Page 1

1

Attack of the Condors The varsity rugby team won bronze at

Halloween howl Students

filled the Sanctuary Halloween party on Oct. 30.

for the

NEWS

the championships

Guild

Welland

in

Nov.

and

1

Award handed out

Disability services counsellor Rick

2.

was honoured Feature

Monday, November

10,

for biking

Casey

across Canada.

1

2003

Conestoga College, Kitchener

35th Year

— No. 9

College security stepped up By CARLA

SANDHAM ty

After a rash of thefts lege.

security

at the col-

services

countermeasures

to

taking

is

fight

the

crime.

Susan Gilbert, manager of securiand parking services at Sheridan,

said about 100 doors in the school

can

be" electronically

Therefore,

accessed. order to enter stu-

in

dents must swipe a card, which

The

latest

security

is

addition

to

improve

after-school admittance

passes.

Although the policy may sound

new

to students, chief of security A1 Hunter said they have been in place for years.

"We just stepped ment," he said.

up enforce-

At 5 p.m. each day specialty labs and high-risk areas, such as journalism and broadcast labs, are locked. Hunter said students who wish to use the labs in the evening must get a faculty

which

member

indicates

to sign a pass,

the

student’s

monitored by security

The cards

let

is

staff.

know who

security

and when a person enters and can determine who is permitted. For instance, she said a marketing stu-

would not allow him or her access to a graphic design lab. Gilbert said there are also dent’s card

between 75 and 80 cameras around Sheridan’s campus. “There are cameras

in halls,

set

up

park-

ing lots, classrooms, labs and areas w'orth a lot of money," she added.

Mandy design

Corbiere, student

at

a

graphic

Fanshawe

name, number and times he or she

College in London, said they also use swipe cards in specialty labs.

will be there. Then the student must present the pass to security before the door is unlocked.

"We also have cameras in the labs to stop people from stealing, eating and drinking in the labs,”

Some students think the policy is inconvenient, but Hunter said it’s the way to go.

said Corbiere.

“We have

better control

balance

still

and can with

accessibility

and security,” he said. Hunter added if a student

safety

an overnight pass or a

requires for

an extended period of

time, the

program dean must sign

pass

the pass as well as the teacher.

And

for safety reasons.

said there must be a three graphic their

Hunter

minimum of

design students

in

department after hours.

Some

other colleges use a

more

sophisticated system.

Sheridan College

in

Oakville

is

currently in the process of imple-

Conestoga has cameras on the second and third floors, but none on the fourth or in parking lots where most of the thefts have

first,

occurred.

Between July and October about $6,000 worth of camera equipment was stolen from the fourth floor television editing suites and several stereo systems have been lifted from cars in various lots. Other technical equipment was also stolen throughout the college. Hunter said cameras were not previously installed in parking lots and on the fourth floor because they didn’t have the funds.

menting keyless entry.

Continued on Page 2

(Photo by Ryan Connell)

CSI vice-president

of student activities

Ethan

140-pound hog. See Page 10

for

a roasted pig. The CSI sponsored a pig 200 students showed up to chow down on the

Miller digs into

roast for students at the residence on Oct. 30. About

more photos.

Students pig out on pork By

RYAN CONNELL

“It

went

beyond

far

my

expecta-

tions.”

When

free food

was offered

to

Third-year special studies student

students at the first-ever residence

and resident adviser Debbie Brock w'as in charge of managing and promoting the event to make sure

pig roast, there

could pass

it

was no way they

up.

The Conestoga Residence and Conference Centre held a pig roast for students in the residence's first-

floor lounge, courtesy of

Conestoga

Approximately 200 students showed up for a piece of the roasted pig that weighed 63 kilograms. Baked beans, casseroles, buns, pop and fixings were also donated by the CSI for the residence event. The number of students that lined up outside the lounge and into the lobby exceeded the expectations of Ethan Miller, CSFs vice-president of student

activities.

was unsure how many students would come to the pig roast Miller

(Photo by Tim Murphy)

£

Nature’s light

solar flare.

show

were out in full force Oct. 28 due to a powerful The lights were seen as far south as California. lights

because the event wasn't advertised until the day before.

"Word

spread

through a wheat

like

field."

wild

amazing. seemed happy about "It

w'ent

Everybody and I'm it

looking forward to seeing another

fire

Miller said.

The

roast

is

events that CSI

one of many hoping to hold in

just is

conjunction with residence. CSI

has already helped fund different residence events like a trip

Niagara Falls shopping trip

in

to

to

September, and a Toronto on Nov.

29.

Assistant

leave each day to walk to classes. “It w-as probably one of the most organized events we’ve had." Oberle said. "CSI has done a great job and w e thank them for all their

help so far this year."

CSI spent about $350

students show'ed up.

pig roast in the future." Brock said.

Students Inc. (CSI) on Oct. 30.

Ti^Fiorthern

3

general

manager

Genevieve Oberle said she was impressed by the student turnout at the pig roast, with it being one of the most successful events held so far in residence this year.

Oberle said the great attendance could be attributed to the pig roaster being set up by the back door of residence where students

the

food,

the

pig

in total for

itself

costing

from Egli's Meat Market in Baden. Ont. Miller said he would like to do more pig roasts in the future, but they involve a lot of work. "The thing with roasting pigs is about

$200

people just see the romantic side of it. They only see the end product

and they don't see that you have to gel up at 5:30 in the morning and lift a 140-pound sw ine onto a rolisserie." Miller said.

The that

industrial-sized

pig roaster

cooked the pig was something

Miller

made over

the

summer

as a

personal project.

He hopes battle

to organize a

combined

of the bands and a huge pig

roast at the college in the future, as

well as another pig roast at the res-

idence in the spring.


News Corned!

down by

Students struck

teacher

CSI appeal board decision By JEFF

The CSI has upheld its decision who to disqualify the two students appealed

to

from the board of director’s elec-

be

Nizar Abboud and Francesco Robles both lost their appeals in a unanimous decision by the appeal

also disqualified but chose not to

three candidates

was made on

after discussion

Amongst

CSI

the

He

the

Falconer said the accusation was

disappointing

Justin

who had

make

to

the

decision, asked Falconer for

final

intention

was

and

that

how does

anyone deal with you honestly say.'

what can

that,

doesn’t think the rules

Abboud

were significant enough

point.

disqualification

campaign

three broken

was due

s

"Pulling the race card,

his advice from a policy stand-

The

Ekpen

create attention.

to

to

to result in

their disqualification.

policies.

The rules stated candidates were allowed one poster per 30 feet of

“Anyone can take a poster off and it makes it somewhere else,

stick

no difference,

it’s

no

The

legitimate

not an issue.

sleep on Oct. 18 at the age of 61.

dents, said

be filled. Falconer said the decision on how it will be tilled will be left up

clerk

Kawalec took his job seriously, Lowndes. “He was proud to have worked for the college for so long.”

Kawalec was

He

said

will

it

Country Club. Donations can be made in his name to St. Mary’s Hospital, the Heart and Stroke Foundation of

campaign

the

be under his

insis-

“They’re so experienced, they’ve put so much time into the CSI, it’s sad that they’re probably upset, I

tence that they review the election policies at the end of the year, and

don’t blame them.’’

make needed changes.

also a previous

Zehrs employee and a former owner of the Conestoga Golf and

who now acknowledges problems policies.

oversees the continu-

said

This whole experience has raised a red flag, according to Falconer,

to the board.

who

attending his classes,” she said.

tion for the last spot.

of

the

ing education courses. “They all looked forward to

board of directors. Falconer encourages the three to stay involved and even run again it the board decides to hold a byelec-

some

Norma Lowndes,

Waterloo campus administration

to the

with

Kawalec more

for

than 20 years. He was well liked by the stu

were acclaimed to their positions on the board, leaving one position

and brought a very neat perspective

(Ted)

Thaddeus

taught these courses

remaining candidates

five

bartending and mixology

A

to

He said last year when Robles and Ekpen were on the board they didn’t always agree with the other board members, and because he was with them this year, the CSI thought he would cause problems for the board as well. Falconer disagreed and said Robles and Ekpen were both very active people who had a lot to say

discriminat-

dents.

Falconer.

Dusick,

for

ORMSTON

teacher at Conestoga College s Waterloo campus died in his

happen.”

were

they

reason and that the CSI has a specific reason why they don’t want the three of them on the board.

ing against non-Canadian born stiu

the

between the CSI Judy Dusick, president

disqualified

body.

CSI was

to

would have

not, they

thinks

in an e-mail accused the CSI of being a proficient racist student

said the

was

Abboud

who

chief returning officer

and

the accusations, the

all

someone went

if

had an advantage.

most serious came from Ekpen,

of the election

Monday morning

material

were followed as

fair opportunity.

had a

Ekpen, was

appeal the decision. The decision to disqualify

rules

written, so that all the candidates

board, Oct. 24. third student. Sele

Falconer said

three of their

all

By JENNIFER

that with the

them together on the board and only six total members, every vote would have been difficult. “The CSI doesn’t want people who stand up for themselves,” said Abboud, “they want people to go with whatever they want to

three of

vote and campaign material was up, and other candidate’s still

was a tough Falconer said decision but he wanted to make the

Abboud explained

three candidates chose to use

one poster with names on it.

certain

a

it

sure

tion.

A

down by

taken

deadline.

disqualification

their

The

wall, posters could not be posted in the business wing and posters had

HEUCHERT

dies

Ontario or the Children’s Wish Foundation.

Students win new Canada Millennium scholarships By JAMES

Millennium

Canada

The

Ronda Shantz and law and security student Justin Kennedy received

CLARK

Scholarship Foundation has award-

ed the in-course excellence award to five Conestoga College students for their academic achievement

and role

A

in their

total

more

community.

of 830

than

institutions

200

students,

from

post-secondary

across

Canada,

received the award.

There were up to 100 renewable $5,000 scholarships, up to 200 renewable $4,000 scholarships and 900 $4,000 scholarships available. has It is the first year the award been distributed. Students are eligible for the award if they achieved a

77 per cent average in their previous year of studies at a post-secondary institution. The student must display strong leadership qualities and perform volunteer work that betters their community.

Only 16 Conestoga College students applied for the award.

To apply a student must have two references, one from a friend and one from a faculty member. An application form must also be filled Sarah Roberts

and one other

Conestoga student, whose name was unavailable, were the recipients of the renewable $4,000 schol-

They must maintain

their

average and continue to be an asset to their

said he was surprised read the email that said he was one of the winners because he realized the chances of winning

Kennedy

when he

were slim. Kennedy volunteered

community

award next

to receive the

year.

at a

number

of different events at Conestoga.

He

preformed security duties at pub nights and helped with Explore

Conestoga days. Outside of school Kennedy volunat Planned Parenthood, a

teered

group

that

group Kennedy coordinated a conference that educated youth on making responsible sexual

Through

decisions.

He

said the 10 to 15 hours of vol-

unteer

work he did a week was

done not

Getting crafty

this

to

win

community. “You don’t really plan your volunteer work around something like this.” said

Kennedy,

who

is

plan-

ning on joining the military alter

graduating

Mary Anne Helmond vintage

show

from

Conestoga

Sewing

Canadian

Millennium

Scholarship Foundation also offers an entrance award. This award is available only to students

who

are

Continued from Page 1 He added cameras were also not included in the design of the fourth

with

“We were more concerned

protection,”

not asset

safety,

Cameras mounted in

he

currently

are

parking

the

our mouth

creation

All awards given out by the foundation are based on merit with no

childhood education student La-

regard to financial need.

being

lots

but

they will not be added to the fourth floor. However, Hunter said a high-

“We

Parr said. “If something is being taken, security will be on top of the thief.”

Stoltz

is

studies also

Dean

teacher

happy with the immi-

in

her booth at the craft and

would

are putting our

Steve

is,”

he

is

money where

said.

a

Parr,

teacher, said he

be.

broadcasting

excited about the

new system. “It’s a unique system and it will protect every piece of equipment

“It's a deterrent,”

most

thefts

com-

at

she said, adding

the

college

are

crimes of opportunity or carelessness of the equipment owner. Despite numerous break-ins and thefts at

nent security feature. “It reiterates the college’s

ondary education. The foundation has awarded more than $1.2 billion its

some merchandise

left out,”

Media

floor.

tech alarm system

360,000 students since

arranges

Security concerns promptly answered

entering their first-year of post-sec-

in 1998.

Loft

1-2. that took place at the recreation centre Nov.

said.

College.

to

of the

the scholarship but

to help out in the

mechanic apprentice student Michael Gingerich, early Industrial

(Photo by James Doyle)

promotes healthy sexual-

ity.

The

out.

arship.

the $4,000 scholarship.

still

Conestoga, many students

feel safe.

mitment and dedication to the program,” he said. “Sometimes it s hard to get even a nickel or a dime

“Personally I feel safe. I think I am capable of taking care of myself,’ and said Tanya Parasram, a law

out of them.”

security student,

Gilbert

said

Sheridan

uses

a

system called a screamer is being stolen the alarm will immediately sound in the security office and the cameras will automatically show the area where

similar

alarm. If anything

the

theft

committed.

is

being

She said she hasn’t taken any to extra precautions when it comes parking her car here. stuMelissa Dorken, a marketing her dent, said she double-checks doors are locked now. “But,

I

they can.”

think security

is^ing

all


News

SPOKE, November

10,

2003

— Page 3

•Lasagna luncheon huge success By CARLA

KOWALYK

Kast said. “Next year

do

Thanks

to the hard work and dedof volunteers, cafeteria and Conestoga College stu-

to

op placement, has been on The United Way campaign committee

dents and their grumbling stomachs, the Oct. 28 lasagna luncheon

for three years.

was

Prcikschas helped dish out the luncheon to students. The lunch included a slice of

Welch

a great success.

John Kast, lood services director for the cafeteria, said they sold 240 lunches at $5 each. those

ol

‘All

lunches

equal

Chef

and

lasagna

-

granola

bar and

Michael

vegetarian or meat piece

ol"

Kast said. “All of the proceeds will he given to The United

bread.

Way

the

Welch said with a smile. “We've gone through six

the

lasagna and we’re only

The $1,200 cafeteria’s

raised

school drive for

was not

donation

final

to

The United Way.

hand

for vol-

luncheon.

at the

"It’s a nice feeling to

portive in their

to

a

lend a sup-

good

really

cause,” she said.

comfort-

Natalie Hivi, 25, a second-year

able clothing.

nursing

"With the Casual Fridays’ money raised an extra $500,” Kast said. "So that brings our grand total to

student, both agreed they chose the

$1,700.”

smelled great.

we

This

year’s

total

year's donation

"We

topped

Wanzo,

by almost $600.

“Plus

Fright

Week

the

in

Conestoga College, in celebration of Halloween. Conestoga Students Inc. put on a Sanctuary

at

number of horror day

the

it

because

was only $5

-

it

tax includ-

films throughout

third-year broad-

it's

these movies.

come and

It’s

different organi-

1

he

Way

United

offers

direct

financial

than

also

provides funding to an

support to more 7,000 funded agencies. It

it fltfital

10,000 organizations through direct donor giving. Big Brother, Big Sister and Habitat For Humanity are just a few of the organizations that are funded through the campaigns.

Kast said The United

one of

many

Way was

his favourite charities for

reasons.

and worthwhile “Without the United Way most of these charities would not even exist. Their "It’s

great

a

cause,”

he

said.

a lot of areas, and

that’s a great thing.”

(Photo by Carta Kowatyk)

Chef Michael Preikschas serves up a plate of lasagna for the United Way on Oct. 28. They sold 240 lunches at $5 each.

students

Halloween party rocks

computer programmer analyst student, said he loves these movies and plans to watch as many as pos-

D’ Souza.

“I definitely

won’t attend

anymore of these movies.”

can’t

I

at

watch the whole if I like what

lunchtime, I'll

the Sanctuary

1

rent the movie.”

Kelly,

a

second-year

Students packed the dance floor

and

thrilled

here during

“I

love

coming here

during these movies.”

Mark Quigley,

to

year.”

Halloween

Bogdan

CSI

relations student, said he’s not real-

movies, but

something new ‘

Alex Donn, a second-year

civil

engineering student, said he likes the movies, but wishes they

showed a greater seems

“It

ing

is

want

variety.

like all the

CSI

is

play-

these teen slasher films.

to see

said

and

at least it’s

for a change. it’s

convenient so

I’m not complaining.” Jody Andruszkiewicz, the CSI events programmer, said he likes the way the movie theme week was received by students

classic

He

Donn. “Even

them

some good old

horror films.”

I

“It’s free

dressed up.”

Roughly half the students

is

Soica. a first-year public

ly into the

Quigley.

Neil D’ Souza, a third-year mechanical engineering student, said he's not really enjoying the

By MIKE WILSON

Halloween movie pretty cool and I think there should be more movie theme weeks throughout the “I think this

theme week

filled

a great place to

chill,” said

many

helps

sible.

great for relaxing. in

going

is

Kast pointed out that The United

Way

Andrew

marketing student

coming

luncheon United Way.”

see then

Quigley, a first-year mar-

love

money from to The

fantastic that the

it’s

the

get to see a part of a movie.” said

atmosphere in the Sanctuary and "1

the

regular lunch,” the 23-year-old said. ‘‘And

movie

keting student, said he enjoys the

feels

was some-

it

from

though

with students.

Mark

there and

different

movies and wishes the lights would be turned back on. "1 don’t like how you come in here for your hour lunch and only

movies included Friday the 13th, Halloween, I Know What You Did Last Summer, Urban Legends and Scream. CSI played three or four movies a Sanctuary

was

“It

movie marathon

of the

that kept the

why

food.

money covers

for students to watch.

Some

day

luncheon

Week spooks

By BRYAN MARTIN was

25. a first-year advertising

Wanzo said. Rob Speers, a

with scary It

Helena

ed,”

outdid ourselves this year,”

Fright

and

student

lasagna

last

into

additional

unteering

Fridays.”

worker could donate a

trays of

in the first

Welch had many reasons

uniforms on days called "Casual

Each

been going really well,”

hour.”

Cafeteria stall were encouraged to dress in clothing other than their

toonie and dress

a

-

garlic-

he hadn’t

said

much thought

zations.

"It’s

every single penny.”

student,

he chose the lasagna over other

thing

$1,200,

-

casting

really pul

Julie Welch, a volunteer with co-

ication staff,

we want

again and aim for $2,000.”

it

says he plans to have more of in the future.

party wore costumes. Cat outfits,

Oct.

30

gypsies, tarts and schoolgirl cos-

was a welcome change

for last

tumes were popular for the girls. A lot of the guys wore hobo costumes and there were also a

pub

couple dressed as pimps.

capacity

It

at the

nearly

The Sanctuary was

the

for

party.

Conestoga Students year’s

filled

Inc.

from

attended

sparsely

nights and parties.

shows that students are starting to buy into awesome Jody said life,” student “I think

it

Andruszkiewicz, the CSI's events

programmer. The dance floor was packed for most of the night and bartenders and other staff were consistently

Second-year journalism stuJames Clark was memorable in his Jack Nicholson dent,

costume made out of an About Schmidt movie poster. And second-year computer Glen student engineering Sutherland wore a full-bod\ Dragon costume.

busy.

"We had 320 kids through the said night.” last door Andruszkiewicz. The capacity

Sanctuary

at the

is

400.

One hundred given

were male and

dollar prizes

the

for

best

female costumes. Jessica

Wismer won

for dressing

first

prize

up as a pregnant nun.

The male student who won first place dressed up as a box with the phrase "box man” written across

The

the front.

His

name was

CSI merchandise and a Batman statuette from Cam on Comics were also given away. Andruszkiewicz did not dress up.

(Spoke photo)

(^estoga College students filled the Sanctuary on Oct. 28. Conestoga Students Inc. showed a ’^Pty of scary movies, including Know What You Did Last Summer and Friday the 13th. I

"1

love Halloween but

working

I

don’t

when I'm

like

to

night

wasn't without

its

problems.

not available.

get

One rity

student tried to hit a secu-

guard, said Andruszkiewicz.

"He was drunk so we didn't let him in and he got upset." Andruszkiewicz said he was happy with the way security handled the situation.


Page 4

— SPOKE, November

Commentar

2003

10,

McGuinty misled Ontarians getting it. Ontario has chosen change, but we're not less than a for premier been only has Dalton McGuinty promise. month and he has already broken a campaign the end would he announced On Oct. 30, McGuinty voters during told he when freeze, rate hydro current until 2006. the election he would keep the cap premier s plan to the of part is subsidy Cancelling the from the reduce the $5. 6-billion deficit he inherited

HYDRO?

Step right up and test your

RArt$}-

/

\ /

strength!

Conservatives. residents and This decision is a smart one. Right now, hour kilowatt per cents 4.3 small businesses are paying picking up the lest, been had government provincial The the which is almost two cents more. So far, it has cost ,

province about $700 million. also The cap does help those with low incomes. But it not aie they since energy, waste encourages residents to cost. real the .. seeing „ r lied. However, the simple fact remains that McGuinty the playing He's defence? his in doing he is And what .

.

blame game.

,

.

,

,

.

,

towards the former premier for misleading the public about the Eves told the deficit. During his campaign, Ernie

On

Oct. 30,

McGuinty expressed

his anger

out at province there was no deficit. But the truth came Peters Erik auditor former the end of October, when announced the province has a $5. 6-billion debt. In a speech to the Economic Club of Toronto, McGuinty took aim at the Tories. He said, “Never has any state of provincial budget so inaccurately represented the or billion $1 by oft be To the government's finances. billion $5.6 by off be to but thing, one is $2-billion even incomprehensible and unforgivable. I mean what hapis

pened

to the truth here?" did happen to the truth? Yes, the

What

Eves government

for it. did lie to us, and they should be publicly criticized But the finger pointing has got to end. During the election in race, the liberal leader also promised $5 .4-billion increased spending, as well as a cap on tuition fees ovei two years. What else- is he going to put on his chopping block in the name of Ernie Eves? McGuinty is acting as if he was caught off guard by such a large debt figure. But he has no reason to be surIn prised McGuinty even said he was expecting a deficit. it Dunfield Allison by article Mail an Oct. 30 Globe and $2said McGuinty’s campaign promises were based on a billion deficit. Also, on Sept. 22,

Mark

hear you knocking but you don’t come in I

Mullins, an economist from the

Fraser institute, predicted a $4. 5-billion deficit. That was enough time for McGuinty to adjust his campaign. He had 10 days to come clean with the voters and tell us which campaign promises he wouldn’t be able to keep if the prediction was true. But he chose not to because he knew it

seems sometimes

spend

I

Opinion

endless hours listening to others

complain about they are with

do nothing 1

how

life

to fix

seems

can but see

1

in their actions.

to be the place

School

where

this

play a

I

per get to the students and facul-

of Conestoga College.

my work

lying to Ontarians. The public should hold McGuinty accountable for his own dishonesty. If McGuinty is not going to let Eves get away with lying to Ontario, we should not let McGuinty get away with his hypocritical behaviour. Is it too much for Ontarians to expect politicians to do what they say

ple enjoy reading

I

about

hope peo-

I

what

my

class-

it’s

like

saying that

a joke. Well,

me

Supposedly,

this

paper

pathet-

is

people are thinking well,

where do

I

call?

this page.

Look at the botYou will see all

you need

to get a

the information

hold of us. There's even a room

it

better.

not easy being “the voice of

the school” and

But,

much

my

it’s

admit

I’ll

not

it's

in this

I

I

pretty

can honestly is in

at

you

tries

add

to

we

our ideas.

else that will

want,

It’s

Talk

pen

exhausting and

Not

are willing to fight.

political

faculty to talk to us,

anyone

open-minded.

physical sense, but

members of CSI and we poke at

sometime

I’m someone who believes nothing can be accomplished unless

the

basis, that

program

stop in

and offer your thoughts; we’re

care

people will want to read.

hound

newsroom.

You should

duty and

someone who newsroom on a daily

We

number, so you can find the

fun.

say, as

and prod

it?

any

make

nag

do

to

stories, just

you may have noticed.

tom of

their best to get the stories that

can’t help but hear

no thanks.

the time to offer suggestions to

everyone

in the halls

Spoke is crap or what would you

in

passing. But no one has taken

about the paper.

take

1

write.

I

However,

comments

and

according to remarks

even that

big role in helping this newspa-

I’ve heard

ic

It’s

As a journalism student

mates and

my

Now

occurs most frequently.

ty

It

be one of story

dissatisfied

it.

get

doesn't even have to

enjoyable.

but continue to

offer any advice

no change

pride in

they will?

that

we

well-written, entertaining or

Blake Gall

choice. It

our work

a I would love just once to get phone call saying that a story was

I’m beginning to think that theracareer py would have been a better

affect his votes. The new premier deliberately deceived us. Then, he turned around and chastised Eves for

would

after all

studying journalism but

may be

I

more

in

in a

a

manner. Tell us what you

dare you.

I

is

until

big but nothing will hap-

you put your words

into

motion.

Spoke Letters are

welcome

is published and produced weekly by the journalism

students of Conestoga College

Sandham Spoke Online

Editor: Carla

Spoke welcomes

letters to the

editor. Letters should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be

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Commentary Sober

0

SPOKE, November

10,

2003

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

CSI comments taken out

driving

applies to

all

The Oct. 14, 2003 issue of Spoke contained an article covering the “Student life 102” student activity.

The CSI

leels

that

readers

Lesley

quotes

Leachman

message of safe student life. Because of this lead, the CSI feels the valuable message that stu-

Opinion

dent

in the lead, rather

life

You never know what kind of an influence you’ll have by setting a

than the

not

body, yet those same

ing the rest of the article.

comments do

The CSI does endorse the use

not

of mari-

juana, unsafe sex or drinking to the point of

can be fun, while remain-

was diminished. The CSI recognizes that comments made in the lead are designed ing safe,

Practice what you preach.

to get the attention of the student

may

have put too much emphasis on the

fit

in

of context

comments made

with

dur-

CSI does not endorse the use of marijuana, unsale sex or drinking to the point of drunkenness. In fact,

we have

taken

many

steps to

do the

opposite including the distribution

of free condoms over the years, the use of Digital

drunkenness.

(license

Justin Falconer

event and

scanning

last

few

Doorman

The CSI applauds the efforts of the students in the journalism program to continue to report events and activities

on campus

in

lair

I

recently attended a the

tent

of

their stories.

devices)

Justin Falconer

experienced bar

CSI president

wedding and

guests departed

wit-

I

nessed an appalling sight. At least 10 middle-aged people who had

obviously had “one too many” got in their vehicles and drove home. As a teenager I was always told

under any circumstances,

never,

So am

drink and drive. believe

now

I

to

drunk driving only applies to people under 30? That something magical happens to you when you turn 20 that takes away that

the effects of alcohol?

The older generation needs some responsibility.

to

take

According

to Statistics

year 98

last

Canada,

people died

1

hol-related crashes.

in alco-

Almost 40 per

cent of those crashes involved peo-

between the ages 16 and 24. is an alarming statistic. But il it’s going to decrease, an example needs to be set. Although the older generation may have more driving experiple

This

ence,

alcohol

impairs

still

judgment and slows

You

time.

their

their reaction

immune

aren’t

to

its

any age. Adults aren't any less likely to face the consequences of impaired drinking either. A 40-year-old can effects at

still

55-year-

have a breathalyser

still

installed in their car.

can

A

lose their licence.

still

old can

be put

year-old can

A 75-year-old

in jail.

be

still

And

an 80-

paralysed

left

after a car crash.

Consequently, a 40-year-old can be a designated driver. A 55-

still

year-old can

spend the night,

still

old can

still

year-old can

a cab.

call

A 75-year-

home.

instead of driving

And an

80-

act responsibly.

still

The concept of “it will never to me" doesn’t just apply

happen

to teenagers.

think most adults

1

feel alcohol-related accidents are

something reserved for the young. Most ads against drinking and driving

make young people

like the

only reckless ones on the

road.

Because of

this,

look

most adults

don’t believe drunk driving applies to

them. But what older people don’t

ize is

when you

real-

get in to that car

after a night of drinking, you're

endangering more than you think. Not only are you jeopardizing your life, and the life of other drivers. you are teaching your children that it’s OK to drive after having a couple of drinks. After

all,

knowing after a

more

if

that

grows up and dad drive

a child

mom

few drinks, then they are

likely to adopt this irrespon-

sible behaviour.

A

parent should have the integri-

ty not

only to

to drink

a t \gm this

tell

®fsponsibility street.

their children not

and drive, but to teach by example. is

a

two-way

and balanced

However, the CSI also urges student reporters to ensure the quotes they print are consistent with the con-

increased security presence at our the hiring of highly staff.

a

manner.

bad example.

when

— Page 5

STUDENTS

INC


News

to student radio, CJIQ

CSI donates By

control room. There are

REBECCA LEARN

sons for

CJIQ

receiving

is

a

$10,000

donation from CSI that will help

the radio station grows, a new board would have more inputs for lines to

said a donation to student radio.” He Falconer. Justin CSI President

CJIQ

they can provide a greater lab experience for students and upif

CSI wants

to-date equipment,

to

participate.

The donation was confirmed at. a board of directors meeting for the radio station a couple of weeks ago.

Programming

Mark

specialist

come from

to

the Sanctuary

This would allow

or the cafeteria.

from these

broadcast

areas.

Burley said there are also two

microphones operating on one conbe trol right now and they could split so they each have their own control. “It’s just the

next step

evo-

he

said.

Burley said the board they have

now

common

not

is

in

relationship the said Burley between CJIQ and CSI began with with a donation of $30,000 to help startup costs during CJIQ’s first three years.

industry.

one that

to get

most comThe plan is

will look like

some-

thing the students will see when they leave here and get jobs in the

“we work with them

new,

“It’s

on promoting and advertising all the CSI events," Burley said,

date,

adding, “What they’re doing in exchange for that is donating

at

$10,000 to buy new equipment.” Burley said the money is being “earmarked” lor a new board in the

in the

lution of the radio station,”

mercial radio stations.

Since then,

rea-

As

them buy a new control board. “It was a clear-cut choice to make

said

many

this.

it’s

adding,

it's

current,

flashy,”

it

“It’s just like

s

up-to-

Falconer,

said

opening

gifts

Christmas.”

He

said

it's

a special gift that

is

given on occasion through co-operation. ly

“We’ve been working close-

with the radio station

all

year.”

works with the equipment Third-year broadcasting student, Stacey Edwards,

CJIQ

the

in

control

room.

An Amazing Race

THE GOAL OF STUDY GROUP LEARNING

By KATE

know what

VANDEVEN

public relations

all

is

about.

When you go to college, you are joining a community that is organized for One of the keys to success is to form study partnerships with your fellow students as much of the learning in college goes on outside the classroom as

Give up? Conestoga College,

study groups are better than others are. Some groups develop a rapport that enables the group to perform at a high level. What makes a

play

this level?

the

in

Coggan hopes this race will clear up confusions and let people know

The

show.

reality

Well, not the real show, but a

performance are usually good participants. Students who attend regularly, who complete their assignments, and who take notes in class make good candidates.

53 »

their

that public relations is a

similar one with a public relations twisf.

Students in the public relations

course are putting on this race

size should be small to encourage participation. Small groups have fewer problems agreeing on a meeting times, can generate more ideas when brainstorming, and are better at evaluating ideas

Group

the

RACE

3

dent in public relations, says the event is being held to inform peo-

can include comparing and sharing notes; sharing and discussing reading assignments; and holding research sessions and post-exam reviews.

the

ple about public relations

know

school

.

It

together. Tackling a test review as the

evaluation”

action,

for the pub-

research,

formula:

communication and evalua-

And each to learn

stressful for the group.

guest will get a chance

about

all

aspects of this

to learn

Once

She adds there

are

many new

businesses coming to the region

need the expertise of advertising and public relations personnel. This program

move

on, they have to

they receive

six

activi-

student

Coggan says people

what or what

is

is

the only

not meant to

tell

TUESDAY

to

think of the people it.

but rather “to gener-

ate

awareness of the program and

to

educate internal college people

stamps,

it,” Reyner says. Along with faculty, deans and

some

Connie

often

don’t

who

are enrolled in programs that

deal

with public relations have

been invited to the event.

those shown.

Big Xtra-

Big

of the week. Mac s

McChicken ®

2

Cheeseburgers Mdj/

Filet-O-Fish®

the

president of the college, students

McDeals™ every day

f

peo-

to think of public relations

Playing your favourites, every day of the week. MONDAY

one

in the area.

on

prizes.

First-year

The race

involved in

about the topic.

they get a chance to win

may vary from

program’s

ple

In order to

At participating McDonald's Restaurants in Ontario. Offers at participating Restaurants

the

Various booths will be set up, each dealing with a specific area of

complete all of the booth’s ties and get a stamp.

offer.

for

graduates.

formula.

go

•Not valid with any other

a great

being offered

public relations, where guests will

3

is

that

tion.

order of business can be quite

Deborah Reyner demand in the

Co-ordinator says there

marketplace

relations

lic

takes time for people to learn to work

first

to let

program

exists.

Accountability of all members is important. All participants should have a clear idea of what they should bring to each meeting. Members should work on their own before going to the group and come prepared for the session,

Organize your study group early.

and

this

for

communication and

1:30 to 3:30 p.m.

Study groups are not cram sessions. Groups need to meet early in die semester and meet regularly throughout it Having review sessions prior to exams is only one reason to form a study group. Other functions of the group

an acronym

is

research, action,

in

Sanctuary on Thursday from

RACE is an acronym

•w

good pro-

gram. This is the first year the program has been offered at the college.

Jeff Laythorpe, a first-year stu•

is

that’s what.

Amazing Race.

Motivated students who care about

.

She says a big misconception

that people in this field are deceitful, something she says is not true.

And in three days, a number of invited guests will get a chance to

Some

group function at

and

common?

public relations have in

students study on their own.

S

reality television

What does

teaming.

Double Cheeseburger

M Quarter Pounder® with Cheese

2003 McDonald’s Restaurant of Canada Limited. For the exclusive use of McDonald’s Restaurants of Canada Limited and

its

fra nchisees

J


News D,

Casey

gets award

Conestoga employee bikes

You Can Make

across Canada

Difference

,a DAWN HASSON

By

A

Conestoga College

services

counsellor

disability

HUNTINGTON

sometimes

questioned what he did, but in light of the outcome, lie should rest assured he did the right thing.

DISEASE

Rick Casey received an employee recognition award, called the Guild Award, lor community

involvement on Nov. 5 for amazing 8,000-kilometre bike

HUNTINGTON SOCIETY OF CANADA

his trip

across Canada.

m

"I

by

very flattered and humbled said Casey. “I got a

it.

from our department and by surprise.” call

human

me

The school had a reception attended by about 30 people on Oct. 28 to congratulate Casey. Casey began B.C.

his

May

bike tour on

cross-Canada 4 in Victoria,

was sparked by

It

Marian Mainland, the co-ordi-

nator ot disability

Casey

(Photo by

Casey stands

Rick

services,

said

really deserves the award.

Testing clerk Judy Hart agreed.

nity

services Guild Award.

him messages throughout his trip. “I was really excited to follow him on his way,” said Mainland. She was not the only one. Cheryl

resources

"Part ot his bike trip

Casey

to think

was to give and go through

the healing process.”

phone

got a

“1

from

call

human resources

our

department and took

me

department,

introduced

her 10-year-old son, Keenan. He painted three stones with his name, Cheryl Vogan's five-year-old son Connor, and Casey's daughter Kyla. Keenan Vogan gave them to Casey in a felt bag with a message of support. to

Casey took the stones on the ride with him and collected a rock from each province. He gave the rock collection to Keenan, which fed his

kind of

it

by surprise.”

Rick Casey

love for rock collecting.

"He won’t even

shortly after her 16lh birthday with

boost his confidence.

disorder,

symptoms of

the psychotic

and

his family

system because

it

had a bad

delayed getting

the help she

her illness

needed before

that experience really

exists than

it's

that

it

really hard to get the

funding and support to

treat

it.

and

to refer

written information, to author or

letter.

answer questions of a numerical nature.

to process a question

the

ability to

and respond

to

speak with confidence, make

take the appropriate

amount

of time

creatively.

PROBLEM SOLVING - the ability to

answer with thought when

presented with situations.

“Keenan gained confidence in in so many ways by being

DECISION MAKING -

a part of Rick's ride.”

Keenan

attention

has

hyperactivity

disorder

which causes a person

some

deficit

cases, hyperactivity.

develop and,

ended on Aug. 20 in Nfld. and cost about $7,000 for his food, airfare, and trip

Cape Spear. equipment.

"My

bike

has held

Casey joked.

up really think

"I

if

you're going to take on a trip ot

magnitude to

make

that

you

do good

really

sure you've got

equipment.”

Mainland

followed

throughout the the

the

trip

summer by check-

Canadian Mental Health

Association's website. The site had updates on where Casey was each da\ tSk-tures. day/jp.'!

and a place

to send

ability to

answer adequately when presented

PLANNING AND ORGANIZATION -

in

typical

He was

going through a rough time dealing with it and being a part of Casey’s

it

the

with a question that requires a decision.

(ADHD), to

Casey remarked that it was a very moving experience for him. “I was very touched by it,” said Casey. “My wife (Audrey) and I are always so amazed by the gen-

ing

ability to

THINKING SKILLS -

boy,” said Vogan.

various places across the country.

want

NUMERACY - the

and

eye contact, and use correct grammar.

“At a time important to Rick he took the time to help a small

ride as well as being able to follow

that

in

fill

ORAL COMMUNICATION - the ability

\i

Casey said. treat In order to raise awareness about mental health diseases, he spoke at effectively,"

well.”

a

helped to

inappropriate' impulsivity

became worse.

you don't acknowledge

His

ability to

compose, or communicate by

in,

himself

Casey and

it

skills that are required to be successful in academics. Did you know that employers use this same guide to help them assess the skills of an employment candidate?

WRITING - the

still

experience with the mental health

"If

These are the

READING — the ability to look at, to understand, to take to written or printed material.

Keenan was given the chance to Casey in Owen Sound,

schizo-

phrenia.

Kyla

*a

ride with

a

form of mental illness that includes severe mood swings and some of

x

them out of

the bag,” said Cheryl Vogan.

bipolar/schizophrenic

^

take

changed his life,” Hart said. Kyla Anne Casey died from a pulmonary embolism in September 2001. She had been diagnosed "It's

ESSENTIAL SKILLS NEEDED FOR SUCCESS

Vogan, a support services officer from Conestoga's physical

“He had a really hard time for a couple of years,” said Mainland. him time

Dawn Hasson)

Keenan Vogan, 10, and Marian Mainland, the co-ordinator of disability services. The three are enjoying Casey’s reception on Oct. 28 to congratulate him on his commuwith

the untime-

death ot his 19-year-old daugh-

ly ter.

800- 998-7398

-

resources

kind of took

it

1

phone

4a

day and to

MEMORY - the

list

them

ability to

the ability to plan tasks for a

appropriate order with

in

direction.

little

repeat information heard and not to ask

questions that have already been answered.

through was very special for the

FINDING INFORMATION -

10-year-old.

find important information

WORKING WITH OTHERS and

talk

the

when

research and

ability to

know where

to

asked.

- the

ability to

about times when you worked

in a

function as part of a team,

group.

erosity of people." In

light

of Keenan's adventure

with Casey

summer. Vogan him for the Guild this

nominated Award. Casey has been on leave from the college and is set to return next

$

COMPUTER

- the

related tasks

in

CONTINUOUS LEARNING

He of his

plans to pull together stories

trip,

to

w ith

make

a scrapbook

the help ol stall in

disability services.

understand

when

referring to

computer-

- the

ability to

show eagerness and

_

necessity

for on-going training, and professional and personal development.

August.

and pictures

ability to

a professional manner.

Jtomasevnc/spokeads'39


Page 8

— SPOKE, N ovember

“Student

News

2003

10,

tackles

ally”

municipal politics By

here for two years on a volunteer

CARLA SANDHAM

basis.

The

“The position exposed me he world of education,

college’s past president of

Conestoga Students Inc. continues to speak up for students.

adding

“It’s a similar skill set.”

one of eight on the .ballot today

Ethan Miller, CSI vice-president of activities, said he never worked

Waterloo

with Olinski but knew him well. “He was a warrior for students

for

Catholic board

school

the

in

trustee

and was never too busy to you,” said Miller. He added Olinski '

2003

munici-

here and brought

pal election.

26-year-old is running against Wayne Buchholtz, Carole Reitzel. Terry Sehl. Maureen

The

Thomson

Marion

Sutherland,

Howell and Steve Woodworth. Each candidate is vying for one of

am

concerned about some of

made

at the

Olinski said

when

the recent decisions

board asked

level,”

why he decided

added he

is

proud of

to ran.

He

his Catholic

education.

One highly publicized issue Olinski said he would address is the debate on whether or not to allow public health nurses into the high schools. bers worry

Some board mem-

the nurses will contra-

But, Olinski said nurses should be permitted as long as they adhere to the teachings of Catholic values and principles. “We must allow and trust our trained professionals to council our children on health-related issues in the schools."

Olinski’s objectives also include setting priorities for the

budget,

keeping the province accountable and representing the interests of

But before becoming involved politics,

saw decisions

million plus budget and represent stakeholders by putting himself

all

in others' shoes.

CSI

the

health

plan, assisted in co-ordinating the

polar plunge for the Heart and Stroke Foundation, raised more

$4,000 for the- on-campus food bank and dealt with many other issues during his term. Justin Falconer, present CSI who worked with president,

in

Olinski over-

affecting students

(Photo by Jen Howden)

than

Olinski last year, said Olinski is persistent and is not swayed by

popular opinion. “He knows students and can the

table.”

Currently Olinski is the executive director for the College Student Alliance (CSA), a provincial lobbying group representing more than 140,000 students,

including Conestoga’s. He was also the volunteer president for the

CSA

about a year ago. This Conestoga graduate

Vote today

said

if

And

director

of the

CSA.

not elected he added he

will be looking for

By CARLA

even more vol-

unteer opportunities.

It’s

start

two months before classes Conestoga College. Kate

and her friend Theresa make a trip from their hometown to look for a place to board while going to school in Kitchener. They are on a for residence, so they

list

in

lower

coming

may become years.

To address this concern, College Student Alliance executive director Jon Olinski said students should the municipal elec-

vote today in tion.

Justin

Falconer,

agreed.

He added

CSI

president,

students should

with the college’s expansion, hous-

wants

ing could become a problem

try to

in the

future.

college

Falconer.

people

in

in the

Gazzola said another problem students and their living

col-

arrangements

said

lower

parties are a nightly happening, not

on weekends. have seen these young people

various states of social interac-

have been embarrassed,” he “The aftermath is not a pretty sight with empties strewn around

said.

Carter,

Ward 3 candidate

Doon and

lege, lives in

tion.

and

various states

Len

facing

bylaw prohibiting any

to council

of social interaction.”

this

“I

it

have seen these young

Len Carter, candidate for ward (3) and governor of the

Recently, the City of Kitchener the area across

can take

“So residents knew there

area and late-night parties.”

of them.

in

‘I

said

built,”

would be student housing

in

new duplexes

was

know what everyone

take part in the political process.

and a lack of long-term planning on the city’s part. “Only one house was here when the

understand each

to I

change the bylaw,” he said, adding he encourages students to

plaints

just

a

com-

neighbourhood

of

result

Once I

to get all

what each wants.

“We have other.

examine the candidates’ platforms and look carefully at the important issues - student housing being one

passed

find out

combined

trend continues,

if this

impact yet. Falconer said the bylaws were a

reality in the

baskets donated by various departments at peers between the college and from the community. Monetary donations were being accepted in exchange for a ticket for a chance to win a

Kevin Mullan, vice-president of finance and student services, said

Doon

90 student houses

fictional, the situation

Give and you shall receive Conestoga United Way campaign chair Monica Himmeiman

meeting.

the players involved together and

However, Mullan added the bylaw has not had a negative

have already reached their limit of three boarders each. Although Kate and Theresa are

(Photo by Jason Noe)

do something about it. Gazzola said he wants

look for the closest thing off campus. They come up empty. The 80 to

basket.

city

during a recent college council

Conestoga Registrar Fred Harris

SANDHAM

at

waiting

gift

Ward 3

of

and human resources elected he would remain as

if

for

Housing bylaw in lower Doon heated issue for students and

business

executive

Catholics.

municipal

legacy

positive

bring their perspectives to

dict Catholic morals.

all

left a

many

talk to

things to the college. As” CSI president, Olinski said he learned how to manage a Si-

He improved

the four spots up for grabs. “I

said,

will correlate well with

it

elected. his position as trustee if

Jon Olinski’s name will be

Olinski

to the

1

"If

we had

is

the transit system.

a good transit system

here, students could live

anywhere

in the city.”

Falconer added busing to school would also cost students even more money. However, the college is doing its part.

Mullan said Conestoga hopes to build another residence close to the

from the college known as lower Doon.

the property.”

Previous to this, the city passed an interim housing bylaw, which limits the number of boarders per

principle of families opening their

existing one for 2005.

homes

house.

residents.

But, he said it is still in the exploratory stage and they have to be sure they can fill it before it

This year saw a seven per cent increase in first-year enrolments at

“The problem is that there has been a group of absentee landlords

opens.

who

for student housing and

the college.

"We

even greater increase next year as the enrolment Grade 12 have for figures expect

increased

an

significantly,”

said

Carter said he would support the

to

students,

but

not the

modifications of houses to student

divide every

room

to get the

most dollars out of the house.” John Gazzola, current councillor for Ward 3, said he knows the issue is a serious problem and wants to

“We

get no government grants we can’t

subsidize

it,”

he

said.

The third candidate for Wt®p, Bob McColl, was unavailable for comment.

(


News

SPOKE, November

10,

2003

— Page

Sharman sues By TIM

MURPHY

hear

I

Sharman Networks

Ltd.

is light-

ing back against the Recording Industry Association of America

(RIAA), filing a federal lawsuit for copyright infringement. Sharman, the makers of the popular file-sharing application Kazaa, claims

RIAA

the

warning

messages

to

embedded potential

infringers.

Sharman

Sharman is accusing entertainment companies of using an altered version of the program known as Kazaa Lite, an ad-less version, to

who

is

They download song files from computers to search for

users'

copyrighted material.

RIAA

determines a song file is copyrighted, a subpoena is issued to Internet access providers to find out who the account holder is sharing the file.

month of September, 261 lawsuits were launched against In the

users, ly

who were accused

distributing

files

of illegal-

hundreds of

MP3

over the Internet.

l

have too

though.

I

so

manager. only have,

using

10 or 13 songs

like,

not going to slop

it’s

me from

it.”

Some

people avoid the threat of

detection

by not downloading music, but rather copying friend’s "I

many

really

don’t

RIAA

has in downloaders.

care

mind

All the tracks that

purchased,

from

or

that

users worried

what the music

for

have on

1

computer came from

a I

CD

my

that

I

borrowed

a friend,” said

Wilfrid

19-year-old student Ben

Laurier

Street.

He

says his

MP3

collection has

more than 500 songs, but not one of them was downloaded from the Internet.

The lawsuit alleges that the entercompanies violated antitrust laws by stopping Sharman from distributing authorized copies of music and movies through tainment

Kazaa.

The RIAA called Sharman's “newfound admiration for the importance of copyright law" ironic and self-serving.

Sharman Networks

The abundance of lawsuits doesn

ice

sharing Copyrighted

files.

the

of

1

has no

the RIAA's actions “monopolistic and conspiratorial” reports Canoe.ca news in a Sept. 24 article.

Once

subpoena

CDs.

RIAA

said the

right to alter its software, calling

find out

only

songs, and I'm not a very avid user, says 8-year-old Carolyn Allan, a Wal-Mart customer serv-

distributing

is

versions of Kazaa with

they

who have thousands

users

ed

in

the

Ltd.

Vanuatu with offices Australia.

is

locat-

South Pacific island of in

(Photo by Tim Murphy)

Why did

Sydney,

A

the seagull cross the road?

seagull uses a student crosswalk outside the recreation centre at

Conestoga College.

Conestoga Students Myitis

wicked" are hats “these miscellaneous student; quote

1 4.95 $ At the CIS office I

in

the w

-SanctuaryOGA STUDENTS NO.

COT* E S T vl

]

1


News

(Photo by Ryan Connell)

(Photo by Kate VandeVen)

student Matt First-year architectural construction engineering at residence. offered food free of the advantage Reid takes

Get your delicious pig here! 140-pound pig for residence s Ethan Miller, CSI VP of student activities, cooked up a free to students. was CSI, the by funded was on Oct. 30. The event, which

first

pig roast

(Photo by Ryan Connell)

A

piece of tender white meat

is

removed from the

pig that

is

on

the roaster.

(Photo

The

pig

was roasted on an

industrial-size pig spit outside the

by Ryan

Connell)

Conestoga Residence and Conference

Centre.

(Photo

by Ryan

Second-year police foundations student Steve Gill (left to right), third-year special studies dent Debbie Brock, and Ethan Miller get up close and personal with the pig.

(Photo by Ryan Conn&t

Connell)

stu-

Students lined up outside the the lobby

in

order to “pig out.�

first

floor

lounge

in

residence

into

'

(


Feature

SPOKE, November

2003

10,

— Page

Condors win bronze By KATE BATTLER

The Conestoga men’s rugby team overcame

game

to

a hard loss in their

come back and win

bronze medal Championship Welland, Nov.

the

OCAA

the

at

first

Tournament

in

Humber Hawks

flyhalf Joel

Hussey connecting on

The aggressive play of Alex

the

Brubacher and Craig Johnston all game helped push the Condors ahead and Adam Pettipiere helped move the ball forward by running

penalty

three

Condors lost their opening match to the Fleming Knights, 245. The team was down 9-0 after the half with the Knights connect-

“We

rode on the foot of Joel

Matthew Caudle,

after his finger

became

dislo-

They played

In the

end the Condors

despite

moving

lost the

the ball well.

A couple of mistakes made by the team ended with the Knights scor-

with

stuck to the

more modest

saying the team played well defensively

“I’m sure

we

Humber

stop

to

I

Jeff Desruisseau said the

players were nervous going into the game. They tried to destroy the other team with hard tackles but missed some which helped the Knights to

gain the advantage. “It was an utter disappointment,"

he said.

The difference between the first game and the second was like night and day. The team got off to a great

start

from

ball.

was named

helped,” he said, “but

MVP

I

for the

game

for

The Condors year a

his contributions. try in the

game

plan.

They

relied

on both the forwards and the backs working together and were able to have better control of the ball and the game. Hogg and Keegstra are the league all-stars and the championship allstars from the Condors. “The goal this year was to finish better than last year,” said Hogg.

pjayed well as a team.” Hussey

The Condors scored a

ing.

Coach

little

said the dif-

Fleming and the win on Nov. 2 over Humber was that the team

Jeff Desruisseau,

Hussey was a

Hogg

to

intensity.”

advancing the

cated.

“The team played well in this game,” he said. “They came out

ference between the loss on Nov.

well.

the player that

penalty kicks, went out early in the

hard said Desruisseau.

Captain Alex

“The team played

coach

usually kicks the conversions and

taking the lead.

with intensity.”

Hussey.”

sion kick.

game

putting

kicks

Condors up 9-0 going into the second half. Desruisseau said Hussey helped win the game with his superb

ing on three penalty kicks. The Condors tried to rally in the second half when outside centre Philip Lakatos scored a try but the team failed on the 2-point conver-

game

with

kicking.

1-2-

1'hc

first

against the

in

in their

team the

finished fourth last

inaugural season. For

that has only

been playing

league for two years the

half when Nicholas second Milbury ran the ball in but the team missed the 2-point conversion kick. Humber rallied late in the second half with two trys but missed both

bronze medal means that much more. Desruisseau said it was a

conversion kicks.

honour to be recognized by low coaches.”

team the said Desruisseau almost lost the game in the second half but pulled themselves togethSteve Keegstra came through for the team with a gamesaving tackle late in the second half to prevent the Hawks from er to win.

end to a great season. Desruisseau was named coach of the year for the league. “It’s an

perfect

Coach Desruisseau

my

will be

fel-

back

next year, as will most of the team. Only a few players are graduating this year.

“We'll work to get back into the playoffs again next year,” he said.

(Photos by Kate Battler)

Above, Alex Brubacher reaches against the to

a game Hawks 14-10

out to catch the ball in

Humber Hawks. The Condors beat

the

win the bronze medal.

veteran, runs the ball against Below, Joel Hussey, a second-year first game of the OCAA the Fleming Knights during the

championship Nov.

1

(Photos by Kate Battler)

Above, Ontario Colleges Athletic Association bronze

medal winners, the Conestoga College Condors.

The Conestoga Condors and the Humber Hawks scrum

Left,

during the bronze medal in Welland Nov. 2.

1 BwB aaSffi J

aL

game


:

Page 12

— SPOKE, November IJlI

10,

2003

National

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News

MORLEY

Region and the Ministry of Health, will be financing upgrades to the Region’s three hospitals: St. Mary’s, the Regional Cancer Centre at Grand

People in the tri-city area have chance to win a Tree house in

the

Lottery.

Dream Home

18th

year’s

this

River

is

selling tickets to

home

the

home

nance imaging services River Hospital.

One

to the

One

Grand

regional

Most unique about this year’s dream home is that it is solar powered. David El/inga works for

Voice-

Vision campaign. This cam-

company

Arise Technologies, the

paign, in co-operation with Waterloo

The campaign’s ing goal

is

fundrais-

$42

million.

Currently, the Rotary Club

has sold about 6,000 tickets for the dream home. Moreover,

including a 98-bed wing.

used for their lottery. Spall explains that proceeds from

go

at

electricity.

for

new can-

A new

kilowatt

3,600

approximately

R2000

the

home

energy-rating;

an

has

meaning

it

is

more energy efficient than the average home. As a result, the dream home uses 50 per cent less natural to about a

in

sav-

about

the

$1,000

Elzinga

is

excited

out with your financial planning. One of the ways to make sure

These are available for as little as $20 a month and make a lifechanging difference in the event that something happens. They also bring peace of mind since you will be able to support

that

One

sums

Lottery and the solar

house. The Kitchener-Conestoga Rotary Club $100. The draw will be held Nov. 30 for the home. solar-powered 3 000 -square-foot

that

is

set aside for rent,

food

it’s

and other expenses. An important part of setting up a budget is being realistic with expenses and with the amount of

money coming in. Don't lie when outlining expenses. If

you plan on going out

ical

neglect

is

adviser

Banton. with

a

Cowan

that they are their

cost

asset.

look crit-

RECOGNIZE THE SIGNS

OF STROKE

WHEN YOU SEE THEM.

financial

Wilkin

Financial Services Inc., says it is important for students to realize

tickets for the

and a

yourself.

themselves.

Michael

students

and disability plan.

illness

your budget. If you don’t, you'll end up short on money in the

provide jobs for today and tomor-

dream home. Tickets $100 each and will be sold until Nov. 30 when the draw for the home will be held. The dream home is at 346 Schooner Cres.

He recommends

into a life insurance plan

to the

building this capability today will

ill-

ness, they need to be prepared.

bar twice a week, add that into

weeks to come. Another important aspect students, and young people in general,

Rotary Club has sold about 6,000

this

important

and

enough

The campaign's fundraising goal $42 million. Currently, the is

selling tickets for

of the most important things

away from home for the first time, is to make sure that there is enough money each month to pay for rent. OSAP payments come in lump

row.’’

is

is

it.

for students, especially those living

Elzinga calls solar energy the

You could win

you don’t run out of money

to start a budget and stick to

energy of the future, in part because there are no emissions. “We’re producing our own electricity and we’ll be less dependent on other countries for energy. So,

(Photo by Jeff Morley)

long-term

ability or a critical or

energy industry.

,;;r

they are not invincible. If something were to happen, like a dis-

Are you running out of money? Have you been eating macaroni and cheese for the last three weeks? Then keep reading and you might find something to help you

ings every year.

Dream Home

— Page 13

for rent?

By KATE BATTLER

gas for space heating. All of this

works out

2003

10,

Stop spending so much!

behind the energy system. He says the house is powered by a large solar panel installed on the roof. This panel can generate hours of

advanced cardiac care centre will go in St. Mary’s and enhanced mental services will be developed at Cambridge Memorial Hospital,

Rotary Club has ever

the ticket sales

Cambridge

cer care centre with magnetic reso-

nicest

the

is

and

the hospitals will build a

win the solar home in the in subdivision Eastbridge Waterloo. Bill Spall has been working with the Rotary Club for more than 20 years. He says the 3,000square-foot

Hospital,

Memorial Hospital. The redevelopment project

The Kitchener-Conestoga

Rotary Club

Need money

house anyone?

'Free By JEFF

SPOKE, November

most important

What would you do if you could no longer work to provide for yourself.

Banton says young people forget

,

/

VISION PROBLEMS SuddcQ ktt* vS vision one eye ot double vtvkm

particular}) in

HEADACHES

/

Sadden, severe and unusual headaches

A WEAKNESS

Sudden weakness, numbness and/or tingling in the face, arm ot kg

zimmmm Temporary’ toss of speech

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: Study Skills

/

DIZZINESS

Vaseadmew of suddea

laBs,

espeaa% v,uh aay of tk alwvt

come naturally. Students who want to Knowino how to study efficiently does not always always know what to do. Many who are eager to do well in college do not They may not or how to use their time wisely. students do not know how much to study information fronr textbooks. Absorbing and remembering

“nd

know how

to read college-level

lectures can be difficult especially

if

HEART

style of they are not familiar with the lecture

AND STROKE FOUNDATION

teaching. Seek immediate

Manv

not be able to read well skills. potentially good students lack basic notions about English grammar. Many college-level material, or have vague

enough

°

svmptoms.

tliese

for

students have

t„ T

medical attention if you have any of

They may

difficulty writing their

HEALTH CARE TIP

ideas clearly.

skill workshops to help Student Services offers several study allow us to work more * need to succeed. Good study habits thev na ^Sls 9 methods get better grades with fewer Students who have been taught study

th „<~ p challenaes

£

efficiently

hours of study.

It

is

not

how much you

study but

how

well.

When should you seek help with study When you feel overwhelmed. When you want to reduce your study time. When you feel disorganized. concentration. When too many distractions reduce your read more effectively. When you want to take better notes and When exams approach. skills?

Need

to lose

some weight?

Follow Canada’s Food Guide and try cutting

down

the overall

number of calories

in

from Student Services

your

diet,

particularly those that are high in fat.

Remember

to exercise

and

weigh yourself regularly and above

all

give youself a pat on the

back for each pound

Anytime!

A Message

WEIGHT CONTROL

that

you lose

St John Ambulance


Page 14

— SPOKE, November

Feature

2003

10,

Web cam By JASON MIDDLETON

dios

it’s

at strip club perfectly legaf between them

private. It’s

and the person.” In a

room, comparable

dorm room,

by a lone bed reach

Within arms a computer, and on top of a

is

sheet.

web cam

chair, a

Black’s studio

in size to a

lays a mattress covered

points directly at

is

affiliated with

playboy.com and 30

world-

sites

wide.

The women can make up to $1,000 a week being Internet mod-

the mattress.

els.

The only thing missing from the room is a girl whose every movement and word would be webcast

Mirage website, click on free chat, find a girl and talk with her. If you

on the

find her interesting proceed into a

Internet.

While

the

woman

is

on

the

Internet her customer can ask her to do anything while he watches via the web cam. Nothing is taboo; the girl could perform sexual acts on herself; put on lipstick; or in some cases,

smoke

cigarettes

for

the

person

watching.

The concept

private

Of

broadcast, Black will never

what goes on

“When

in these

know

rooms.

these girls are in the stu-

US

that

room

will

be pay-

employment. “We have a variety of students who hook into this and they can

work out of the privacy of their dorm. Every student has a computer. With access to a high-speed network you can hook into my system.” All girls on the site must be 18 and over. Black says, "We have to make sure we have the proper iden-

We ask for four pieces

tification.

a minute.

identification,

$1.80 goes back to the

record at

all

“The whole idea

go private you do your

of

which we have on

times.

Another group of

women

that are

is to

interested

with the clientele.

If

mothers, says Black.

The Mirage

math and

60 minutes

“We have a lot of single moms who don’t want to be on welfare.

basement.

efit.”

“semi-pom” business. Even though he owns the studios from which these fantasies are

to the

girl.

next six months.”

Internet

Go

room where only you can

Patrons of this ing $4

utes a

Operating out of the basement of Black operates an

simple.

see and hear her.

Len Black, president of Cambridge's Mirage strip club, says once a customer asked a girl to smoke a cigarette for two hours on the web cam. “The guy paid $300 to watch her smoke cigarettes and after that the girl did not pick up a smoke for the

his strip club.

is

time and got her money.” Students make up a big chunk of women who look into the site for

a girl did

period of three or four hours a make $108.”

in

a

girl

could “If

you don’t work, you don’t get

paid.

This

being

rich. If

is

not a free road to

you want

to

work 10

hours a day you're going to benefit. you’re willing to work five min-

If

day you’re not going

to ben-

According

to Black, students use website as a stepping-stone to help fund expenses in university this

and college.

He

says, “I

They want

a girl from a and she got on pay her tuition. She

to

the

site

are

single

be able to buy new

(Photo by Jason Middleton)

working on the

and with devel-

site

in

the

mainstream very quickly.”

opers ever since.

food bank. Therefore, they work out of their homes.

CKCO

basically wrote a novel of

“We can provide a situation where these woman can have a better standard of life and not rely on welfare and take money from

ensure nothing illegal was happen-

could and couldn’t do, but everything we’re doing is legal.”

to the

social

work

services.

Instead they can for themselves.

way

there’s

more money

Local

Before starting the

news

television

station

and the Waterloo regional police went to the Mirage studio to ing.

What

was

they found

that every-

was legal. was really concerned about how I was going to get the publicthing “I

exposure and

how bit

for health care, education, police

with a

university nearby

force and fire department.”

class.

the site just to

Black started the idea of the website four years ago and has been

exposed

was on only for a short period of

Cambridge has a web cam studio located

in

clothes for kids; they want to be able to shop without having to go

“That

know

in

out

little

CKCO me and

I

could do

it

of finesse and

and

the police they brought me

of the closet and

into

the

“got advice from

my

site

Black

lawyer

who

what

I

Black says this industry is based on fantasy and says life in the strip club

is

basically a prayer and a

hope.

“When you walk into the club you’re praying you get the opportunity to take a girl home with you at the end of the night, but there isn’t

a hope in hell one of these girls

going

home

with you.”

is

1


SPOKE, November

Plained Glass course lets students express steps

By DESIREE FINHERT spectacular

creating

Despite

an

sional piece.

Although the students are not to do a 3-D project

required

artist.

Instructor Chris the

teaches

Hodnett recommends learning the

Hodnett, 54,

technique.

continuing education

course Stained Glass

at

"The three projects and the complexity arc based on whether a person does work at home," said

Conestoga

College.

He

is

also the executive director

Hodnett.

of the K-W Accessibility and Information Resource Centre for people with disabilities. He said he has students in his

who

class

draw

"Students can do three projects if come and work during

they only

class, but the projects will

themselves

consider

to

do stained

glass.

consider inyseli a craftsman," said Hodnett, who has been teaching the con-ed course for 21 years. "Really

it's

(Photo by Desiree Finhert)

Conestoga

"I

about putting colours

together.

Conestoga offers the stained

Student John Duncan, 38, displays his first project in Oct. 18. Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Stained Glass continuing education course on

of

foil,

is

taking the adult sculpting

Waterloo campus Saturday mornings from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.,

stained glass is artistic at a certain

stained glass."

and holds two other classes at a stu-

creativity

Hodnett

times.

dio

in

three

teaches

different at

the

Breslau on Tuesday and

level, but

"It's

on Tiffanystained glass work, with an

The style

class focuses

you are limited to your by the materials and not good or bad,"

project

three-dimensional

jewelry, used small pieces of glass, which collectively, were too heavy

limited by flat planes."

for soft lead to hold

is

and cumbersome for pieces of glass different many

too

you

round shape, but you are

think

causing the lead to sag. "Tiffany wanted his lamps to

I

think

a

is

little

closer to art than

making

ornament for

the Christmas

his three-dimen-

much

Hodnett said his students leant pay attention to detail and that

stained glass

Duncan

is

In previous

taking the eight-week

classes,

students

still

you be yourself," said Rorye, who is making a bowl for her threelets

dimensional project. "When we make a mistake we all laugh about it. "I've dropped a lot of glass." She said stained glass can be expensive, but Hodnett is awesome at finding ways to save money.

"He has a lot of tool, so you can borrow the tools until you can afford to buy your own." The course costs $130 and students should be prepared to spend between $80 and $150 on materials.

Hodnett save

tells his

money

students

how

to

including where to rent

not forgiving like other

studio time and avoid buying tools. "When you compare the

mediums," said Hodnett. "When you have a pattern you have to be

expense of materials to the value of what you produce it's not expen-

patience. is

it is not going to fit going to put everything

exact or else

and

it

is

of whack." Hodnett said people who are new to stained-glass need to fall back on grade 1 and 2 drawing and

else out

"It is

sive," said Hodnett.

"An average lamp can

amazing

for

Hodnett operated

a

full-time

stained-glass business from 1974-

1982 and said

hobby how, over time,

sell

$300."

that

it

is

you have

the kind of to sell if

are going to continue to

do

you

it.

stained-glass sculptures.

said Hodnett.

going to use the patterns as a template, it has to be

of glass, it can be expensive." Hodnett said stained glass

exact."

about the interaction between light

"Really, the limit

is

your imagi-

There are three projects that

stu-

two projects are five-by-five-inch

51

it.

helps you along, but

"The glass is not expensive. It's between $4 and $6," said Hodnett. "But if your projects utilize 10 feet

an engineer.

want to exercise the other portion of my brain more," said Duncan,

â&#x20AC;&#x153;He

we become

dents will complete while taking the stained glass course. The first

I

a craft that

run with

side

have made jewelry boxes, candle holders, planters, atriums, and

he wants to try something different than his job as "I'm a technical person and

is

demands

cutting skills.

nation," said Hodnett.

course because

in place.

Hodnett explained that lead

a

is

Duncan tree

said

Duncan. "You have limits and it makes it more challenging. For the

make

don't

sional project.

introduction to lead work. Tittany, designer known for creating

the

sculpting

process.

Thursday nights.

"I

course through Conestoga. think 1 have the 3-D perception and

gluing them onto the glass

the creativity of sculpting.

at

to

"Glass

who

have intricate designs so he came up with the method of cutting strips edge and soldered it." Student John Duncan, 38, said

course

glass

be

simpler."

but that you don't have to

artists,

of creating a stained-glass

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Page 15

2003

artistic

window hanging and were learning how to assemble a three-dimen-

works of stained glass the creator says lie does not consider himself

10,

fiat

window hangings. By the fourth day of

dents

cutting

had learned the essential

cavalier with

and following the

lines,"

"If you're

Student Jennifer Rorye, 31 said she previously took a two-hour

and

stained-glass course but didn't get

there

,

nearly as class, stu-

rather

much

information.

She said the instructor gives students the ideas and lets them

is

glass.

"When

the light hits the glass

always something wonderful that happens," said Hodnett. "It allows everyone to express themis

selves creatively."


— SPOKE, November

Page 16

10,

News

2003

Singing the classics RYAN C ONNELL

By

The idea of a pop

covering

star

songs that are fondly remembered by today’s middle-aged generation could evoke some groans of disgust, but

look

at

depends on how you

it all

album, a remake of Waterboys’ Mike Scott’s The Whole Of The Moon. Moore personally chose all of the

album from songs she heard over the years and thought were wonderful classics tracks for the

has

that shouldn’t

it.

Pop singer and actress Mandy Moore released her fourth album on Oct. 21 called Coverage. Instead of debuting a set of new tracks, Moore’s album covers 12 of her favourite songs from the 1970s and ‘80s.

The idea of remaking old classics into pop songs can be a little repulmusic listeners who think if song sounded good by its original

“Moore adds a modern day pop twist to the classics that today’s youth

be able

artist

then

doesn’t need to be

it

What Moore manages

to

do with

most of the tracks on her new album is beautifully revive songs that may have been forgotten by longtime music listeners as well as introduce

beautiful

classics

that

younger audiences may not have been aware of. On first listen, the album has similarities

the

to

Idol with a

singing

karaoke

the

retro

www.mandymoore.com.

MANDY MOORE

BIO

10,

1984

is

some-

Birth

Place:

Nashua.

that today’s

like

in

Christina

Simpson and,

two more releases How to Deal and Liberty. Her other

most recently, Britney Spears, have begun co-writing their own songs. is

you

stand by you.

Aries March

Scorpio -

21

October 23

April 19

November

What goes around comes around. Seek legal counsel, ask advice from elders. You may be embroiled

Do

cratic systems.

bureau-

healthy things

-

you have the strength to provide it. If you lack information, have the determination to find

hopefully the next pop in

their foot-

to

May

-

:

Love conquers

N;

,

Avoid

all.

-

November 22 December 21

;

v

; ;

Sagittarius 20

petti-

the

only

isn’t

the

that

remakes so diverse from the

loved

Chasing

peace maker. Weigh

advice. Trust your

releases

every situation. Don't be so set in

2004,

A

Remember.

your ways

that

sides of

all

you miss

to get

you through

own

instincts

a crisis.

the big

picture.

steps.

Capricorn December 22

-

January 19

Stop being so close-minded.

You

There are plenty of alternatives

makes

thing

much on

Don't rely too

ones or business associates for

in

include Princess Diaries, and

Walk

April 20

A

day pop influence

it!

ness and prejudice. Try to be a

Partridge.

A modern

21

what's best for your loved ones and co-workers, and

Taurus

#

remake that shows a noticeable pop influence is the 1982 single Senses Working Overtime which was originally composed by XTC’s Andy industry.

-

You want

youth will be able to appreciate more because of the mainstream

pop

who

will continue to

New

her recent release, Saved, and

princess to follow

a break

Hampshire

Fellow pop

The next expectation hopefully

Jessica

Make

physically and spiritually.

ed rotations before the songs get tiresome and boring.

stars

truly love

-

resent the intrusions of

others in your life?

and assert yourself. Those

work.

at

in negotiations or tedious

Date of Birth: April

Do you

Beware of overindulgence.

Coverage

artists.

The album, however,

Moore

twist to the classics

Moore’s

either written or co-written herself.

The Earth Move, day pop

needs of others

available at most record

young voice

modem

a

is

from the

profit

9.

Mandy

thing you could only hear in limit-

197 1 single

Feel

to the

Dec.

soon

Stop being overly sensitive

Cursed/which will hit theatres in February. Her past summer’s movie How To Deal will be available on DVD and VHS on

show

classics.

will

Craven’s forthcom-

Wes

Moore’s musical career is to hear an album with songs that she has

to

You

extra efforts you've been putting forth.

they aren’t continuously remade to

death by

Aguilera,

I

album seem cheesy

or comparable to karaoke because

Although some of the songs on the album do hold a karaoke vibe, such as the remake to Carole King’s

Moore adds

in January, an independent film called Saved to be released in February, and a

Moore discovered her love of singing when she went to a summer musical theatre camp when she was nine years old. Moore is also an actress with

reality

American

Chasing Liberty out

in

September 23 October 22

movies such as

stores, and sound clips of each song from her album are also available on her website at

make

redone.

starring in several

album

Most of the songs, with the exception of one or two, don’t

Libra

Birthday!

album. The talented actress will be

will

to appreciate.”

Nov. 15

-

Happy

Moore won’t just be working in new year to promote her new

ing thriller

sive to a

Week of Nov. 9

*

the

cameo

be forgotten.

Horoscope

and solutions

to

your problems.

Try something new. This

origi-

is

anciapologies.

no

to learn. This

time to be lazy or melancholy.

nal songs, but also because seven

don't always

have

to

come

out on top. Accept compromises

You

is

still

a vital

have a

lot

time to

reprioritize.

of the tracks on the album were originally composed by male artists.

Cancer

Moore’s rendition of Elton John’s 1972 classic Mona Lisas and Mad

June 22

-

Aquarius January 20 February 18

July 22

Hatters demonstrates an interesting take on

the

melody from

soft

a

female’s vocal stance. Her voice in the remake of Cat Stevens’ 1971

To achieve

song Moonshadow beautifully matches the song’s violins and gui-

goals carefully now.

tar solos.

when

The album’s

first

single

is

a

remake of John Hiatt’s 1987 song Have A Little Faith In Me. The song, which has been covered

Moore

the

19-year-old

Remain humble. You'll need imagination to come up with options for action now. Examine

to say

no

Knowing

will help

you

and

evaluate issues carefully, Stubbornness is your challenge of

some time

the

for yourself.

|

Mp

Leo July 23

artist.

-

Pisces

August

February 19

-

March 20

22

The aggressive

has seen some considerable maturity since her last record. that

Moore

also

shows

goals results

in

pursuit of your

serious setbacks

with superiors. Learn to be more

different

restrained and original.

ranges in her voice which shine through in her remake of the 1978

An

on-the-

job transfer or change of status

is

likely.

One Way Or Another by

Blondie. Overall, the to hear

moment.

mt

sings the mid-tempo melody with her powerful voice

hit

and happi-

maintain your integrity. Take

before by several artists like Joe Cocker and Jewel, is impressively

remade by

security

ness you've got to plan your

album

how Moore

is

way

hurry to get things

and

think

things

through before acting. Take a vacation and stay away from responsibilities. There is life beyond work.

Virgo

that

August 23 September 22

are comfortable to her voice. The songs chosen on the album are also refreshing because many of the songs are not commonly remade, such as Joe Jackson's 1982 song Breaking Us In Two. Another honorable mention is to

second

in a

Stop

interesting

has interpreted

the different songs in a

Moore’s

Don't be

done.

track

on

the

Diana O’Neill

is a thirdyear journalism student

is

Tensions begin to mellow; help on the way. Slow down and

relax

-

(Internet photo)

phase.

Mandy Moore’s new album, Coverage,

is

12 tracks of classics.

you're entering a leisurely

Remain calm.

who dabbles with astrology and likes to read tarot cards just for kicks.

^


Entertainment

Tru Calling From

slaying vampires to hearing

actress Eliza

her

first

rising

people,

Dushku does

it

all

starring role in Fox's

television series.

in

new

Tru Calling.

The 22-ycar-okl

rising star plays

Tru Davies, a recent college graduate who lands a job working the midnight shift at a city morgue. On her first night working, Tru hears the voice of a dead body beg-

ging for help. The voice brings flashbacks ot Tru’s childhood when she witnessed her mother's murder. At her funeral, she heard her mother’s voice assuring Tru that her death

was not her she

is

fault.

reliving the

in

2003’s

The drama to CBS’s now-defunct

been

television

drama Early Edition where

a

there, she

brother and drug-addicted

The show’s

sister.

viewers on

pilot left

the edges of their seats, with sudden plot twists. Hopefully the show

be able

tum.

Good

to

continue

its

momen-

writing and elaboiate

for each episode, without being repetitive, will be the decid-

plots

Turn.

offered

her

own

to

have

television

series from Buffy the Vampire Slayer, with her aggres-

man

spin-off

saved the lives of people after get-

copy of tomorrow’s newspaper a day in advance. Unlike that show, which ran for a lour-year span, it lacked the talent ol edgy

sive attitude slayer character playing the lead. Dushku was forced to

Boston actress Dushku, who could help decide whether or not Fox’s new show will have a prosperous

Tru Calling series. The show’s series premiere didn’t receive high Nielsen ratings, which

ting a

future.

“The show’s

turn

down

probably didn't surprise the Fox network. The Nielsen ratings, which record the number of people

3.3 out of five. The show Temptation Island had a ranking of 3.7 on its series finale when it aired in the same timeslot that Tru

Calling

Dushku

is

ABC’s

plished actress

who

to television or the

is

is

accom-

no stranger

big screen.

She has earned most of her popu-

the

new

to

in.

work on promoting show its potential

series to

Tru Calling could have a promising future if a lot of work goes into developing the dark plots and quick action,

larity for her recurring role as Faith in the television series Buffy the

thrilling

Vampire Slayer and Angel. Dushku has also appeared in more than 10

seats.

movies, starring in 2000's Bring

now

Fox needs to viewers.

Alias.

a talented and

to prior

at

sudden

high-impact fast-paced, reminiscent of also is

Jennifer Garner in

due

are watching a particular television programs, ranked the show

plot twists.”

The show

the offer

negotiations with Fox to star in the

who

pilot left

viewers on the edges of

bed to find

goes through the

Wrong

Dushku was rumoured

has subtle similarities

same day over

day finding out what lead to the death of the corpse, and having to tix the follies of her gambling-addicted

will

— Page 17

On, 2002’s City By The Sea and

again, living 12 hours in the past.

From

2003

Tru excitement

their seats, with

Tru suddenly awakes that

is

ing factor in whether the show will be the Fox network’s next hit.

RYAN CONNELL

pleas of dead

the

10,

new FOX drama

ftie

By

SPOKE, November

It

making sure

it

provides

climaxes and quick turns, (Internet thoto)

leaving viewers on the edge ol their

be can Calling Tru Thursdays at 8 p.m. on Fox.

seen

FOX’s new

series Tru Calling.

the star of the midnight plays Tru Davies, a mortician working Eliza

Dushku

is

shift.

o n

forThe position on the Board of Directors vacant one has Inc. Students Cnnpstoza

invite apjjlications 2003-2004 year. The Board wishesto

CONESTOGA Doon,

W aierloo, or Guelph.

previous semester.

As

a Director,

your role

is

four ares. to function in the following

Provide a link to students Policy 2) Write Policy 3) Monitor Create Legislative change

1)

4)

A full iob description and a role explanation

will

be available

ih with an application form, The e and submitted to the attention of t completed be must form anolication order 4:00pm November 17, 2003 by Committee" Selection %oard to be considered.

Mondav November 10;2003 in the CSI

office

m

Dushku


.

Page 18

— SPOKE, November

News

2003

10,

Diana’s butler sets record straight' By JENNIFER

ORMSTON

out the

she was being observed.

working for Diana was employed as the Queen’s personal footman

Diana, Princess of Wales, feared

In this well-written

someone would tamper with

who

and the British intelligence saying and fascinat-

Burrell,

prior to

of the princess,

for a decade, generally portrays the

her brakes and cause her to be

Burrell expressed the devotion he

injured in a car accident.

Wales, to remarry, said her long-

had felt for her. The connection between princess and butler was not one-sided. She often referred to him as her “rock” and the only man

Windsors in a positive light. It was the Spencer family, Diana’s immediate siblings and mother, who he viewed harshly. Burrell wrote the Spencers were

time butler Paul Burrell in his con-

she could truly

not close to the princess during the

that

way

This would clear the

ex-husband

troversial

The

new book,

for her

Prince

Charles,

ing look at the

book

A Royal

of

Duty.

of

The book con-

an excerpt from the

with the

name of who

she believed

tling

publishing the princess’s

premonition

star-

in this insightful

authorities

would

finally

pursue an inquest into the death of “the people's princess.”

The

princess

was

her

most confidential

secrets to him.

As a result, he chose book

with intense hatred.

fearful

about

this

was

On

prince until her dying day.

She believed, especially

day her divorce was finalized she wrote in her journal she never wanted to end the marriage and a

in the last life,

her

actions were being monitored

She

thought listening devices had been planted in her home. On one occasion, Burrell wrote he and the princess moved all

also

part of her

Another he Burrell wished

the furniture, pulled back car-

were

listening

was

if there

hidden Although the duo devices

under the floor. found nothing, Burrell said the princess had good reason to be suspicious. She had received-warnings from members of the Royal Family

the

knew

his anti-

feelings clear.

the Spencer family had the Royal Standard removed from Diana’s coffin

Later,

at

estate, he

flag

and replaced

the

it

Burrell

flag.

with the Spencer said

the

princess

would have been saddened by both actions.

The Princess of Wales had been proud of her ties to the Royal Family. She had also instilled in

the

her sons a sense of pride over their

to dis-

birthright.

addition,

In

she

estranged from most the

had

been

members of

Spencer family for the

years of her

life.

Her

last

true family

was her close circle of friends; however, the Spencers did not even

The Royal Family was opposed

read the

to

Abbey, Earl Spencer made

Windsor

equate to a personality disorder. to the publication

privy

In the highly publicized funeral

the princess suffered

The Queen even

been

address to his sister in Westminster

from a personality disorder. According to Burrell, this was completely false. Diana suffered from bulimia, an eating disorder, which does not pel

had

Diana would disapprove.

prince.

pets and pried open floor boards

with a screwdriver to see

would always love

After her

princess’s innermost wishes,

said

her personal security, said Burrell.

couple of years of her

who

life.

took charge of her

a manner which Burrell,

affairs in

to set the

Burrell

they

death,

Diana loved the

false;

years of her

final

she

life;

record straight on various falsehoods about the princess that had been spread by tabloid papers. For instance, since the early 1 990s the press had often portrayed the relationship between the Prince and Princess of Wales as one filled

book, Burrell said his hope was the British

knowledge

aspects of Diana’s

to write this riveting

letter,

would commit the crime omitted.

By

all

confided

cern in a letter to her loyal butler

tains

trust.

Burrell has intimate

princess admitted this con-

prior to her death.

life

of A Royal Duty.

know

this.

A

would not novel. However, through-

Royal Duty is available bookstores for $39.

said she

(Photo by Jennifer Ormston) at local

Diana’s former butler tells the truth about her life A Royal Duty. It’s available at local bookstores.

in his

new book,

an authentic American samurai flick Kill Bill

FALLING ALL GLBT STUDENT! & Looking to meet new people Looking for people who you can relate

By HALLEY MCPOLIN to

& Looking to talk about issues in the community # Lookingfor a place to express your views

Almost film,

to

meetings of

GAY LESBIAN BISEXUAL TRANSGENDERED STUDENTS and see what

November

11

th

about.

& 25

th

way

out of the

Doon Campus

typical

Tarantino-style,

Volume

Bill;

action-packed,

Kill

shocking,

a

is

1

witty

and,

of

Jackie

Brown

many wondered what had been up

(1997),

the director

to during his

extended

absence. turns

attempt by her former teammates,

The Bride (so named because she was attacked on her wedding day)

out,

Game

yellow-and-black

homage

to

Bruce Lee

of Death (1978).

lent scenes are a play

kung

CISV

a non-profit, volunteer organization. For more information attend one information night at Grand River C.I. in Kitchener on Thursday November 13 OR Friday November 14 at 7:30 pm. www.cisvwaterloo r»r P is

on old ‘70s

means of hidgore irom American cen-

fu flicks as a

ing the sors.

actress Chiaki

plays

the

Kuriyama,

cute-but-devious

bodyguard of Lucy Liu’s O-Ren was recruited from one of Tarantino’s favourite movies: Ishii,

now

out for blood. With a

list in

*

will

go

to

any length

to

down and kill every former member of The Deadly Viper track

Assassination Squad, including the big boss. Bill.

With

its

fast-paced, stylized dia-

logue and imagery - including an entire sequence done in riveting Japanese animation - the lack of plot will be the last thing on your mind. Kill

Bill:

Vol.

1

is

a

violent,

intense and captivating

Even

who

is

hand,

The Bride

The black-and-white photograin some of the more vio-

education, culture, children and fun.

All the rest of the information in the

according to

it

phy used

summer 2004. Candidates must

tried to kill her four

was watching a lot of his favourite movies while searching for the inspiration for what would become the two-part Kill

in

adult leadership travel opportunities for be 21 yrs or older and have an interest in peace

on her former assassin

movie is conveyed on a needto-know basis. All you need to know is: after spending four years in a coma caused by a brutal assassination

film,

Many

Summer Villages has

ting revenge

comrades who

the disappointing reception to his

jumpsuit; a

International

entire

years earlier.

Thurman’s

s

its

course, non-linear addition to his small but impressive resume. After

of those influences can be clearly seen throughout the movie, such as lead actress Uma

Children

necessarily

absorbing plot two-part storyline is

be praised for

based entirely around Thurman’s nameless character, The Bride, get-

Bill series.

or inquire at Student Services.

Bill.

The movie shouldn’t the

Tarantino, he

Next Meeting Dates: Tuesday, November 11 th & 25 th 4:30 - 5:30 , For more information and room location contact Barb bkraler@conestogac.on.ca

miere of Kill

Quentin

shadows with yet another master-

As Location:

wore

piece under his belt.

last

its all

years after his last

six

writer/director

Tarantino blasts his

In

Then come out

Battle Royale. Tarantino even

a Battle Royale T-shirt to the pre-

will leave

romp that you begging for more .

and don’t worry, you’ll get enough. Kill Bill Vol. 2 release

is

it

.

soon

scheduled for

sometime next

year,

f


Sports

hockey launches

ifltramural body’s

By JASON SMITH

the Kenneth K. Hunter Recreation Centre and the games have already

really

care

don’t

The puck was dropped on Oct. 27, marking the beginning of another fun-filled and competitive season lor hockey lovers throughout

the col-

lege.

Ten teams signed up

to take part in

and the early stages of competition have been full of energy, excitement and love lor

the action this year

the game.

not so

much

about competi-

caption,’’ said Mike Graham, team tain of The Chiefs, who are named the after the notorious team from

hockey

classic

film

‘•We're here to have

Slap

some

Shot.

fun and

echo Graham’s sentiments, enjoying their time out of the classroom and

about win-

ning.”

McDermid joked about

the team,

of play

he’s seen on the ice so far this year. “I had to have a good talk with

our captain Mike Graham,” said

McDermid.

“1

was

a

little

disap-

pointed after seeing him rack up six minutes in the penalty box in need him to be our first game. I

more of

You know, kind

a leader.

of like me.” Matt Jordan,

who

also helps out

behind the bench and er

room

for

in the lock-

The Chiefs,

said the

when

their laughs group of guys get together. "It’s a riot. 1 know 1 won’t forget to open the door tor a line

don't

stop

Jordan was hassled by the team open the door to

after forgetting to

the

ice

on a

line

change

that

thankful for the ice time intramural

resulted in a goal scored against

hockey allows them.

The Chiefs on Oct. 28. The Chiefs look forward

Brian McDermid, a second-year recreation and leisure studies student at the college, has also joined the fun, taking

on the

role as

coach for The Chiefs. have a good time and every-

assistant

"We

to

an

entertaining year to say the least. “It’s all in fun,” said Graham. "Just like our team slogan says, win or lose, we’re hitting the

booze.”

teams will compete against one another for five weeks, wrapping up the “regular season” on Nov. 26. Playoff dates and contenders will be announced at the conclu-

The

10

every

saw

4o parking signs stand outside

p.m., Tuesdays at 4:30 and 5:30 p.m. and Wednesdays at 4:30 and

of parking

a clear driving path. (Photo by

James

5:30 p.m.

not the

one

JAMES DOYLE

Red Sox were

because his high-powered offence he stalled in the playoffs. Instead, losing his job because he made one wrong decision.

is

In

are you struggling to get THROUGH A COURSE?

Game

ace, 7, Little left his

Pedro Martinez, in the ball game. on Little came out to check

Martinez

in the eighth inning, but

Pedro told him he proved to be This was both the beginning of the end for Martinez, Sox. Red Little and the

left

him

in after

all right.

gave up a double to Derek Jeter, followed by an RBI single by Bernie Williams. Hedeki Matsui and

who had

a 5-2 lead,

off Jorge Posada both got hits Martinez, and it was the end of the line for Boston. Now looking back, yes, Martinez was tired and probably

should have come out of the game. But Little had struggled

When

BEFORE TUTOR MAY HELP GET YOU ON TRACK THE END OF THE SEMESTER DON’T DELAY!!

anyone

inning.

And why shouldn't he? Pedro Martinez is one of the game s premier pitchers. If Little cannot the trust his ace, and perhaps same’s best pitcher, who can he trust?

managers should be able

All

show confidence in

that

guy

Game to

only giving up two runs through seven innings. Unfortunately tor Red Sox fans everywhere. Martinez

was unable to get the job done. But this does not mean Little move. should lose his job over one The positives of the play offs far outweish one decision. Little found a

way

to get his

Little then split

ASSOCIATION

OIAOCTES ASSOCIATION

CANAOIEHNC

ou chase re

www. diabetes ca

team

into the playoffs.

found a way to keep a

clubhouse together. The Red

Sox were so close through

the play-

offs that instead of high

ing each

fix

other a other, they would gixe each

hug.

But

man the

Little is

gone, and another

will have the job of ending worst curse in sports. So.

good luck one word of too advice, don't leave Pedro in

whoever to him.

this

person

and here

is

long.

life,

you need

Canadian

Ccroi seto. dietitian

SOMEONE YOU KNOW. CALI 1-800-BANTING CAHAOUM

to

in their go-to guy.

7, they should want be on the mound, even if he has- thrown 115 plus pitches.^ Martinez threw a gem of a ballgame.

And

turn to. Call the

Diabetes Association."

blame

to

with his bullpen all year, and trusted Martinez to get out of the

diabetes enters your

someone to

HELP

looking

already playing.

because they didn’t win the World Series (the last time the Red Sox took the title was 1918) or

Clark)

still

to their roster.

the rec centre or speak to

eliminated in seven games by the New York Yankees, it is manager Grady Little who is being blamed. not Little is being fired, but

be placed at the rows to ensure

will

ends

add more players

Anyone interested in playing intramural hockey should contact

Monday from 4:30-5:30

guy. " After the Boston

he maintenance department The at Conestoga College. signs

to

The curse of the Bambino has reared its ugly head yet again. But tall this time. Grady' Little is the

...

during a recent

Several teams are

sion of the season. Games are currently scheduled

By

I

Graham

talks with player Mike Brian McDermid, assistant coach of The Chiefs, college. the at game intramural hockey

Little

the sign

new season

into

change ever again."

enjoy our time on the ice.” Many of the players

in

— Page 19

tun and

“It’s

talking about the quality

begun.

“It’s

we

2003

10,

about

laughing

usually

something,” he said. Intramural hockey has returned to

SPOKE, November

is.


Page 20

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; SPOKE, November

10,

2003

ggtm

STUDENTS

INC

Digital Edition - November 10, 2003  
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