed to another large

that

classes

Tuesday, the

open

work

out

no

were

there

who wished

is safety.

more quickly

and efficiently. Hunter says that workers were clearing the parking lots for about 24 hours to ensure that classes could resume the next day. If the school had remained open, this would, have taken days

to students

in labs. last

April due

snowstorm

that hit

(Photo by Darren Smith)

the area. Wilfrid Laurier and the University of Waterloo were also

Emergency crews have been swamped

closed.

knifed, blocking

all

lately

due

to

three lanes of the 401 on Jan 22.

bad

road conditions. This transport truck jack-

_

(Photo by Darren Smith)

Backed-up

traffic

ramp and slippery roads were a common scene on the 401

last

week due

to

weather conditions. Temperatures dropped

to -30

C

with the wind

chill.


Page 4

— SPOKE, February

2,

Commentary

2004

Don’t shoot

the messenger The recent court ruling on the media’s use of sources reaffirms the importance of the industry, as well as being a vote for democracy. On Jan. 21 Superior Court Judge Mai^ Lou Benotto said “journalist-source confidentiality is as important to society as to the press itself - particularly when a story has ‘explosive potential.” The news story surrounding this case began in April 2001 when a National Post reporter received an

anonymous package. The contents suggested

.

.

the current Prime Minister, Jean Chretien, had given money to a golf club in his riding, clearly a conflict of interest. “Sources want confidentiality for a variety of

reasons

...

They may, themselves, be breaching

They may have stolen the confidentiality. information. They may fear economic reprisals. They may lose their jobs. They may fear for their safety. They may fear for the safety of their families,” said Benotto. One of the most important aspects of journalism is credibility. If journalists don’t protect their source, journalists, along with the media outlet, can lose all credibility.

Without journalists’ confidential sources protected the Watergate scandal may have never broke and the reasons around the deportation of Maher Arar may have never surfaced. Since when did reporting the news become a crime? Well,

RCMP

when 10

showed up on an

officers

Ottawa Citizen reporters’ doorstep. In her story about Arar she referenced a security source and leaked document. When she wouldn t

RCMP

got a search warrant reveal her sources the for her house. They seized her notebooks, computer and various other things from her office that they considered evidence. First of all, the Arar case is of importance to every Canadian citizen. Why was he deported? How did this happen to a Canadian? Currently, under the anti-terrorism law, you can be charged and serve up to 14 years in jail for not co-operating with police.

Prime Minister Paul Martin, who agrees with press freedom, told the Toronto Star on Jan. 23 the laws need to be reviewed. “Freedom of the press is one of the important pillars underlying our democratic freedoms and I take that very seriously,” he said. “Obviously, given the fact that it was security information made it all the more serious. I’m not going to comment any further except to say that what is of interest, what should be of interest to everybody, is who leaked that information, not the journalist that received it.” For the good of the public, when Parliament reconvenes today, hopefully freedom of the press will be on the top of the agenda.

Ontario heritage act unfair When you buy

the decor, the grounds

That would make his property a

Jason

owner-occupied duplex.

I

Middleton

my

in

could swim summer. It wasn’t to be. yard so

during the

I

Neighbours

ing a heritage building just because

Running through the back of our

Under

were unable

to install

we

of fear of additional neighbours

the Ontario Heritage Act

is

wrong.

any house designated a heritage

any type of

dislike the idea of

having a duplex in their neighbourhood. But to declare the build-

Opinion

yard was a sewer, (below the ground), and because of that

McGill’s intention

rear of his house.

renovations.

When I was growing up dreamed of having a pool

is

of building the addition on the

and minor

A heritage

landmark could not be altered or

building should be

demolished without the permis-

established because both the owner

sion of the Municipal Heritage

and the

Committee (MHC). That would mean any time

worthy of

McGill or any other heritage

heritage committee

three-storey addition to the rear of

house owner wanted

list

his house.

change any part of

why I sympathize with Waterloo homeowner Brad McGill. pool. That’s

McGill bought a house on Central Street in Waterloo nearly a year ago.

He wanted

to

add a

During the process of declaring his intentions to the city

and

aware

that his

of properties in Waterloo that

could be considered historical.

Behind McGill’s back, some

to paint or

owner

know that

McGill

would be

fine with

neighbours began trying to

but the neighbours and the

designate his house a heritage

went behind It

seems

what

is

their

“wish

list”

of

it.

be buying a

that they could

a heritage landmark.

me,

If

MHC

McGill’s

home

receives the

designation, his kids one day might

his back.

that

a

property that could be designated

wanted the heritage designation, this ruling

make

Prospective house buyers should

for a property

were

to

heritage locations in the region,

it

have to live?

to

If the situation

to the

is

of their houses and properties,

and post

anyway

Is that

is

that designation.

which are on

their property,

they would have to get

MHC believe the house

Another suggestion

approved.

was made house was on a list

his neighbourhood, he

landmark.

Letters are

designation

a house, you

expect to have total control over

“Why

wonder, driving this

in

can’t

we have a pool

our backyard?”

Spoke

welcome

Is published and produced weekly by the Journalism students

of Conestoga College

Editor: Blake Gall

Spoke welcomes editor. Letters

should be signed and include the

and telephone number contacted

No unsigned Letters should

Spoke

letters to the

name

of the writer. Writers will

James Doyle Jason Noe

Photo Editors: Aimee Wilson, Carla Sandham, Michelle

Taylor

be published.

be no longer than 500 words.

reserves the right to edit any

Address correspondence to: The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

Faculty Adviser: Christina Jonas

letter

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

for publication.

N2G 4M4

Editor:

Circulation Managers:

Jeff Morley, Nick Horton,

be

for verification.

letters will

Spoke Online

Advertising Manager: Carrie Hoto Production Managers: Rebecca Learn,

,

Dr.,

Web

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The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors

not necessarily reflect the views of in

advertising

beyond the amount paid

acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a Letters must not contain any libellous statements.

to the editor are subject to

MS Word

Conestoga College. for the file

space. Letters

would be

helpful.


News

Wee Willie makes By JENNIFER This

is

in

day of honour of

mammal! Although

it

is

not a holiday in the

and we all still have to go to school, on Feb. 2 traditional sense,

Wiarton Willie

much

longer

snow

the

road

how

predict

will

we

will

have

to dust

off our cars and brave icy

conditions just

to

get

to

Conestoga College.

Groundhog Day has been celein the community of

brated

Wiarton since 1956.

At 8:15 a.m. the famous pinkeyed albino groundhog, which is

comes

basically a giant squirrel,

When Wee

who

died some-

time during the winter of 1998 and 1999, awakens on

said Paton.

Now

that she is older,

know

"This year

Toronto but

my

I I

he doesn’t, his hibernation will

in

end

the festivities.

enjoy

an

Willie has had a

good

will

taking

far

Wee

am am

2003 he incorrectly predicted an early spring. But from 2000 to 2002 he was right.

badger

shows groundhogs only accurate 37 per cent of the

are

CBC

in-depth time, according to a backgrounder into Wiarton Willie. Years ago Wiltie actually came

out of a hole in the ground and looked around, making the prediction

Paton, 24, in

believable, said

Came

who was bom and

raised

more

flies

came to Canada 1700s when German immi-

in the

Willie’s success, a

who

to take part in

tradition of animals predict-

grants to North

Wee

friend

ing season change

ing the season change. However, in

Despite

going back and

boyfriend to celebrate

track record for accurately predict-

scientific report

living outside of

She even has one from the West

The

early spring.

So

is

on Friday and a dance on Saturday where Willie’s mascot makes a guest appearance.

Willie Day.”

he

Paton said

the casino night

whether or not he saw his shadow. If he does, legend says there will be six more weeks of winter, and if

and

important prediction

“The town is buzzing with people and the media throughout the whole weekend of the festival. It is great to see our small town so busy with activities and celebration. Plus, it really benefits our economy, as it is estimated the festival brings in $750,000 annually,”

Monday, thou-

sands of people will want to

— Page 5

pizza-eating contest.

her favourite pail of the weekend

until spring.

Willie, the successor

Wiarton Willie

to

2004

which was named the world’s greatest Groundhog Day event in 2000, according to the Bruce County website. The festival includes a weekend full of fun, with a Monte Carlo night, a pancake brunch, the Wiarton Willie parade and a

how

out of hibernation and predicts

many more weeks

2,

the Wiarton Willie Festival,

the only

year set aside

the a

Monday

ORMSTON

SPOKE, February

America used a determine when winter

to

would end.

other

In

and

bears

countries

“But now they pull him out of a cupboard on a constructed stage

were also used. "In any case the honour belonged to

a creature that hibernated.

Its

emergence symbolized the imminent arrival of spring,” according to the Groundhog Day, Is It Spring Yet website.

Although the Groundhog Day Wiarton is world in renowned, Americans look to

festival

of Phil Pennsylvania to find out when spring will arrive.

and he pretends to whisper his prediction to the mayor, which is all

on information more For Groundhog Day go to Wiarton

very

Willie’s

silly.”

Regardless of whether Willie is right. Groundhog Day is also about

if

European hedgehogs

Punxsutawney

Wiarton.

(Internet photo)

The mayor of Wiarton and thousands of tourists come out every year to sea Wee Willie sees his shadow. Groundhog Day has been celebrated in Wiarton since 1956. Despite Wee Willie’s past success, a scientific report shows groundhogs are only accurate 37 per cent of the time.

website

Volunteer

Support Request

Of WATERLOO REGION

at

http://www.southbrucepeninsula.c

om/index.cfm?member=willie.

Support of the Food Bank of Waterloo Region

Rock Revival

-

in

6 volunteers required

Must be able to lift. February 26th - 27th

9am

-

1

pm

Budd Park Soccer Arena Contact: Judy Dusick 748-51 31

CONESTOGA (Internet photo)

Wee

Willie Wiarton, Willie’s successor, is

family. Early in the

more weeks

morning

until spring.

a

Wee far Wee Willie

So

Willie will

member of the rodent how many

predict

has had a good track

record for accurately predicting the season change.

STUDENTS

INC.


Page 6

— SPOKE, February

2,

2004

*

I I

'Wfi

STUDENTS

INC

I

®Pri

_

Feb 5th 1

-

The Pond

1am - 1pm

We are competing with the University of Guelph for Charity

See CSI for details


Entertainment

Video games are not

SPOKE, February

All fun and

Perhaps,

In 1989, another system appeared as an alternative to the

games?

childish

video game industry means big bucks to companies like Nintendo, Sony and but

the

Microsoft. With such fierce

com-

more important now than ever before to stay on top of petition, it’s

game

8-bit

play

of

their

campaigns, “Welcome to the next level.” Sega Genesis arrived with a 16-bit system two years before Super Nintendo emerged.

would go on

in

Once upon a

time, video

games

consisted of no more than a couple of white blocks and a ball,

which was more than enough entertain

the

When

masses.

Atari system hit stores with

“sophisticated”

goal-driven Hunt,

it

graphics

games

and

maintaining 80 per cent in the - until an unfortunate business decision left them out in early ‘80s

the cold. After spending a fortune

smash hit game, developers were

getting the rights to the

time for

in

— zoomed

named Sonic into living

rooms

at

lightning speed.

Sony Playstation one of the highhome gaming systems

est-selling to date.

It

the

All

release

blew both the Nintendo

of the water. In 2001, when the Nintendo

Game Cube was (CDs and

finally released,

was already too late. Many wondered how a big, purple box could possible comall)

it

much

anticipated PS2,

Playstation’s newest model. Plus,

of Luigi’s Mansion with the Game Cube only reiterat-

Sega’s answer to Mario - a speedy hedgehog named Sonic -

release

— Page 7

games and systems

ed the idea that Nintendo was a child’s system and couldn’t appeal to an adult audience.

to be

64 and Sega’s attempt at the CD game system, the Sega Saturn, out

the

zoomed

own and

pare to the

its

gaming industry needed. Atari remained the reigning champion of the gaming world -

rushed to put it out Christmas sales.

the

Jungle was the breakthrough the

E.T. for a

Sega’s answer to Mario a speedy hedgehog

to

like

released.

Sony, with no plans to ditch their idea, went on to create a system of

Nintendo, boasting in their advertising

the latest technological advances

order to reach the widest possible audience.

was

2004

child’s play

Big businesses bank big bucks on the sales of By HALLEY McPOLIN

2,

year

of

this, coupled with the of Microsoft’s Xbox a

later,

makes

the

future

Nintendo questionable for the time.

The gaming industry

is

of

first

more

try leaves

no room for error and

Nintendo

will

to

consider

it

games or just

the design, everyone has a system they can confidently claim to be superior. With both

competitive then ever and Nintendo appears to be falling behind, making the new champions and biggest competitors Sony’s PS2 and Microsoft’s

children

Xbox. However, Nintendo remains healthy enough in sales and who can say where the next advance will come from? One thing is for

jumping on

certain:

have

move carefully to avoid going the way of Atari. Whether s the name, the their next

and a large portion of

adults to appeal

to, the gaming industry isn’t going anywhere any time soon.

More and more companies are the bandwagon and

trying to find just the right reel in a all

this

hook

to

new audience. What docs mean to game lovers

everywhere?

such a competitive indus-

Boredom

is

no longer an option!

rooms at lighta message in the dust for its competition: you are not alone. This would only be the beginning of the gaming wars. Also in 1989. Nintendo became leader of a new genre of gaming, a title they maintain to this day with into living

ning speed and

left

the handheld system.

Gameboy. and

its

modern-day

Gameboy Color, Gameboy Advance and Gameboy counterparts.

Advance

Millions of E.T. cartridges

ended up crushed, buried and covered in cement in

New Mexico

a

landfill.

SP, have managed to keep Nintendo on top. even while its other systems fall behind. Although more and more companies are trying to take advantage of Nintendo’s success with the portable gaming system, none has been able to steal away their loyal audience.

mixed with an incomprehensible plot and frusTerrible graphics

Sega, a

company

been ahead of

its

that

had long

time, tried their

luck with the Sega Gamegear. It boasted colour instead of the drab green of the Gameboy, along w ith left a lit screen - an option that would dol-^ billion half a over with Atari only appear on the Gameboy lars in losses. Advance SP many years later. Believe it or not, millions of Still, the competition was cripE.T. cartridges ended up crushed, pling and Sega never fully recovburied and covered in cement in a

trating

game

play (players spend

most of their time falling into and trying to get out again)

New Mexico Of

ered.

landfill.

course, E.T. wouldn’t be the

only knife in Atari’s back — anticipating

huge

company

profits, the

selling their consoles as cheaply as possible. Also, their next generation model (Atari 5200) proved to be a devastating disappointment because of a

was

clumsy joystick and

the fact that

their existing cartridges

were no

did the rise and

fall

of the

Atari empire prove?

Of

course,

no company should

ever get too ahead of themselves no matter how well they may be doing. It also proved just how' fickle the

gaming audience could

be.

With the Atari home entertainment system essentially out of the way, one company that had been developing arcade games fbr several years was able to try out a home console of their own. Nintendo the In 1985, Entertainment System - or NES for short - was introduced to the public. The games Duck Hunt and Super Mario Brothers were sold with the system and both proved to

be big

hits

The most

recent addition to the

handheld family is the N-Gage by Nokia. A phone, e-mail and messenger service, MP3 player as well as advanced gaming system all in one ... miracle or monster? Most critics condemn the system for being over-complicated and not very user-friendly. Sales have also

announcement of the much-anticipated Sony hand-

with the audience.

Mario and Luigi became the latest, animated household names.

held:

the

the

PSP

or

Bobbing John

Field

gummy worms

in a bowl of dead minnows and worms during Conestoga Field went on to win the competition. Factor. Fear version of NBC’s

searches

residence’s

for

own

for

gummy worms

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

Eating Disorders

one out of every hundred women might become anorexic? Estimates hundred college-age of the frequency of bulimia vary from five to twenty out of one

Did you know

women. Men

that

also develop both disorders, but in

Anorexia nervosa

is

much

smaller numbers.

characterized by an all-consuming fear of “getting fat.” There with food, body size and sometimes compulsive exercising.

is

an

intense preoccupation

reflected that notion.

Now, with

longer compatible.

What

(Photo by Jennifer Howden)

pits

original weight. Serious health Dieting can gradually lead to a loss exceeding 25% of and lowered heart rate occur. Some issues such as cessation of menstruation, malnutrition

Playstation

Portable, Nintendo will have even

starve themselves to death.

more competition.

through vomiting or the use a cycle of uncontrolled binge eating and purging more extreme cases, absorb nearl) of laxatives. This extremely debilitating pattern can, in

Bulimia Sony’s Playstation would

go on

to

become one

the highest-selling

gaming systems

is

and isolation. Frequent of a person’s time, energy and money, and lead to depression Kidney and cardiac vomiting can cause damage to the teeth, throat and esophagus. all

of

home

problems are a danger.

to date.

An important first step in overcoming Eating Disorders In the early ‘90s Nintendo bigwigs made a business decision

they would live to regret

A

new

Nintendo system was initially to be a merge with Sony, with plans to create a system with 64-bit technology and the use of compact disks instead of cartridges. For whatever reason, the CD idea was tossed and the Nintendo 64

is

for the individual to

problem exists. Medical and acknowledge to herself and counsellor in Student psychological help is available in this community. Talk to a immediate benefit is the feeling Services or the nurse in the Health & Safety Office. One to a professional that a

part of one’s of relief at no longer having to keep such an important

A message from

Student Services.

life

a secret.


Feature By MICHELLE TAYLOR

Using a flash. Most compacts and

days have a button to force the flash

or they’re just not as spectacular as

sometimes you may end up in a position where the camera thinks the flash is not needed but it really is. For example, most cameras will not

all

you thought they would

A

little

be.

planning ahead and some

how

advice on

to

use your camera

If you own a single (SLR) camera then most

on.

tures in any situation.

outside

to

be a professional

likely

you

SLRs

have a button to open the flash. Automatic cameras all know when to use the flash and when not to, but

fire a flash

You don’t need

lens reflex

flash. If not, all

have an external

properly will help you take great pic-

In

outdoors, yet using a flash

often necessaiy.

is

my own

experience,

I

was once

Adams

taking a picture outside of two chil-

shot or to capture that perfect sunset

dren inside a tunnel. According to the light metre in my camera, I did not

order to take the next Ansel

in

on the beaches of the Mediterranean. I put together 10 tips, from my own experience and from some professionadvice I’ve been given in the past, to make your next photography

al

help

shutter6

these

digitals

done it before. It’s someone’s birthday or your sister's wedding or your brother’s new baby and you just want to capture it all on film. But, when you finally have the pictures developed, hall ot them don t turn out e've

experience a pleasure rather than a disaster.

need a flash because sunlight.

As

I

would

I

was

in bright

learn later,

I

did

need a flash because the children were in a dark area. When the pictures were developed there was exposure but their faces were very dark. Turning the flash on would have solved this problem.

Your equipment. Before you ever leave the house to

no matter what the always make sure your camera is in working order. This may sound pretty simple, but nothing is worse than arriving at your friend’s wedding with dead batteries or an old

Choosing the right film. With so many types of film out there it can be hard to decide what film to buy. What you should be looking for

film stuck inside the camera.

ber on the film the less light-sensitive it is, so if you are taking pictures in a dark place you will want a film with a

take photographs, situation,

If the

for

camera hasn’t been used

in a

long time and you are taking pictures at an important event or going on a vacation, take a few test rolls before

film

speed) of the film.

you were photographing a wedyou would most likely want to go with 400 ISO film

because a

Always carry an extra set of batteries, especially if you own a digital camera. The advantage with digital is that you can see the picture right away,

inside,

digital

camera

that has

because even on a cloudy day a 200

ISO

camera, make sure you purchase an

sure.

film will help get a better expo-

trip.

As

These batteries are rechargeable, but they do not last forever. Having a specific rechargeable battery die on you in Europe could be a problem. They aren't easily available and usually need to be ordered from the company of whatever brand your camera is.

have

you go on any

of the shots will be

lot

either in a church or at the

reception. If you arc going on a trip to a hot place then 100 or 200 ISO will do just fine. I recommend at least a 200

a rechargeable battery specific for that extra one before

ISO (or num-

the

we

tograph. Since

brands go, you will also

to think

about what you are tak-

ly appealing.

The composition of your photograph.

For as long as we can remember we have been taught to centre the subject in

middle

the

of

the

camera’s

viewfinder and take the picture. Taking a

moment

to look at

what you are tak-

make all the difBe conscious of what is in the viewfinder. Just moving the subject off centre can make a big difference. This ing a picture of can ference.

Shooting

is

often

referred to as the “rule of

thirds.”

Most compacts and digital cameras have a focus lock, which is why the subject in focus

is in

the centre of the

problem it by pushing the shutter halfway. Hold the shutter in position and move the camera until your subject is off centre. Push the shutter all the way and your subject will remain in focus. picture. In order to solve this

centre the subject and focus on

Mounting your camera on a

tripod in any low be on the safe side.

Use a tion to

Get

If you are taking portraits and you want warm tones in your picture, then

Kodak developer

is

right for you.

on Kodak paper oranges and yellow's which

Places

that

develop

in

print

make

a world of difference to your

photograph.

When

taking a portrait try getting

closer and focusing on the subject’s

Eyes draw people

eyes.

in to take a

Fuji film. This film

takes pictures in blue and green tones,

checks and adjusts every frame on

close.

your negatives. These places will lighten and darken each picture accordingly to make it look as good as possible.

face

is

the

child

you are taking scenery or a wedI

which

recommend

results in crisper,

more

real pic-

tures.

orange tone, so if you are taking Halloween pictures or anything that involves really vibrant colours

ommend

I

rec-

it.

Use a tripod. Newer cameras will often have a mode on them for taking night pictures.

Where you

develop.

you had to choose the right choosing the right place to develop can make all the difference. Just as

film,

Any

place

that

develops on Fuji

this

light situa-

close.

closer look at your picture.

If

this-

problem.

warmer, softer picture. Also, when looking for a place to develop, make sure it is a place which

ding,

tripod,

or even just a table, can solve

Getting close to your subject can

to go.

results in a

ing pictures of.

take pictures with

cameras already in the horizontal position, our eyes have been trained to always see horizontal pictures every time we compose a picture. Changing the picture to a vertical one is, to our eyes, unusual and so, therefore, visual-

paper will result in crisper, clearer pictures because, just like with the film, the pictures are developed in green and blue tones. This means the water in your beach picture will be bluer and crisper. If you arc a scenery photographer than a Fuji developer is the place

a far as

Kodak has more of a yellow and Turning your camera. Just changing the angle of your camera can make a big difference to a pho-

(Photo by Michelle Taylor)

camera sideways and taking a vertical shot can change the look of your photograph. Moving your subject off centre adds a unique touch.

Just turning your

If

horrible feeling.

you own a

the

higher speed. ding, for example,

If

is

The lower

you go. Coming back from that trip to Paris without any exposures can be a

but batteries die extremely quickly.

pointers

when choosing

When you

mode

turn your

camera

to

the shutter speed automati-

When

taking pictures of animals or

children get

A a

down

to their level

much

better photograph than

waving from across

These

tips are just the

beginning to

great photographs. Practice and making mistakes are part of the process as well.

wowing your

result in blurry pictures.

your next vacation.

for the

the

street.

compensate low lighting. When this happens any shake to the camera will

cally decreases in order to

and get

close-up of a child’s smiling

But, with time and patience you’ll be friends with your photo-

graphic skills by the time you take


News

SPOKE, February

beans help

Jelly

sick

RYAN CONNELL

By

2004

2,

— Page 9

girl

Hospital

the past.

in

we

“This time

figured that since

beans are just one of the ways that money is being raised at

just directly donate the

Conestoga College

someone

Jelly

she

to help a sick

girl.

why

a sick kid herself,

is

not

money

to

our community,” Saini

in

said.

The Conestoga Residence and

She hopes to raise $100 from the bean contest, which she

Conference Centre is encouraging students to guess how many jelly beans are

win

in a giant jar in

jelly

expects will run until spring break.

order to

The

it.

Residents pay 50 cents per guess or $1.25 for three guesses at the front desk.

The money

recreation centre

also help-

money by providing

a

donation jar

at

the front desk. But

if

foundation students

police

that is raised

is

ing to raise

go towards a good cause, Help Give Hope to Hope. Three-year-old Hope Monaghan, of Puslinch Township, was diagnosed in early October with diffuse will

can pay a $

called

enter the recreation centre.

intrinsic

pontine glioma,

a

middle of the brain Hope’s prognosis is poor.

The proceeds

like to see

other parts in raising

Hope. “It would be nice if the college would recognize the need and help throughout the campus by having faculty talk to the students and see

rare

stem.

how

many expenses

for

they could help out,” Saini said.

The community has

money

Hope’s care and

raising

treatments, including her continu-

family

ous

including

associated with

Toronto's Hospital for

visits to

(Photo by Ryan Connell)

Sick Children.

Resident decided to

Bally

adviser

start the jelly

A

Saini

guess the quantity

tions teacher

in

the jar at the

who

is

auction

at

events,

concert

University

of people don’t do any“1

1

do

to

figured

we

by having

it

Bv R EBECCA LEARN

a jelly bean count

should just incorporate it

on.Zhao also

Conestoga’s international students celebrated the Chinese New Year with food, fun and friends on Jan.

for charity.”

Residence management is also raising money by gathering beer cans and beer bottles from students and redeeming them at the

food night brate.

in the

"We

students to

just

Sanctuary to cele-

want

to get

more

know each other and

decided

it

would probably be

move it to Friday. “We have about 200

The

students,” said Zhao, but she

stu-

that they only

people to come.

z z a

Beer Store. Saini

management has money from beer cans

bottles

Sick

the

to

go

make

said

donated the

and

to

to the recreation centre

better

walk

give donations to the front desk at

Kids

in

the residence.

with your

international

added

expected about 30

"Everybody's just

busy with their own stuff,” Zhao said. All of the events are e-mailed to

h n e s e o o d rtacks and i

,

ilad

all

from

7 p»m. he night till

/as initially

ordinator for international educa-

ut

due

to

the international students.

Zhao said they are also trying to work more closely with Conestoga planned for Wednesday, the

poster sale

Zhao

walk out with your

Students Inc. (CSI) “to get our international students involved with the

CSI.”

amhk &

(

The Central Ontario Chinese celebration

on Jan. 24.

Cultural Centre performs the lion

rnuiu uy uciinua

i

dance during the Chinese New Year's

call 1 -8O0-HRBLOCK

or visit hrbiock.ca

mJ * Restrictions apply.

Students

who

See office for details.

H&R BLOCK

qualify must be 'full time

or with attendance of four or more months at a university Offer expires soon and is good only at participating offices

and

contributions to the jar, or

,

1

share our different cultures,’ said Yanting Zhao, activities co-

to

“We welcome we can

to

i

2004 it is the year of the monand they had an international

said,

anadian students tdo so arn more about them.” ents shared

23. In

of

10 that attracted hundreds of sup-

Chinese monkey around

key.

and

porters.

contest (in residence) for awhile so

said.

various

benefit

been

Students and faculty are welcome

wanted

a friend of the

thing for charity,” Saini

a

also

Monaghan

Waterloo’s Federation Hall on Jan.

inoperable brain tumour.

family. lot

will

beans

Conestoga Residence and go towards nelping a young girl name Hope who has an

of jelly

for the

through

silent

from a police founda-

the sick girl

“A

ballot is filled out to

Conference Centre. The money raised

bean con-

residence after hearing about

test at

donation to the jar to

of the college involved

money

help Hope’s

will

family offset the

I

would

Saini

inoperable brain tumour located in the

have

forgotten their student cards, they

college


— SPOKE, February

Page 10

News

2004

2,

Conestoga teacher purchases Miller worked five years to get

By JASON MIDDLETON

both

his

from

degree

business

Think of a lemonade

stand.

Wilfrid Laurier University and his

Now

person that

Certified

of the

think

would run

it.

That person would not be continuing education teacher John Miller. Miller would be the person who would organize the purchase of the

Purchaser

Professional

(CPP) diploma. He has been teaching a continuing education business course for

Management

Purchasing

the

materials needed to run the lemon-

Association of Canada. The program allows students to

ade

receive their

stand.

Since he started working for the City of Waterloo as the purchasing

now does

officer in January, Miller

same jobs

the

stand, only

lemonade

as at the

on a much bigger

Conestoga College.

at

The 52-year-old father of one decided that a job in the public sector. which he has never worked in,

or two nights a

when

taxpayers’

most It

money

taxpayers'

manner.

gets

the

in

manner.

difficult.”

of Waterloo

City

purchasing officer

You have

etc.).

most

in the

It

gets

effi-

difficult."

"I'm really enjoying

with

City

the

of

again

could do everything I'd

services department.

dents in his

purchase of control in an

products that we inventoried environment,"

Miller

says.

responsible for materials which include salt for the

is

tor roads,

roads and recreation

snowplows,

for the

oil

and

arenas,

leisure,

recreation facilities and any contracts that the city needs.

my

say

be teaching."

the

Miller (Photo by Jason Middleton)

I

Waterloo Miller oversees all purchasing activities in the supply and oversee

it,"

says. "If

job

his

He

money

efficient

diffi-

Miller says.

"We

make sure

sure you're spending the

make

In

he

that

John Miller,

cult are the projects (fixing roads,

cient

Conestoga

at

you’re spending the

you're

becomes more challenging. "The things that are more making sidewalks,

week

“You have to

dealing with tax money, purchasing

to

designation.

and hopes to continue now is working at the city.

would be a unique challenge. Miller explains that

CPP

Since 1990 Miller has taught one

scale.

For the past 14 years Miller has education continuing been a teacher

for the city

over

all

profession would

Having taught 300

to

400

stu-

14 years on the job.

Miller occasionally

recommends

good students to employers in the community. He says you get a feel for students you've taught which helps

when

you're interviewing for a job. "It's kind of hard to get a feeling

of somebody

two or three interviews, but if you teach them for 15 weeks you get to know what they in

College offers a

Continuing education teacher John Miller started a new job with the City purchasing officer. Miller says he lives and dies by his Palm Pilot. are like."

Purchasing has been both very good and very exciting to Miller in the past 30 years. Miller wanted to give something back to the community and that's

why he

lot

Lang explains

and no

"He

of integrity and likes to do

a good job for the company.

He

likes to

work hard and play hard. He's got a really good sense of humour, likes have fun and get the job done." Miller also enjoys fastball, golf-

squash and the theatre. Another activity Miller enjoys is working with his hands. ing, skiing,

"My

brothers

all

laugh at

its

all

thumbs

fingers." says Miller.

Organization is key for him and he is a huge advocate of time management. "I live and die by my Palm Pilot. "Planning is extremely important ... make sure you have a to-do list. There's things you have to do in a day, things you'd like to do that day and there are some things if you

that Miller likes

participating in sports.

Waterloo as

because they think I'm

to

teaches.

Fred Lang is Miller's friend and used to work with him. He says, "John is just very intense, honest, has a

does his job as though the money he was spending was his own."

of

me

don't get to

it's

fine," Miller says.

more

lot

than meets the eye Management Centre (CMC) and

just a regular college that offers

Conestoga also offers many programs on campus. They range from introduction to keyboarding or the internet to harassment and

young

discrimination, a course teaching

ing

By KATE BATTLER Conestoga College programs

to

is

more than

adults before

they join the workforce.

business owners

how

Conestoga offers a wide range of on and off campus training programs, evaluations and re-certification programs to many different businesses, companies and corpo-

deal

with

the

rations in the area.

The college

offers

courses

in

it

in

to spot

and

workplace.

There are also a number of information technology courses available to anyone wishing to update their skills.

Conestoga has also formed partnerships with the Canadian

CMC

provides business-learn-

solutions

and courses that

help take companies to the next level.

MLCP

is

a supervisory training

program designed by manufacturCanadian Manufacturers and Exporters to help manufacturers adapt to rapidly changing ers with

technology.

areas like engineering and tech-

nology training, multi-skill maintenance training, and technical, supervisory and management development. By being ranked the No.

1

Conestoga has been able lasting

many

large

partnerships

and

influential

to

with

compa-

nies in the area including Toyota,

.

Conestoga College Class Rings

10%

Off Sale

RIM, ATS, Linmar Corporation and COM DEV.

Many

of these companies

location training to provide their

employees with

the training they

need.

Toyota has management, communications and

human

relations

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News

SPOKE, February

2004

2,

— Page 11

Imagine being afraid of food ORMSTON

By JENNIFER

E

not necessarily true, she said. “I

veryday people deal with personal

their

fears.

people suffer from arachnophobia, the fear of spiders; experience

maintain a very

to

I

Some

others

was able

low weight for a long period of time. People thought wasn't very sick because I was not continuing to lose and wasn’t 30 kilo-

pteromer-

grams."

hanophobia, the fear of flying; and some even live with helminthopho-

But eating disorders are mental illnesses.

bia, the fear of being infested by worms. But for people with anorexia and bulimia, their greatest fear is

“It has to do with things other than your weight,” said Clark. “So

even

you’re

if

on

not

deathbed, you can

your

be seriously

still

food. ill.”

said

was actually scared of food,” Jane Clark, a pseudonym,

who

has struggled with anorexia

“I

Now life is

“My perceptions about food my body have totally changed.

for the past four years.

saw it as a substance that would do nothing for my body “I

make

except

She also said she has stopped her compulsive eating habits. no longer eat my food in a cerand I don’t count how many times have chewed.” However, the battle has not yet been won, as she is unable to fore“I

was really sick with anorexia I would only eat my food in a certain order, and 1 would I

never deviate from that pattern.

chewed each

bite exactly

tain order

I

I

10

see a time in her life

times before swallowing.”

and pushups;

uncommon symptom

this is not

now

“Right

was a compulsive exerciser who used to do at least 600 jumping jacks a day, plus 100 disorder, Clark

sit-ups

when

her eat-

ing disorder won't be an issue.

having an eating

In addition to

eat

it.”

it fat.”

with food, said the 16-year-old.

also

and I

a wide variety of food and enjoy

Anorexic people are obsessed

"When

Clark said she feels like her getting back on track.

still

l

think about

my

eating disorder everyday, for most

My

of the day.

hope

is

one day

I

be past this.” She is a semester behind in high school because of her time spent at will

an

of eating dis-

orders.

Homewood,

Approximately 80 per cent of patients with anorexia and 55 per

but she

is

starling

back

this term.

“My

goal

really to just take

is

it

cent of patients with bulimia also

one day

engage

Even though she is in recovery, Clark continues to see her physician, psychiatrist and nutritionist

in

according

excessive

exercise,

2002

nutrition

a

to

research newsletter.

Lying about what you are eating, or how much you are exercising, is another symptom of eating disor-

(Photo by Jennifer Ormston) For people suffering with eating disorders, the thought of getting on a scale evokes painful feelings. Lying about what you are eating or how much you are exercising are other signs of eating disorders.

ders.

always

to

my

was

exercising.”

Over

said Clark.

centres. Unfortunately, the first 10

changed on her 1 th attempt to get help, when she checked herself into Homewood Health Centre in

However, she was fairly honest about her food consumption.

times were far from successful for

Guelph.

“I

about

lied

how much

I

parents

the past four years she has

been checked into

1

1

treatment

1

several reasons.

It

was

different there, said Clark.

Most daily menus would include some cereal for breakfast, cottage

ing

admitted

cheese and a piece of bread for

underlying issues people with eat-

wanted

lunch and a vegetarian salad for

ing disorders are dealing with, she

ing the eating disorder lifestyle.

And once in a while she would have a snack, but only if it was fruit.

said.

was boring.”

dinner.

For Clark, the road to recovery has been a long one.

These centres focused on gainweight, as opposed to the

'

Also, her parents forced her to go

treatment centres; as a

these

to

she was not personally com-

result,

mitted

to

getting

better.

This

This was the

first

time

actually

I

had a problem and

I

help.

was

I

I

just sick of livIt

Instead of just focusing on gain-

ing

weight,

to the root

and

counsellors

the

Homewood

staff at

helped her get

Her days there consisted of both group sessions and one-on-one with doc-

counselling,

in

tors. She also participated in various groups during the days, including nutrition and bodyesteem workshops and cooking and recreation groups. “Everyone was very supportive.” Clark said she is frustrated by the misconceptions people have about

eating disorders.

Many

people think the less you

weigh the sicker you

of her eating disorder.

are.

Eating disorders are on the increase By JENNI FER

O RMSTON

in 10

Did you know millions of people around the world suffer from eating disorders? In fact,

an estimated 200.000 to

300,000 Canadian women between the ages of 13 and 40 have anorexia nervosa; statistics for the rates

the ages of

double the anorexia figures, according to the Statistics on Eating Disorders to be

week

is

a time for

all

of us, especially students, to con-

“When

the pressures get

be too much, people

to

may

turn to anorexia.”

www. mirror-mirror, org also important to note eating

disorder statistics are

inaccurate

eat-

ing disorders continues to rise

and

the stigmas attached to the illness-

views

on

food

and

weight.

are shocking: 15 per cent

students suffer

of college from bulimia; one

some people

make

ly

and friends and

life

job

and, in in

some

to

starting a

on a completing

cases, taking

addition

to

school work, there are a

“When way

lot

of

the pressures get to be too

to block out

to anorexia

what

is

hap-

pening. If

they spend

all their

time focus-

ing on calories and their weight,

es.

For young students, going to

anything

else.

Others

believe the only

way

accepted according

they

is

if

to

might

they will be are

thin,”

www.mirror-

society’s

fit

into

perceptions of what

attractive are difficult issues

in

ideal today

is

uni-

formly thin, white, able-bodied, smooth-skinned, young and “glamorous.”

Given of us

that less than

fit

this ideal,

women

dissatisfied

is

young

a time.’’

regularly.

Clark's advice to Conestoga College students is to get help if they think they have a problem.

She knew she had an eating disorder because she had many of the regular symptoms, including the fact

she

thought she looked

fat

despite being underweight, and the-* loss of her period. However, she resisted seeking treatment.

She said she wishes she had gotten help sooner.

waited far too long and, as a the recovery process has been a lot harder for me,” she “I

result,

said.

“Don’t

fight

just

it,

get help.”

Canada ing, enjoyable activities.”

“The beauty

it

in

with

one per cent

is

not surpris-

our society are their

bodies,”

according to the National Eating

Disorder Information Centre web-

Conestoga interested

College

students

participating

in

in

the

awareness week can attend the healing from eating disorders interactive talk in the Waterloo Region health and social services building on Regina Street on Feb. 11 .

Homewood Guelph

is

Health

Centre

in

also hosting a seminar on

site.

preventing eating disorders on Feb.

So this week, the centre will promote the slogan “celebrating our natural sizes.” To take part, all you have to do is focus on the beauty of

4; this talk

diversity, as

opposed

conform

society’s

to

to trying to

unrealistic

beyond appearance and concentrate on putting their energies into more empower-

their bodies,

is

directed towards edu-

and health professionals who work with youths. To learn more about eating disorwww.mirrorders go to cators

mirror.org/eatdis.htm.

For more information on Eating

ideals.

'This allows people to accept

mirror.org/eatdis.htm.

Self-esteem and trying to

is

people face.

ing most

students.

much, some may turn as a

new

they don’t have time to think about It is

The number of students with

our

easier for

demands on

because of a high percentage of unreported cases. Often people are afraid to come forward because of

sider

a big adjustment, one that

than others. Between leaving fami-

Eating Disorder it is

is

and eating disorders are the third most chronic illness among young females, according to the Hopewell Eating Disorder Support Centre of Ottawa website.

website.

Awareness Week;

school is

of bulimia nervosa in

Canada are believed

This

women between

10 and 20 are starving themselves;

This

at

get

Disorder Awareness

Week go

National

Eating

Information

Centre

www.nedic.ca.

to the

Disorder website

at


— SPOKE, February

Page 12

2,

News

2004

new

Ontario looks at By VALENTINA

RAPOPORT

Commission agrees. "The ministry is already commit-

Ontario’s drivers’ licences could

working with us

ted to

to look at

Bob Spence,

include eye scans and fingerprints.

privacy issues,” said

Earlier this month, the Ontario government announced it would be spending up to $50,000 to study new security measures for licences.

communications co-ordinator

Minister

Transportation

Liberal

Takhar

Harinder

reporters

told

these additional measures are being

looked tion

at for

and

both forgery preven-

Human

the

According

Spence, the com-

to

mission says the most important thing

is

to

make

from the licences

sure information is

being used for

a specific data base only. “It

should be created and then

encrypted so however

cerns.

Nichols

says

Ministry

the

Transportation has sions so

Bob

Spokesman

Ministry

made no

of

deci-

stage

is

just

used

it

others.”

But some people at this

it’s

can only be used for that data information and not be shared with

far.

"The ministry

for

Rights Commission in

Ontario.

con-

anti-terrorist security

still

aren’t too

sure.

a

Carlos Tisero, 50, immigrated to

request for proposals for advice on

Canada almost two years ago from Argentina. He says one of the main

information

seeking

what the

latest

through

technologies

out

ly

come

reasons he decided to

there are offering.”

He

said the ministry

is

constant-

looking for ways to strengthen

to

Canada is because he was told it was a country independent from the

the licence program.

U.S. But, he says ideas such as the

“We're always looking to see how we can make your identification, in this case your driver’s licence, even more safe and secure,” he said, adding, “We are certainly aware of privacy concerns and no privacy

ministry’s will

' will

grants see

Human

Rights

make many immiCanada more like the

"This country

more and more it

(Photo by Valentina Rapoport)

$50,000 to study new security measures for licences. This could include incorporating eye scans and fingerprints on your licence.

The Ontario government

is

identity regulations

will start to change,”

described

but with

free,

from

he

said.

experience,

how he was

he

forced to

spending up

is

to

drivers’

and

corporations,” he said, adding, “It’s

So

family behind in Argentina for both

important that Canadians anticipate

ering

how

today’s technology can be used to

leave

U.S.

Talking

be infringed on.”

Ontario’s

drivers’ licences

business

successful

a

economical

human

and

rights

the implementation of regula-

one could be a

far.

help

the ministry

information

is

only gath-

how

see

to

within

issues

issues.

tions such as this

“The laws began to change to benefit only the government and

threat to the population in the long

province.

run.”

with photo ID expires in 2005.

security

the

Their current contract

Student organizes Showcase Conestoga By

DAWN HASSON

the posters,” said Orr.

The

first

CSI-type

student to organize a

event

at

Conestoga

College didn’t meet with

much

success.

Showcase Conestoga with Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI). She based the event on her high school Presst Fest, which featured various bands, dancers and student, ran

singers

who

shared their talent with

Orr’s high school.

and there wasn't any Everyone was singing or a band,” said Orr, who had orig-

in

inally

Showcase Conestoga was held on anyone showed

up.

planned to have eight

dents for a dance routine and two

comedy routine. She had only planned to have two students sing and four or five people or three for a

band.

week

before and nobody really looks at

communications

the

All the proceeds went to charity

and the bartender

tips for the cause.

Both On* and staff at CSI agreed that posters needed to be put up at

Egleston,

specialist for

CSI.

He added

attendance tapered off

went on. However, about 25 people arrived at the end of the night to watch the a

little bit

as the night

band.

last

“It

has to be something spectacu-

come

lar to get students to

back,”

was to do it next year, to do something differ-

said Orr. “If

to support cancer,

donated his only put out posters a

stu-

Sam

really put out,” said

diversity.

in a

Jan. 19, but hardly

“We

the idea in October, there wasn’t a lot of time 'to plan the event. “Not many people came out for

auditions

Lindsay Orr, a general business

two weeks in advance. “As for Showcase Conestoga, I love the idea of it, but word wasn’t least

She said since she came up with

I

would try I would maybe have it at lunch hour when more students are here.” I

ent.

The experience Orr,

who

soured

hasn’t

may

said she

run for a

CSI board position next year. As for CSI, they will continue working with students on events. "It’s your right to come down here and organize an event. We want to make it first come, first serve, that way we can book it and

work with you,”

Showcase Conestoga wasn't

there,

that

because the Open

is

Mike Monday interest.

for Jan.

listed

generate

didn't

When

a

lot

Alarming!

at

and noticed

their events calendar that

(Photo by Darren Smith)

said Egleston.

who have looked

For those

19

of student

Conestoga College is the routine one on Jan. 21. Above, students, faculty and brave the cold weather during this year’s first fire alarm. Everyone was only outside a couple of minutes. Part of feeling secure at

drills like

the

you knew

first

available date she could have. will

continue to reinvent

itself in the future

and

come up with more

it

one hour

hopes to

successful

“Success comes through

CSI

in in

my

someone’s

failure.

the future

is

Would you help?

going to be

In just

many many ways

failure; failing miserably, as

(Photo by Dawn Hasson)

Robotics and automation student Paul Hicken takes the stage with his own original songs. He took part in Showcase Conestoga

on Jan. 19.

life...

opinion, the success of

times as possible as

of your time

could save

events.

And,

staff

Orr came into CSI

with her idea, Jan. 19 was the

CSI

fire

possible,”

in

said

as

Ethan

one

hour, you could

save as many as lour

lives.

As a blood donor, you're eligible to give blood every 56 daysyet someone In Canada needs blood every minute oi ovary day.

Miller,

Please help by giving blood.

vice-president of student activities.

“You

can’t build yourself

cesses.

on suc-

That’s an invisible ladder

of nothingness.”

acey receive* iamimune*, * bkwd y -product. on a monthly Without It, hor flfo rouktn’l bo Iho x&Md) ,

For clinic information, 1-888.871-7201

call:

CANADIAN SL000 SERVICE: Blood,

it’s

in

you

to give.


Feature

SPOKE, February

2004

2,

Page 13

Delving into the future Spof{e reporter ventures into

worCd

of mystic powers By AIMEE WILSON was a usual morning for Norah. But as she flipped through the morning newspaper and noticed a woman’s pict

I

on one of the stock exchange pages she sent a message. Three days later, that same picture appeared in the very same newspaper. The girl had been killed. ture

knew she was being

As

sat

1

and listened

to the 82-year-old

woman

openly talk about her ability to see apparitions and various other visions, 1 knew was looking into the eyes of a true psychic. 1

It

at

was

the 16th annual psychic expedition

Ramada

the

Hotel in Guelph Jan. 24. took the opportunity to speak to several

1

known psychics who

internationally

ed the weekend

attend-

festival.

“We have a very professional group,” said Linda Fulcher, from Vision Quest Inc., who organized the event. “The whole psychic field is developing.”

As I entered the conference room the smell of burning incense seemed to envelope me as 1

made my way around

the various booths.

“(The expo) focuses on the and future,” said Fulcher.

past, present

I admit 1 went in with a fair bit of skepticism. I’ve done the tarot card and tea leaves thing with my friends but this was my first

professional psychic.

visit to a

Fulcher introduced me to Mark Lewis, a famous Irish psychic who does palm and tarot readings.

His humourous nature got

laughing and he started showing

of Chinese numerology. After birth date

I

me

me

the art

gave him

my

he started to work his magic. After

filling in numbers on what looked like a TicTac-Toe board he told me I was a Number 8 and the colour pink is good to have around

me. Considering

him

despise pink

I

I

decided to

the benefit of the doubt

and see what else he had to say. Other information he got simply from a number told me that family is important. I’m stubborn, a good spender and indecisive. As I looked over to my friends who were chuckling and nodding had to admit that there was some truth in what he was saying. Now that I had dipped my toe into the water of mysticism I eagerly went on my

Joyce Barnes

way

possible find true happiness.

give

(Photos by Aimee Wilson)

of

Quebec

internationally acclaimed

(top), is fifth

an

generation

I

in

She began seeing apparations

psychic. at the

pose

search of another enlightening expe-

age

of four

in life is

and believes her puras many people as

to help

rience.

A

(Photo by Aimee Wilson)

sauntered over to a particular

s I

woman was

booth where a reading done

getting a

overheard her being

I

cautioned about a certain

man

in her life.

The

Miki

a fourth generation

is

psychic expo

and

British psychic.

She was on hand

at the 16th

Guelph Jan. 24. She has been featured on radio and

in

annual

television,

various newspapers and magazines.

in

Above, Toronto’s Michael Telstarr works with voyager decks and angel cards. He says he acts as a flashlight to those wanting insight.

psychic was warning her about trusting him.

As

I

on

to the next table.

impose I quickly moved It was here that I met

didn’t want to

Joyce Barnes, a psychic, medium, clairvoyant

and healer from Quebec.

down with her she

got

me

When

I

sat

to take a handful

it

was a sign of a

lot

By now my cheeks and

I

of love coming

felt like

my

way.

they were on

fire

couldn’t help but blush. She said this

I

up and. placed it on the napkin. At this point a weird sensation went right through my body and I could feel my cheeks getting hotter. She knew something about me picked

and

I

it

didn’t

know

what.

While watching her skim over the stones I felt my eagerness rise. She advised me to really work on my energy level in the next four months. Considering

was in my third year of months left I related “You’re gonna have to

I

college with only three that

back to school.

learn how to speak up for yourself,” said Bames, adding, “Learn to be true to yourself.” As far as the blue stone that I had dropped.

to

be well-anchored,” she

said as she put the stone in a small plastic

reading that

sweetheart,” said Barnes, as

"We need

baggy and handed

relationships.

bright blue stone onto the chair. “Ah, that is

my

ground.

new

them out onto a silky napkin. While laying them out I accidentally dropped an eccentric important

said this particular stone resembles

the importance of keeping both feet on the

year was going to be important for love and

According to Bames, a lot of changes will happen from September to Christmas. She kept repeating over and over throughout the

of multi-coloured stones from a bag and lay

Bames

it

to

me

with a smile.

After thanking her for her gracious gift ried over to

My

show my

I

hur-

the incense getting to I

needed

to

me

know more.

it

was

as though

was

like

an addic-

but It

tion.

walked around a

I

became

little

more and came

woman named

across a

intrigued as

I

pictures of her walking across

friends.

disappointment seemed to quickly fade

Geraldine.

I

flipped through fire,

a task she

“ugly

duck-

was an impor-

ling”

turned

perform for her teachers to prove her level of concentration and hypnosis. For 30 minutes she gave me insight on where my career would head in the future, who I was going to meet, my successes and my family, and I even got to meet my spiritual guide. Well, I didn’t physically meet her, but I now know her name is Carolyn and

message. Once she put the stones back into the bag she asked me to reach in and pick one out

into

some-

she’s a six-foot blond.

I

needed to keep myself grounded and find balance.

I

initial

got

a

as

A weird sensation went right through my body ... she knew something about me and

feeling that this

I

didn’t

know what.

tant

without looking.

My

for the perfect one.

sharp stone

I

fingers fished around

As they

grabbed

it

glided across a

and pulled

it

out.

Hoping for a nice shiny blue or purple stone was a bit disappointed when an army-green

I

coloured pebble landed on the table. Again,

thing beautiful

that

stared at

I

my

For weird

gift.

some reason

reminded

me

the

to

end of my visit my skepticism had Whether this stuff is real or not it

the

sure does

make

up.

my journey I’ll up for myself, communicate with others and thank Carolyn now and

strong.

Of course, being

a student studying journal-

I was tickled pink to learn that I at least was heading in the right direction. By now I was hooked. I don’t know if it was

ism.

to

declined.

stay

The more psychics I talked to the more word “communication” seemed to come

had

By

So,

the

as

I

remember

for a great conversation piece.

continue on

to stick

again for guiding thing

we

call life.

me

through

this mystical


1

Page 14

— SPOKE, February

2,

Entertainment

2004

Horoscope

Linkin Park concert

Week of Feb.

1-7

Libra September 23 October 22

kept Toronto rocking Trust your intuition

By KATE BATTLER Linkin Park came back to Canada as part of the Meteora world tour,

Canada Centre

Jan. 24, at the Air

in

Toronto. .

for them were Hoobastank and

The bands opening Story of the Year,

P.O.D. Story of the Year got things going

They played with so much energy that the crowd got into it right away. They helped set the early.

mood and pace

for the night.

up on stage and play

down

band. They pick a guy named Alex and he did an absolutely amazing

started off with a couple of

songs from the Meteora album and then they played some album. Hybrid

were

Theory. The crowd was totally pumped during their set with three

night.

They got

off to a

good

start

by playing some of their older songs but when they played some

stay

on stage

for

the rest of the show.

The End,

the

first

or four separate

mosh

who come

could play guitar on Faint to

During the song

One

Step Close.

the singers, and

all

members, from the came out and

other band

rigidly attached to order

think about your options. Tackle

tine

March

was a good show

comes

through modesty and compassion.

Scorpio October 23

-

21

November

-

21

Exaggeration abounds, emotions

mind. overpowers Desires mle. Beware of your dark

Matter

side.

The

pursuit of materialistic or

ability

it

too

and rou-

ignore the process and love

-

April 19

joined Linkin Park on the song. all,

become

the result. Personal growth

Aries

j

sensual pleasures

All in

-

with enthusiasm

difficulties

three opening bands

think

to

may

your

taint

Cleanse

clearly.

run high

-

especially jealousy.

Beware of self-indulgence and greed. Slow down. Don't let anyone rush you or push you

into

things.

yourself of bad habits.

with a great finish. Try out Linkin Park’s Live In Texas

pits going.

Linkin Park asked for a fan

than on facts. Take your time to

song of the night was

last

things happen by taking

care of details. Don't

crowd wouldn’t leave

without an encore so the band came back out. The first song they

Their

Make

your reason; act more on feelings

these are opportunities to learn.

their first single,

to

tunes off their

really into.

him

change in the crowd was electric. It just went to a whole new level.

and the guy had

played a rocking set that people P.O.D. was the third band of the

job.

let

live

played was My December, one of their rare songs that can only be found on a rare independent disc.

their

Year started

They

it

be taken out by emergency workers. When Linkin Park came on, the

called for security

keeping the intensity that Story of the

bit.

P.O.D. had to stop during the song because lead singer. Sonny, saw a guy being trampled in the pit. He

They

They

a

The crowd came back up with loads of energy when they played the song South Town. In fact, the crowd was in such a frenzy that

Hoobastank kept things going by off with.

with the

of their newer songs the crowd died

more than

-

get a feel for what

it

CD/DVD

was

Taurus

to

like at the

April 20

-

Sagittarius

May

November 22 December 21

20

concert.

Don't be too trusting. Put your faith in

Everyone expects the best from

number one! Pamper

you and

yourself. Seek intimacy and per-

sonal happiness in

you

all

vice-versa.

do.

close associates. Ignore intimida-

come slowly but will be worthwhile when they arrive. Resolutions

tion

and pressure. Never go

May

21

Capricorn

June

-

bed

to

angry.

Gemini

mJt

Beware of

arguments with your lover or

December 22

21

-

January 19

Don't get upset

You

if things aren't

going as you hoped. Be open to

and prepare for a

alternatives

slowly.

at the Air

of the

two lead singers

Canada Centre

for Linkin Park, put

a

lot of

behaviour.

Avoid

-

January 20 February 18

passion and aggression

Be

Ross and Rachel

will

back

get

together.

Brock has been watching show since it started and hopes

are saying goodbye.

writers will give the

decade they have kept us coming back for more with their wacky relationship problems, love triangles and hilarious lines. They have made us laugh and cry and their final episode, which airs ,in May, will surely do the same. Babies,

marriages,

new homes

^ind possible reunites, are ing us

keep-

on the edge of our seats

find out

So

all

far,

having a

how

the

show

to

will end.

Monica and Chandler are baby, moving out of their

New York

city

apartment to a house

in the suburbs,

Phoebe

is

getting

married and well, the big question remains, will Ross and Rachel get

back together. Debbie Brock, a second-year special studies student,

says she thinks

the the

whole Ross

and Rachel saga some closure. If it were up to her, they would have gotten back together when

Emma

was bom. However, Christa Campbell

dis-

agrees.

She thinks

whole Ross and Rachel story line has been overplayed and hopes the ending will have nothing to do with them. Campbell, a second-year business

the

management

wants

student,

Rachel and Joey to get together

in

the end.

And

also saying

as far as Ross

she thinks

it

is

concerned,

would be funny

if

he

This

when

hit series

goodbyes

heart. Don't let the past distract

you from

this

affair,

the present. This

renew vows or

an

is

new

love

issues cloud today's progress.

relocate.

which premiered

1993,

Pisces February 19

August 22

Be kind

to strangers, as well as

Your emotions are

Are you seeing things realisticalWait another day to take action. Get rid of some old habits.

to

Roz and his British maid Daphne, it is no wonder this show has been kept on the air for

time to keep your fears discreet.

Stop doing anything that doesn't

Follow made.

feel right for you.

assistant

1

years.

Other shows year

include

that are

ending

Boomtown,

yourself.

now

unfocused. Therefore,

on

through

is

a

promises

ly?

To be

a

winner

now, don't withdraw.

this

The

Wayne Brady Show, L.A. Dragnet

A

Minute With Stan Hooper. that are still up in the air include Everybody Loves Raymond, Crossing Jordan, Six Feet Under, NYPD Blue and

and

Shows

to look

forward to

season include Survivor All

The

American

I

Virgo August 23 September 22

Diana O’Neill

You made your

New shows Star,

in

-

neurotic brother Niles, his trampy

this

ing this season.

Leo July 23

March 20

of his laid-back father Martin, his

long-time running show that

end-

\^

moved

back to Seattle after his divorce from Lilith. With a hilarious cast consisting

Nip/Tuck.

is

spun off of Cheers,

Frasier Crane

Dr.

ended up with his lesbian ex-wife. However, Friends is not the only

Frasier,

its

Things are unclear for you right now. Don’t let yourself be intimidated and don't judge others too harshly. Others seem uptight, set in their ways. Are you? Don't let past

year.

After 10 years, Monica, Ross, Rachel, Joey, Phoebe and Chandler

last

is

on

is

firm in affairs of the

excellent time to start a

Friends premiered in 1994, and

self-pity.

Jan. 24.

Final farewell to Friends

over the

it.

Aquarius

July 22

Your personal magnetism

VANDEVEN

will offer a help-

Don't take "no" as a final answer.

the rise.

By KATE

one

reacting and beware of childish

(Photo by Kate Battler)

show

No

ing hand unless you beg for

Cancer

into his

growing

Acknowledgement comes

change of plans. Think before

June 22 Chester Bennington, one

are entering a

phase.

Idol.

Bachelorette

and

must

lie

in

actions and

it.

bed,

Own

now you

up to your

responsibilities

suffer the consequences.

Be

-

or

is

a third-

year journalism student

who dabbles with astrology and likes to read tarot

true to

yourself. Try something new.

cards just for kicks.


Sports

SPOKE, February

— Page 15

2004

2,

Condors devoured by soaring Hawks By NICK

HORTON

respectable

Outside the weather was grim.

Snow

fell relentlessly

were inside

and the roads

condition,

terrible

in

it

Conestoga College was worse, much worse.

The Humber Hawks brought savage

of the storm inside with them and reigned havoc over the Condors Jan. 21.

The Hawks dismembered 14-2

with

the

60-minute

a

recognizes this and says the team

needs more. "There are some hockey players

the

disregard

Condors

league in Brent MacDermid. Head coach David Cressman

in the

but

the

arena,

hockey pro-

varsity

gram, especially when they have one of the most dangerous players

We

school that don't play.

in this

need these players and the support of the school, right from our presi-

down

dent

the

to

athletic

staff,"

said Cressman.

onslaught of ferocious checking,

Although,

Cressman

realizes

excuse-me moves and committed

after losing 14-2

hockey.

on a soapbox and preach support. "Of course it is hard to gamer

Losing by such a margin can only result in poor attendance and unfortunately, a stifled

college's

confidence

ability

to

in the

produce

a

when we

support

hard to get up

it's

lose

like

this.

This was an embarrassment," he said.

By

the end of the

was Hawks; by was 10-2.

5-1

score

Hawks

first

period the

favour of the

in

end of the second

the

it

In the third period, the

didn't sit

back as one might

expect, instead they

lit

the

Condors

for another four goals.

Assistant

captain

described

his

Scott

Foster

of

mind

state

"My game like

thoughts were to end the with

little

holding

moral victories,

Humber from

scoring

find

it

difficult

a

still

trated," said Foster.

was

clear

this

to maintain a level of

to take in the action during

room atmosphere was

said.

night

the

Condors played with little heart or passion for the game, but it is hard

Condor coaches

locker

players could play so poorly," he

again. I was also thinking how a team with so many great hockey

(Photo by Nick Horton)

Conestoga Condor goaltender Jason Lafortune gets the paddle up on a Humber Hawk rush Jan. However, by the second intermission and the end of the game, the team felt like we had hit rock bottom. Everyone was frus-

It

confidence

and competitiveness when you're trailing by eight goals after two periods.

14-2 loss.

"During the

first

(Photo by Nick Horton)

«

throughout the game.

intermission the

positive.

Playing as a team

is

an attribute

team needs to achieve. Cressman acknowledged this and said there are players on the team more concerned with personal goals than team goals. "We have guys that want to win a point championship and that won't the

do it for us," said Cressman. Forward Vance Stark echoed a

However, I would not blame losing on players playing individually."

When

similar opinion. "I

think they are getting ahead of

themselves in games and want to do too much for the team," said Stark.

"It

become more own accom-

players

concerned with

their

plishments than the team's, red

leads to defensive break-

downs and more

21.

light

that

the

it

players

is

a

don't

have enough confidence in their teammates' skill to pass them the puck. "We're afraid to give our guys that don't have the skill a chance to improve and we're getting burned because of it," said Cressman.

opportunities for

the other team."

Foster also recognizes this as a problem, but said it can't be blamed

by 12 goals. "At times players are more focused on personal scoring titles.

for losing

Sundin deserves more R-E-S-P-E-C-T It’s

time to dish out some respect.

That’s right. R-E-S-P-E-C-T!

Mats Sundin has been a Toronto Maple Leaf since the 1994-95 season, yet every year there are people

crying to trade the captain. say he

is

made

team because of the lockthis year is no different. Sundin was named to the team Jan. 22 But going deeper into the numbers shows why he has been an allstar the past eight seasons. Sundin out.

They

not a leader or that he

is

the

And

is

Sundin has not missed an all-star game, unless you count his first year in blue and white when no one

as of Jan. 25.

ggSgg* RECREViON

o

°

leading the Leafs in points with

17 goals and 30 assists. This puts

him

tied for ninth in

And

low for Sundin, that

matters.

it is

scoring,

although 17

when he

Six of his

James Doyle

is

scores 17

are

But

are

Sundin’s game. is

Sports View

points

looked

team.

And some

not have what

which is tied for first in the NHL. To go along with his six game winners, Sundin has helpers on seven game-winning

game-winning

goals,

goals. In his career,

Sundin has scored

As

at as

only

varsity

Public Skating Tuesday 11am - 1pm Sunday 2pm - 3pm

games

Men’s Hockey Remaining Away Games

Feb 8 Vs St. Clair Feb 14 Vs Humber

winning streaks

captain, Sundin

say that he does takes to be

simply not

Shinny Hockey Mon, Wed, Thurs, Fri 11am - 1pm

in

NHL

a

finally

history.

broken by the

New

York

Islanders Dec. 27.

true,

So everyone out

there

who

thinks

Sundin should be traded, think again. He means more to this team that anyone else, so let’s give him the R-E-S-P-E-C-T he deserves. that

l

“Q"

4

Conestoga Extramural

Women’s Hockey Thursdays from 3:30

Practice

pm

-

4:30

pm

Come tryout and meet the Intramural Sports Co-ed Indoor Soccer; Tuesday 4:30 - 6:00pm Co-ed Volleyball: Wednesday 7:00 - 10:00pm 3 on 3 Ball Hockey: Mon. & Wed. 4:30 - 6:00pm Non-Contact Hockey: Mon, Tues &Wed. 4:30 - 6:30pm

that,

They earned a point in 16 straight games (14-0-1-1). The streak was

and the best example came Nov. 20 in Edmonton. The Leafs were struggling and Sundin, as captain, called a team meeting. Now, it is not known what leader. This is

was worked. After

it

the Leafs rolled off one of the best

of

the leader of the

it

said behind those doors, but

whatever part

DROP BY THE RECREATION CENTRE TODAY AND TAKE PART IN A HEALTHY LIFESTYLE

Varsity Sports Your upcoming

NHL

was

assists,

1

.

They say the Leafs need to bring in some fresh blood. Why? Since becoming a Maple Leaf, over-rated.

451 goals and added 610 3 6 coming as a Leaf.

new Coach of the

team.


Page 16

— SPOKE, February

‘Are

2,

2004

you going

to the Tease

-

Freeze

Feb

?

5th,

we can win a Daytona Trip

ililil!

mmmm, that’s a tasty beverage, starts at 9pm in the Sanctuary

m

Cheers everybody,

THIS

let’s

swing you crazy

cats, see

you

there!”

THURSDAY 9PM SANCTUARY

“DAYTONA ”

-

C

()

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INC

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Digital Edition - February 02, 2004