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The

battle of

Healthy products for healthy living

the bulge North Americans have little willpower

when

it

comes

Maria Georgas eases her chronic pain with alternative medicine.

FEATURE

to

food and fitness.

influences music Ryan Connell looks at the effects of gay

shows!

it

culture

NEWS Monday, December

35th Year

— No. 12

Cafeteria gets into the Xmas

work delayed

cheer

DAWN HASSON

By CARLA

Problems with precipitation have delayed the opening of the college’s

industry.

uonestoga College, Kitchener

Road

By

on the music

3

2003

8,

12

Gay community

And

’n’ spirit

KOWALYK

school to help spread

some holiday

cheer.

Thanks

main road.

“They’re hoping to have everything ready by Dec. 8,” said Cheryl Vogan, a support services officer in

to the

think

I

it’s

days with both their families

said.

On

The road between Door 2 and Door 6 has been blocked off for excavation work since Nov. 25. Xhe work was necessary because too much water was seeping into

cafeteria, stu-

Christmas

home, and

the physical resources department.

main

dents at Conestoga College will have a way to celebrate the holi-

Dec.

10,

Chartwells’ food

services will be Christmas luncheon cafeteria. 1

at

their friends at school.

holding

a

main Between 10:45 a.m. and in

it

a good idea because

students

right

spirit,” the

into

the

19-year-old

“It’s also a change from the everyday things that students buy to eat from the cafeteria.”

the

:30 p.m., students can enjoy a tra-

gets

Carla Black, 20, agrees that the

luncheon

is

a

good

idea, but for a

different reason.

the campus’s sewer system.

ditional Christmas lunch.

"Right now, the ground is too wet. There has been too much pre-

John Kast, food services director tor the cafeteria, said this luncheon should be enough to fill anyone’s grumbling stomach.

al

include roasted turkey dressing, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes and gravy and

student said. “So it’s a nice touch.” Only 300 lunches will be made and sold, which is 75 more than

some mixed vegetables,” Kast

last year, Kast hopes to break last year’s record. “We really want to aim for the

cipitation

to

finish

repairing the

sewer on time,” said Vogan. Grand River Transit bus routes' will continue to pick people up at a temporary bus stop behind the recreation

reopens.

centre

As

well,

all

road

the

until

the

services

student/client

"There

to the

will also

be

some assorted pies.” The luncheon will

building,

the early childhood education cen-

and the employee services

tre

will

said.

forest

from the main building

trails

“It

with

a choice

of

“Not everyone some of

especially

students,

get

celebrate

to

Christmas with their families,” the second-year management studies

300 mark,” he cost students

Conestoga,

at

the internation-

said.

a good don’t see

“It’s

deal for the price, so

I

$5.65 plus tax, which brings the

why

our goal can’t be reached.”

total to $6.50.

So have

just

building remain closed.

Stephanie Riach, a second-year marketing student, said she thinks

Bus passes are coming

the

idea

luncheon

of having a Christmas a great

is

way

for the

how many

turkeys will

be cooked? "All 300 lunches equal 14 big 25pound turkeys,” he said. “And. trust me, I know - that's a lot of turkey!” to

(Photo by Jennifer Howden)

By JENNIFER

HOWDEN

Try, try again

Soon students won’t have worry about scrounging up $2

A

to

for

the bus or buying bus tickets every

week.

On

and 9, from 10 a.m. to Grand River Transit (GRT) be at Conestoga College's

son up after he fell skating outside Kitchener on Nov. 29. The 550-square-foot rink is open Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. On Saturdays, Sundays and holidays the rink is open from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. father helps his

City Hall

Jan. 6

2 p.m.. will

Door

3

to

four-month bus

sell

passes.

“We know more

students take the bus

most people,”

than

often

said Arlene Matthews, a

“We want

resentative.

GRT to

Conestoga partners with Windsor university

rep-

By JAMES CLARK

make

delivered over three semesters.

A

taking the bus as convenient as

The

possible."

numbers

have

been good

deal for graduates of Conestoga’s

each student receives the same education that a regular Windsor

business administration-account-

student would get.

Each pass is valid from January and costs SI 69. For students w ho take the bus twice a day. five days a week, that saves them

crunched and

approximately SI 50. their pass

The University of Windsor and Conestoga College have part-

bus driver when they board a

nered to offer a bachelor of busi-

to April

All students to the

must show

bus.

The passes can be used as many times as the student wants over the four months.

For students

who

can't wait until

January, passes are also available

20

starting Dec.

Charles

at

Kitchener

Centre located

Transportation

^ Btmbridge

at the

St.

and

at

at

the

Bus Terminal located

35 Ainslie

St.

cap of 40 students has been

put on each class to ensure that

it

looks like a

ing program.

ness program beginning in the fall of 2004.^ Windsor's Odette School of Business Dean Roger Hussey and Associate Dean Diana Kao made the formal announcement Nov. 27 at Conestoga College. The program will be taught at Conestoga by faculty employed by the university. It w ill consist of 13 three-hour credit courses

To be student

eligible for the

must have an

program

a

overall aver-

age of 70 per cent. Melissa Ford, a third-year business

administration-accounting may not apply

student, said she for the lot

program but

said there

is

a

of interest among her class-

mates.

“This has got a

(Photo lot

of people

The

really excited.” said Ford.

The Odette School of Business is one of the largest business schools in Canada, with more than 2.000 full-time and part-time students.

No. this

roof, the roof, the roof is

isn't

the woodworking building.

on

The Guelph

by Jeff Mortey)

fire!

Fire

Department was practising a fire drill just outside Guelph Nov. 26. firefighters were looking into how buildings around the burning barn could be kept under control.

The


News

Student satisfaction lowest By CARLA

"Everyone I know from other programs have com-

SANDHAM

lege,”

Conestoga College is rated number 1 among 24 other colleges in Ontario,

but

some

are

students

unhappy here. According to

results from the student satisfaction Key Performance

Indicator (KPI) survey,

some

stu-

dents are “very dissatisfied" with their

programs

in

overall average of the student

The

83.5 per cent,

is

said.

plaints about

some of their

teachers

and a lack of shared equipment.” Dan, who asked that his last name not be published, said he is not satisfied with his program. “Various departments, such as early childhood education,

have a very integrated

2002.

satisfaction survey

he

seem

do various

to

seem to They

staff.

activities

to

involve the class with one another,

development practitioner and journalism - print and broadcast. are concerned,” said Tibbits, adding they need to get to the root

“We

of the problem.

which he name, has issues with course sequence, equipment and quality of faculty. "There is only so much we can do

He

said one program,

didn't

to

want

to

help what goes on

room. then

money

If

we

program. To address

gest there are

some

Conestoga

President

issues," said

John

Tibbits.

Ritchie Morgan, a telecommunications student, said he doesn't feel

Conestoga should be number 1. “I do know this is not the worst college to attend, but

ber

1

I'd hate to

be

at

if

we’re num-

any other col-

wonderful landscape, and offering a lot of hours to study,” said Dan. Tibbits said there are about five

programs that are substantially below the satisfaction standard, which he sets at 90 per cent. Some of the programs are microcomputer administration, career

New system By KRISTEN

MCMURPHY

Get ready for change. Conestoga College has set aside $1 million for a new Student Information System. College Registrar Fred Harris says the Student Information

System, or SIS, is essential for maintaining records for admissions, registration, fees, databases

of courses and programs, and also serves a variety of other purposes. “This is a major strategic investment for the college,” Harris says. Conestoga has had an information system for almost 30 years that functional, he says, but

is

is

flawed

some ways. Finding a new system became a priority for the college when Hewlett Packard, the maker of the

in

current

system,

declared

they

would no longer be supporting

the

it

cated,” he said, referring to another

the

issue

Kevin

Mullan. vice-president of finance and student services, said they sent out letters to each program. “We sent out congratulation

Recreation and leisure services

ters

to

the

Top 10 programs

that

and letters attained 90 demanding programs below 80 per cent satisfaction come up with an per cent

action plan to address the prob-

lems,” Mullan said.

He added

the plan could involve

meeting with students

to

discuss

support Ontario college processes,”

he says.

March 2004, due

to the termination

of a partnership with another financial group. “These two things coming together basically forced the college to make a decision now, as opposed to later, in terms of how

we were going problem,”

Hams

Conestoga options for a

to deal

with this

many explored new system, which is

endeavour estimated by most companies at around $5 million, before choosing a company Academic Decision called Graphics, or DAG, to do the job for

a costly

based product, with a portal for students that will allow numerous functions.

have

nity to provide

he

ty,”

feedback

way to go. “DAG’s prodwas, in many respects, made to

to facul-

Tibbits said he also believes

in

continuous improvement and the KPI survey results help determine

By JASON

NOE

reached its goal of $40,000 in donations for the campaign. United Way tries to improve the quality of life in communities by funding various agenthe contributions are

supervised

to

ensure the agen-

money

for the pur-

poses intended. Last year, the committee raised and this year they

$39,000

slightly increased their target.

The United Way all

sets its

own

the people

services officer and United

chairperson for the col-

organized much of the campaign. She is overwhelmed by all the support faculty and students have given the United Way. “I’m extremely happy about achieving our goal,” she says. “We organized it over a longer period of time and really, the thanks goes to the canvassers. Without their help and gentle reminders to people to return their pledge cards we wouldn’t have been as successlege,

ful.”

The most money for the campaign was generated through

New bus

stop

detour around the college because of construction. The bus circled around the rec centre instead of using the main road. For photos of the construction, see Page 10.

make a

in

employment (93.6 per

which Tibbits said is the most important. “If people leave here and can’t

cent),

is

use-

less.”

Mullan said the college receives

money

for achieving

number

added no funding

is

sta-

1

associ-

ated with the student satisfaction

Way

students and faculty could donate any amount to the United Way. Through the week,

where

They crossed the finish line. The United Way committee at finally College Conestoga

Way

to

are

reaches its goal of $40,000

ni

bus had

KPI surveys

Conestoga scored the highest

United

campaigns to boost their goals by the same amount. The crusade began on Oct. 27 and Monica Himmelman, alum-

city transit

the

satisfaction.

survey.

running

This

Each year

working on improving campus

life

like

said

do,”

completed for graduate employsatisfaction, graduate ment, employer satisfaction and student

tus, but

goals and asks

(Photo by Ryan Connell)

marketing

not

Tibbits.

what needs improving. Already the college has been

uct

DAG

be

money in classwe need

where

get a job then their time here

years to fully complete.

Harris says

to

they

said.

the right

seemed

us

told

appreciate the continuous opportu-

cies use the

North Bay.

in the

constantly

is

dents said.

change their personal information such as address, view marks, drop or add courses, request transcripts, and pay fees. The project will take around two

in

the

and

graduate

cies. All

their records,

It

ment with the field," he said. Burns added they react to the input and make changes based on what stu-

Online, students will be able to do many things, including access

$1 million. DAG has recently implemented a successful SIS for Boreal College

full-time teachers.

“We spend

some other colleges

"When compared to American companies we looked at, DAG’s daily costs were half of what we would have to pay for a company coming out of the U.S.” and colleges throughout North America, making them a reputable company. The new system will be a web-

new

of 81

resources,

college.

has various thriving proj-

Some of these things include upgrading software and open labs, renovations, programs, new improved orientation and the hiring

from students. “Our focus is very much

The company runs out of Ottawa,

DAG

1

attributed this to constant feedback

which makes business sense for the

ects with universities

says.

it

rooms

to cost $1 million

college said Conestoga would need to find a new financial system by

status

scored 100 per cent satisfaction and program co-ordinator Greg Bums

“Students let-

the current financial system for the

product.

Another push for the SIS upgrade came when the company running

progress.

evolving as a result of student input and through continuous involve-

he explained. But, he added, Conestoga does feel like a number 1 college to him.

“Conestoga has done an amazing job keeping computer labs up to date, the school clean, designing a

now.

becomes more compli-

as low as 43 per cent satisfaction

"Student satisfaction has always been ranked the lowest out of the four surveys and the numbers sug-

it

meeting with a focus group or advisory committee. And they are also required to meet with their dean each month to report problems and

deals with

However, this is theme for information technology,

rates.

when

in order to

curriculum area.

tionship

not exactly the

problem,

maintain the number has held for five years

changes, visiting other colleges and seeing how they do things and/or

a student-teacher rela-

as well as with the staff.”

is

in the class-

the

will try to help, but

almost 10 per cent higher average. provincial the than However, some programs reported

which

is

KPI results

in

pledge card donations, but the committee also received funds through a prize booth and a lasagna lunch. On the first day of the campaign, Himmelman set up a booth near Door 4

managed to raise more than $260 and the lasagna lunch held the same week earned $1,200.

it

“Both the union locals make a significant contribution, but the

of

majority

money was

the

raised by people returning their

pledge cards,” says Himmelman. On Nov. 28 the United Way of

Kitchener-Waterloo and surrounding communities also surpassed its goal of $5.3 million. The announcement was made at the Waterloo Inn during an appreciation breakfast.

very

“It’s

exciting,”

says

who

has been involved with the organization

Himmelman, for 12 years.

of the donations raised year will be distributed before Christmas to the agencies that need the funding. This year’s campaign had All

this

more

prizes

to

give

to

those

who donated then previous years and Himmelman contributes

people “I

the college.

think

worked in

to the generosity of

it

at

the

another thing

for us

was

that

we

that

ran

same period of time

it

as

we did last year,” says Himmelman. “The college community

gets used to

Way time.” Himmelman will

it

being

United

chairperson

for

the

not be the

campaign

next year, but is already preparing things for the individual who will take her position. “I just want to thank every-

body who worked hard this

a

to

make

successful campaign,j|

she says.

*


News

SPOKE, December

— Page 3

2003

8,

•Alumni banquet’s speaker helps students soar, literally By JAMES CLARK

The

the police foundations and law and security administration program, will be held on March 27 at the marshall hall at Bingemans. It is being held not only to unite old classmates but also to cele-

police

foundations and LASA banquet organizers icceived an early Christmas present when the banquet’s keynote speaker met with them on Nov 26.

Canada

On

the airline

top of

West Jet

flies.

Falls view in

Hotel and Conference

Niagara

Chris Ecklund,

said there will be anoth-

A

the response has been good.

Organizers

making er

offices

He

Kreme donuts

Any

Canada

company

in

the entire world.

for clients

will

Krispy be for sale at the

additional

money

raised

charity that provides homeless youth with health care, education and job training.

Eckl und’s staff processes court

documents

holding

from the auctions and the banquet will be donated to R.O.O.F, a local

the largest process serv-

it

still

school on Dec. 9 and students can bid on a private lunch held at the school for themselves and a date.

out.

throughout

are

fundraisers for the event.

The business, now known as Canada Process Serving Inc., has 71

their

total of 2,500 letters were sent out to alumni, and organizers say

got the job and, attending Conestoga,

still

remember

at the

You have a duty, and I emphasize that, a duty to give back to the college.”

it

In his first year of college Bob Hay, his program co-ordinator, told him about a job at a process serv-

the banquet.

both past and present students of

is important for all maintain ties to as students and teachers as it

to

college will be responsible for future success.

be.

while

to

said

many

Ecklund graduated from Conestoga College 20 years ago.

Ecklund donated the prizes after he heard organizers had been unable to find any door prizes for

open

say thank you,” he

attendance

bought the company

is

He

students

give any hints as to what

me,

like

said.

tickets are being sold.

ing company.

former Conestoga student

The banquet, which

life

come back and

they can, and to

might

you.”

somebody

basically everything in to this college, the ability to

Tickets are $60 for a single and $100 per couple. A total of 1,000

n't

everything to this college, the ability to come back

and say thank

at

er surprise at the banquet, but did-

somebody like me, who owes basically

allows

“It

fles for prizes.

Ecklund

support

who owes

dinner and a dance will be part of the evening along with raf-

Falls.

allows

“It

program

litigation

Ecklund said he is happy to at the banquet because he owes so much to the college and to his former program.

A

he also donated

that

weekend accommodations for two at the four-diamond Sheraton Centre

law and security Conestoga.

ol

speak

brate the 30th anniversary of the

Chris

Ecklund, the owner of Canada Process Service Inc., donated a trip for two anywhere in

lull-range services.

and offers a

(Photo by James Clark) , Christena Ager was one of more than 60 third-year business administration-marketing students in the international trade show. .

.

Marketing students

show

their talents

By JA MES CLAR K

An

draw

lobster and a

Red show had Conestoga College buzzing with activity on

physical resources

Nov. 26.

closed

international trade

Room

Blue

the

More

at

than 60 third-year business

administration-marketing set

students

up 17 booths displaying a prod-

uct they created to market to a for-

for a dinner at

Lobster.

Barry Milner, the manager of at

Conestoga

College, said the Blue

Room was

down

as early as possible

He

for the event.

pose of the room teria first

main pur-

said the is to

act as a cafe-

and a venue for events

second.

eign country.

Some

of the displays featured

products such as rubber bumpers

automobiles

for

in

shorts for players in

and (Photo by

Disability services testing clerk

Judy Hart works

diligently at

her desk

in

the office

in

Dawn Hasson)

Room 2A109.

dirt

Italy,

New

rugby-

international marketing

teacher

and the amount of

visitors

dents, faculty that acted as

Despite the conflict

show included

stu-

and the professionals

mentors

to the students

while they worked on their projects.

As from Conestoga

Testing clerk Judy disability

services

Hart

at

College will be retiring Dec. 19. “It was a tough decision to

make,”

comes

Hart.

said

“But

a time in your life

exams

Vankampen. worker for

as disability servic-

es counsellor Rick Cases

MJoth were

hired

^®fived funding

when

the school

for the service in

said

Joanne

clerical

support

person." a

disability

services.

“She’s an integral part of the office." In retirement. lot

Hart plans to do a

I

are

good buddies.”

She

Industries in Toronto for a year.

Since working

She will visit Florida, her famiand friends, and just stay at home and relax. “I'm going to be like Forrest Gump. I'll find out where the bus is going and eat chocolates." Hart ly

joked.

Hart worked

Hart has developed a good

relationship with the students.

"Mv know

favourite part the

is

Vankampen

getting to

Savage Shoe

in

still

agreed. stu-

keting teacher, said this

is

the fifth

planning to write memories of Hart onto cards prior to her retirement. But she doesn't want to be

much.

to fade into retire-

ment." said Hart. “I will stay in touch with everybody."

dents

still

came

to the

many

stu-

event and

entered draws at different booths for prizes that included gift bas-

and cups filled candy Runts. The trade show capped off an

kets. polar fleeces

with the

fruit

year the event has tun.

exciting time

“Every year it gets better and better.” he said. “The students put an

dents.

for

marketing

stu-

into

Earlier in the month 12 students competed against 14 other colleges

The students were happy to finally show off what they worked so hard

at the annual Ontario Colleges Marketing Competition held at Sir Sanford Fleming College in

on but

Peterborough.

amount of

effort

this.”

felt

the event should have in

the

more students could have

day so

attended.

"It's a little frustrating.” said

Staff from disability services are

want

Brooker. international mar-

taken place earlier

dents,” she said.

in the spotlight too

Ed

incredible

and helping

students

them succeed." Hart said. “1 go out with them regularly.”

“I just

at

in disability serv-

“She really cares about the

of travelling.

Prior to working at the college.

“Rick and

which no longer exists. also worked at Dobbie

Preston,

ices.

"She's a very caring and compassionate

purchasing moving on to the registrar's office. She joined disability services at

same time

for students with disabili-

ties.

Hart has been with the college

the

Hart books tests and

there

She started in the department before

started this together.”

the testing clerk in disability

services'.

when

you have to move on to a decision, and this was mine." for 35 years.

“We

Ed Brooker,

ing professionalism, effectiveness

tation

35 years of service said Hart.

of

The displays were evaluated on a number of different aspects includ-

Visitors to the

DAWN HASSON

amount

effort into this.”

bikes for Mexico.

the booth attracted.

By

incredible

Zealand

of the display booth, sales presen-

Disability services clerk retires after

‘The students put an

Stuthers. a

member of

Jenn

the Great

Canadian Lobster Specialists marketing team.

“We

have been working on these

The Conestoga team finished second overall, just two points behind St. Lawrence College. It is the seventh year in a row Conestoga has won a medal for their team performance. The contest challenges

the stu-

projects since the beginning of the

dents with practical problems in

year.”

areas such as marketing research,

Slruthers' display included busi-

ness cards for her business, a live

direct

marketing,

retailing

international marketing.

and


Page 4

— SPOKE, December

8,

Commentary

2003

Spoke has the right to print the truth For the Nov. 24 issue of Spoke, Conestoga in Students Inc. (CSI) chose to pull its advertising ediSpoke 17 Nov. in a made comments to response torial. ... „ .

,

,

was felt that the editorial unfairly criticized the CSI for poorly attended events and problems with past CSI elections. It

,

.

All advertisers have the right to pull their advertisements whenever they deem necessary. An adverin the allottiser may also print anything they like as the long as paper, ted advertising space in the offenconsidered or libellous not advertisement is

Spirit

The new Christmas

sive.

However, advertising revenue does not give any company, group or organization the right to dictate the content of any media source. Spoke is an independent news-gathering source and has the right to print any article, as long as it is true and is fair comment. The Charter of Rights and Freedoms says, “Everyone has the following fundamental freedoms, freedom of thought, belief, opinion and expression, including freedom of the press and othei media of communication." The Charter of Rights and Freedoms is not only relevant to Spoke, it also relevant to Spoke s readership. Our readers have every right to hear the truth without advertiser’s bias. Readers should feel confident that the news they read is factual and as objective as possible.

In a world where almost everything can be compromised by money, including the truth, even small papers, such as Spoke, must print the facts without bias.

CNN

The Daily News reported

Sept. 7, 2001, that had started covering the opening and the closing of stock exchange, a major advertiser the for the network, although there was no real news value. coverage of the NASWhen the story broke, stopped and the network agreed that the adver

NASDAQ

CNN

DAQ

tiser’s interests, instead

of the viewers’, were taken

to heart.

whole

truth.

October?

in

times have changed.

begins immediately after

It

Now the

Halloween.

love as

all

Jason

pumpkins

the

are

the trick-or-treaters are

busy

ing their night’s take, but tainly feels like

December and

it

Opinion

eat-

streets,

and

store,

along

Christmas was on. I immediately began thinking of things to ask from Santa Claus and would gleefully jump on his lap to

city

and the com-

mercials arrive on television,

tell

reminding everybody of the jolly

I

This heavily commercialized time of year has different mean-

what

it

I

once meant

to

me

as

hap-

time.

snow and

made me

all

about the commercialization, try to make time to catch a Christmas special or

two and not salute other honk at me for

year after year.

I’m German, so my family would open presents on Christmas

pace. But most of

I

we

still

my

will never forget the

sparkling

new

enjoyed

I

presents and ate

a fancy dinner with ily,

keep

as

my

entire

not driving at their Christmas

my

I’m going

to appreciate the holi-

day, like

did

I

when

I

was

like to

Santa’s lap.

be that

And

I

to

was

younger, and remember what

fam-

gifts.

all,

remember

little

it

boy on

have had a

of time to practise, because

looking forward to the next

day and playing with

every-

at their cottages.

the holiday. I’m planning to forget

special

magic of those nights

to

Christmas shop-

drivers after they

today.

the colourful decorations

my

summer when

in the

But this year I’m going to try and take a different approach to

happiest.

anticipate the season

Eve, a tradition

hanging from the rafters of the mall I went to every Thursday

did not do

I

to

makes me wonder why

It

body was

made me

irritat-

walking right when you want

ping

Christmas television programs

when Christmas used to mean so much more. When I was a little guy I used to jump for joy the minute I saw

my mom. The countdown

hardly have time

ing place filled with shoppers who always have the tendency to stop

pass by.

show I liked best at the It was not just about the

falling

smiled to myself and recalled a

with

of what

Colourful lights, happy music, I

I

Christmas specials,

and a million other things. The malls are a crowded,

vision

phere that

I

Cambridge two weeks pened to walk by the Santa Claus display and witnessed a little boy talking to the white-bearded man. ago.

all

detail

little

presents, but the holiday atmos-

was reminded of

strolled through a mall in

I

him every

wanted, usually consisting of

action figures from whatever tele-

holiday.

ings to people.

is

snow rarely starts last week of

because I’m too busy with school

it.

in malls,

to see the

cer-

The decorations then rapidly appear in every

to fall until the

blown out and

seem

the happy music

overplayed, the

Noe

cially kick-off just as the lights in

-

colourful lights

less bright,

know and not offimay Christmas

The season we

time

While advertisers can wield enormous power because of their advertising revenue, the news must not be compromised. The same is true here on campus. Spoke cannot relinquish control to its advertisers. If we did, Conestoga students would never get the

Christmas

I

lot

start-

ed right after Halloween.

But

Spoke Letters are

welcome

is published and produced weekly by the journalism students

Sandham Spoke Online

of Conestoga College

Editor: Carla

Spoke welcomes

letters to

the

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be

editor. Letters

contacted

No unsigned

Jeff Morley, Nick

for verification.

letters will

reserves the right to edit

N2G 4M4

Horton

Faculty Adviser: Christina Jonas

500 words. any letter

Address correspondence to: Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

Editor,

James Doyle Lesley Leachman

Photo Editors: Brandi Stevenson, Rebecca Learn

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

for publication.

The

Editor:

Circulation Managers:

be published.

Letters should be no longer than

Spoke

Advertising Manager: Jason Noe Production Managers: Kate VandeVen,

Web site:

Dr.,

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors

acceptance or rejection and should be must not contain any libellous statements.

to the editor are subject to

Letters

not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College. advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters

in

clearly written or typed:

a

MS Word

file

would be helpful^

J


News Running gates By

DARREN SMITH

Some people are willing to do almost anything to save $4, including taking desperate measures to avoid paying the parking fee in Lot 11

employee of Conestoga College was coming out of Lot 13 and noticed a car driving into Lot I.

As

the car entered another

cat-

waited

to use the entranceway as an while the gate was still up. Upon being noticed by the col-

exit

lege employee, the driver returned to the parking lot and waited. He

was

later successful

in

following

another vehicle leaving the lot. Security services has noticed this type ol activity and are taking steps to

by an employee stopped after comcom ing out ol Lot 13 to give way to traffic. While stopped it was rearended by a car trying to run the gate.

No one was

injured in this

incident.

The

.

An

I

costly

is

remedy

the situation.

They

also

consider this theft and those caught may be dealt with under the student

code of conduct.

driver admitted that she was trying to get out of the lot without

paying, and that she had seen lots of other people do

For

it.

this particular driver the

ble didn’t

pay off because

her around $570 to

it

gamcost

car she

fix the

hit.

to save $4 by being a smart ass, said the employee.

said this* type of

behaviour is not fair for those who pay and is potentially dangerous. Individuals caught are subject to disciplinary action under the student

code of conduct, which

in

turn

could affect a student’s academic

In another incident, a car driven

in

the

career.

I

HEUCHERT

Director for the LRC Catherine Wilkins says the purpose of these sessions is to ask students how they use the LRC, what they like, what like

to

see

improved or

for the future.

They

groups that include full-time frequent and infrequent LRC users, as well

as> part-time frequent and infrequent users, to get both perspectives. will last

45

REDUCE

have

"I

to

60

minutes.

Wilkins says her role is to create a vision for the LRC, but her vision

some

ideas

and

down

RE-USE

those paths, but now it’s time to get input from students.”

Students

who would

RECYCLE

like to par-

ticipate

can sign up this week. Posters and a sign-up sheet will be up in the LRC, and posters will be in the hall on the LRC bulletin board, and near Tim Hortons.

LRC

students have volunteered,

and spread out students across the groups by program to get a good representation staff will try

of the college.

Students who participate will receive a coupon for a free bever-

age and food item at Tim Hortons. Wilkins encourages students to join, saying

it’s

a

PITCH-IN

CANADA

www.pitch-in.ca

good opportunity

to get involved.

?

LRC a little or a lot - whether you’re a continuing education

student or a full time student,

we want to hear from

you.

looking for students to give us about an hour of their time the Januaiy 12 or Januaiy 19, 2004. re

In organized focus groups, led by a faculty

member, you can

tell

week of

us what you think

and help us make important decisions about your library. As a thank you for your participation each focus group member will receive a Tim Hortons certificate for a beverage and a muffin.

To

sign up send the following information -

• • • • •

Your Name Whether you are a fulltime or evening (CE) student What program you are in if you’re fulltime Your Email address or phone number and Whether you use the library More than once a week or Less than once

week on average To:

— Page 5

I

directions, and we’re going

Once

are hoping to have focus

Each session

2003

has to be based on what the students want.

The Learning Resource Centre is looking for 60 students to participate in a series ol focus groups this January.

they d

I

8,

How would you like to have a say FUTURE DIRECTION of your LEARNING RESOURCE CENTRE

Whether you use the

We

By JEFF

nPPfte ,IV^V^VjlO hpln C |J

changed, and what ideas they have

"They were trying

The employee

IRC ^

SPOKE, December

cpotvin@conestogac.on.ca

Please indicate on the Subject Line: “Focus Groups”

a


— SPOKE, December

Page 6

News

2003

8,

Small business, big opportunity HORTON

By NICK

and wants

plish

“It’s great

Work

hard enough

at

and the

it

success will come.

This

the attitude that

is

two post-

secondary students have adopted to make sure their future is on solid ground.

Since a

May, Brad Robertson,

late

student

computer science

at

ow ner of B-Com offers

expand

provide pretty much anything to do with computers, including software training, hardware upgrades, network support and web

'We

cover a wide lange, on-site support,” said

computer programming student at Conestoga College and is the web/network specialist for B-Com Faulkner believes in is

trying to

am

I

doing

Amazon.com, retailer

can definitely

see myself competing against

some

companies,”

said

of these big Robertson.

strength is in software that allows employees to work together online

work with

many

in the

expanding.

is

major Internet

a

and IT employer, recently

reported a profit of 33 per cent in first the third quarter. This is the time the colossal Internet retailer

has seen revenue in a non-holiday quarter since it went public in 1997. No matter how miniscule, this

comes

as great

me tact me through e-mail and give what I need by way of file transfers

traps.

site,”

“It’s inspirational, I

s

out ol

Robertson and Faulkner are get-

where opportunity

my FTP

Open

B-Com, working

homes.

ting involved early in an industiy

venience the Internet provides. with “It’s a lot better than dealing phone tag. He (Faulkner) can con-

to

in a friendly takeover.

Text

their

past.

looking for jobs

accom-

this

students^ and has hired

based company. Martin Freeman, owner of The Taxperts Limited, enjoys the con-

Robertson's other half is Nick Faulkner. Faulkner is a third-year

what Robertson

is

II.

Robertson.

Solutions.

two

and Sweden. Currently he is workfor ing on a web-based program The Taxperts Limited, a Chicago,

We

including

for

why

size.

B-Com,” he said. Freeman has no problem with contracting this kind of work to

Using the Internet, Faulkner has picked up accounts across the globe including the United States

capabilities.

design.

is

said

future,”

area.

going to work out. This is about the sixth year I've had a webbusiness, site and it does bring in but I want it to bring in more. This

is

the

its

“It’s

Robertson.

programming

web-based

with

resides in

Chicago

in the

selves, like

The company recently made a bid of $230 million (US) for Ixos Software AG of Germany

only income tax-oriented w'ebsite

an Internet connection. you to “It (the Internet) allows build a database of customers and

and hardware solutions

software

B-Com

computers. All that

is

tomers by developing for him the

a skyscraper in Silicon Valley In fact, the be successful.

threshold of

ful business.

that

can

own

needed

a business

I

advanced technology and the to Internet, B-Com doesn l have

he believes will become a success-

Solutions,

Now

size,

personal

the

experience.

and exchange documents over the Internet. So students looking for a job. come spring, may find them-

and students alike, comes with news of Canadian software giant Open Text Corp looking to double

helping Freeman get a competitive edge over his cus-

B-Com

it.

only benefits me,” said Faulkner. B-Com Solutions may be small in but in today’s world of

to

is

be a part of

go to employers and show' them I programmed this and it works. It

Ryerson University, has been posiwhat tioning the stepping stones for

Robertson

to

he said.

news

for people

in the industry

and

Internet retailers, who some market analysts had written off as money

But maybe the largest boost of confidence for Robertson, Faulkner

(Photo by Nick Horton)

Nick Faulkner, the web/network

specialist for

B-Com

Solutions,

account. puts the finishing touches on a client’s

Trip to T.O. fun for

all

Cold weather didn’t put damper on occasion shopping on their minds; they were interested in going to a

Bv RYAN CONNELL

more

Hooters bar, which

Breasts and Christmas shopping were on the minds of some of the students

who went on

the residence

shopping and tour trip on Nov. 29. Approximately 50 students from the Conestoga Residence and

next to the

bus intoxicated.

Brock said they decided to enforce waivers on the Toronto trip because the city can be a dan-

Resident adviser Debbie Brock, 1

,

a third-year special studies stu-

dent, organized

(Photo by Jason Noe)

in Kitchener’s City Hall on Nov. 21 from Waterloo's city council, members and Many groups, including CKCO-TV, 570 CHYM, Rogers of Trees. Festival the off kicked event The were competing to decorate the best tree.

Niagara Falls casino and tour

Kitchener Mayor Carl Zehr helps decorate a Christmas tree

even though

Brock a professor in

College coat of arms. “The winners come on the com-

2003 winner and

Students aren’t the only ones at Conestoga College who can cash in

mittee and serve for two years, so

on awards.

history,”

engineering technology programs, described why she felt she won. “I’ve been really involved since

The Aubrey Hagar award is available to a teacher who shows distinguished teaching

ability,

with an

$800 reward. “Aubrey was one of the founding administrators of this college.

He worked

here for quite a

num-

ber of years after it was founded,” said Edith Torbay, chair of the Aubrey Hagar award selection

committee. “When he a

gift,

retired,

he didn’t want

so the college

community

took up a collection, and turned into an award,” Torbay said.

The money

for the

it

award comes

from the interest earned off the original

receive

collection.

$800

for

Winners professional

development, a specially designed liripipe and a framed Conestoga

that there's

some consistency and

Torbay said. Students and faculty must nominate a teacher for the award.

the

I’ve

electronics,

computers and

been here over the

years,” said Nelson,

who

last

20

has an

Nominations require four people; at least one current full-time faculty member, and two current or Support staff former students. and administrators are also eligiteachers. nominate ble to Nomination packages will be accepted between Jan. 19 and

engineering degree from Queens and a master’s degree from

March

do, and

12.

“We have

an awful

good teachers it’s

lot

of really

in this college,

and

a difficult proposition to judge

between them.” Winners are expected to have contributed to new curriculum development, have innovative teaching methods and show con-

2003

winner Nancy

McMaster. being in the classroom and I with our students. make them work hard. I challenge “I like

in the labs

it’s not somebeyond what they can like to work with them to

them,” she said. "But

Nelson,

trip

said.

it

was

very

“Although

we were

It

left

the

the residence centre

SkyDome

just after

10:30

got destroyed because people idiots.

money to go on Conestoga Students

the Inc.

trip.

(C Si)

spent approximately $400 to rent the bus for the day.

a.m.

go to the Eaton’s Centre for a day of shopping or visit many of the nearby stores, restaurants, and other notable places such as the CN the and SkyDome, Tower, Students had the chance

event).

Residents didn’t have to pay any

at 9:30 a.m. with students arriving at

the

to

were hammered and being

really fast.”

The bus

residents

Queensmount Oktoberfest

there for about 10 hours, the time

went by

transport

to

cold,”

to

MuchMusic headquarters. Some students had more

and

new year including trips to a Chuck E. Cheese restaurant, snowthe

boarding

at

paintball,

than

management

Residence

advisers will be planning on adding many more outings and events in

Chicopee

a

ski

semi-formal,

hills,

and

another pig roast.

thing that’s

make

1

sure they achieve that and

walk away satisfied.” Nelson used her award money to purchase a digital camera to aid her “I put together a lot of

my own

my

students

resources.

Last year, a

1

don’t like

saved

Max s

so

I

put together

my ’”<s

Heim an4

life*

tritfi

having to go out and buy a $150

own.”

new

pacemaker implant He itm spend turn time

lectures.

textbook,

cern for students.

was implemented to also prevent damage to the school bus. “If you showed up intoxicated to come home, we would not let you on the bus,” Brock said. “Look at the Oktoberfest bus (that was used

on Sept. 23. She said everyone enjoyed the trip immensely. “Everybody seemed to have fun,

Nominate a teacher MURPHY

various residence out-

ings in the past like the Canada’s Wonderland trip on Oct. 3 and the

Getting into the Christmas spirit

By TIM

gerous place for people and they did not want to be held responsible for any injuries. The waiver

and attended the trip. Brock has

Toronto shopping organized

its-

the school bus or returning to the

CN Tower in

Toronto.

2

for

ed it was students’ liability if they missed the bus, were hurt or injured. The waiver also prohibited students from drinking alcohol on

Conference Centre loaded into a school bus and made the one-hour bus trip to Gate 5 and 6 of the

SkyDome,

known

is

well-endowed waitresses. Students had to sign a waiver in order to board the bus, which stat-

Stroke

his

grondpikt*


:

SPOKE, December

National

Defense

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nationale

The rewards difference

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you have the

skills we’re your college education could be your ticket to a high-tech career with a difference in the

looking

2003

Les avantages font toute la difference

make all the

If

8,

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for,

education post-secondaire pourrait vous mener a une carriere differente en haute technologie, au sein des Forces canadiennes!

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Vous apprecierez les defis stimulants, le travail en equipe, les nombreuses perspectives et la securite d’emploi, ainsi que

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une indemnity de recrutement de 10 000 $ pour les diplomes de niveau collegial de I’un des

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Canada

— Page 7


News

McJob” requires

£

Anyone want

a job that

paying and provides

little

is

low-

oppor-

advancement? you answered yes, than con-

tunity for If

work

at

gratulations, you’re

fit

McDonalds. At

what of Merriam-

.he

11th

to

least that's

edition

Webster’s Collegiate

job

advancement.”

By NICK HORTON

Dictionary

Ron Christianson, the manager of corporate communications for McDonalds Canada,

The McDonalds organization

is

flipping burgers over the defini-

“McJob,” which MerriamWebster feels is common use in he English language for "a low-

tion

little skill

paying job that requires and provides little opportunity for

angered

and frustrated by the term. “It is not the reality of working in a

McDonalds

or working in the

who

service industry. The people work in our restaurants work hard, enjoy their jobs, take pride in

says.

is

what they do and are learning

skills at the

same

time,” he said.

Christianson believes working at McDonalds teaches young people how to deal with people, learn communication skills, responsi-

and how to take initiative. “These all form a foundation of

bility

(Photo by Nick Horton)

The McDonalds organization

is

angered by the term “McJob.”

skills

for,”

he

any employer

is

looking

said.

there

advancement

is is

no

for

who McDonalds

organization for training people with disabilities so they can However, a high-profile work.

room

inaccurate.

“A large portion of people work for Canada got their

today

start

working

behind the counter,” he said. But Merriam-Webster is standing behind the accuracy of the word. The publisher believes the word is common usage and has

been used for the last 17 years, including in The New York Times, Rolling Stone Magazine and newspapers in Australia and South Africa.

the flip side, McDonalds is considering a lawsuit. The term

On

trademarked word used as a slogan by the

Christianson also believes that

saying

little skill

“McJOBS,”

lawsuit

is

is

a

not the best

way

to

keep the

word from becoming

more familiar. Jim Cantalupo, McDonald’s chairman and CEO, defended McDonalds’ employees in a recent

press

people

release,

stating

more young than America’s armed

McDonalds

trains

forces and referred to Fortune magazine naming McDonalds as

America’s best place to work lor Cantalupo is asking minorities. the word to be eliminated from the next edition of Merriamand dictionary Webster’s

for

from

removed

immediately. This is not the

website

their

first

time a cor-

poration has had their good name-

described or

trivial

Mouse

is

dictionary

as

Mickey

belittled. in

the

simple,

while

the

Canadian Legion probably isn’t too impressed with Legionnaire s disease.

The Oxford English Dictionary definition of that of

McJob

is

similar to

Merriam-Webster's.


2

News

Hobby By

Kids more interested

Classy

alter

years of service to the

12

community.

The

store,

located on

Road, opened

when many

in

Hespcler

1992

believe

a

at

the

time

plastic

model industry was beginning

downward

its

slide.

closing their store due to health reasons.

responding demand.

to

The store has noticed demand for model-related kits and products has She the

problem

said the

local

level

making fewer items,

like

to

replace

them.”

Over the years she has noticed kids have time for computer and video games but have little interest in plastic models. Classy Chassis opened its doors with intentions to be a plastic modeling shop.

After five years the opportunity

occupy more space became available and in order to remain

parts

for specialty

airbrushes,

new

product

was

replacement

find

hobby

as

As

a result

it

She brought

in

the

dollhouses,

Tank Engine

and other items. new,

toys, kites

The

week

Jan attributes another reason for the lack of interest in modelling to the rise in television and movie viewing.

With the

rise

dinosaur.

She remembers,

in the local

hard to find a specialty

it’s

model

store for

kits.”

She said stores like Wal-Mart are the conscience of the country showing what people really want. Big chain stores devote little space for plastic models and what ’

‘erest

to

the public.

m

e

n

I

selec-

h e

t

o n

a

1

brought years

increased

become

She said getting mothers, fathers and children into the store was wonderful and in time relationships began to form between the employees and customers. "We're on a first-name basis with half of our customers,” Jan said. Success continued when in 1999 they acquired more space and entered the die-cast car market.

have

taken

plant about four year

e

has

it

its

ago due

“Retailers are

numbers

we

only sold plastics,” she

“we'd be struggling." AI and Jan pondered the idea of having someone manage the store said,

but found this

would present prob-

"It's

else

very hard to

let

manage what you've

someone put your

classroom.

Horse Hobbies on King Cambridge was a victim changing times. The store

Iron

Street in

of

closed

its

doors in

November

He compares

Owner John Logan

Distinguished

teachers

are

like to

those

who demonstrate

exceptional

commitment to students and to their programs and whose teaching They also demonstrate leadership in their skills are above average schools andior the college and in related work with their professions or in

started selling

focused on

He

trains.

has seen the hobby of model

and

train

collecting

the community.

For more information or nominations forms, contact one of the following committee members:

and personal reasons. “The people into trains seem to have everything they need." said Logan. "They're not buying as

2002 Award Winner - Tony Kattenhorn 2003 Award Winner - Nancy Nelson School School School School School

of Liberal

& Media

Studies

- Mike Thumell

Al would spend hours phoning all over North America in an effort to

going up. People are not willing to pay high prices for such products

He

said there are

many new

coming out and

of Engineering

prod-

prices

are

anymore. He has also noticed kids

ext. 3213

ext. ext,

3724 3223 3233

ext. Business - Dianne Kraft-MacDonald ext. 3271 & Information Tech. - Rudy Hofer Stephanie Fulher. .. ext. 3905 of Health & Community Services White ext. 3269 Greg of Trades & Apprenticeship ext. 3331 Chair: PD - Edith Torbay

of

much.” ucts

closing

his store to having a funeral.

various models, trains and acces-

For more than 12 years Classy Chassis tried to provide everything their customers wanted.

customers' needs.

the family.

Jan

after

12 years of business.

making

^neet

with

nominate a distinguished teacher?

notice students playing video games online. Such sites as

decrease in popularity as well and closed his store due to lack of sales

hobby shops.

Would you

On campus

satisfaction.

Another option was to have someone buy them out but there were no takers.

local

agrees

Nominations open on January 12, 2004 Nominations close on March 12. 2004

1

feels like a death in

AUBREY HAGAR DISTINGUISHED TEACHER AWARD

model making, preferring

in

instant

heart into.” said Jan.

Jan said the recent popularity in online shopping has also affected

also

it

Students also seem to lack inter-

sories but for the last 10 years has

lems.

Logan

After being in business for years he said

then suppliers disappear.”

70 per cent of

“If

ness has slowed right down.

said.

for the

driven,”

AddictingGames and Nickelodeon are becoming more popular, providing a quick break from the

store.

has noticed the hobby busi-

O’ Hagan that hobbies are going the way of the dinosaur. “The lack of interest has things on the downturn in the industry,” he

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS

Jan said. “If the product isn’t selling in the thousands nationwide,

you'll

and carrying the

He

to a

other modellers required, and thus the relationship between store and client began to change. Die-cast cars accounted for up to

are strong

video-game bug. "He’s now mainly into video and computer games,” said Young. Logan said the kids who were into models years ago have grown up and are doing other things.

lack of demand.

advice

to finances as sales in die-cast cars

to be more into computers and video games. "People just don't have time for models,” said Logan. Roger Young, a photography teacher at Conestoga, said he used to do models as a kid but has since lost interest. His son was also into models at one time until bit by the

paint

est

sales.

seem

hobby

Employees noticed the die-cast car customers didn't need the

Jan said they are not closing due

.

.

granted.

for

Canada closed

Testor's

t

increas-

ingly difficult finding items

stores

s

v

t

sales.

(Photo by Darren Smith)

n n uiassy unassis Hobbies owner Jan O’Hagan discusses inventory with employee Dennis Bell. The Cambridge store will close its doors in April after 12 years in business. Photo at left is an Enola Gay one of the many completed kits for sale.

offered isn’t of

is

and

in

model

as a child,

could be purchased drug stores. kits

store

i

other

in

forms of entertainment she believes models are going the way of the

expanded

t

trying to

find

“Now

Jan noticed the wives of modellers were often bored with the predominately male hobby items in

to

parts.

“Al could spend a

added.

t

at

suppliers are

stores’ sales decline.

to

i

not just

is

but

something now,” said Jan. “Before he was able to get it with one quick call.”

Thomas

computer end video gemes

changing

the

new customer base

stock.

in

Unfortunately lor the hobbyist, hobby store is a dying breed as people change and suppliers are

becomes increasingly harder

puzzles,

— Page 9

the

However, Jan said the age group the modeller has been rising. "We're not bringing in the young,

ol

a

2003

fallen.

Although many hobby stores are struggling, A1 and Jan O’Hagan, the owners of Classy Chassis, are

profitable

8,

stores becoming extinct

DARREN SMITH

Chassis Hobbies in Cambridge will be closing in April

SPOKE, December


Construction at Conestoga

(

Top

left,

S

construction vehicles try to

fix

a sewage problem

at the

r

i

iu iv

uy

ulm

Conestoga College Doon campus

to through the college due to work being done signs were up blocking the major roadway

Above, there were no construction workers through Conestoga Nov. 28.

in sight in this

view of roadwork on the

mam

fix

road

(Photo by Jennifer Howden)

Obesity By JEFF

MORLEY

normal-sized person has between

the free and brave

The land of

is

North America dying from weight-related illnesses in an epidemic that is only getting worse. A Nov. 20 Hamilton Spectator

getting

more

In

fatter.

people

are

more than

article says obesity kills

300,000 people

North America

in

every year. In the year 2000, for

number

the first time in history, the

of obese people rose to equal the

number of underweight and

starv-

ing people in the world at

.2 bil-

1

Currently, 59 per cent of adult

men

are overweight

and 20 per

cent of this population

women

Less

is

obese.

are overweight at 51

per cent, but 25 per cent of this

population

obese.

is

The number of

overweight kids has doubled over generation.

past

the

almost one

in

three

Currently, children

The Canadian

overweight.

and Lifestyle Research says children

is

Fitness

Institute

not exercising

are

enough. Approximately 60 per cent of kids are not active enough to "promote optimal growth and development.”

David Katz Medical Studies Dr.

is

the director of

in Public

Health

Yale medical school. In an Oct.

28

article in the

Record he

"Children growing up

a shorter

life

said,

in the U.S..

and soon Canada, are the cohort in modern at

30 and 35 billion fat cells. When a person gains weight these cells get bigger and then increase in number.

When

a person loses weight

the cells decrease in size, but not in

number. This is the reason why many people have such a hard time keeping weight off. Recent studies have shown that a number of different factors may be involved

the rapid increase in

in

weight for North Americans. While genes do play a role in a person’s development, they are not the only causes for obesity.

lion.

at

a widespread epidemic

is

memory

first

looking

expectancy than

Obesity fat

is

defined as an excess of

frequently resulting in a

significant

impairment

online article explored

Persinger,

Michael

Dr.

addiction.

neuro-scientist

a

Laurentian University

at

Sudbury,

in

has been studying food addiction rats.

One week he

in

them next week he feeds

sucrose and water, the

feeds them normal water.

Persinger

found that the

rats

drank up to 30 per cent of their body weight in sucrose water every

He also found they ate more as well. The rats would drink at conday.

sistent

and constant intervals for the compulsive behav-

in health.

A

(Photo by Jeff Morley)

More and more North Americans are eating fast food and are becoming more inactive. Currently, North Americans are gaining weight at unprecedented rates. More than 300,000 people in North America die from obesity each year.

entire day. This

one sign of addiction. Tire

iour

is

rats’

sleep behaviour

was

also dis-

turbed and irregular; another sign of

Volkow has not determined whether this is the

patterns

in

obese people.

dopamine Dopamine sig-

She has been looking levels in the brain.

at

addicts,

obese people also had high

concentrations

throughout

the

of brain.

dopamine However,

sity is

inactive lifestyle.

More

shown

that obe-

not only based on science.

person’s lifestyle has as

much

with weight gain. Children

to

A do

with

some

sort

food

Many

number of in

,800 calories.

calories they should

an entire day.

Obesity can lead to heart disease,

a

sedentary

$30 and

billion is spent targets

of children. Fast food

dren will gain weight.

calories ical

An estimated

on advertising

approximately one-third

habits and a lack of exercise, chil-

more

the

be ingesting

1

this is equivalent to

diabetes, increased cholesterol and

to

live a

For many kids

a daily part of their lives.

is

paign that targets kids.

Many of today’s youth

can have as many as

Today’s children are besieged by a massive fast-food advertising cam-

fast

much more likely become obese themselves. Due to bad eating

have

of disposable income, and

obese parents are

lifestyle,

take the bus

play video games, and

to school,

play on the Internet.

Studies have also

In Long Island, N.Y.. Dr Nora Volkow has been studying brain activity

cause or the effect of obe-

sity.

addiction.

nals pleasure to the brain. Like drug

their parents.”

body

A CBC food

and

is

Most

experts agree that the best

foay to lose weight and keep

it

off, is

a balanced diet and consistent exer-

loaded with

trans-fatty acids.

hamburger with a

high blood pressure.

fry

A typ-

and a pop

For more information go website www.weight.com.

to the


I

Feature

SPOKE, December

Snowmobiling captures magic By LESLEY

LEACHMAN

$6,000

to $ 2,000. 1

cost of a It’s

windy,

it’s

snowing and

Winter has

cold.

But there

a

is

way

it's

arrived.

finally

advan-

to take

tage of the frosty weather. Snowmobiling is a great

to

keep active during the long winter

much freedom,”

gives you so

“It

Barclay Riley, an employee

for Aberfoyle Snomobiles Ltd., located south of Guelph. “You can go so many places you could never

go

in

a car.”

Riley began snowmobiling when he was a boy and has about 30 years of experience. He says it's the thrill

of speeding through the open draws people to the sport.

trails that

driving through and twine,” says

"1 love

twist

Silverthorn,

who

23,

trails that

Rachael has been

snowmobiling lor about four years. "It makes you feel like you’re on a race course.”

But for some, the most exhilarating part is getting to enjoy the fresh air

when

there

is

often very

a

il

“There are so many vast

little

is

another issue. Unlike

unfair,”

“It’s

Snowmobiling has been around since the

'60s.

Sporting flashing

colours and streamline technology, sleds can reach a speed of 160 kilometres. sleds themselves have develthe over the years. Some of

oped more expensive ones have the same luxuries as cars. Electric

start,

han-

remote dlebar warmers and even a your start to you start (that allows are just sled from inside the house) come with. a few of the extras they But even without all the luxuries, snowmobiling is costly. Riley says

someone who clothing

is

says

Riley.

“The

person that has been snowmobiling all his life should have lower rates than

someone who just

started.”

But he says once you gel through all the expenses, you'll sec .snowmobiling as an incredible sport. “There are miles of groomed trails to explore in Ontario,” he says. “It’s a great family sport that

gets the kids off the

couch and out-

doors.”

“It

gives you so

much

freedom. You can go so many places you could never go

in

Barclay

a

car.”

Riley,

snowmobile enthusiast

trails that

province."

sport,

year,’’

any breaks for being good drivers.

to

you see different regions of the

for

lew months of the

Insurance

says

outside,”

The

also the

permit ($160) and the

says Rachael.

Nathan Silverthorn, 25, of Cambridge. let

of winter

an expensive activity, conyou really only get to

“It’s

and majestic winter scenery. you outdoors in the win-

do

11

sidering

“It gets ter.

is

Page

-

motorists, snowmobilers don’t gel

months. says

There

2003

licence.

enjoy

way

trail

8,

beginning the

(insulated

and

waterproof coats, helmets, snow can cost pants, gloves and boots) $900.

them anywhere from $800 The snowmobile itself can cost to

However, Riley says there are a few precautions that you should take before hitting the

trails.

{Photo by Lesley Leachman) good family sport in his father’s footsteps. Snowmobiling is a follow to trying eagerly Alex months winter long the during that lets children enjoy the outdoors popular trails are in Huntsville, some snowmobilers behind them But because the temperature can Parry Sound and Muskoka. But his rope. a had them of one and luckily often fluctuate during the winter favourite trails are in Durham. to out Riley says he then crawled months, open water can appear in some “It’s not crowded there like his with stomach, his on the ice the middle of a lake. north,’ he says. the in places trykept friend holding his legs. He Riley says if a rider ever sees Durham is also Rachael’s in ing to toss the rope to the man around turn to ahead, water open favourite place to snowmobile.

For instance, always know the area where you're sledding.

Look

Riley, 5, is

for trail markings and stop signs and always obey the speed limit, which is usually 50 kilomethings tres. And also be alert for

out

like sharp corners

and barbed-wire

fences. “I

had one customer

that

ran

at through a barbed-wire fence and ripped the speed he was going, it and the off the top of his machine

However,

and

if it’s

absolutely neces-

a sled can go across open water for a few metres, at the high-

sary

windshield," says Riley. “But luckthe handlebars ily it got tangled in didn’t hit

the water.

immediately.

est speed.

him.”

Riley has had first-hand experience with coming across open

also Also, he says riders should

be cautious when snowmobiling be at across lakes. There needs to

water.

He and two

other friends

It were snowmobiling in Bala Bay. trails the and nighttime was

ice on a least six inches of solid cross it. to attempting before lake,

weren't familiar to them. They came to open water and all three plunged into the freezing lake. Riley and one friend

swim

to solid ice

But the other man

managed

and climb out. was left sUug-

sling in the sub-zero water. Riley managed to flag

r

to

down

“""°

'

After a few' attempts, his friend was finally caught the rope and

remarkable. Nathan, however,

pulled out. the get

Then

nearest

they travelled to

cabin,

to

Barclay

try

and

the

w'hole

experience really

shook him up." But this incident didn't deter the Riley from getting back on trails.

He has been sledding all over more Ontario. He says some of the

and

well

scenery

the

is

is

attracted to

He says the west coast landscape. trails mountain the through riding in British

him warm.

"“We just went to the first light we saw and banged on the door," Riley and dry, says. “We got him warm but

groomed

are

trails

the

She

Columbia

an amazing

is

experience. But you don’t have to travel great distances to find good trails. Riley

snowsays that most towns have mobile clubs that groom trails and provide

events,

which allow

the

like

cookouts.

whole family

to

enjoy the sport. away from “It helps get the kids 1

the Nintendo," he says.

(Photo by Lesley Leachman)

-

(Brochure photo)

and those wh0 owmobiling attracts thrill seekers " v,,y „ s an expensive ac Although scenery. whence the winter winter. every snowmobile trails .usands ot people ride the

says

“The whole time I was yelling at him to just keep fighting,” he says.

Riley,

an employee

tor

Aberfoyle Snomobiles

province.

He


.

Page 12

— SPOKE, December

Quantum By LESLEY

LEACHMAN

health problems, like muscle aches.

a business that started from

one woman’s passion

Quantum Living is all about helpbody mend itself from the

inside.

is

cre-

called

It’s

the

Device, which

is

Frolov Training a breathing tool.

simple device where you

a

It’s

Maria Georgas, of Puslinch,

place water in the bottom of

it

and

that I

came

to a point

estly felt that

were

hon-

I

make

wouldn't

I

it.”

Georgas says she went to the doctor and had several blood tests, but no one could figure out what was

wrong with her. It was then she discovered

the

Frolov

with health problems of her own.

The user

She was born with a structural problem and has gone through several surgeries. However, she has

two seconds then exhale

weeks of using it she regained her energy and eventually recovered.

business after dealing

been left with a structural deformity and suffers from degenerative arthritis. Georgas has since learned

how

to help herself ease her pain

through alternative medicines.

"Because of

my

condition

first-hand experience

what

it’s

like to live

I

have

is

into

as long as they can. This

is

it

for

called

endogenous breathing, which stimulates the cells in your body to produce its own oxygen and energy.

The

illness that exists in the cells is

And

itself

both physically and mentally.

It

in

constant

thing from

has been

known

to help heal any-

pulmonary emphysema

enthusiasm for heal-

business

Living. She operates her

through her

home and

advertises mainly through

“People see such a change have more energy and I’m

constant pain, but be

word of

able to carry on.”

mouth.

ment,” she says.

Maria Georgas,

consists of pro-

moting three different products. The first is HeartMath, which is a system of self-management. People learn through books and software how to let go of stress quickly, without having to wait for a vacation. The second is a product called Vita Fons II. It’s a spiritual healing agent that is made from flowers. It comes in creams, ointments, powders and liquids, it’s used for daily health maintenance and many other

like

it’s

in

how

see

my

me.

in less

the

improve-

know what

“I

not to be well

and

this

device can give people hope.”

owner ofQuantum Living

She says

that

some it’s too unique and sounds too good to be true. for

"This uct,”

isn’t a

she says.

hocus-pocus prodbeen approved

"It’s

by Health Canada as a Class A (fully approved) device.” Although it’s

Quantum Living

People can

the respiratory tool.

have first-hand experience in knowing what it’s like to live in “I

ing that has led her to establish

Quantum

I

But Georgas does run into some problems while trying to promote

to depression.

way.”

it’s this

tools for the device.

pain.

“I’m a seeker (for healing methods) and I don’t let obstacles

my

She says her own recovery is one of the biggest marketing

device works through

knowing

After

Device.

then pushed out by the cell’s oxy-

says.

get in

Training

gen. This allows your body to heal

in

pain, but be able to carry on,” she

required to inhale for

a tool that’s

new

to

Canada,

patients in Russian hospitals.

It

is

excited about this

has

orders.

device because she has experienced its

healing ability first-hand.

She says that last winter she was suddenly hit with an illness that caused her body to become weak and she was bedridden for months. “There were times that I was too weak to even hold a glass of water."

Georgas also meets people

that

believe the Frolov Training Device is

(Internet photo)

The

Frolov Training Device

cells to

produce

a breathing

is

own oxygen and

their

to help heal itself both physically

and

tool that stimulates the

energy.

It

too much of a commitment. She says because you start off

using the device for about 10 minutes daily and then gradually work up to an hour, some customers find it’s too time consuming.

“That’s a poor excuse,” Georgas

with your health and your body,” she says. “You can feel your body

“Why

wouldn’t you put time into something that will help your says.

come

health?”

She also likes the Frolov Training Device because it allows people to take

their

health

into

the device, but

own

their

you

once

buy

the

device, which sells for about $215, you don’t have to worry about extra

expenses or going to see an expert.

"You

start

a

new

relationship

>

IS

know it will catch on eventuGeorgas says. "It’s something that is worth knowing about, so you can free yourself from pain and disease.” ally,”

you heeoine your St

-

1

mother."

February 2004 ”1

QUALIFICATIONS:

hope to Bod not

It's

Ipiio."

My mother is dying from Hummgton

> > > >

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m

disease.

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strong ability to problem solve

Good communication and

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It may take X O, 15 — even 25 — years before it finally kills hen And even then, the disease may not go to the grave with her.

You see, once you develop Hummgton disease, there’s a 50 percent chance you will pass the gene responsible for Huntington's along to your children. And if they develop the disease, then their children face those same fifty-fifty odds.

Ju«

like

my

the gift of Instead?

mother,

life.

1

wanted to give

What have

done

1

But there is hope. Recent research breakthroughs have brought u$ closer than ever to finding a cure.

' .

With your support, we will beat this and for all. Please call the Huntington Society of Canada today disease once

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For more information on becoming a Peer Mentor Visit Student Services (2B04)

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taking time to

gives such dramatic results

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as you get older

nd

Semester Practical Nursing students to mentor semester Practical Nursing students beginning in 2

it’s

catch on in North America. “It

says

more than two million

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hands.

She

alive.”

Currently,

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THE PEER MENTORING SERVIC E CURRENTLY LOOKING FOR:

allows the body

mentally.

it

has been used for years to treat

helped to heal a variety of illnesses, including many cardiovascular dis-

Georgas

withirf

she says. "It went on for so long

breathe through a straw on the top.

ated her ~"fcJ

newest and the one Georgas is the most third product is the

enthusiastic about.

to heal.

ing the

own

encourages healing from

Living The

It’s

Feature

2003

8,

I

}

&<3&

5316

£P..C<Mn


SPOKE, December

8,

2003

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Page 13

mm

STUDENTS

INC

into the CSI office, list your as a short well as gender and age childs suggestions for what your child

Simply come list

of

Christmas A Christmas. for want miqht them for tree the on hung tag will be the purchased, is gift the and when returned are gift and tag Christmas to distribution for office CSI to the

the students,


Page 14

— SPOKE, December

8,

Feature

2003

Real chocolate By D ESIREE FIN HE RT

He explained that there are two kinds of glossy truffles, the kind

In a stainless steel kitchen, stu-

dents in a full cooking class will melt, measure and

mix

made with a good Couvetoure and the kind made with chemicals. His

the ingredi-

to three

Two parts chocolate to one part cream are the only ingredients used during Conestoga College’s contin-

In fact, there

or

start

Pistachios, white chocolate, dark chocolate

shavings that coat the delicate chocolate

and ing

make

his son, Richard, 22,

course offered as part

of

and coconut are the

truffles

Frank Reid, 50,

during the Christmas truffle-mak-

Conestoga College’s continuing edu-

cation program.

ent.

Reid said nothing is cheap, but is only $56. The class is provided with all of the ingredients to learn how to make basic French the course

which they get to take end of the course. Reid and his 22-year-old son

truffles,

Reid explained that plain chocomelts at blood temperature, which is the temperature of a person’s hands. The preservatives used

Richard teach the two-day course together, providing each student with

late

with garbage, you end

who

no extra milk, sugar

dark chocolate and coconut shavings make each truffle taste differ-

home

Instructor Frank Reid, 50, says he

“You

is

products added to Reid’s

oil

Pistachios, white chocolate,

lates.

truffles either.

only uses 40 per cent cocoa butter chocolate in his work.

with garbage,” said Reid,

only good for two

days because there are no preservatives or stabilizers added.

ents for Christmas truffles.

uing education course.

(Photo by Desiree Finhert)

truffles are

key

is truffles

%

has

store-bought truffles keep the

in

been teaching the course for four years at the Waterloo campus. “You start with a good product, you end

chocolate from melting until you

with a good product.”

uct

Reid uses a Belgium Couvetoure chocolate, which costs about $12 a pound, but gives his truffles a

taste

glossy look.

to

put

your mouth.

in

it

“If

you buy a

it

the same,”

it

doesn’t

said Reid,

who

studied at the Stratford chef school.

The

more personal attention than they would receive with one instructor. The Reids find it easier to teach in pairs

lesser quality prod-

looks the same, but

at the

class will also use shavings

coat the marble-sized

choco-

because each student has degrees of cooking

different

knowledge and they try to teach everyone at the same pace. “It’s really

interesting that in a

class of 16, five students are really

good cooks,

five are really

bad and

the rest are in between,” said Reid.

Reid also teaches cooking courses on Italian food, fresh fish and

MANAGING THE STRESS OF BEING A STUDENT

He

cheesecake.

stopped teaching

vegetarian cooking because his stu-

dents were interested in a low-fat

Anyone who

feels stress usually feels emotional discomfort

and concern about no

vegetarian course. don’t

“I

being able to cope. At a physical level, this may mean loss of appetite, sleeplessness, headaches, sweating or illness. At a psychological level, this involve feeling helpless, anxious or afraid of losing control. Stress of Being a Student - Fleet, Goodchild, Zajchowski

-

Learning for

teach vegetarian slim-

ming,” he said. “I teach vegetarian

may

Success Managing the

tastes good.”

The

students are given step-by-

:

step instructions in

1999.

If you can identify effective ways of relieving tension, you will feel more motivated to study and more in control of your school experience.

all

the courses

Reid teaches. “When I do a pie-crust class, everybody does a pie crust and we sit there and watch them, one-byone. When it’s done, it will always

come

out the same.” Reid estimates that 10

Strategies for Coping with Stress Personal factors have been attributed to a person's ability to handle stress. These include: having a sense of control over your life, having a network of support,

to 20 per cent of his students take his cours-

having a flexible attitude, regular involvement

them with their cooking at home and offers private instruction.

in

hobbies, sports or outside interests.

es

more than once. He

making

Truffle

There may be times when problems

overwhelming. Sharing your worries and discussing solutions with another person can make a positive difference. Contact Student Services to make an appointment with a counsellor. Don't hesitate to seek

Conestoga

help from others.

designed for

feel

also keeps in

contact with his students to help

courses

are

is

offered

times a year.

five

offered

in

the

at

Two fall

semester, two in the winter semester

and one

in the

summer, which

summer wedding

is

truf-

fles.

Physical Strategies for Coping with Stress Find ways to become a more relaxed person. • Learn relaxation techniques (e.g. deep breathing, yoga, or music). • Take regular breaks from studying: get up from your desk and take a short walk. • Exercise is important: take up a sport, walk, or work out in the gym.

Reid said store-bought truffles wedding can cost $500. “You could do the whole thing yourself for $125 and get a better for a

quality. It’s not only the tor,

it’s

&

Plan to eat with friends to maintain social contacts.

Take a

toward your body image.

Try to eat a variety of foods

Look4aPlace.com Local Rental Search

for a balanced diet.

Site

Maintain a sensible sleep routine.

Many Places 4 U 2 Maintain a High •

Find out as

View

Commitment to Your Courses

much

as you can about the program so you can deal with your

workload. •

Find a study group.

It

can be helpful for students to meet and share ideas and

study tasks. • if

3 4a

fac-

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money

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SPOKE, December -^7-.

We love By It’s

in love with this stranger, flying aeross the country to meet

students explain

said she has a

Gowing

for the scene

vision screens everywhere.

Some

why

love eertain Christmas Paula Kerr, a registered practical

and one-liners make him unfor-

the

Red

Nosed

ness student, said he prefers the

Reindeer

is

that

movie

defi-

A

about a

is

This flick is a about a

but

no one

lis

with

who

ell

so old

it’s

adding, “It’s so cute

beep and turn

starts to

_

^ urr y

red."

first

saw

lime she

rity

administra-

tion

student Nik also

shares a love lor the

little

red

“It's

ter”

and

He

won’t come

it

said he first

By JENNIFER Have you

off.

saw the

movie

get

all

is

said he’s special sinc e

Webb

young. Office administration student

Lauren Gowing said she loves to

watch Sleepless in

Seattle

at

Christmas it’s “cause romantic and, I

Gowing don't know,

it’s

really cute."

Baldwin is a In the movie. Sam his man whose wile has died, so on show radio son calls a

some Christmas Eve trying to get father. A emotional help for his named Annie Reed hears

woman

broadcast

and immediately

started

ORMSTON

TtTe

“Of

Who Christmas and The Grinch Christmas. Stole has to be Tracey stipulated that it grinch “the of version the cartoon version starthough, and not the

all

sale,

the pieces

less

“Of

development

Grade a

little

4, but

to take

fuzzy before

and

best interests to it is in your possible to see get there as soon as

kind,

officer

150 original pieces of

before s

that.

Reindee

maximum pieces

is

art

by more

artists for sale;

than 20 local

saw the

added, “Everything

different

All of the

The

in°\

said the first time he movie was definitely

is

galleiy. currently on display in the of a As each piece of art is one

in

a drawover Christmas” and doing

He

“It

said

pottery,”

the

in

relation, these fect gift for an older she said. pieces may be the answer, available pieces are

the

in

the pieces in the sale, stu-

the selection.

Tracey said his favourite The Nightmare Before Christmas

how

sale

the

But erally attract older audiences. the perfor a student in search of

Kate Macpherson,

he’s plotting

list?

landscapes

into

“when

so

price

for

the

any of the

$250; the media of these

sculpworks include watercolours, tures, pottery,

lages, to

paper crafts and col-

name

a few.

kinds There are many different

ol

art will

remain on

sale at the

Homer Watson House and until

Dec.

The

Gallery

14.

gallery

is

conveniently locat-

at 1754 ed near Conestoga College, Old Mill Rd., in Kitchener. more information on the sale

that

he

gallery go and other events at the

www.homerwatson.on.ca

is

human and

his real

dad

New

York City. So Buddy heads out on a journey crossing lands filled with candy 'canes and gumdrops to

lives in

find his biological father.

By the time he reaches The Big Apple, you’ve already laughed so hard that you’re in need of a bathroom. But the real humour hasn’t even begun.

From watching Buddy adapt in New York, work

to at

living

an Gimbles, get into a fight with imposter Santa and eat spaghetti

maple syrup, it’s easy of enough to say you'll walk out

with

,

the theatre sore.

However, for Buddy, being an not so fun. elf in New York City is bad luck__ Just as his string of get any couldn't as if it looks

crash worse. Buddy sees Santa into Central Park. Now Buddy not only has to find but also he out where he belongs, Santa’s sleigh and save

must

fix

Christmas.

Needless dull

For

to

other

making toys, his adoptive father. Papa elf, played by Bob Newhart, makes the decision to tell Buddy

functional at the same time." Some of the pottery sells for as low as $5 to $15. of Other pieces, such as paintings and nature scenes, gen-

the

in

all

Macpherson.

tall t done movies and they don category." Rudolph cute the

is

available,

interested

pottery.”

“They’re realty well

on your

at

and can’t keep up with

elves

dents would probably be most

students would be

most interested

ring Jim Carrey.

scene

Buddy is, well, different. As he towers over the

said Kate Macpherson, development officer of the Homei Watson House and Gallery.

an excellent alternative. The gallery has approximately

said,

$38.

tastes,

sale is

He

for

appeals to people with varying

your Christmas

Homer Watson House and Gallery’s ninth annual Christmas show and

Tracey

Homer

a pitcher

sells for $15,

artwork

For that hard to buy for person who already seems to have everythe thing, a unique piece of art from

to

been watching he was very

at the

on sale

is

art lover

than 17 days until the big day.

the lost toys to give to the

kids.”

Gallery.

shopping yet? If not, keep in mind there are

film in

1997, and has enjoyed

sort ol

“when Santa comes

A mug

Do you have an

said his favourite scene in

Webb

the

is bundled up “and he can't walk

one always

I’ve

the

the

the

the

watched growing up. It just grew on me,” he admits. "

when

is

Taylor

human who while

accidentally orphanage, an climbs into Santa s bag as a baby one Christmas Eve. When he is discovered in the North Pole, it’s decided to raise him as an elf. But as he gets older it becomes evident that

Christmas idea

himself.

and he falls over.” Curry also likes the scene where the little boy named Flick "sticks his tongue to the pole in the win-

December

nosed reindeer.

Webb

Watson House and

Randy

in his snowsuit

secu-

Webb

brother

little

the special.

Law and

him of

His favourite scene

Kerr said she was probably two or three years old the

One-of-a-kind pottery by Simon

boy in the movie reminds

little

nose

his

(Photo by Jennifer Ormston)

Curry said the

funny,” she said,

when

Farrell, is a

hurl himself.

obstacles. “It's

send you into hysterics. Buddy, who is played by Will

will

he

think

be a dentist, who strike out on their own and come up against lots of

favourite

will

they

because

wants to

my

I

him

to

ten

a

will

is

know and “Santa's coming, him” arc just a few lines that

lor

Christmas,

classic

reindeer

BB gun

ninny-mug--

“Cotton-headed gins,” “smiling

boy who

little

desperately wants a

favourite.

gettable.

Christmas Story.

This film

her

nitely

Buddy the Elf may not be your average Keebler, but his humour

talks about

Gowing said “it was a long time ago” when she first saw the flick. Cameron Curry, a general busi-

Rudolph

town.

true love.”

student,

said

red nose, and an

is listen-

the radio “and she

when he

starts to cry

VANDEVEN

Move over Grinch, there is a new Christmas character in

weakness

when Annie

Sam on

ing to

they

specials.

“ nursing

By KATE

him.

to start

Elf

unforgettable

falls

time of year again for Dying across tele-

that

Rudolph

— Page 15

Buddy the

Rudolph

REBECCA LEARN

2003

8,

I

to say, there is not

moment

in this

one

movie.

ot five give this film five out

stars.

solution? need more than a bandaid you CAN VISIT A NURSE SEE A DOCTOR OR MAKE AN APPOINTMENT TO OFFICE (INSIDE DOOR #3) at THE DOON HEALTH SERVICES We

can also help with: blood pressure monitoring , immunizations allergy injections and community referrals non-prescription medications

I

(Photo by Rebecca Leam)

the Red Nosed love watching Rudolph nv Conestoga students specrals. Christmas as other indeer every year as well

prescriptions from a Doctor information health resources and first aid

birth control counselling

pregnancy testing a place to rest

when you are

il


,

— SPOKE, December

Page 16

Entertainment

2003

8,

Horoscope Week of Dec. 7 - Dec. 13

0

Libra September 23 October 22

Make

things happen

by taking

become

care of details. Don’t

and rou-

rigidly attached to order

tine

!

the- ritual

shouldn’t

mean

Everyone expects the best from you and vice-versa. Arguments with your lover or close associates are likely now. Don’t give in to

more to you than the result. Growth comes through modesty.

intimidation or pressure and never

go

to

bed angry.

Scorpio -

October 23

November

Things

out

are

patience

Practise

of balance. and persever-

ance. This is the time for some solo work. In your dealings with others, don’t distort the facts. To be a win-

let your insecurity drive be overly generous to the needy - you’ll end up with less energy and less money. Are you

Don’t

you

to

seeing things realistically? Wait

one more day

ner now, don't withdraw.

21

to take action.

(Photo by Christina Bramburger)

Taurus April 20

May

-

Sagittarius 20

November 22 December 21

1

Three members their first

CD

Dean Foreman, Mike Radatus and Flo, are preparing to record winning The Most Excellent Battle of the Bands Ever at the Still on Nov. 13.

of .Unit, (from

after

left)

Local band hits the studio more than more on feelings

Trust your intuition

your reason; act

than on facts. Take your

time to

think about your options. Tackle difficulties

with enthusiasm

-

Happiness arrives soon, but

may

some

take

to bring

it

to fruition.

Ji

-

BRAMBURGER

Capricorn December 22

-

January 19

“We’re not like The Tragically Hip sitting on Muskoka Bay,” says Mike Radatus of his band .Unit’s

emerge. Be prudent and confident.

Brainstorm with peers and explore

Make

teamwork.

13.

is

second

Let go of something old in

to

none, so express yourself. Your talents are in attain

demand. Just

preparation for

you

as

one goal, another will plans and a

new

Keep your

new

opportunities.

ears tuned to alterna-

tive business proposals.

objective.

as

June 22

-

JL

Aquarius

lilo

January 20 February 18

July 22

qkMi

have been compared to System of a

and

activity

come

to

A

the forefront. Don’t get stuck in old

behaviour patterns. If you

come

to

job well done delivers many rewards; laziness is punished. Make peace - don’t nit-pick your-

a fork in the road, keep your eyes

self or others too harshly. Patience

open for

brings success. Health improves,

all

options. Past efforts

and labour bring rewards.

but

it

may

take effort on your part.

tries to

make

their audi-

ence feel the same as they do while on stage. time for us to play and

“It’s

you’re going to listen,” says Flo.

The band dabbled

few

in a

vari-

of music before they made themselves at home in the metal

CD.

a

spot on

the

genre.

Radatus says the band puts their music in the audience’s face when

Flo tends to describe

it

as

not to set boundaries with overly

at

our show.”

music was so

tight

it

sounded

like a unit.

They agree with

this

statement

wholeheartedly and say no matter what happens within the band they will always remain friends.

“heavy

has gone through a few

.Unit

changes

we are,”

They will come up with various rhythms and harmonies while driving and then pitch them to the

themselves

their

but

says

the

all

band.

while they were playing and said

groove, hard core.”

not preppy like

Koeckritz and Flo write music.

Eckert has lyrics.

three

in

members

years,

but

in

they

full

control over the

As a band, they say they

try

political or opinionated views.

.Unit

Festival lineup in Hamilton,

members.

Radatus had considered leaving the band, but says his love of music always brought him back. “We trust each other and have respect for each other. “It’s like we’re all dating,” he says. “It’s hard to break up with your long-term girlfriend.” Radatus says he feels if he were to leave the band he would never be able to find another group that played as well together.

on stage. “Even people who don’t appreciate heavier music can still enjoy

The band decided on the name after a friend showed up

Spring

What is their style? Most say it is heavy-metal,

friends with the former

eties

and an opening spot at The Wax for a yet to be announced, established Canadian group that is close to their style.

“It’s

and Disturbed.

The band

gift certificates

life

riffs

they’re

Music

Social

do.”

Down

$10,000 in promotions, including a 10-song recording with Mastermind Studios, artwork for their

play as heavy

or solos in their music, but they

Their prize was approximately

Cancer

we

us and you

at

we

There are no Metallica-type

unique sound. “There’s no Canadian group that sounds like us.” The Kitehener-based band consists of guitarists Helmut Koeckritz and Dean Foreman, drummer Flo, who goes just by his first name, vocalist Mark Eckert, and Conestoga journalism graduate Radatus on bass. .Unit won The Most Excellent Battle of the Bands Ever competition at The Still in Kitchener, Nov.

Your imagination

Radatus. “You look

Those

be the voice of reason.

June 21

By CHRISTINA

wouldn’t imagine

around you are more emotional

Gemini 21

on your part

than usual. Don’t rely on them to

these are opportunities to learn.

May

effort

it

.Unit will be entering the studio in

weeks

three

to

record

their

album. They have

until the spring,

so they

be rushing the

will

not

process.

Then

they will have the

CDs

dis-

hopes of getting signed,

tributed in

Radatus says. “It’s

we we want we do get

not like

expect to be

work hard

the

past

signed, but

to

are

still

enough so

signed.”

Pisces February 19

-

March 20

You

are

entering

a

growing

phase.

Acknowledgment comes

slowly.

No one will

offer a helping

hand unless you beg

for

it.

Don’t

take “no" as a final answer. Avoid self-pity.

Get

rid

of old habits.

Fight for and hold onto what yoi believe.

Beating diabetes

You tions.

treating

Your projects are nea

completion; relaxation

is at

hand

diabetes both

depend on

research.

Victory soon arrives. Luck come: to children.

Don't

let

nervousnes:

or worry cloud your thinking.

CDA funding makes Or.

1

and

it

possible.”

Daniel Drucker, research scientist

Virgo August 23 September 22

&

I"-

Diana O’Neill

is

a third-

misinterpret another’s inten-

year journalism student

This could be a time of

who dabbles with astrology and likes to read tarot

regret or separation, so keep your

chin up and look for the light at the

end of the tunnel.

cards just for kicks.

HELP

SOMEONE YOU KNOW.

CALL

]

-800-BANTING

CANADIAN diabetes ASSOCIATION

ASSOCIATION j

canaoseni-sc !

DU DIABETE

(


'

Feature

community helping

fiay

CONNE LL

By RYAN

because they “are more deeply in touch with their emotions. They’re not

If you have ever listened to a song on the radio and thought, "This song is so gay,” maybe the artist wanted it to be that way.

decreasing over the past several years because of the illegal downloading of music from the Internet, artists are

new mar-

searching for

music

kets to sell their

to.

The gay community has become a popular

revealing

market over the past 10

years for record companies to tap into.

Through

with her

in three years

albums

create national campaigns, thinks

gay community is a lucrative market with a lot of buying power. the

who

an

(GLBT) market includes

from

paper to toothbrushes. is

little

to

regarding Canada’s

non-existent

gay community,” Wagg said. “Recording companies, as with most marketing companies, tend to believe that by creating ‘generic’ marketing campaigns, the spillover will also target the gay mar-

to

single, second from her 2002-released album, featured two young men kissing on a public bench, as well

I

toilet

man going through the transformation into a female imperson-

it’s

as a

ket.”

a niche form of marketing where you start there and get loyal audi-

ator.

also a big part of the life in the gay

don’t want to say minority, but

Wagg

“There are

The Karpel Group for dealing with

is

hoods’ across the country

gay marketing for

that

Alanis Dion, Celine Margaret Cho, Reba McEnlire, and Toni Braxton. The leading agency generates a buzz in the gay community with

showed

Aguilera calls Beautiful a

does a

other artists like Barbara Streisand

did.

amount of gay

said.

release events.

‘gay-bourhoods’

across the country that said.

we

infil-

"We just do

a

making sure everybody knows that her new album has come out. It s not the

lot

of promotion,

kind of thing that people need to

song (Me Against The Music) is on the radio already so promotion it's collectively a lot of

hear,

the

and advertising. Spears has never been reluctant reach out to the gay community, especially after her famous lesbian

with

Madonna

at

the

MTV

September.

Video Music Awards in Spears has admitted to loving her gay fans, according to the Rainbow ^^etwork at www.rainbownet-

^^ork.com. Spears

feels that her

gay

tans are able to connect with the intensity and emotion of her music.

com-

Jonathon, 21 Aspiration:

Game Developer

to cool new music.” a Thursday night outing to downtown Kitchener’s gay club.

On

Mannino. who has been doing world gay marketing in the music and companies marketing with record labels for approximately have eight years, said they don t music is input about what kind of they put onto the albums. However, sometimes work with the record be labels about remixes that could gay or mainstream the popular to

community. Rishi Spears' new album has a Me Rich’s Desi Kulcha remix to Against The Music featuring

Club Renaissance, 24 Charles St. W., the entertainment was lead by the female impersonator group. Miss Drew and Crew. The impressive impersonators

two

performed

tracks during the

Spears

Britney night:

the

Make You Love Me, from

the

Again album. The audience responded positiveand cheerly to the music, dancing

Oops!

...I

Did

record “If you're going into the

you don’t go out saying someyou’re gay when you buy you "So said. Mannino thing.”

STUDENT FRIENDLY FARES right now you’re You’re going places in life, but thousands of With break. just going home for a Greyhound fares, low everyday great destinations and often. more places more go to freedom gives you the

first

new track being Toxic from her album, and" the second song, Can't It

* FROM KITCHENER 65

GUELPH

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BELLEVILLE

5

$30

50

(ONE WAY PLUS GST)

PETERBOROUGH TORONTO SUDBURY

us for "Valid Student ID required. Call

ing to the music.

more

$25 50 $12 50 $57°° details.

Second-year broadcasting student Kevin

McGrath

said that the

upbeat, happy music from artists Cher. Madonna, and Britney like

is

one of the hardest target audiences of whetliet to measure the effects oi not. the promotion is working stores,

promote

exposed

a daring singer.”

said gay marketing

trying to

working, would be to go to a gay quotclub. Britney Spears has been the are clubs “gay that saying ed as be best places to hit if you want to

to

kiss

for record

best place to find out if gay audience targeting is actually

sense to be targeted to the gay community because she s a little mystevery rious with her sexuality. She’s

Madonna. Mannino

is

Go Greyhound

could

The

“Pink’s a very gutsy celebrity.” Mannino said. "She makes perfect

is

Group

gay communities.

rela-

in technology.

a “no-brainer.”

bold and

the Karpel

income, but they are also interested

of ongoing research to

develop-

artist

proven that the gay market is not only shown to have significantly higher disposable and discretionary

feels unac-

Madonna

one

“But the reality is, they really won’t know until they try it. Through research, it has been

artists

There has been extensive promofor tion done in the gay community Spears' album, with magazine advertising, club promotions, and

Mannino

lot

to

is

panies.

uni-

should be tarfind out what geted to the gay audience such as Pink, while Mannino considers

way Madonna

make more money

cepted or discriminated against just by being who they are.” Mannino said the Karpel Gioup

community. Mannino suspects Spears’ album previous will sell more than her it is tapthat now album self-titled

trate,"

who definitely

(Internet photo)

Britney Spears

You're going places. some

tively simple solutions that

anthem for anyone and

everyone

gay

is

stage on Pride day.” Wagg thinks there are

Aguilera was

versal

Britney Spears’ new album. In The Zone, is the first time the artist basis has been targeted on an active

little

and

human beings

Against Defamation (GLAAD) for the positive gay and transgendered images in her music video.

sorship with gay pride events, film festivals and trade shows.

"There are

spotlight

everyone else. presented with a special award from the Gay and Lesbian Alliance

newspapers and national magazine advertising, websites and radio programs, participation and spon-

Madonna fans,” Mannino

the

that they are

like

promotional gay club events, gay

has a huge

into

lifestyle

is

people plus attend Pride in Toronto, they should be busting their butts to get that hot new act they want to be the next great thing onto the main-

The tasteful video brought the homosexual and transgendered

Morissette,

ing herself the

Group

-

Bolton,

model where (Spears)

infiltrate.”

sales executive, Karpel

Streisand, Jennifer Lopez, Michael

ping into the gay market. basically the “It’s

we

Marc Mannino,

Minogue, Mariah Carey, Dolly Parton, Whitney Houston, Barbara

the

‘gay-bour-

responsible

a large range of artists including Britney Spears, Pink, Cher, Kylie

towards

little

said that entertainment

community, and is often covered by most publications as editorials, whether in print or online. He said record companies could do a better job reaching the gay community if they were able to understand the market better. “If they realize that one million

ences in order to impress the main-

stream community.”

works.

billion.

“Consumer research

Beautiful,

audiences,”

porate and special events, television programs, and cable net-

approximately

is

However, the worth marketing everything

$54

Aguilera’s

the Latin and the African American communities are thought

coming out.” As well as gay marketing, the Karpel Group also specializes in

Founder and principal Shane of Wilde Marketing in Toronto, a Canadian gay marketing agency, said the consumer value and worth of Canada's gay, lesbian, transgendered and bisexual

equivalent

isn’t afraid

and main-

stream advertising for movies, cor-

just like

Wagg

share her views on homosexuality.

how

of,

achieve

to

also an artist

out there, just like

a kind

It

it

York/tri -state area,

gay people

It’s

industry.

10

record sale. Her new album, In The Zone, sold 605,000 copies in its first week. Pop star Christina Aguilera is

“It’s

active

has been estimated that

approximately 10 per cent oi the world’s population is gay. This esti-

first

Madonna

took

agency that works with high- and low-profile developing artists to

target

New

mation means there is a large audience of people who were once never targeted to by the music

years

said.

of

hoping to attract the gay audience on her new album. “You know, in the same way Madonna and Cher appeal to a gay audience? We’re doing appearances at gay clubs and things like that,” Rudolph said. Spears has become more popular than Madonna, selling 52 million

Karpel Group, a lifestyle marketing

as

and

music industry publicity for theatre and film in the

take risks.

censuses

— Page 17

keted towards us are not afraid to

research,

three albums.

Mannino

lot

2003

selves and the artists (that are) mar-

Larry co-manager Spears’ Entertainment told Rudolph Weekly magazine that they are

Marc Mannino, a sales executive the New York City-based

about

you see a

but

8,

is

the promotion

(if

results overall."

their

for

“It's a lifestyle

working),

hearts.”

music industry’s sales

With the

of

fearful

to influence

measure

can’t

SPOKE, December

an can allow gay people to find with problems or life escape from beina gav

it

they needed

it.

marketed to this we need somebecause audience one who makes us tecl happy. McGrath said. “We need someone who makes us feel good about our"1

believe

it’s

w

For local info contact: 15 Charles Street West

GREYHOUND CANADA*

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,

Page 18

— SPOKE, December

8,

2003

r

£3)

December 9th 3D d 11:30 am -1:50pm

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&

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Sports

SPOKE, December

8,

— Page 19

2003

holidays bring

hockey

exciting By

JAMES DOYLE

and they don’t appear willing him lake two weeks out of the

year, to let

NFIL schedule.

a part of Christmas

much

as

It is

Second-overall to Fleury was for-

as Santa Claus and relatives hitting the egg nog a little too hard. Hockey Junior The World

ward Eric

Staal.

He

playing

for

the

currently

is

Carolina

This year’s event will be held in

Hurricanes and doesn’t appear to be getting the go-ahead. The same can be said about third-overall pick

Finland from Dec. 26 through to

Nathan

Championships take place every season.

holiday

the

year during

The Florida Horton. Panther forward appears set to

Jan. 5.

As the

won

Canada

in past years,

favourites

going

the silver

medal

championship

one

is

stick with the Panthers.

of

Other NHLers

Canada

in.

camp

Brent Burns, Marc-Andre Bergeon, Pierre-Marc Bouchard and Rick Nash. Bums is hull and was

will be

held in Kitchener from Dec. 11-18,

placed on

and will include the likes of Sidney Crosby, a 16-year-old phenom from

Rimouski Oceanic. Crosby is Quebec Major Junior Hockey League in points with 27 goals and 67 points in 29 games. Unfortunately for Team Canada, there will only be one returning player from last year’s silver medal leading the

ward

Dan

Guelph Storm Paille

by the

Columbus’ top point getter. But Canada will yet again have a strong team.

who

Some

local

talent to

forward Mike Richards, Kitchener plays for the

watch for

is

Rangers, along with defenceman

for-

Andre Benoit. Some more

lone

the

is

reserve

injured

Minnesota Wild, Bergeon and Bouchard are both staying with the big club, as is Nash, who is

the

performance.

are eligible to

are

Halifax.

in

This year’s training

who

play for Canada, but probably won't,

year's

at last

local tal-

Kitchener native

returnee at camp.

ent to watch for

notables who are missing include goaltender Marcyear this

Kevin Klein, who plays for the Guelph Storm, and Tim Brent from Cambridge, who currently plays tor the St. Mike’s Majors. Win or lose, Canadian hockey

Some

Andre

who

Fleury,

was

Pittsburgh Penguin’s

first

selection at last year’s

the

overall

NHL

draft.

The 18-year-old Fleury has been solid in net for the

Penguins

this

is

(Photo by Kate Battler)

Condors net a win

fans can be sure they will be treat-

University Ravens 8-4 during an exhibition The Conestoga men’s hockey team beat the Carleton

ed to some exciting hockey.

game

at the rec centre Nov. 30.

Calling

Pro Sports ticket prices too high 1

By BRYAN MARTIN

hype exciting pre-game shows that importantly the sport more and most so they the teams have a salary cap most just have the best and

The four big professional sports in North America are considered foot-

promising future and

is

three sports are having extremely tough time filling seats

The other

an

the defending Stanley

ons and

this

5,000 fans

not just the New Jersey Devils and hockey, it’s basketball and basegenertoo. The only teams that It’s

good fan base

ket teams like the

New York Yankees

These are two teams

and the Los Angeles Lakers.

when of the original six teams

so successplay 16 ful is because they only is so game each and season games a

The reason

football

who were

is

part

the

are getfirst stalled up. Players of because and money much too ting

NHL

to

games

the

and not the

it "Prices are way too high and businessa not re you seems that if who gets a corporate deal you

man

COtLECE ATHLETICS &

RECREATION

Varsity Snorts Your upcoming

varsity

games

Mm’s Hockey

a Matt Jordan, mechanical engineering student, something said pro sports need to do to attract

more

*Jan 14 Vs Seneca 7:30pm Jan 17 Vs Cambrian

Home Games

fans.

fans “If s just pathetic to see so few showing up and if it s a bad game they’re long gone before the ”

game

broadScott Wilkie, a third-year

hockcasting student, said baseball, and basketball play too many

games.

“The amount of games needs be reduced so

that

more important,

Public Skating

Tuesday Sunday

am - lpm 2pm - 3pm 11

Shinny Hockey Mon, Wed, Thurs, Fri 11am - lpm

to

each game

said Wilkie.

the also thought the food at

is

He

games

was too expensive. “You’d think price for a after you pay such a high ticket

the

much, but

food wouldn’t cost so in reality it's just as bad.

r

CONESTOGA COLLEGE ATHLETICS &

RECREATION

- 11pm Dec. 22nd & 23rd 7am CLOSED 26th & 25th Dec. 24,

7am - 8pm - 9pm 8i 30th 4pm CLOSED Dec. 31st & Jan. 1st Jan. 2nd 4pm - 11pm

Dec. 27th Dec. 29th

&

28th

If

you've been looking for a place

to run,

you've found

it.

Brent" Gerhart, a first-year jour-' nalism student, is trying to get a

cross-country team started at the college and he needs other students to join so

he can get a team, well,

up and running.

is

said.

Christmas Holiday Hours

Jan 4 Vs Waterloo 7:00pm

*Jan 7 Vs Fleming 7:30pm

excited.

second-year

do

fans.

you

to get

The

preother sports just give you a little view that is dull and doesn’t sell."

ey

broadPhil Warder, a third-year teams casting student, blames the

By KATE BATTLER

ball.

TODAY DROP BY THE RECREATION CENTRE LIFESTYLE AND TAKE PART IN A HEALTHY

CONESTOGA

*

be promoted better. Look They have the best stuff before at foot-

students. that’s just for college

Professional sports should have no

the Chicago. The attendance for game was under 6,000 people and

are the high-mar-

Warder. “I also feel the games need

even over, he

problem getting crowds, but they because things are too expensive.

runners

A games,” said to the Pamf go to to nn get tr» don’t

ago the Michigan Wolverines drew a crowd of more 100,000 for a football game and than

It’s

Canadians played the Chicago Blackhawks in a NHL game in

ball

to the

Two weeks

not hard to lealize that way these sports need to figure out a Montreal the 14 Nov. On to fill seats.

where.

more than 20,000

people.

ate a

much determined

a huge problem for baseball, basketball and hockey fans every-

year are only managing home games, at an

arena that seats

brim because the Ians prices are affordable and the stadium. full a of excitement love the

are packed

It’s

at their

get played, but

lege

before the start of the season.

Cup champi-

still

you lose a huge part ot the at a game. Atmosphere is everything colsporting event. All the American games football and basketball

in the In other sports the teams

playoffs are pretty

1,^4.

that

Bowl champion.

should not be at their games and that sports lovers many so with the case Devils are out there. The New Jersey

-L*

sports to fill the athletes play the and without fans the impress to seats

The main aspect people love about is that the National Football League teams different are every year there Super in the playoffs and a different

not strug-

.

Sure the and sports is an entertaining business

expensive players.

gling financially. "

games

can’t

hockey. ball. basketball, baseball and a Football is the only sport that has

owners are jacking up ticket the fans aren t showing and prices suffer. up, which makes the game

that the

important to win. There are also

all

Brent Gerhart won’t give up his quest for a cross-

country running team. Gerhart has been trying to get a

team started for the last two months but he has ran into a couple

^

of road blocks along the way. He w'ent to the rec centre for

some help to have a

was

but he list

told he needs

of people

w ho

are

serious about joining the team. for Gerhart also went to the CSI

can assistance but was told they for-fun only help the recreational or o ro ups or

teams

like the

snowboard

club.

Gerhart hasn't given up though, to continue his quest for

and plans

a cross-country team. 1

"More people need

to

become

school involved in teams at this our support to out and come teams," he says.

Gerhart

is

also looking for any-

students or teachers, who would be interested in volunteering

one.

to

coach the team once

it is

up and

says this person would set up workouts. and give advice Anyone wishing to join the team

running.

He

Brent at or help out can reach

B 2erhart-cc@c0nest0gac.0n.ca.


Page 20

SPOKE, December

8,

2003

.

STUDENTS

INC.


Digital Edition - December 08, 2003