Page 1

Landmark

Christmas at the bookstore The Conestoga bookstore can

burns down Jason Noe reports on the

fill

shopping needs.

that

fire

destroyed the Hespeler train station on Nov. 1

FEATURE

Monday, November

24,

your

all

Homolka and Bernardo Author of

new book on

killer

couple

faces numerous charges.

9

2003

Conestoga College, Kitchener

35th Year

— No. 10

Road closure on campus By CHRISTINA

BRAMBURGER

A

temporary bus-stop sign

will

be up during the construction to

The main road through

the

cam-

help people locate the stop.

The closure more than just

pus will be closed for approximate-

week.

ly a

Beginning tomorrow

going to impact

is

vehicles.

The

trails

6 a.m. the road between Door 2 and Door 6 will be blocked off due to excava-

through the forest between the

tion work.

and the employee services building will all be closed.

is

It

at

main building,

expected the road will open

again Dec.

There

3.

The campus

having water

is

the

student/client

services building, the

will

students,

ECE

centre

be signs up directing

and visitors along

staff

ECE

problems and water seeping into

the

the sewers.

Signs will also be going up on doors that direct students to enter

The

came on

project

denly,

fairly sud-

chief of Conestoga

said

through Doors

Many

security A1 Hunter.

"Because of the time of the year and weather conditions, it is imperative

they

get

back of the

that

I

and

centre.

2.

doors will be locked from

the outside and have tape in front

of them.

“They

construction

done now."

will strictly be

emergency

Hunter said, adding everyone hopes the work will be completed as soon as possible. "But realistically speaking, it’s going to be awhile. It's a lot of work." exits,"

This closure will affect the Grand River Transit bus routes that usually pick people up at Door 3. The buses will be routed around

Hunter said. "There will be a bus pickup at the west end of the E-wing.”

the recreation centre.

With

files

(Photo by Jason Smith)

Santa

well as, benefits on parity with colCurrently, student part-time workers make $7 an hour. The union

cautiously

voters are

w'ould like to see seasonal student

vote

Public

workers receive the same compensation as union members and to pay

ing process.

commu-

The 6,500

members of

the

Ontario

strike

Service Employees Union (OPSEU).

College support

have been

staff

without a contract since Aug. 3

Nequest tive for

is

the

1

Lisa

.

Conestoga representa-

Local 238. She explains that

the strike vote does not will necessarily

be a

mean The

strike.

vote only supports and

there str

ike

authorizes the

bargaining team to call a strike

nec-

if

essary.

The union has ment's

latest offer

(Photo by Mike Wilson)

James

Flu clinic By MIKE

a success who came back

WILSON

mer Graduates of Conestoga's nursing

program were back

running the free

The 13

6.

flu

school

shot clinic.

was held on Nov. 4, and 14 and was part of a

clinic

province-wide

initiative

to

pro-

to help their for-

Trish

Weiler.

involved

in the clinic, said

most

of the nurses were former students

and work experience throughout the summers. Cheryl Simpson is the academic vice-president at Georgian College

three per cent increase in wages per year, for three year’s.

students

staff want the

new

conditions

of the contract to be retroactive. The latest management offer included a

employment

By

"We always

DAWN HASSON

More

students

with disabilities

who

have a

tion every vear.

students even

though thev are not covered under OH1P.

signifi-

said the co-ordinator ol

ation.

international

fairly

identity as having dis-

residents

The evaluation, in the form statistical review, showed 651

ot a stu-

dents with disabilities applied this

year compared

to

450

in

2001

disabilitv

"1 think

services.

She conducts an what

that

they're

she

is

new

about a

that a strike

She explains

is

also optimistic about a

Both sides are still working together and making an contract.

come to a resolution. College support staff consist of clerical and administrative staff, such

effort to

as student services, financial

es,

aid.

computer sen icphysical

security,

resources and others. Support staff

make up

the

infra-

administrative

structure of the college.

Nequest says

that in the ev ent

strike, the college

there

to

w ould would be no OSAP. cleri-

run, but at a limited capacity

mean

of a

would continue .

It

work on timetables would stop, and there would be no further registra-

cal

among

other things.

shows

getting

they're

meeting

all

the

admission

criteria despite the fact thev

have a

disabilitv.”

Mainland said the number would the

school

Marian

not change despite

ev alua-

applied degrees.

arc that

"Our (disabled) students have to work harder than the other students, said Mainland. "Their work ethic is

these people are just as academicalcompetent as anybody else ly

because

optimistic

a standard step in the bargain-

Nequest

new

tion.

cant proportion of the student population

made and

disability services

Students happy with

Mainland.

all

opportunities

and relevant w ork experience.

years, according to this year's evalu-

for

s

However, management believes mandate is to provide students with employment

that part of the college

2000. the province has

offered free shots to

stu-

dents.

abilities."

sidents.

Ontario

own jobs from

being turned over to part-time

have been applying to programs at Conestoga College the last three

gelling their first-ever flu shots.

Jocelyn Schnarr. one of the nurs-

all

cent.

the

is

a

Conestoga health-sciences nurse. She also said it was a good turnout and that many students were Since

by 95 per

The union wants more money, as

older than six months. Conestoga College also provides free shots

vide free flu shots to

f

in

teacher

manage-

union can protect their

way

and was speaking on behalf of management. She believes union demands for job security undermine the need to give

Support

shot from nurse Kerri Brown.

rejected

union dues. Nequest says

this

contract.

recent

that

believes

progress has been

be holding a

vote Dec. 10.

Simpson

1

lege faculty and better job security. staff at Ontario’s

Support

nity colleges will

Dec.

strike vote

MORLEY

By JEFF

flu

coming to town

Christmas is just around the corner and to kick off the season, the Kitchener Santa Claus parade was held on Nov. 15. Pictured above is one of the numerous floats in this year’s event.

from Darren Smith

Union

Prunean gets a

is

in

and

amazing."

Continued on Page 2

s


LASA

students receive scholarships debts piling up,” said Browm. “I owe my mom some money, so she

JAMES CLARK

By

A

33-year-old mother of six has

$500 BarberAwards Scholarship

won one

of the

Collins offered

second-year law and

to

Tammy

McClure, along with Brown, were selected from

five eligible

classmates to receive

Brown

and

president

Collins,

to collect.”

credits

for

parents

his

making him want

much

to put so

schoolwork. have always just had a drive

effort into his

me to achieve the most I can on tests and assignments,” he

inside

said.

To be

the award.

Paul

was here today

"I

security students.

Elliott

News

— SPOKE, November 24, 2003

Page 2

award

eligible for the

stu-

minimum

dents had to achieve a

owner of Barber-Collins Security Ltd., presented the award to the

average of 80 per cent in their first year. Only five students achieved

students on Nov. 14.

this distinction.

hard to study while trying to run a household, but recognizes how important it is

students.

McClure

said

it

is

Collins then interviewed the five

He

said he

was impressed with

good grades. “It’s kind of showing the kids that it’s important to go to college and do a good job,” she said. McClure currently works as a

attitudes of the five students

security guard at the University of Guelph. She works around 24

nition that they did

to get

hours a w'eek patrolling agricul-

viewed.

He added

really refreshing to

an excellent job

in their courses.

the first year that the scholar-

It is

private

Kitchener,

from Guelph

school

to

using his

is

money

for

other things. in college

I

have some

to

services

investigation

Waterloo and the sur-

rounding area.

The company

everyday.

(Photo by

Barber-Collins offers security and

ing for things like the gas she uses

"Being

is

it

hear from the students that the award is not about the money but the recog-

She said the scholarship money she has won will go towards pay-

Brown

the

inter-

ship has been awarded.

ture labs.

driving

he

10 to 15 law

hires

The evening was more to come.

On

the

first

of

many

added

the students

ing an effort to have a co-op term

hard to raise interest amongst the

work experience helps

11, the

alumni association handed out 21 bursaries to first-year students,

who

had parents who graduated from Conestoga College.

The awards, called "welcome home” bursaries, were given out al

By KATE The

The first

come

to

and whose parents grad-

uated from here.”

was not easy, because the college wanted to make certain there was enough funds for bursaries in the coming Setting up the bursaries

years.

nice for

parents to have an opportunity to

Conestoga and have at least one parent who had graduated from the col-

come back

recipients

were then

Monica Himmelman,

quizzes or by answering a ques-

and then were tested on

“They've been talking about

this

bursary worth $250. Those students

for the past four or five years

and

who

saving up

The alumni profit

association

pose

is

a non-

organization with a board

made up of graduates. is

Its

main pur-

to raise aw'areness of gradu-

community and to help employment opportunities for

ates in the

find

students

currently

some funds

so that

it

could

be a significant amount of money so

mailed to them.

enrolled at the

can

they

perpetuate

Himmelman. that

it

actually

“It

said

was very exciting

came

She has heard a

lot

of positive

feedback since the meeting and

is

looking forward to the next one

in

2004.

The annual meeting

alumni association

The meeting was held in the Guild Room with more than 45 people in

November and more be given “It

will

through

Advertising student Kelly Leonard said she found the displays to be informative and the students in the program knew their

for the

be held

in

Leona Watson, who works admissions

office,

in the

said the event

ence between the advertising, marketing and public relations courses.

to first-year students.

w'as very nice for parents to

Continued from Page 1 The key performance indicators,

which come from the

who made

campus,” said Himmelman. “Some

questionnaires

had been aw'ay for a long time and some had been more recent gradu-

graduates and employers, to evaluate

ates.”

students with disabilities.

After the bursaries were handed out,

former students were given

gifts

from the alumni association. Alumni services officer Monica Himmelman said, “It’s something the alumni association has had in

the Sanctuary. Above, these students were

and students about

staff

crisis

in

Amazing Race

charge

in

teaching

of

management.

She

was a great was glad she came see what it was all about. said the race

idea and she

out to

addition

In

about

learning

to

public relations, participants also

Disability services

have an opportunity to come back on

of the evening.

Nov. 13, public relations students put on the

chance to win some They ranged from a handmade quilt to free Big Macs for a

had

the

prizes.

year. Fourteen prizes

out in

were given

total.

making the grade

bursaries will

of Conestoga College, John Tibbits, a speech at the beginning

(Photo by Kate Vandeven)

On

stuff.

helped her understand the differ-

to being.”

college.

attendance, including the president

it,”

it

tion hidden in a balloon.

officer

invited to

could not attend had their bur-

Charlene Genno, a public relaand event manager, said everyone in the program was thrilled with the turnout. She added it “made the entire program feel like one big family.” The two-hour “race” had more than enough activities, food and prizes to keep everyone interested. Participants learned about the public relations program by read-

tions student

ing material at various displays,

the general meeting to each receive a

saries

amazing

held Nov, 13.

on campus.” alumni services

lege.

a

at the

About 140 students and faculty came out to the event, which was

was very

is

good chance a co-op term could be added next year.

the

We really wanted to be able to

recognize the students w'ho

year of his or her program at

The

staff of

years.

criteria for the aw'ards includin the

and

be happier with the turnout

meeting.

ed the student having to be

students

is

business community and there

public relations program could not

Amazing Race.

“It

He

VANDEVEN

long-range plan for several

after the association's annual gener-

to the

riculum.

PR’s Amazing Race

their

the college

the evening of Nov.

law and security cursaid he is working

apply what they are learning in class. Presently Collins is spearhead-

21 $250 bursaries to first-year students NOE

Clark)

security

and security and police foundation students each summer. He said the

Alumni services gives

By JASON

James

program co-ordinator Don Douglas (sitting front), and his class, listen to Paul Collins, president and owner of Barber-Collins Security Ltd. Collins presented the Barber-Collins Scholarship awards to two LASA students on Nov. 14 at Conestoga College.

Law and

of

fied

given to students,

that

a program or service,

is

results

that

our staff works

extremely hard and that

we

try to

population.

Students

with

other students

have

disabilities rate

than

at the college.

This

had a higher retention

stay in close touch with our stu-

year, the retention rate for disabled

students

was 13 per cent lower this year. A provincial student is someone who is attending any college in Ontario.

have

shows

think

almost 13 per cent of the student

dents,” said Mainland.

satis-

a chance to tour the college together that

I

satis-

The

faction rate for provincial students

occurred over recent years.

become more with our services. So

higher for

Students and their parents also had

and see the many changes

“As we’ve become bigger, our students have

The provincial percentage of abled students was 9.5 per cent year,

abled

and the percentage of students

at

the

disthis

dis-

college

is

is

14 per cent higher.

Mainland said

this is

because

stu-

with disabilities are givej| more individual guidance and help|

dents

and communicate more with

staff

J


News Bookstore has gifts for Christmas

The

Nest a unique

Bird’s

2003

24,

— Page 3

store

gift

LEACHMAN

By LESLEY

snowmen

Tin

SPOKE, November

with

playful

expressions stand facing the road.

MCMURPHY

By KRISTEN

Christmas lights decorate windows. Wooden Santas stand next to the entrance, welcoming Bright

the

Christmas

is

around the cor-

Have you

started your shopping yet? For one-stop Christmas shopping, look no further than the Conestoga College book-

display

store.

played to catch the eye.

ner.

In addition to the usual

chandise

Inside,

just

in

time for

Every inch of the store It’s

The

services

at

Conestoga, says the

bookstore

has

ordered

new

another Christmas season for

gifts for

you name

“We

kind items

also offering

is

Even the building itself is disOriginally it was a one-room

tinct.

schoolhouse, built in the 1800s.

a

lot

of time finding the perfect

that will appeal to the

“We’re especially trying to keep a wide variety of colours in our clothsays.

ing selection.”

The researched this

even found out just how many people drove down this road every day,” says Wayne. Once she began to design the inside of the store, she knew she had picked an ideal spot. location

...

the ambience of the building. It creates such a relaxed atmosphere, it just feels right, she

clothing and will be sporting the during hats Santa

says.

Christmas season. There are

ferent

manner

nursing

“We

have a

in

scrubs.

From clothing to backpacks, the bookstore has items for everyone on your list. It s a good way to show how proud you

are of your school.

“I

Bird’s Nest, located in Aberfoyle,

side garden centre

full

of Christmas

items to decorate your yard. If you’re in the garden centre, you might just get to see Hayden. He’s the neighbour’s mischievous tabby cat. He loves attention and is always

love

willing to have his

tummy

weeks ago business wasn’t as good as Wayne hoped. This was

lot

rows,”

in

“And

right

Though

setup in quite a difthan shops in a mall.

because

explains Wayne.

spring

Highway 6 was closed

now we have over 250

active suppliers and

the

part

tor widen-

keep things unique." These themes range from every-

Drivers had to take a detour in order to bypass the construction.

“I

revamped the

it

which

is

ornaments,

with

son has begun, people have started to the store,

and

the store to have a new look." She even put a large white Christmas tree at the front of the store,

feel this year.

come back

entire store

helped me rebuild the displays,” she says. “I wanted

my employees

costumers would come in and the day would be at a net loss,” says Markle. But now that the Christmas seato

tried very

hard to keep up business.

decorated

1

of

Wayne who

a relief for

says that in the summer the store lost 80 per cent of their business virtually overnight. “Some days business would be so slow. Very few

ing.

that helps to

that has really

Wayne

the

in

"And

says Wayne. hurt us.”

wouldn't see in other stores. And they're arranged in themes rather

is

“Once people get used to taking a detour, they just don’t come back,"

rubbed.

of items that you

inside

than

gifts for

Although the road reopened a few months later, business didn’t pick up for The Bird’s Nest, which relies on drive-by customers.

thing from a golf section to an out-

Christmas season has brought lots ol eager shoppers to The Bird’s Nest, just a few

The

has

I

Teddy bears are another new item in the store. The bears are clad in Conestoga College

also bears dressed

(Photo by Lesley Leachman) every occasion. It also sells many handmade and one-of-a-kind items. Originally the store was a one-room schoolhouse, built in the 1800s.

spot for her store. “I very carefully

items this year.

Andraza

employee. "The Bird's Nest

a really unique place.”

the past eight years, says she spent

"We’re always looking for students."

Canadian

put-

genuine effort to keep the shelves stocked with

new items

local

Robin Wayne, who has owned and operated The Bird’s Nest for

ting forth a

new

made by

says Jannell Markle, 21, a

for

nursing students.

The bookstore has been

store

there.

also have lots of one-of-a-

artists,”

is

south

weddings, baptisms, it's

it,

“We're getting some new mugs, lady's pajamas, lots of lounge wear and some toques with the Conestoga logo on them,” Andraza says. reference books

6, just

every occasion. Christmas,

retirements,

shoppers.

The bookstore

packed

of Guelph, The Bird's Nest offers

items especially for Christmas

optional

is

Bird's Nest.

Located on Highway

Christmas.

Mary Andraza, supervisor of retail operations and campus

Christmas

Everything from

with neatly arranged items.

some new items making an appearance

glittering

a

set up.

is

ornaments to stocking holders to Christmas tea is carefully dis-

mer-

the store, there are

at

people into the store.

lights,

and Victorian tinsel (all Wayne says she wanted The

crystal stars

for sale).

Bird’s Nest to have a real Christmas

hoped

“I

new

(the

look) would

get people excited about the holiday season," she says. "Hopefully will be a whole new shopping experience for the customers. .

Canadian and international students can learn from each other’s culture By LESLEY

“When

LEACHMAN

Imagine coming to a country where you don’t know the

The

guage.

foreign to

culture

is

lan-

completely

you and you don

t

know

anyone.

This

a reality for most interna-

is

at

students

tional

Conestoga

College. But. international activities

co-ordinator Yanting Zhao

trying to

make

is

things easier lor

Zhao organizes

different events

for international students to partic-

ipate

in.

They have one big

every .month.

trip

For instance, they on excursions to

have aone Canada's Wonderland and to see a Toronto Blue Jays game. And in between, they go on smaller outings, such as roller-skating. But so

most popular trip w as to Niagara Falls, because it s something Canada is famous for. She also feels that the trips can far.

a smoothie on Nov. Resident adviser Barry Gregory, 20. makes Residence holds Smoothie Sundays every week.

9.

Zhao says

the

help the students meet other people and learn more about Canadian culture.

Canada,

to

they don't always have a lot ot friends, or know the places to go."

says Zhao.

“The

them something

give

activities

and

to do.

gets

it

of the homesickness." Zhao is an international student herself. Currently, she is in her second year of early childhood educa-

rid

but

tion.

China

in

came

to

Canada from

1999. She says that this

helps her in her role as international activities

these students.

come

students

“I

co-ordinator.

know what we

students) want to do.

(international

And

I

m

able

them out in many ways, she says. “And I’ve been to many

to help

places in Canada, and

this

helped

more about the culture. She also knows the difficulties

me

learn

It s that international students face. not just the language they have to

become accustomed

to. it's

like the transportation

things

system and

even the food. Zhao says for some students who live with Canadian at families, things like eating bread dinner instead of rice they have to get used

is

to.

something

Zhao

Although

flyers

posts

advertising the events outside international education classrooms and

sends out e-mails, she w ould like to the see more people participate in events.

For instance. Zhao has planned a to Toronto in December and

trip

stu-

wants as many international

dents as possible to attend. She also feels that Canadian and international

help

can

students

each other out. Zhao would

like to

more Canadian students become volunteers for internationsee

al

education activities.

"We w ant

(international

to learn

culture and just

want

to

students)

more about Canadian its

people.

come here

We

don't

to study

and

Zhao. “And there is international students can

that's all." says

so

much

share

about

their

culture

with

Canadians." She also encourages international students

to

go

to

Conestoga

Students Inc. (CSI) events, so they

can meet more Canadian and national students.

inter-


— SPOKE, November 24, 2003

Page 4

Tougher sentences needed for drunk drivers drive and kill

You drink and house Is

someone and you

are punished with

arrest.

anyone

by

else disturbed

Locally, three

this?

men who have

killed people

by driving drunk have

received these three different sentences: two years of house arrest,

two years in jail and three years Drunk driving kills an average

in jail.

of four

Canadians a day and injures

another 200, according to a study done by Mothers Against Drunk

(MADD) Canada. Something needs to be done to make the penalty fit the crime. If someone points a gun and shoots someone then they get a life senDriving

tence in prison.

But someone gets

in a car

under the influence, also causes a death,

but gets just two years of house arrest?

The

who

Traffic Injury Research Foundation estimates that each person

is

caught driving drunk has done

445 times without being is likely to have done

it

caught. To be convicted three times, the driver it

1,500 times. They also say that 16 per cent of fatal collisions in

Ontario involve alcohol.

These are scary

statistics that

bring into perspective

how much

MADD

Canada says this isn't true. They say Canada only reports Criminal Code violations, not provin-

Statistics

says

Columbia there were 7,000 criminal there were 45,000 provincial charges that

British

in

charges last year. But ... weren ’t counted. We are making progress here in Ontario, but there is more we can do. We’ve made a start with mandatory breathalysers in cars for

people

who have been

However, there

still

convicted of impaired driving.

need

to

who

derer and then

maybe people would

think twice about taking a cab

they're drunk. If they faced the prospect of 25 years in jail

instead of

two years

at

home

they would, hopefully, understand the

seriousness of the situation. In

Quebec

there

is

also a proposal to prohibit

living driving, such as bus drivers

any alcohol lent

way

to

in their

anyone who earns a

and truck drivers, from having

blood while working. This would be an excel-

make people

attach a sign with a

D

on their

car.

With the

statistics

saying most

people drive almost 500 times before they are caught, maybe this a

good

idea.

-

about

you know I'm

is

Hopefully the fear of being ostracized will do the

trick.

city buses,

even

in

on bathroom

we need more

of

it

stalls

and

So

why

Inc.

(C$1) think

books.

does

at school.

CSI recently partnered with an ad company called University and College Television (UCTV). Ten TVs have been installed in high traffic areas of the Doon camwhich

pus,

will

show a

in to

make

it

variety of

A

tick-

bottom of the screen

will

news headlines and weather. er at the

also

promote upcoming CSI events.

This

latest project

has

me

of questions, such as

asking a

when was

in-your-face advertising a positive

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be

No unsigned

ment and

installation

As

more

is

TV

going to create

for.

a better college experience?

a concerned

And

student,

profit will

again CSI comes up empty.

president Justin Falconer says

know how much money

it

they don't have a plan for

it.

money, but would not say

make how much

it

money

the not-for profit association

was putting

He

this

could get up to 20 per cent of adver-

call

know how

If

it.

tising revenues, but didn't

much

that

would

be.

stakeholders

we have how much money

the is

to

our heads with countless hours

fill

of commercials. say in what Several

we

Do we

right

be

says

to see

how

it,

is

useful.

CSI

not

tool," as they

TVs on campus

events in a timely manner,

fill

the remaining air time

with programming from our students taking broadcasting courses, some-

to

being used

thing

Mohawk

College does.

Only then can

not have a

nication tool.

think will benefit us?

other colleges,

I fail

they want to have

why

about $400,000 to CSI. As

know'

then again

“communication

airing

Each Conestoga student pays $90 totalling

will

He

could be only $300. If so,

did say they

into

ask

I

be used

Falconer says because they don't

the venture has the potential to

CSI

but as

at as entities,

bills.

myself what the

equip-

it

And

be called a commuuntil then these

TVs

are simply an advertising tool, which

such as

don’t belong on a college campus.

is published and produced weekly by the Journalism students

Sandham Spoke Online

Advertising Manager: Jason Noe Production Managers: Kate VandeVen,

of Conestoga College

Jeff Morley, Nick

Editor:

Circulation Managers:

James Doyle Lesley Leachman

Horton

for verification.

Photo Editors: Brandi Stevenson, Rebecca Learn

be published. Letters should be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter letters will

Faculty Adviser: Christina Jonas

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534

for publication.

The

how

dollar

Editor: Carla

letters to the

editor. Letters

contacted

being looked thing in an educational institution?

than $20,000 worth of

jump on

band wagon.

Spoke

welcome

Spoke welcomes

expects 25 other

But with this type of business endeavour students are no longer

Opinion

UCTV. Thrown

look better are some

the

Sandham

Secondly, exactly around, on TV,

Conestoga Student

lot

Letters are

Carla

Probably not. is all

Brown,

up and run-

colleges and universities to

and

1

Advertising

UCTV

ning and

talk-

M&Ms

Nike,

advertisements from

safer.

Another province taking action is British Columbia, which is proposing that everyone convicted of drunk driving would have to

already, have the system

Kentucky Fried Chicken. But, if why 867 is an important year or what the Hutchins Commission is, would you know as quickly as what Cover Girl’s slogan is?

on

be tougher sentences for those

have killed someone. They need to be treated like any other mur-

when

That’s right

ing

George

and

Sheridan

melt in your mouth, not

it,

your hand, finger licking good.

in

asked

cial charges.

MADD

do

Just

really

going down, but

questionable

this

going on. These people are continually getting behind the wheel and playing Russian roulette. They need a wake up call! Statistics Canada says the number of drunk driving incidents are is

New campus TVs

Address correspondence to: Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

Editor,

N2G 4M4

E-mail: spoke @conestogac. on. ca

Dr.,

Web site:

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College.! Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters* to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a MS Word file would be helpful .j Letters

must not contain any

libellous statements.


News

SPOKE, November

2003

24,

— Page 5

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Faithful I

readers

read Blake Gall's opinion article

bad student attitudes about Spoke), and I want to tell you that (re:

despite the students

Spoke, there of us I

who

is

who do

also a

not like

community

are your faithful readers.

read Spoke every week, and

I

enjoy most of the

Times

me informed

regularly) or other newspapers.

articles. It keeps about happenings

around the school as well as out

I

(the other

am proud

newspaper

to

I

read

be a Conestoga

there in the "real world.”

College student, and

Politics, especially, is something would rather read about in Spoke as opposed to a city newspaper, because the articles are more readable than those in the Cambridge

what Conestoga does and stands

I

I

am proud

of

for.

Reading Spoke gives of pride because

believe in is training people for real jobs with hands-on experience.

1

me

a sense

can see

hand how the school

I

first-

love and

I

appreciate the work

staff

that

the

of Spoke does to bring

this

newspaper to the students of Conestoga every week, and any time

I

hear a negative

about Spoke

because

I

1

think

comment

i

A

few people. do have a couple 'suggestions that you may like to hear about. I

it

is

just as

good

as

of

First

all,

think you should keep that up.

I

think it would be nice if you had a crossword or some other "newspaper" puzzle as a weekly

Secondly,

I

feature.

Way

to

go on

a job well

Jessica Martin

3rd year computer programmer analyst student

Keep up good work Re: “I hear you knocking but you come in” (Blake Gall)

don’t

Special

just felt that

I

should finally

I

write a letter to Spoke. After read-

Winter Semester Block “B”

ing Blake Gall’s article on Nov. 10,

was really touched and saddened. would just like to let you guys know that you are doing a GREAT I 1

job

representing our school.

in

also hear the remarks about

you speak of. “Spoke is crap,

it’s

plenty of compliments,

Hey

who

are experiencing Test Anxiety, Public Speaking Anxiety, and performance (workplace, placement, co-op) Anxiety as a barrier to success at

school or in the workplace. This course will be taught by Student Services Counselors.

Room 2B04

before completing your elective choice form.

“Hey

Saw your

did you guys

personally always look forward Monday morning to see what the paper has to offer for this week. Reading Spoke during class kills I

boredom

the

1

have from listening

my

classes to the teacher. In all of you will always see at least four or five

copies

floating

around the

tables.

disagree with Blake on the issue no one really cares about the paper. At least a couple of times a I

that

week Spoke causes conversation among people. The articles that are written

in

classes and

in

Spoke evoke a tremendous amount of emotion in students. Every week I see people in class, residence and the Sanctuary' reading their weekly horoscope. I and

many

students enjoy reading about

w'hat’s

going on

in the school.

personally enjoy facts

reading the

about CSI events.

I

humourous that sometimes only six people show up to some events. Without Spoke I would never have had that good chuckle. to I just wanted the Spoke staff find

Student

i.e

hear

on

TRUE

to

I

read that article?"

I

To sign up, come

But

a joke.”

right along with those insults

pic in Spoke.

for students

I

Spoke

that

did you see the Spoke?,

Services,

done

every week.

i

General Education Elective For Students A course

CSI

really liked the

I

calender of events on the back of last week's Spoke.

defend the paper

Anxiety and Personal Performance -

a “real” paper. I’ve even converted a

it

know

that

I.

and many other

dents. really appreciate the that you do. So keep up the

stu-

work good

w'ork.

Kathleen Bahen

Be proud

of

Spoke

wanted to send you a word encouragement about your

just

1

of

newspaper. After reading Blake Gall s article. I thought you might appreciate hearing something positive about

your

1

efforts.

a support staff member and look forward to reading Spoke

I

am

even Monday.

I

think

it’s

all

be proud

of.

work.

Beth Blaney

very

w ell

you should Keep up the good

written and something


Feature

— SPOKE, November 24, 2003

Page 6

Finding yourself Con-ed students discover naive to us. but

their struggle to try

covery.

cover what

classroom behind the

In the dusty

Watson

Homer

35.

through

sculpting

adult

in

McNicol,

Scott

Kitchener.

teaches

Gallery,

that

When we

and interpret

3-D onto

are

we

are older it

because of

is

it

Clammy grey clay coats the hands of eight students who are embarking on a journey of self-dis-

things

student Gary Jacques, 61, found creating a

3-D clay

they are and ultimately have

fun with

journey,” said McNicol,

graduated from the University

of Guelph with a fine arts and philosophy degree in 1993. “You have

go from one end to the other and you have to love the process.” The course is six weeks long and students begin by making a small model before attempting a fullto

said

wouldn’t divulge

was

it.

“It is a

who

dimensional,”

no

better place than the sculpting

is

three-

Jacques,

who

who

He

said he has

how

it

is

of

My dad worked

industrial design.

my in

Three

dimensional was the key to his business.”

goes.”

someone

won’t mention who

in

instructor

mind,

until

worked

“If

then at

the

you are an absolute beginner can start you off from I

scratch,” said the gallery’s former

preneur

different projects.

picture at

“Sculpture

mediums have always

been a part of

worked

my

life.

My

in industrial design.

dad

Three-

He

different

mediums

to get an equal

standing and that he doesn’t teach anything that he has not made a profession

hammer

they are not considered a carpenter

apply themselves in that

industry,” said

it is

always wise

When

I

stalling to

is

signing up for the class

wanted

my

do

to

I

decided

father.”

said he wants the stu-

in.

McNicol. “If I have do the exact same thing some of them are going to be ther”

Student Jon Duncan, 37, is making a medallion. Jan Robertson, 44, is sculpting a bust of her husband Jim and Anne Huckleberry, 50, is

making a

ulate

as she goes.

trouble with

said Takacs,

statue

easier to care for than

clay

said it

has to be

does not dry

out.

can be damaged easily because it has this brittle softness. “It

me

When

it

is

wrong way

to do.”

of the biblical char-

is

is

McNicol

Canada from Romania months

and

maintained so

who

six years ago. “This will take

three or four

build-

clay.

if this stone can be might have a lot of

it,”

is

wax around a wire frame to make his sculpture dragon. The soft wax is easy to maniping synthetic

Takacs said the carving will be

I

life-size egret.

Student Colin Lam, ; 25,

hard to do in stone and that she will

know

all

bored.”

ing her design into alabaster.

carved or not.

said

them

day of class student Sorina Takacs, 37, had just finished her six-inch by six-inch model and began the tedious process of carv-

Her

is built.

in his hair.”

ested in will inspire them to go fur-

the third

to

it

“Ultimately what they are inter-

it.”

moved

of

headed sculpture.

ested

they are ever going to fin-

“I don’t

the face rid

look like her mother and Ramseyer is considering making it a two-

McNicol

a mistake,” said McNicol. it comes to sculpture, three classes later the students are won-

it

said

dents to pursue what they are inter-

“When

create

can always get

to

make

On

how

the form,

working from a model. “When they left it open

"You don't have detail, but at least you have some grounding of where you want to go before you

ish

go,”

to

Ramseyer thought she would be

impression.

if

look like him, but

way

has a long

Ramseyer. “I’m using the back of the head to work on the basics of

McNicol, who also

sketch

dering

and sculpt him from

“It’s starting to

I

said

try

But now the back a

with something small as a to give you a general

start

want to memory.

n't

of.

somebody swings

until they

home. He passed away

about three years ago and she did-

it

said he took the time to learn

not

father, but she forgot her father’s

dimension was the key to his business.”

is

The Kitchener resident and entreis making a bust of her

painting,

scale piece.

McNicol

Student Patricia Ramseyer

a novice, having taken art in col-

photography, drawing and sculpture and is currently working on 10

“If

he

recognizable.

McNicol

mediums have

always been a part

his portrait

gets to a certain point and the per-

son

“Sculpture

Scott McNicol,

have to see

lege.

McNicol has studied

classes.

of.

"I'll

but

two-

is

it

resource.”

artist

life.

time, difficult.

teaches animation classes.

artist in

2001 and said if you wanted to try something different there is until

bust, lor the

“With photography dimensional and this

residence. “If you are an coming in with some experience than you can look at me as a

Cambridge Library and Gallery

at

a professional photographer,

As

first

who

their inner-self with sculpture

things from every angle."

education programs. the material the students discover

look

to

like

is

paper.

try to redis-

Conestoga College’s continuing

McNicol says by playing with

do are

that they

“The drawings

By DESIREE FINHERT

clay

in

dry it

if

you touch

will break and

it

the

crum-

ble.”

He recommends

who turned into a pillar of salt when she looked back on the falling cities Sodom and acter Lot’s wife,

that

students

take a casting class to preserve the student’s finished products,

Gomorra. Takacs said she is fascinated about the shapes and colours in the alabaster and how her sculpture

is

might look

can

which

also offered through Conestoga

College.

“Some people come

in

with the

idea of making a product that they

in stone.

“Each stone has a surprising colour as you go in deep.” McNicol said stone carving is

sell,” said

McNicol. 'A

lot

of

manufacturing concept comes from casting as well.” that

slightly different than sculpture in that

you have

things

are

to think about

where

going to be removed

instead of built up. “If

you

hit

it

the

wrong way you

can lose a piece,” said McNicol, who has worked at 4he Homer

Watson Gallery

for

the

last

10

years.

McNicol’s goal for the class

is

getting the students to see in 3-D.

“As kids we see in 3-D,” said McNicol. “One of the biggest and hardest to realize is that very soon those kids are going to turn into

two-dimensional thinkers.”

McNicol

also teaches children’s

sculpting and has four classes: oneto

five-year-olds,

five

to

eights,

nine- to 12-year-olds, and teens.

(Photo by Desiree Finhert) (Photo by Desiree Finhert)

Instructor Scott McNicol.


.

SPOKE, Novermber

National

Defense

Defence

nationale

24,

2003

— Page 7

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Delphi

For those

the second of a two-part on travelling in Greece.)

(This

is

Located on the

buried

hilltops,

within a deep mountain fog, stands the city of Delphi.

Today, lar

Greek town

this

tourist

is

a popu-

Millions

destination.

take the long journey every year to

view its historical ruins. However, thousands of years ago, Delphi was much more than a tourist destination;

was

it

of the most significant

the

Kings,

and

warriors

who

the

are visiting

Greek mainland, you must go to Delphi to see the Temple of Apollo (the oracle's temple). Though it now stands in ruins, you still get an impression of what the temple looked liked. Massive columns stand surrounding the chamber of oracle.

the

A

sacred stone

path

leads up to her throne. Although it hasn't been used in centuries, there

This eerie

is still

an aura about

feeling

enough to make the hair back of your neck stand up.

on

the

it.

is

home

woman

in

“Thousands

Greece.

would

peasants

travel great distances to hear

her sacred words. After depositing

years ago

was much more

Delphi

than a

of

tourist destination;

jewels or gold, the visitors would enter her temple. There the Oracle

home of the most significant woman in

of Delphi would predict the future. The oracle was the high priestess

Greece.”

of Apollo (the Greek god of prophecy). She would respond to the questions of visitors while in a

Her incoherent

trance.

were

cries

then translated by an official interpreter.

Kings would often seek the ora-

outcome of would ask anything

cle’s prediction for the

a war. Peasants

from the gender of children, to which

historian’s paradise

an ancient

is

LEACHMAN

By LESLEY

series

News

— SPOKE, November 24, 2003

Page s

unborn crops they

their

it

was

the

Located about three hours south of Athens, Delphi has a wealth of historical ruins. Most of the sites

be extremely

hot in

the

Greece, but be snowing

at

sites

However, the answers the oracle gave were usually vague and her predictions were often misunder-

Delphi surround the Temple oi

stood.

ple

sacrifices of

is

money

North of the

Apollo.

For instance,

in front of the

to the gods.

altar is the

Built

Theatre.

tem-

the Altar of the Chians.

top and

white marble on the base. This makes for an impressive looking design. The people used it to lay

in Delphi.

historical

the

made of black marble on

of

rest

BC

300

in

Delphi

from

provides a spectacular view of the city. The theatre’s 35 rows can hold about 5,000 spectators. The ancient Greeks gathered here to enjoy plays, poetry readlimestone,

It’s

ings,

and

political

announcements.

the

are displayed here. For about $15

Delphi Gymnasium. This is where the athletes prepared for competi-

per person, you can literally spend

tions.

relics.

the left of the arena

To

is

an entire day just looking

The

Everything from exercising to bathing went on

in this building.

The young men would

practise for

hours. Running, stretching, and weightlifting went on all morning. In

afternoon,

the

the

athletes

prize artifact of the

The

bronze.

were public. Also there were a series of bathing rooms that var-

at a

bottom

normal tone, those can hear you clear-

the north of the theatre,

down

the Delphi

is

Like the stadiums

Olympia,

at

stadium was used for national competitions.

athletic

The stone

can hold about 6,500 spectatrack, you can still see the starting gates and the marker

seats tors.

At the

ied

all

the baths

temperature. The athletes

in

as

if

presenting his horses to the

cles.

Delphi.

Only

the base of the

gym

still

lines of the different

But sites

chambers.

And

if

the decor doesn’t relax

Opa

Restaurant and Cafe, which

We were greeted

warm

with a

smile and wherever we

told

we

specializes in souvalki and gyros,

could

has a bright and airy atmosphere.

chose a table beside a panel window. 9.99)

The decor of located

the small restaurant,

3101

Kingsway

sit

liked.

Unfortunately, the mall parking

across from Kitchener’s Fairview

Kingsway Drive didn’t make a great view. But I was quickly drawn into the menu, which offers a variety of Greek and

Mall, will put you at ease.

The top

half of the walls are painted a pas-

wood

tel

green with

the

bottom half painted

paneling on in a

darker

green.

One

wall consists of five large

panel windows, which brings in a lot of light to the cosy room that has about

12

Beside the kitchen there is a small desk where friends and family of the staff drop tables.

have a bite to eat or a coffee. Various plants that line the winin to

dow-sill and counter top enhance the

carefree

atmosphere. Greek

music was playing background.

softly

in

the

lot

($7.99-9.99), 10.99) .

sheftalia

($8.99-

and gyros dinner (7.99Sheftalia

is

a

mixture of

ground beef and pork with chopped onion and spices shaped into a

nothing

of the meal.

salad, four large potato slices, four

warm

a pita with tomatoes

and onions.

All of the dishes are served with

Greek

salad,

tzatziki

bread and a choice of

and

Canadian food. There is a large breakfast menu, ranging from the traditional bacon and egg breakfast, to omelettes and egg sandwiches. The main menu features a few burger choices, wings, sandwiches, and of course, Greek specialties. There is a chicken ($8.99-10.99) or pork souvalki

ki

Greek salad, plenty of feta cheese. The dressing was nice and light, so it complemented the taste of the cheese, instead of over-powering it. However, the salad was a little wilted because it was on the same plate as the rest of the hot food, which didn’t taste the greatest by the end

slices

roasted on a rotisserie and served in

I

Dr.,

at

red onions, whole black olives and

of beef and lamb

is

sauce, fries,

pita

roasted

potatoes or rice. I •

chose the small chicken souval-

dinner ($8.99), but there was small about it. I was brought a huge portion of Greek pieces of tzatziki

chicken.

warm

the best part of any

The highlight of the meal was pita

bread with

tzatziki

sauce and one skewer of The chicken slid off the

One combo

skewer with ease. broiled taste to

it,

pita

It

had

that char-

but wasn't dry at

all. The potatoes were delicious. They were lightly seasoned and had a creamy texture. The Greek salad was very tasty. It was mixture of iceberg lettuce with

large slices of green pepper, peeled

cucumber, tomatoes, several large

bread and

as

in the

Temple of Apollo. and historical

artifacts

if

don't interest you, there are

pottery

And

popular

are

items

in

enough stores in keep you shopping for

there are

the area to

quite a while.

sausage and charbroiled. The gyros dinner

animals,

many shops on the main streets of Delphi. Handmade jewelry and

remains

see the out-

are

well as miscellaneous artifacts dis-

covered

today, but you can

museum

of sacred

sculptures

would first enter a steam bath, which would rid their skin of built-up oils. Next, there was a lukewarm bath that would clear the body of sweat. Lastly, there w as a cold bath to soothe the musr

the

in

of the Greek gods, and

statues

Opa

Enjoy a taste of Greek cuisine at you, the staff will.

sculpture depicts the

moment of victory. His

driver in his

today. If. you stand at the

this

STEVENSON

The

Charioteer of Delphi stands at almost six feet and is made of

crowd. Also,

Stadium.

By BRANDI

museum

the statue of a charioteer.

is

the

at

ent from ours. Firstly,

the cobblestone path

have a spectacular view of the mountains in Greece. Thousands of years ago people visited Delphi to hear a prediction from the oracle.

of the

collected from the ruins

artifacts

track themselves.

Museum. Most

the Delphi

hands are raised, holding the reins

To

ruins at Delphi

and run around the

would relax in the baths. Their bathing process was quite differ-

ly-

The

to try

It was built in such a way that the sounds within the theatre amplify upwards. This trick still works

sitting at the top

by Lesley Leachman)

come

the north of the ruins stands

To

for the finish line. Visitors are wel-

it

and speak

(Photo

hold about 5,000 specta-

The Delphi Theatre was built in 300 BC from limestone. Its 35 rows can tors. It was built in such a way that the sound amplifies upward.

doing a lot of walking. And you should be aware that because it is located on a mountainside, the temperature can drop drastically. It can

Most of

should plant.

you don’t mind

are free, as long as

the

knowledgeable about the menu. She came by to check on us regularly, and even helped me select a dessert. I chose a traditional dessert called spanakopita ($3.20). It

good.

custard with papered pastry in It

honey. The pastry was

was

light

and flaky

that

was softly sweetened by the honey. However, I didn’t enjoy the custard filling. It had a very spongy texture that was hard to swallow.

homemade

sauce I’ve ever had. of my friends had the Greek

is

dipped

Overall, is

Opa Restaurant and Cafe

an excellent place for breakfast,

lunch or dinner. The bright room

which are tow samples of the Greek specialties. She chose one skewer of pork and chicken, and was very pleased with both. She especially liked the pork because it was quite tender. Even I found the pork tasty, and I don’t

ed for four people. So if you’re doing some Christmas shopping at

normally

Fairview Mall,

The server

($10.99),

like pork.

service

was

was very

filled

the

with plants, accompanied by

friendly

prices

staff

makes

it

and reasonable

the perfect dining

spot.

Our

total

was $67 with

tip includ-

it is worth it to cross and enjoy a homemade

excellent.

Our

the street

friendly

and

Greek meal.


News

SPOKE, November

2003

24,

— Page 9

Pire destroys historic Hespeler community loses

vandalism

to

NOE

By JASON The Hespeler

due

train station

train

had

station

stood for more than 100 years, but it took only a lew minutes to be

destroyed by a

fire.

The abandoned building had been a

popular target for vandalism over

recent years and the cold night of

Nov.

was no exception.

1

After

firelighters

extinguished

more than half of the historic station was reduced to smoldering pieces. The wooden struc(he blaze,

had burned rapidly and by the

ture

time firefighters arrived, there was nothing they could do to save it.

The blaze even scorched a section of a wooden caboose, which sat behind the station. Their investigation

uncovered

several clues in the rubble that indi-

was handWaterloo regional police. “It has been a derelict building for some time, so we have had the odd vandalism down there and we've had people break in,” says Waterloo regional police Staff Sgt. Bryan Larkin. “But certainly nothcated arson and the case

ed over

ing

of

to

this

magnitude and these

types of crimes are only

solved

through the assistance of the com-

munity and the public.” well protected and believes that it

great

is

target.

there,

there’s

the building.”

becomes a In this case, what some sense is a comit

we've seen in munity tragedy, because

officials

immediately deemed the

building unsafe after the blaze.

Rick Cowsill, ward councillor for a couple of days after the fire

it

The remaining portion of

even though

this

community

is growing in leaps and bounds, with a lot of new people coming into our community,” says Cowsill. "It’s sad that it happened

because

there

is

a

tremendous

it.”

amount of history with this station. As the City of Cambridge, we try

the

to preserve the history of the three

is

building with a lot of history to

and

was saddened by what he viewed. “It’s a big loss,

attracted loiterers.

“There's nobody nobody monitoring says Larkin. “Thus

vintage diesel passes waving onlookers at the Hespeler train station on Oct. 5, 2003. The plumes of smoke are from the Locomotive Restoration Society’s steam locomotive built in 1923. The steam locomotive is being pulled by the diesel.

Hespeler, examined the debris field

Larkin knows the station was not

why

(Photo by Jason Noe)

A

a

once proud railway station was demolished two days later, because

former communities and part of it for sure."

this

was

The

was constructed

station

in

1900 along the Grand Trunk Railway (GTR) line, which ran between Lynden and Palmerston. In 1923, Canadian National (CN) took over the GTR and the line was absorbed into the CN system, including

all stations.

The Hespeler depot functioned where mail, freight and passengers paraded through its doors on a daily basis. In 1957 Queen Elizabeth II visited Canada on a royal tour and the journey took her by the Hespeler

for decades

station.

Crews

the roof

placed large flags

on

and gave the building a

fresh coat of paint in celebration of

the

event.

special

As her

train

passed the station, the Queen stood on the platform of the last passenger coach and

waved

to the

crowds

in

1959.

CN

discontinued

passenger train service on the line and it was only utilized by freight trains.

The station had sold its last was eventually closed and

ticket. It

sat

unused for many years.

CN

continued to pass the dormant building and during the '70s an industry operated out of it for

a

trains

brief period.

eventually (Photo by Jason Noe)

The

was demolished after the fire because officials building was too unsafe to be left standing.

train station

determined the

But

ended and

that its

didn’t feel guilty.” to

enough funds to purchase the station from CN and have it designated a national historic site. The cost of restoring the building was estimated to be between $300,000 and $450,000. “We had the historic sites and raise

monuments board come down about ago to designate it and it didn't get designation,” says Langan. “We certainly had the pub-

five or six years

lic’s

support

at that time,

but that’s

not the criteria they use." In January 1997. the association

bowd-a-thon at Playfair Hespeler to raise money for the project and they managed to generate about $1,500 in dona-

held

Lanes

a

in

too

During September 1997, CN informed Langan the company would be willing to sell the station and lease the land it for only $ resides on to his group. Cambridge city council even I

promised the

HRSA $10,000 for the

project, but that

money never came.

Without die funding, the association could not lease the land from CN. In

December

1997.

commitment

several

art

“Well,

Cambridge

1

ger excursion on the railway

the train with their vintage steam locomotive, built in 1923. More than 900 tickets were sold in 24 hours for the trains, which

ran

several trips on the line between Hespeler and Guelph on Oct. 5. This was the first time an operating steam locomotive had

made

travelled over the line in

“I think people understand

since

it

rail

service and passenger

images trains, two themes

require heavy structural

repairs,

including the installation of new plumbing and electrical systems. Paul Langan was the chairman felt strongly

of this group and about preserving

the

station,

because he believed it was a vital part of the history in the communiBut the fire that eventually ty. destroyed the landmark does not surprise him.

“In downtown Hespeler. there is not a lot of policing, and it was evitable because anything goes in

have played history of Hespeler. The pictures were also displayed in a special outdoor art show' and open house that took the

-

That would be the

last

steam

train

would see pass by its rickety exterior and dilapidating platform. Less then a month later the building would be gone. Langan feels that at least some-

good can become of the where die station once

thing

property

place at the station. Officials with the

rail trav

you give it a chance. It's a tiny example that if you had passenger rail, people would gladly give up

Association Station Railway (HRSA). The goal of the non-profit organization was to restore and

that

it's

generally think the people support

the station

in

w as

it

been so long happened.” says Langan. "I

a rare event since

and

role

more than

three decades.

their cars.”

large

line,

which runs by the Hespeler station. The St. Thomas Central Railway, operated by the St. Thomas Locomotive Restoration Society,

placed on the exterior of the station. The Grade 10 art class created

a

of

city

Preston.

Hespeler and Galt,” says Langan. “Now the city hall is down in quote Cambridge-Galt. I think it’s just a question of it (the train station) is in Hespeler. So Hespeler kind of gets shafted. I've been living here for years and I’ve kind of noticed that.” This past October, Langan helped organize a steam-powered passen-

were shut once again. Almost two more decades passed, until a group of railway enthusiasts joined together and formed the Hespeler Heritage

hockey

the

made up of

is

el, if

depicting

to heritage.

historically

Jacob Hespeler students Secondary School in Cambridge made paintings that were later

from

Thomas

should have done more to help his association and should have a greater

The association attempted

doors

convert the station to either a family restaurant or a community centre. But the aging building would

The wooden caboose located behind the station was also burned the site. in the fire. As of mid-November the caboose was still at

I

tions.

of onlookers.

But

Hespeler as far as vandalism,” says Langan. “I had tried to restore it, so

St.

HRSA loved the

because they believed it created greater awareness of the railway station and it gave Hespeler s idea,

stood.

“The land

is still

think what the like to

do

trail

is start

CN

land and

I

people would

pushing their

trail

younger generation an opportunity to be part of the venture. But despite the efforts of the community, several years passed and die station continued to languish. with only tall weeds keeping it company throughout the chang-

near there." says Langan. "I think it w ill become a park or a green area.

ing seasons.

that a piece

Langan

believes that city officials

But the piles of burned wood that were scattered on the former Hespeler station site reveal much more than garbage waiting to be hauled away. It's a sad reminder

been

of railway history has

lost forever.


Feature

— SPOKE, November 24, 2003

Page 10

and get your

Strip

ad gets worldwide media

Controversial Bv CARLA

KOWALYK

We'll

pay your tuition!” floating her chest appeared in a

school newspaper.

The University of Windsor ran page colour ad

this full

Aug.

in its

26 edition of its school newspaper, The Lance, which advertised for to

girls

Katzman

contact

Enterprises and entertain at any one

of

its

entertainment

adult

three

clubs. In return their school tuition

would be paid. News media around

world

the

picked up the story of the backpage ad that caused a stir in the

Windsor community. D'Arcy Bresson, editor in-chief

The Lance,

of

know

said he didn’t

would cause such an uproar, alone a world-wide media blitz.

the ad let

“The story

is in

languages

even recognize,” Bresson “I

saw

website.

my

don’t

pop up on some didn’t even know what

I

was.

it

It’s

ters, just characters,

see

I

said.

my name

language

not even letand then you

name. ‘Blah, blah, blah,

D’Arcy Bresson,

blah, blah, blah.'

weird to see that.” Bresson made the decision to run ihe ad because Katzman Enterprises has been advertising with them for years. He didn’t think an ad that has been published It’s

many

in so

different

cause the reaction

it

ways would

did.

had originally sold the ad space to one of Katzman’s competitors. Katzman called me up telling me they wanted the space and they would pay for it right away," Bresson said. "So I said that was OK and that 1 didn’t want anything too controversial, and oddly enough..." Renaldo Agostino, the marketing "I

Katzman

director for

Enterprises,

said he choose to run his ad asking

one of the

for girls to entertain at

clubs because he used to attend the

University of Windsor. "I

know how papers to

sity

hard

for univer-

it is

sell their

ad space to

community," Agostino said. "When I saw the opportunity to put back into the school, I did." According to Agostino, girls that have worked for him have gone on

the

to

become

to do something with your life, come see us. We'll pay for your schooling." The program, as Agostino called

successful nurses, legal

it,

pays for $1,500 worth of a stutuition as reimbursement.

dents

Grades have to be kept up and she must work a certain number of hours. However, Agostino pointed

amount

out that the

is

negotiable.

they need

or they do a really

it

good job it can be raised,” he said. Lcn Offless. the advertising and manager for The marketing Brantford Expositor, said most newspapers run advertisements with the same rules in mind. “Ads can’t be deliberately misleading, use abusive language and use a sexual nature

written or

-

pornographic,” he said. “The last rule is the toughest. What may be

use good judgment these kinds of ads.”

think

it

was

“I don’t

that bad.

know why such

was made out of it,” he

a big deal

said. “It’s a

hot topic. If you’re going to

when

they hear that." Katie McGuire, a first-year early childhood education student at

Conestoga College, said she didn’t was ethical but she would probably entertain for her think the idea

college tuition. "1

would

paid for

if it

my

entire

actually a pretty Jessica,

good

who

19,

Erika Brown, a jazz dancer of 15 years, prepares herself for a show.

deal.”

“Tuition

a lot of

is

you’ve already

and one day you say ‘Not valid with any other

offer.

that

women in them,” he said. “A group of students were complaining that an ad with a woman in it is a form of sexual harassment, so for the meantime I would have to say no to running the ad again.” Bresson said that if Katzman Enterprises approached him asking

I'm broke,” the marketing student

would strip to my underwear. That stays on.” First-year marketing student Anita Kahorasanee disagreed with Jessica and McGuire. “I wouldn’t do it for sure,” the 18-year-old said. “I find to get

it

way

him to publish it again that he would try to talk them out of it. “Why would they want to run it

too

your tuition

again?" he said.

Kahorasanee’s friend, Shannon Curran, 18, said she was on the fence about the issue. “I would because it would pay for

my

because

I

wouldn’t

“The ad has done

I

would-

feel

about myself.”

larly as large as

“We had

it

was

the first time.

At participating McDonald's Restaurants

in Ontario. Offers at participating

tastefully, than there

Bresson agreed, saying he’s not about to become a moral authority

on campus - telling people what they should and shouldn't do. “If there’s one place where opinions are supposed to be free without censorship and without being condemned it’s in the academic

campus

its

job.

world.”

Bresson said he thinks people are

Katzman advertises in The

looking to change

pointed out that still

that.

He

pointed

out that everything in the world

it

campus

is

some-

place where opinions are supposed to

their businesses.”

themselves and develop their

if

The Expositor,

the advertisement

said he is

done

is

shouldn’t be.

“A- university

Lance, adding, “We’re not going to turn any advertisers away based on

thinks

Restaurants

done

is

that.”

Offless, at

the other day about running any ads

it

important.

shouldn’t be a problem,” he said.

$30-million

Enterprises

a formal complaint filed

“If

is

censored, where as on a university

like

He

good

he thinks freedom

tastefully, than

of speech

They’ve worth of advertising. It went around the world - it was on Jay Leno! You’re not going to get any bigger than got

market-

tuition,” the first-year

loves dancing but

her clothes to entertain.

with

money and

said. “I

degrading just paid for.”

off

She says she

would

strip to a certain extent.

Bresson said he would think twice

If

she would never take

didn't want to

give her last name, said she

about running the ad again, particu-

us.

(Photo by Carta Kowatyk)

tuition,” the 21 -year-old said. “It’s

who

danced, and you’ve been dancing for years

sell

something you get strippers and coeds. Everyone’s ears always perk up

not just to prospective

entertainers, but entertainers

for

to

Bresson said when he opened the envelope with the designed advertisement in it he honestly didn’t

ing student said. "But then

work

is

when booking

n’t

it

may

seen as sexual to one person not be to others. Our choice

"We’ve been doing this tuition program for 10 years," he said. offer

where

"If they’re in a position

aides and more.

"We

attention

you want

Strippers and co-eds? Those two images caused an uproar after a controversial ad featuring a blond girl with the caption "We want you.

across

tuition paid

flourish,”

going to

tell

he

said.

“If you’re

people to think for

own

ideas, but then say ‘don’t think like that,’ it’s

hypocritical.”

may vary from those shown.

Playing your favourites, every day of the week. MONDAY

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McChicken

2 Cheeseburgers © 2003

McDonald’s Restaurant of Canada Limited. For the exclusive use of McDonald's Restaurants of Canada Limited and

its

franchisees.


Entertainment *

Horoscope

,

if

Week of Nov. 23

£

Libra

.

4

September 23 October 22

freedom

for

-

By CARLA Everyone wants

to get things

Truth

in

completion. This

is

Now

is

the time to re-evaluate matters

the rush to

and

good time

a

soon revealed.

to

some

set

just to

say you're a better person for hav-

home.

ing

or her.

strong and pioneer-

spirit is

your ego get in the good time to push ahead with ideas or contract negoGoals you can meet tiations. ing.

Don't

way. This

let

is

a

Taurus

t

May

-

20

haunt them for

facial

Knowing

a willing listener.

advantage. Help

Sagittarius

(Mjt

tell

Examine

to you.

21

December 22

Invisible Darkness,

contents

in

explicit

tapes have since been destroyed following a court order that the girls’ families fought for. Kirsten Binstock, a first-year general arts and science student,

-

has read the book. She thinks the

ban w'as appropriate.

Your energy before you

chain of

is

act.

scattered.

Make good on

Think

but don't give in to unreasonable

Don't ignore the

demands. Be constructive

command. Others seem

uptight, set in their ways.

all

your promises,

efforts to solve

Are

in

your

was made families,”

in respect to the

the

20-year-old

June 22

Everyone wants things done his or her way, so roll with the punches.

Take a mental-health day to get

away from

responsibilities. Don't

be too trusting or willing to go the extra mile; unless you can afford it.

pains you

It

the answers

when you

judgment are

likely

think

someone

is

really

taking advantage

of you? Think about

Binstock’s reasoning

She

said

for

why

book was

she found the

leading up to

investigation

thing he refers to as the accident

Homolka

the

syndrome. “Many people slow down to see an accident or chase fire trucks in order to witness tragedy,” he said. “It

comes down

to

human beings

being voyeuristic.”

“However,

did find the descrip-

I

tion of the tapes to

be graphic and

sary.

charges.

"The simple knowledge of knowing that those two girls were raped, degraded and murdered is suffi-

of his

cient to

glorifies the killings

know

that Paul

and Karla

on the fam-

me.” penalizing “They’re Williams said during an interview

inflicted

cumstances.

with such great detail that it was hard for me to comprehend those segments of the book." Dale agreed that the exact details of the videotapes were not neces-

"The author

of the victims by having their children turned into what can only

“The trauma

got dif-

Blaming the Canadian justice system, both Dale and Binstock agreed that the Canadian courts made a deal with the devil - Karla. Karla will be out sometime in 2005 thanks to her plea bargain to testify against Paul for lesser

quite difficult to read,” she said.

good crime story. However, Williams said the charges were not necessary and that the book was not as harsh as the media made it out to be.

ilies

trials,

ferent sentences under different cir-

Paul

is

serving a term for the rest

life in total isolation in

change

new

their

minds and look

-

ting

the

punishment

fits

shock he "Great writers do not need

"An author only needs and

titillate

said.

our basic

to

instincts."

such lurid accounts of beastliness to find an audience - their writing should be good enough to speak for itself."

at;

-

20

People around you are cranky; morale is low. Stay calm through the chaos and remember who you are.

Read

all

the fine print

-

legal

troubles are possible now.

it.

Virgo

1 People are

August 23 September 22 more defensive

now'.

give in to intimidation or

No one wants to waste Expect last-minute cancella-

jpure.

ons of plans.

Diana O'Neill

is

a third-

year journalism student who dabbles with astrology

and likes

to

read tarot

cards just for kicks.

Old

man

winter arrives!

and while walking to school Nov. 12. However, ram

Students brave cold winds and blowing snow this week. spring-like temperatures are expected

the

crime:

options.

February 19

the

Kingston Penitentiary. Dale said the charges laid against Williams are appropriate and fit-

Pisces

when emo-

Do you

Karla

she decided to read the simple.

He thinks the book was so appealing because of somea different way.

deal with the

Remain strong. Keep everything aboveboard; allow others to

August 22

Try to appreciate what you have; don't let envy into your life. Errors tions cloud reason.

-

people because and Karla seemed to have everything,” she said. “They were attractive, successful and a seemingly normal couple.” Dale agreed with Binstock, but in Paul

don't have;

March

in

devil

happened. captivates

“It

ask.

Leo July 23

made a

really

to the questions others;

**

-

The Canadian courts

sary to write a

agrees with Binstock.

January 20 February 18

July 22

-

daughters’

details of their daughters’ deaths."

"The victims’ families should

Michael Dale, a professor of libConestoga College,

Aquarius

of their

details

degradation and humiliation.”

be allowed to grieve without the public hearing about the explicit

eral studies at

Cancer

the

deserve the most severe penalties the law allows,” he said. "Nor is more information than that neces-

said.

from being pushy. Find time for deep belly laughs and new pals.

you?

“It

girls’

problems; refrain

in

me down,

during their separate

videotapes

January 19

about reliving their nightmares

up, shut

ing.

book

who is a Canadian writer from Harrison, Ont.. describes the

Capricorn

June 21

-

deaths.

have to worry

me

and ruin me.” Since the charges, Williams’ website has been restricted and his book Invisible Darkness removed from bookstore shelves. Binstock said she thinks the book was once a best-seller because it feeds people’s need to know what

hostage.

graphic detail the

The

Gemini

not

23.

out of

Ken and Barbie, as Paul and Karla were dubbed by the media

in

detail.

May

pain of their daughters’

They should

Oct.

me

sentencing of charging and Bernardo and Homolka interest-

showed

Williams,

nowhere; eliminate the unwanted.

regrettable,” he said.

is

on

situations of the girls being held

In the

of your

all

book.

view the

tances that they suspect have read

in Canada was implemented. The ban prohibited anyone from recreating in any medium the contents of the infamous videotapes. The

November 22 December 21

in his

fact that he got to

the eyes of colleagues or acquain-

obeying the court. During the court proceedings on the killings of Leslie Mahaffy and Kristen French, a publication ban

relationships that are going

your goals and define your wants.

expressions and their

“The

pleas to be released.

ply with publication bans and dis-

mean

ceed on your own. Re-examine

last

offences including failure to com-

is

those closest to you what they

even though you are able to suc-

the

including

on the horizon; meet the challenge head on. over. Opposition

likely

centre stage. Take the time to

on the way,

is

lives,

if

are

loss

Lovers and close friends take

what people need gives you an

The book

life.

great detail

in

greed or insecurity take

Confusion and let

1

business, effectively. They’re try-

ing to shut

Dale thought that Williams went

“The families of the victims have enough to deal with enduring the

their

The demands of personal securiweigh heavily on you now.

timized twice.”

videotapes

days of the victims'

ty

“They’re trying to put

based on the case, those two names

October 23

21

of

with

Dale said. incomprehensible,” “These families should not be vic-

read the book. Invisible Darkness,

will

-

one

to

CTV News

be described as porn stars would be

too far with the details

tapes

Be

Paul

Stephen Williams, a 54-year-old author of two books stemming from the Bernardo and Homolka case, is being charged with 94

you

Pagel

-

speech

of

Canada’s most horrifying serial murder cases. For people who have

describes

quickly are important right now.

April 20

linked

Scorpio November

Your

be

forever

build investments or remodel your

known him

and

Bernardo. Those two names will

long-laid plans in

motion. Call an old lover

KOWALYK

Homolka

Karla

done quickly. Don't overlook important details

is

2003

24,

Author speaks out

Nov. 30

-

SPOKE, November


Page 12

Entertainment

— SPOKE, November 24, 2003

Holiday movies are upon uS By JEFF

HEUCHERT

One thing you can always expect heading into the holiday season is an abundance of movies coming to theatres. This is the time of year movie studios get to flex their muscles and show off their best picks for box office success. Earlier this month New Line Cinema released its Christmas

movie the

Elf, starring Will Ferrell. In

comedy

Ferrell plays

Buddy, a

grown man who thinks he’s an elf. He comes to New York City to find his father, played by James Caan. Once there. Buddy is disappointed to see New York has lost the Christmas

spirit.

He

Master and Commander. Released by 20th Century Fox, the film is based on a series of novels. In the film, Crowe plays Captain Jack

ture

then sets out to

and bring the win Christmas spirit back to New York In its first weekend, Elf City. grossed more than $30 million, and over his father

“The

Also

this

Russell Crowe’s epic

final

chapter

in

Jackson’s trilogy ultimate story of

is

Peter the

good

it.

If the film

month was

versus

evil.”

home. The film brings to odd and colourful sets as we remember them from the book. Dec. 12 will mark the release of Warner Brother’s epic hopeful. The

arrives

novels in the series.

life the

Last

week Universal

released

Cat

in

Myers

adventure

does well, look

comes to a house to lighten up two children's rainy day. After taking the kids for an all-day adventure the house is left in ruins. The cat must then clean up the mess before the children’s mother

cat that

for a sequel, as there are 19 other

its

the

Pictures

much-anticipated adap-

tation of the Dr.

continues to do strongly. released

Aubrey, who is thrust into battle after being attacked by an enemy ship. With a badly damaged ship, Aubrey decides to chase the enemy across two oceans to try and cap-

Seuss classic. The

Hat.

Canadian Mike

stars in the title role, as the

Last Samurai, starring Tom Cruise. Cruise plays an alcoholic Civil War veteran named Woodrow Algren.

The film is set during the 1870s when Algren is sent to Japan to

IMPORTANT REMINDER

emperor’s soldiers, who preparing to wipe out the remaining samurai. After being injured and caught by the samurai,

train the

are

Algren spends time with them and learns the samurai honour code. He then must decide

Application deadline to request tutoring Is

December

2,

who

to side

with

before the final battle.

On

Dec. 17 the third instalment

of the Lord of the Rings trilogy hits theatres with The Return of the

2003

The film picks up with

King.

Sauron’s forces attempting to destroy mankind. The fate of the kingdom lies in the hands of Frodo and Aragon. Aragon, played by

Viggo Mortensen,

battles for

mid-

dle-earth while trying to distract

Sauron long enough so that Frodo, played by Elijah Wood, can fulfill

Mount Doom to destroy The final chapter in direc-

his trip to

the ring.

tor Peter Jackson's trilogy is

the

ultimate story of good versus evil. Christmas Day will see the release of Paycheck, a sci-fi fantasy starring Ben Affleck. Affleck

plays Michpel Jennings, a brilliant

computer engineer who works on top-secret projects. After finishing

them he has

his short-term

memory

erased so that he doesn’t reveal

information to anyone. At end of a three-year project, instead of a paycheque Jennings is secret

the

given an envelope filled with ran-

dom

and is told he agreed paycheque in place of the envelope. With no short-term objects,

to forfeit his

memory Jennings

can't prove any-

thing until he discovers the objects

envelope are clues that will

in the

help him uncover the truth.

Also on Christmas Day the

live-

action version of Peter Pan hits theatres.

tale

in

The

film follows the classic

of Peter Pan and the lost boys

Neverland where they engage in Captain Hook. with

battles

Universal Pictures decided to fol-

Don’t get caught

in a

maze.

A tutor may be able to

low the original story and cast for the first time ever, a boy as Peter Pan.

The

film

will

boast superb

from Industrial Light and Magic, the company behind the Hulk and Pirates of the special

help.

effects

Caribbean.

General

Cinemas

manager of Galaxy Cambridge Bruce

in

Rostamian says they’re expecting

Applications available in Student Services

Rm. 2B04

The Lord of the Rings, Cat in the Hat, and The Last Samurai to be their big money-makers this holi-

PEER

day season. For more information on these movies, or any others this holiday season,

visit

Yahoo Movies

www.movies.yahoo.com/.

at


SPOKE, November

ftuide to music for the holiday By KATE BATTLER With

all

the live and greatest hits

CDs and DVDs

coming out, it will be easy to find something for almost everyone on your that

are

A

lot

of bands arc releasing great-

est hits

his career.

Bon

Big

hits

Jovi has released a greatest

album, This Left Feels Right:

Greatest Hits with a Twist, but

wouldn’t recommend

albums

holiday season

just in time for (he -

a perfect gift for a

hardcore fan or just a casual

listen-

er.

R.F.M, In Time: The Best of R.E.M. 1988-2003, is a great gift for the fan that likes R.E.M. but doesn’t want to commit to buying an album where they will only lis-

the

I

for a fan

it

on one album have

looking to get the singles

CD. The songs on

this year.

list

out that arc more for hardcore fans.

all

been redone and are very different from the classics that fans all know and love. Moby and Pearl Jam, on the other hand, have released rarities and Ball

sides albums.

CD/DVD combo

a

for

Moby

fans

who

18:

pack,

the hits without having to switch

between four or five discs. Other wonderful compilations that are

Essential

Bruce Springsteen,

LeAnn Rimes -

Greatest

Hits,

Counting Crows - Films About Ghosts: The Best of, Motley Crue Music to Crash... Vol. 1, No Doubt -The Singles 1992-2003 and Peter Gabriel - Hit.

live

per-

is

many

of

classics

their

Dirty Deeds, and

Highway

in Buffalo.

Gabriel -

life.

It

also

Peter

Growing Up Live show-

cases his Milan, Italy performance

is

Dave

Matthews

.

Below

an essential piece to any

#3. Ludacris,

fan’s collection.

sions.

This

DVD

is

Chicken*N*Beer #4. Gerald Levert, Stroke

Of Genius #5. Wyclef Jean, The Preacher's Son

an absolute

must for any Pink Floyd

fan.

#6.

Too Short, Married To The Game

#7. R. Kelly, The R. In Collection: Volume

R&B

More Street The Mixtape

Pt. 2:

#9. Chingy, Jackpot

#10. Various Artists, Now 14 #11. Anthony Hamilton, Cornin' From Where I'm

(CD/DVD) and Band - The

From

Central Park Concert.

scenes footage. These are great for it gives them a look into the musician’s life backstage

the first seven videos that helped put Radiohead on the map, and

and on the road. There also some albums coming

Lionel Ritchie - Collection, which consists of 16 videos highlighting

these

albums,

like

with live and

fans because

#12. Loon,

are

Television Commercials, which

Loon

#13. Beyonce, Dangerously In Love

is

(Photo by Kate Battler)

With all the live and greatest hits albums being released right now, you’ll have no problem finding something for the music fan on your Christmas list this year.

COUNSELLOR'S CORNER: Mature Students workplace or raising a family Returning to school after years of being out in the find it difficult to juggle the can be intimidating. Mature students sometimes they'll be able to remember demands of family, school and work. They're unsure if unpleasant experiences from high course material or may associate school with

DMX,

#14.

Grand Champ

Bad Boy's Da Band, Too Hot For T.V.

#15.

RECOGNIZE THE SIGNS OF STROKE

WHEN YOU

school days.

SEE

that might ease some Here are a few observations about mature students

of their

uncertainties about returning to school:

THEM. A VISION PROBLEMS Sockkfl Ion of i ttioft. particularly in

and can usually relate > Mature students usually don't have memory problems

>

1

#8. Fabolous,

Dreams

These albums include: Linkin Park - Live In Texas (CD/DVD), Coldplay - Live

eye

Speakerboxxx/The Love

to Hell.

ruins of old Pompeii from 1972. Also included on. the album are interviews from the making of the Darkside of the Moon album and footage from the recording ses-

from her concert

my

in

#2 OutKast,

like:

Thunderstruck, Highway to Hell,

members and backstage footage, and Avril Lavigne - My World, includes a look into her

Blood

20-track compilation that includes

includes interviews with the band

are looking for

R&B

Albi turns

a

great

is

Top 15

to Billboard.com)

For the more indepth fan there

RHCP, STP, Sheryl Crow and LeAnn Rimes, also include bonus

DVDs

includes

Four

Donington,

for

behind the

of

Flicks, which

-

at

B-Sides,

many different DVDs out there. They include compilations of music videos that made the groups famous like Radiohead - 7

Some

Stones

Rolling

Live

Pink Floyd also released Live at Pompeii, a live performance at the

during the latest tours.

get

The

— Page 15

#1. JaRule-

AC/DC -

was filmed during their 40 Licks tour, Our Lady Peace - Live,

The

all

You

lovers.

There are also live DVDs that were filmed while the artists were on tour over the past year such as:

that

coming out or are already in stoics arc: Red Hot Chili Peppers - Greatest Hits, Stone Temple Pilots - Thank You, Sheryl Crow - The Very Best of Sheryl Crow, The Eagles - The Very Best of The Eagles, Bruce Springsteen -

Greatest hits compilation albums are also great for in the car.

their greatest hits.

This

something extra and different. The Pearl Jam album, Lost Dogs: Rarities and B Sides, is also a great album for longtime fans. It includes the hit Yellow Ledbetter, which has become a staple of their live shows but has not been readily available on an album. It also includes songs like Sweet Lew and Last Kiss. There is also a great selection of live albums coming out and many of them come with a DVD of live behind-the-scenes footage and looks. Many of them were filmed

ten to a couple of songs.

for the tour of the

-

(As of Nov. 22 according

same name. There are also two other DVDs that will be interesting to music

Also available is Great Great Big, which includes videos and live versions of

Sea

2003

Billboard Chart

formances of 50 songs as well as a behind-the-scenes documentary

These are great

longtime fans. Moby,

season

27,

easily. their learning to "real life situations: more Mature students are often very motivated. They know

A HEADACHES

A

WEAKNESS

Sudden wakuckv rtumboes* and or uejliw: in the Ewe, one or leg

/

TROUBLE SPEAKING las of speech

/

DIZZINESS

Unsseadi&ee or todden fdh. apKafir with any of the abowr

sometimes concerned about fitting in socially. Student through a Mature Students brop-In which Services can help, either individually, or ideas. For more information, watch for provides a place to meet and exchange Services. Services bulletin boards or contact Student Student on flyers

Mature students are

or or double vision

Sudden. scvTit and urukuJ headaches

why they re here and

their life plans. how furthering their education fits in with work habits and time > Mature students can draw on previously learned management skills.

ooc

also

,

A Message from Student Services

HEAR!

AND STROKE FOUNDATION

Seek immediate medical attention if vou have any of these svmptoms.


Students score with intramurals Carissa Coleman, a second-year police foundation student, and

By BRYAN MARTIN

a second-year marketing student, are the intramural directors. Coleman said things are

Amanda Zettel,

Although intramural sports at Conestoga College mean nothing to the majority of students, to

some

running smoothly and

everything.

it’s

Chris Maa. a first-year computer programmer analyst student, said for some students it's how they get through their week of classes and homework. If students know they have an intramural game, it makes

with the turnout.

the week go by quicker because students have a game to look for-

need a

ward

love playing basketball

on Tuesdays because the beginning of the

and

I

carry

me

little

it’s

week

spark to

through the rest

ning of the

it’s

the begin-

I need a little through the rest

week and

spark to carry

me

done, with

football

having wrapped up

and at the

student

All the sports are co-ed so

all stu-

it

a shot.”

Ice

referees to

make

sure the

dents have a chance to play what-

run smoothly and no

ever sport they

out.

like.

is

on Tuesdays

in the

runs from 4:30 to 6:30

p.m.

and the quality of play gets better. “I don’t know what it is about the

give

in

Basketball

gym and

hockey has 10 teams playing the league. The games have two

already underway, which consists of ice hockey, ball hockey, basket-

come and

and volleyball.

on Wednesday from 7 to 10 p.m. Volleyball as well as ice hockey will resume after Christmas holiis

Coleman said things will get more exciting during playoff time

I

of intramurals

tough to beat.” Ball hockey is played in the gym on Mondays, and Thursdays from

to

encourage students

better, so

set

game. “The Roughriders really get into the games, which makes for an exciting game,” said Zettel. “The Roughriders are good, but the defending champions are the Firefighters, who are going to be

see a lot of students

participating in these events, she said. “The more that come out the

is

The next

adds a level of intensity to the

days. “It’s great to

end ol

Rez Roughrider rough, which

little

nights and runs

computer programmer analyst

softball

October.

Zettel said the

team can be a

Volleyball

Chris Maa,

of the week,” said Maa. The fall set of intramurals are

on Tuesdays from

are

4:30 to 5:30 p.m.

of the week.”

on

basketball

playing

Tuesdays, because

ball

pleased

to.

love

"I

“I

is

The games

4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

fights

games break

playoffs. rals,

I

know

it’s

just intramu-

but these teams play like

it's

for the Stanley Cup.”

Women's

source

group

(Photo by Bryan Martin)

Conestoga College students take part in an intramural basketball game on Nov. 1 1 in the recreation centre. Students can come out and play Tuesdays at 4:30 p.m.

Condors ready Men’s hockey

Writing Contest

good

off to

By JASON SMITH

trying

make

to

Condors team

Violence isn’t right

Conestoga’s male varsity hockey !

team

is

back on the

ice for

what

they hope to be a very exciting and

Contest Criteria: Deadline:

by the Women's Resource Group of remembrance of the women who died on Dec.

Friday, Dec. 5th, 2003. Sponsored

Conestoga College in 6th, 1989 at Ecole Polytechnique

in Montreal.

two

son with a win and a

tie

home games

Cambrian

against

College on the Nov.

1

in

weekend.

Conestoga battled through both games, giving them three points in the

league

managed quently

Entries:

are off to a great

opening the regular sea-

start after

They

standings.

also

to find the net quite fre-

in the

two games, scoring

McDermott

Andrew

$150 - $100 - $50. Winners will be notified by Jan. 16th, 2004. Winning entries will appear in Spoke, be announced on CJIQ and posted on the web site. All entries become the property of the Women's Resource Group.

have to do their part

team

in

the

playoffs,” said Cressman.

The Condors hope to continue when they travel

with their success

Peterborough to play Sir Sanford Fleming on Nov. 27. The next home game will be played to

against St. Clair College on Dec. 5 the rec centre.

at

Game

time

is

7:30 p.m. The Condors will also play an away game against Seneca

Conestoga

6.

played

to

three goals

and two assists for five two games of play. Brent MacDermid has two goals and an

Results were unavailable at press

points in

time.

points.

three

for

the

Both are

Dave Cressman, the team’s new head coach and a former NHL player with the Minnesota North Stars, has to like the way his team is

looking so far

this season.

Cressman and his entire coaching staff are hoping the success

Conestoga students are encouraged to come out and take part in the Condors’ home games. There is no charge to anybody with a Conestoga student card. “Nothing’s better as a player than looking out and seeing two, three, 400, 500 people watching your team play," said Marlene Ford,

Conestoga.

an exciting season and hope to see

dence,

their

team can do come play-

gets the energy flowing,

makes you want

to

it

produce and

The 2003-04 Conestoga Condors

team over the

men’s hockey team consists defencemen Andrew Maver, Jeff Jones, Matt Little, Josh Dennis, Vance Stark, Ryan Taube, Doug Laginske and Dave Cook; forwards Andrew McDermott, Ben Goodings, Brent MacDermid, Kevin Barnes, Tim Schlux, Reid

this year,

but he will con-

centrate

address and phone number.

contribute in their role.

on developing a strong team atmosphere where it is understood that every player on the roster wants to help each other and "It’s a team game,” he said. “Everyone has to work together to play their role. As the coach, I have

to gain the respect of

my

players

and at the same time, my players have to believe in me as their It’s

Getting

at

boost of confi-

said he not only hopes

Entries may be submitted online to the web site or in hard copy, clearly labeled Writing Contest, to Student Services, Room 2B04. All entries must include the student's name, student ID number, Program, email

coach.

it

"It’s a

succeed.”

off time.

course of

director

athletic

continues as they look forward to

to build a successful

to:

all

19.

The coach

Submit

a reality.

“They’ll

host

what

Information: See www.conestogac.on.ca/~pstadden/wcontest.html

make

Humber College on Nov.

is

returning players.

Prizes:

for this

team’s leading scorer thus far with

assist

Fees: None

name

a goal that the entire team, staff included, hope to

College on Dec.

a total of 10 goals.

Current students of Conestoga College may enter poems, 1st person accounts or fiction in English up to 500 words. Submissions must be printed in a Word document, 12 point font, double spaced. Entries will be judged on their impact in relation to an anti-violence message.

a

start

is

in order to get this

successful season.

The Condors

to fly

a

two-way

into

the

of:

Porter,

Tyler

Thompson,

A.J.

Yoworski, Bob Clayton, Ryan Ferguson, Scott Fraser, Jord4

Ryan Baird, JareX Rogers and Scott Bradley; an?

Thompson,

goaltenders Jason Lafortune and

street.”

playoffs

varsity

and

Jeff Young.


Sports

By NICK

HORTON

pitcher in the past 15 consecutive

Say what you

will

about

These

the

Toronto Blue Jays, but you can’t knock their ace Roy Halladay.

On

Nov. I, Halladay was named American League Cy Young Award winner. If you have been keeping an eye on the Jays over the last eight is

it

the

mound.

pul great pitchers on

In four

of the

last eight

years, Toronto has paid salary to three

Cy Young Award

winners.

won the prestigious award in 1997 and '98, while Pat Hentgcn took it 1996.

in

Halladay finished the season 22-7 with a 3.25

ERA

and 204

With the season winding down, he solidified his spot as the

game

a

game of

10-inning

Sept.

6.

In

$900,000 contract and outfielder Frank Catalanotto to a one-year $2. 3-million

contract,

Mike Bordick

as the only batter

without a contract.

news for

leaving

This

is

good

a batting order that

is

96

now

SO

H

is

He

and recognize

He

talent.

Bus.

Dec. 30-Jan

persistence

It

is

to

BAR HOP

Book Friends

FREE!!

and gave up only three runs. At one point during the season,

extend Halladay ’s contract.

The Jays

power

to

trimmed

bad for a team that payroll and changed

(Internet photo)

Roy Halladay pitched nine complete games recorded two shutouts and won 22 games.

this

past season,

Thames

Travel (Todd)

1-800-962-8262

Education discounts for holiday shoppers. Put Apple on your gift-giving— or receiving— list this holiday season. And get the break you need With iPod an entire

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music collection can

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hit

the road. All-new iSight makes

colleagues a crystal-clear reality.

And

live

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finished in third place

for the sixth consecutive time this

not

Dec. 30th.

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without a doubt that his

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rep-

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spanning three months and joined Roger Clemens as the only other

26

1

represents the organi-

develop a competitive team for the

15 consecutive starts

1

signifies

do everything within

won

1

Local Rental Search Site

General Manager J.P Ricciardi will

Halladay

HR

R

everything right with the Jays organi-

Most the

hand of the Tampa Bay Devil

2

CLASSIFIEDS

Rays, he struck out eight batters

at the

36

204 253

change.

defeat during September, a 5-2 loss

SHO

G

Roy Halladay.

tem and farm league the Blue Jays have developed in the shadow of mismanagement and ownership

only

ERA ER 3.25

scouting for the next potential

Stats

Record- 22 -7

Oakland, the Jays could be a threat. You can bet Ricciardi is out right

resents the talented scouting sys-

the

2003 Season

Many Places 4 U

ers

complete his

They recently resigned

zation’s ability to stick with play-

shutout against the Detroit

Tigers on

decisions.

catcher Greg Myers to a one-year

in

Major League Baseball. The Jays have a goal to be in the playoffs by 2005 and for that to happen pitching must be addressed. II' Ricciardi can manage to work some of the magic he utilized in

the pressure to succeed.

that

1

was

A

— Page 15

2003

Look4aPlace.com

zation.

number contender for the AL Cy Young Award. Halladay started six games during the month of September, five of which he pitched complete games, giving up a total of only six runs on 26 hits. His most impressive

seasons Class

one of the most feared lineups

24,

With the Montreal Expos’ on the brink of destruction, the Jays will soon be, like the Raptors, Canada’s team and Toronto must thrive under

Halladay

strike-

outs.

five

within

This off-season the Jays have already made some

it.

Before Halladay, Roger Clemens

home

who oply two down to play

sent

But winning numerous pitching awards, players’ choice awards, and being an All-Star isn't what the 26-year-old stands for in Toronto. Halladay means more to the Toronto Blue Jays organization then wins. Halladay portrays hope to an organization that needs

hard to say they haven’t

at least tried to

was

some key decision-makers the organization.

ball.

I

the

years,

win

to

statistics are incredible for

a pitcher ago,

60 years

games.

SPOKE, November

for details.

TM and © 2003

Apple Computer. Inc

All

gifts

from Apple.

rights rserved. 1300421 A-CE

www.apple.ca/winterbreak


Page 16

— SPOKE, November 24, 2003

DON'T DRINK AND DRIVE. CALL 1-888-TAXIGUY.

1-888-TAXIGUY

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