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CSI’s

Luck be a lady tonight

new face!

Conestoga students take a

Sam joins

Egleston

trip to

Niagara Falls hoping to win

big.

Conestoga

NEWS

as the new

Art festival

communications

comes

5

to Kitchener

Kitchener City Hall displays artwork from specialist.

a variety

NEWS Monday, October

6,

of artists.

NEWS

3

35th Year

Conestoga College, Kitchener

2003

8

— No. 5

Party animals prowl off campus for fun RYAN CONNELL

By

Efforts to generate

participation

events

middle of the campus because you have to go so deep into the school

Miller said he would like

and

remember such

been going exactly as planned. Conestoga Students Incorporated (CSl) has scheduled 150 events for

dents will

the Sanctuary this year.

Gras and Polar Plunge.

may sound

That number not

it’s

one of those events had only students at

“These are events

six

activities

Ethan Miller wants to make a

change

more “1

would

events and be focusing on quality

advertising,

for

many

about

hear

events

poor

word-of-mouth advertising

sys-

tem.

It is

discouraged

is

I

me

secu-

cerns with

to fird six stu-

off because there’s

certainly

very departmental, very

find

students

“I sense a very passive student

body at this college. There’s not a whole lot of necessity to tackle the issues or voice opinions,” Miller said.

Miller

it

more

this

history

worried

of participation that happened year is starting again already.

“I’m working on trying

made make

year to

is

is

repeating itself because the lack

the

Sanctuary an uncomfortable place to party because it is on college grounds and has a school atmosphere, despite renovations

being brought to

not

their attention.

I

Sanctuary

events are being

CSI held a public forum a few weeks ago where only one student showed up.

ask to have for certain

Many

how

run by CSI, Miller said they are

to the event.” students contribute the lack of student participation to where many of the events are

held.

Bahen

said.

Some

to the

through the grapevine. “Conestoga has a very

feels

school

in

events. “It’s the rebel effect,”

nobody came

activities

ing place so attendance is minimal. Miller said CSI can’t expect to

Bahen agreed, saying she

have that I can’t get,” Miller said. “Yet we’re spending money on security guards who sit around and laugh at us because ideas

event isn’t promoted, the student body is unaware of activities tak-

students

Second-year law and security student Kathleen

administration

guards and police officers for

“It pisses

and events because there are far too many happening at once to promote all of them. When an

It’s

said.

“CSI pushes it on us so much to go to the pub nights and it just makes you not want to go.” If students have issues and con-

money

over quantity,” Miller said. ‘'You want a quality event where students have a great time at it and look forward to the next one.” Miller said there is so little

go to the weird,” Van Haren

smaller events.

pub nights only dents show up.

rather be doing fewer

going to

like

you

pressured to participate

rity

dent events.

Sanctuary.

they think of

when CSI spends money on

by putting on the quality of stu-

much

so

when

school

people

that

it.

“It feels

as the

in the

Conestoga College,” Miller said. Instead, he would like to have 25 large events and forget about the Miller said he

activities

to

effort

when

think about

but that

it.

CSI vice-president of

to get to

to

parties, parties, toga pond Queensmount arena events, Mardi

impres-

when written on paper, when you consider

sive

CSI

create larger events that the stu-

the Sanctuary haven’t

in

doesn’t like the Sanctuary

to focus

with more promotion.”

more student

activities

for

“We need on more quality events

divisional,” Miller said.

things

better

at

these

to

last

(Photo by Darren Smith)

make

Did

events,”

“One of the first starts is just cutting out the fat and saying let’s

Second-year practical nursing student Amy Van Haren said she

do

less

and ‘Let’s do

911?

call

plays the part of a First-year paramedic student Nick Koopman to load him into way proper the learn students patient as fellow

Miller said.

club-friendly.

someone

Gibbons, Kelly an ambulance. (Clockwise from bottom) Katie trial run. Armstrong and Danielle Desrochers all assist in the

better.”'

Students gather to hear Cambridge candidates questions The Sanctuary By VALENTINA

filled

RAPOPORT

as three major parties presented

that took place

when

they were in

how

According

are students doing it? That was Cambridge Progressive Gerry candidate Conservative Martiniuk’s answer when asked how his party would fix high

the Liberals

not affordable, then

we can discuss the and how people feel about

fact

statistics

is,

the costs but there are

more students going

to

more and

our colleges

and universities," he said. His answer brought gasps students

who packed

tuary Sept.

29

among

into the sanc-

to hear provincial

would do if elected. Along with Martiniuk were Liberal candidate Jerry' Boyle and

New Democrat Pam Wolf. should

be

"This government ashamed of the terrible increases we’ve seen (in tuition hikes)."

would freeze

tuition

10

per cent of low-income students as well as increase the number of scholarships available to students

NDP

NDP

candidate Wolf pledged

elected, her party

if’

would make sure

both part-time students and those on social assistance can receive party

In

also

addition,

plans

amount of grants

to

she

said

increase

the the

available to stu-

not believe any student

should be denied an education because they can’t afford it. We believe education is a right and not a privilege." she said. As well as tuition questions, stu-

dents asked about the lack ot time nursing positions in

lull-

the

party,” referring to in tuition

programs, increasing car insurance

42 per cent increase

about the 44 per cent

drop of funding per student when enrolment has increased by 49 per candidates three all cent,

announced

their parties

to increase

had plans

funding tor both col-

and welcomed

for schools should be increased

and

announced the Liberals plan to spend $400 million in the educa“They’re (the PC party's) funding towards the college student is about the same as.their funding to prisoners,"

he said.

All

three

candidates said their

planned to increase hospital

parties

adding the NDP also plans to start the Education Excellence Fund, sustained by a two per cent tax on

nursing positions available. When asked about funding for

Ontario residents with incomes of more than $110,000 alter taxes

we

will

be

giving $1.5 billion yearly for edu-

on the other hand,

Martiniuk.

didn’t outline any specific plans to increase funding for schools but

to

it

"repay their

up

to the students

own

debts to socie-

is

once they find jobs. “1 do not believe in subsidizing

ty"

the wealthy." he added.

Boyle, like Wolf, agreed funding

make more

full-time

social programs, Martiniuk said the PC party has made a great differ-

ence

in

Cambridge by having one

of the biggest shelters

in the tri-city

feel

especially said,

we've done great work, for

adding

the the

Cambridge

is

She

the

with

said the

NDP

plans to raise

S8 per hour and put $32,000 toward affordable

the

minimum wage

to

housing.

Boyle said the Liberals also plan

minimum wage

to raise the

stages and also

puf $20,000

but in

announced plans

ing.

"That’s

the

realistic

we've budgeted, he

number

said.

Regardless of how' the vote has

many expressed that

these

fact

to

took the lime to

the lack ol afford-

minimum

to

into affordable hous-

he

able housing and the low

wage.

far

plans

spend an additional $1.3 billion to help the homeless. According to Wolf, the reason for the increasing number of homeless in

so

seen

Conservatives.”

homeless." party

raised

ended and w ho students voted

area. "I

cation.

instead said

funding to

“We need minimum wage

immediately, not after four years like the Liberals plan or never as

we’ve

tion systems.

“We will put $2.1 million back into education,” responded Wolf,

each year. "This way

dents.

“We do

When asked

leges and universities.

province, the drop in college Binding. plans for the funding of social

responded Boyle, adding. "But so the

elected,

if

hikes, provide free tuition for

loans.

candidates voice what their party

should die

Boyle,

by 50 per cent.

tuition rates.

"The

to

and available health services

new immigrants.

for

power. If it’s

rates

their platforms

for.

their liking in the

three

candidates

come

to the col-

lege.

"I’m glad they were willing to come out and show that they do care about what young people in our province think,

said third-year

computer programming student Sean McCafferty.

analyst


Page 2

— SPOKE, October

The

6,

News

2003

makes an appearance

Ghost’

By BRYAN MARTIN Conestoga College students were when The Ghost came to the Sanctuary on Sept. 22 Also known as Gerry Watson,

table up in the air knocking the bottom ball off the bottle and having the top ball fall and land perfectly on top of the bottle. After this, Watson challenged students to a game, and was unde-

The Ghost showed

feated.

in for a treat

his stuff at the

He gave away

centre pool table.

As soon

Watson was

as

intro-

hats,

videos to volunteers,

He

number of

did a

trick shots

and had many in disbelief. The most popular was the one trick where he had two balls on top of each other sitting on top of a Coke bottle. He then jumped the cue ball from the that stunned the audience

RAPOPORT

nicknamed The Ghost

but since I’m surrounded by stu-

because of his safety aspects of

keep them interested and the best way to do that is to

snooker.

is

He

practised safety

moves

he could hide the cue ball from his opponents and control the

known

is

It

tricks,” said Bjelica.

upon by Watson to perform a was given advice. “I was pretty nervous, I didn’t want to called

trick shot, but

screw up,” said Repasky. “I made a shot I never thought I could make

Francen

way back

LCBO’s

Canada.

do

Absinthe, a hallucinogenic liquor

banned since 1912 by liquor conboards throughout Europe, the United States and informally in Canada, can now be found in B.C., Ontario and Quebec. The green drink, made from a mixture of herbal extracts of chlorophyll, coriander, mint, lemon balm and aniseed, is also blended with 70 per trol

cent alcohol. Yet,

its

high alcohol level

reason

the

why

Absinthe, also

isn't

was banned.

it

known

as the liquor

of the Bohemians because of

among

popularity

its

such as

artists

Picasso and Van Gogh, also contains

a chemical

This

chemical’s

called

thujone.

structure

and

effects are similar to tetrahydrocan-

nibinol,

which

is

an active ingredi-

ent found in marijuana or

“Absinthe

is

OK

THC.

to sell provided

for

has been touring the country

20 years and has performed

more than 2,500 shows.

He

doing

this,

but

is

not ruling out

making a comeback down the road. “Once you’re out of the pool loop it’s

tough to get back

DAWN HASSON

summers

to

off.

He goes

says this could be his last year

in,

so

who

knows what the future holds.” Watson learned his many tricks

to

He

first

talking and doing the trick at the

below

tests

spokesman

a

for

the

quality control board.

“We

when he was 12 and by

pool

15

was

addicted and started travelling to play.

ous to the youth.”.

According

to Francen,

absinthe

trolled,

is

a

when con-

He

started off his career playing

snooker, then pool and then doing

known

medicinal

as

drink

only certain brands with low thujone, such as Hill’s Absinthe from the Czech Republic, are sold in Canada. While brands sold in B.C. contain no measurable amount of the chemical, brands sold in Ontario contain less than four parts per million (ppm).

attacks,

Compared absinthe,

ppm,

is

was

and hallucina-

nearly

100 years after

it

banned across much of think our policies on alcohol regulation and quality have improved just slightly. I hope that the fear of death, madness and hallucination is no longer much of a

(Internet photo)

only contains 45 per cent alcohol. University of Toronto student

ble

Dan Thomson,

insanity,

“It

became something responsifor

madness, hallucinations, sloth, and even murder (in

the early 1900s).” Initially

the liquor

was banned

because of murders that took place

“It’s like trying to

beat the devil

says

I

you have

to figure out

he’s 95 per cent confi-

if

dent the trick will work he’ll throw into his routine.

it

Watson has won many pool titles, with his greatest coming in 2002 at the Canadian Artistic Pool Championships.

He

has a website, www.gerry wat-

video

a

Academy and

a

Pool

called

book 101 Big Pool

Shots.

LCBO Magazine

LCBO

don’t

stores

expect the drink to be one of the

more popular products. “There’s a kind of trendiness associated with these products and

we’re responding to the existence of a potential niche market,” he said.

According 10

than

to

Thomson, more

LCBO

stores in Toronto

have been selling absinthe, which $56 to $85, depending on the brand. “It tastes pretty powerful and somewhat unpleasant on the first costs from

glass, unless

black

you have a thing

licorice,”

said

referring to the liquor’s taste. “All in

energy and money Americans and other prohibitive countries have been putting into

not for the faint of heart or

the

preventing

its

citizens

from

tasting

abnormally strong licoriceflavoured beverage could be well

for

Thomson

concern,” said Thomson, adding, “All

pared to beer. In addition to its lower thujone level, the drink now

ed with absinthe and believes the drink has been labeled more dangerous than it really is.

epileptic

first

Europe,

now com-

23, has experiment-

officials linked the

addiction,

delirium

“Now

“old-time” contained 250

the exotic liquor

to

tions.

the

to

which

Absinthism. After the

murders health

drink easy to digest. Currently,

Watson says he’s always working on new tricks and adding to his shows, but it’s not always easy.

son.com,

in 1905 when Jean Lanfray of Vaud, Switzerland, went on a drinking binge that ended with him killing his family. The murders were blamed on his consumption of absinthe creating a syndrome then

so the levels aren’t danger-

the world.

He

playing

started

his

coming a year ago, but feels he’s fallen off a little from his days where he used to be 15th in

the right combination.”

money.

is

game peaked with

felt his

and says that keeps him on and very busy.

esting for viewers. says,

He

in Solitaire;

his toes

little

of everything.

best pool

approximately 20 col-

Watson says in 1977 nobody would challenge him in snooker or pool because everybody knew who he was and didn’t want to lose their

The one tough challenge he

doing a

his trick shots, before bit

leges and 19 universities every year

from reading books and elaborating upon them, trying to make them more complicated and inter-

Conestoga recycles By

have

liquor returns to the

that the level of thujone is

into

I

He

Michelle Repasky, a first-year business student, was

as the green fairy its

dents

contestants

prescribed amounts,” said Leonard

which has flown

you watch the pros

Watson travels to campuses from September to December and then from January to April and takes the

general

Banned By VALENTINA

my

for

time. “If

game.

fall

started

Watson

same

they have plenty of time to prepare,

books and

mustache.

Watson

talent.

great

talk to them.”

by talking to the audience while he was warming up. He was wearing a dazzling black suit which complemented his

watch him display his

was a

It

privilege.”

until

and some lucky students. Sinisa Bjelica, a second-year computer engineering technology student, came close in a game, falling only one ball shy. “I felt I could have beaten him near the end, but he’s too good to

duced a large gallery of other pool players and students gathered to

in a million years.

all,

a very social activity, though

weak

liver.”

Along with

its

historical reputa-

tion, absinthe is also

known

for the

this

way

spent elsewhere.”

spoon into the liquor, adding sugar and fire to add a caramelized taste and topping it off with chilled

Chris Layton, Ontario spokesman for the

LCBO,

told

Report

News

it’s

drank by dipping a

tea-

water.

plastic bottles

for re-labelling the containers.

The waste management company The time has come: Conestoga College can recycle plastic bottles at

no additional cost

to the school.

The Capital Environment waste management company made a deal

material from the bins, which means cans and plastic can be placed in the same bin. If also provides less work for Martin’s sorts the

Building Maintenance,

who used

with the college to come twice a week, on Tuesdays and Fridays to

to sort

pick up the recycling material.

don’t have the storage space to put

company

currently

comes by

The the

college on Fridays anyway, so they

agreed to

day

come

for one additional

same price. makes it much more conven-

at the

themselves.

worked out well because we

“It

the

it

bottles

until

they are picked

“And the cost is $10 a lift, which doesn’t take money away from academics.” up,” said Vogan.

still

Vogan, a support services officer

The plastics being recycled are number PET plastics, the water and pop bottles found in

for physical resources.

Conestoga’s vending machines and

"It

ient for larger bins,” said

The college

Cheryl

didn’t have to

buy

specific bins to recycle the plastic,

which would have cost the school about $85 a bin. Instead, the bins for cans were re-labelled as plastic and cans only. Martin's Building Maintenance, the school’s housekeeping company, was responsible

1

cafeterias.

Plastics in the school account for seven per cent of the college’s waste that would go to the landfill.

Now,

it’s seven per cent of the waste diverted from the landfill.

Waste management begins new pickup route Oct. 6.

the

(Photo by

Martin Building Maintenance’s Phyliss Caissie labels a blue bin “plastic only.

Dawn Hasson)


News

New face

SPOKE, October

underway

Inc. is

hoping

By JAMES CLARK

the addition of a specialist will help

Sam

year-end

for

banquet

Conestoga Students

more people

— Page 3

Fundraising

behind the scenes at CSI

By JASON MIDDLETON

bring

2003

6,

to events.

Egleston, 27,

the CSI’s

more

Students and faculty of the law and security and police foundations programs have begun to

awareness for events by creating

fundraise for a year-end banquet.

is

commu-

newest face and his job as nications specialist

to create

is

interesting posters, updating their

Small year-end dinners have

new ads

old website and creating

been held

Spoke and C.IIQ. "The main thing is we want to come up with some unique ideas on ways to really promote events and for both

get

students

of students

come

to

"We

Egleston.

includes both

and second-year students has planned a number of events to

money

raise

college and they

paying for these

are

A committee that

have a vast amount

at this

has

it

first-

says

out,"

in the past, but

been a decade since a full-scale banquet has been organized.

for

banquet,

the

including 50/50 draws held every

as

two weeks. One draw has already

students to stop and

been made with a prize of $167. A raffle will also be held with

information

prizes that include a 36-inch tele-

boards, not just pass them because

vision and possibly two HewlettPackard iPAQ pocket personal computers.

activities

part of their tuition.”

He wants look

CSI's

the

at

"When

of their uniformed look. look

at

they

all

why

advertisement boards

the

look the

same and

that’s

Organizers are hoping to hold

He

an elimination draw with a grand

by using

prize in the thousands of dollars.

people just walk by them.”

hopes

correct

to

I

this

unique poster designs.

Plans are also being

Egleston graduated from Thunder

tion off students

Bay's Confederation College with a

members

degree from broadcast and journal-

for a day.

ism and did his Western University.

dations,

internship

at

Conestoga and hopes

at

make

to update

the

the website interactive.

I

(Photo by Jason Middleton)

want

Sam

CSI’s newest face. Working behind the scenes as the communications specialEgleston’s duties include creating awareness for events, updating the old website and creating

to be a source for information. If

it

a student

to access all

home

ist,

be able the information about

at

is

they’ll

with events coordinator Jody Andruszkiewicz. “Jody is the voice. He’s the one

organizes

comes

me and says this is the which we co-ordinate togeth-

one

most

was

realistic

when

really

you’re here.”

money to

a

do with. “There were a

why we we get more

because students are having a better

lot

excitement.”

about

job and wants to be suc-

promote anything and everything that has to do with student life. We want a maximum

want

to

turnout for everything

“We want to make the fun

ing

we

RYAN CONNELL

By

The Conestoga residence and Conestoga Students Incorporated are determined to increase student participation by joining together to

make

school year unforgettable

this

paying for different trips and events that residence will be holding. CSI paid for a school bus to take approximately 50 residents on a

Niagara Falls casino and tour trip on Sept. 23. Students saved $5 because CSI covered the bus fee.

CSI has agreed variety

of

exchange

CSI would much spend money on residence

Miller

for students. to help sponsor a

events

residence for

in

CSI

advertising

events to students in residence.

CSI vice-president

ol

activities

Ethan Miller said the students union is eager to start a positive working relationship with resi-

rather trips

said

where

the buses are packed

with students having a great time, then spend money on pub nights in the Sanctuary where the attendance is

so small.

CSI hasn't discussed with residence management about how

dence.

much money

be honoured if they (residence staff) would support us when we hold an event and pro-

spend on residence events like barbecues and field trips, but has instead agreed to give residence a helping hand whenever they need

"We would

mote

it.

said. "It

like a partnership," Miller

would be naive

to think

most of the people who come our events aren't from residence,

that to

because they are." Residence staff has agreed to promote different events that CSI holds by putting up

posters in the

lobby and on bulletin boards

at .the

exchange, CSI will assist

it.

Miller said the gives

to

money

money

that

in

CSI

residence for events w'ell

spent

because

is it

increases student participation and creates a healthy student life at the

"The residence

is

the lite blood of

can

t

gel residents to

go out

you for

it

doesn't benefit CSI.

we

to get to, so

are willing to

Tercel and a

who

don’t live on cam-

two-week vacation

Barbados. than $125,000

was

ticket sales,

raffle

raised

a golf

tournament, and other events. people 250 Approximately attended the banquet at Waterloo Inn.

The

location has not been set

for this year’s banquet, but

ager Genevieve Oberle said it was great to see residence and CSI

are solely advertised in residence.

expected to

cuss different events that will be happening at both places and how

work together more student turnout.

they can

Students

who

to generate

Residence

in resi-

However, students

on campus ticipate

at

are

still

who don't

welcome

live

to par-

CSI-funded residence

events.

prefer mostly residents but

it

to

spend

other activities.

"It’s best to stay local

way

said.

Some leave

"A

they

(on events)

participate

more.

people don’t even want to to go out." Oberle

campus lot

ward

to in the

month of October

include a Fat Bastard dinner buffet on Oct. 9. coffee house night on Oct.

Sex-education Fantasia party on

have guests over here (for events) and as long as they sign in

Oct. 22. Sex Jeopardy on Oct. 24. and pumpkin-carving contests in

we

time for Halloween.

they

don’t mind," Oberle

said.

It

open

wall be

first-

to

alumni and

and

the banquet.

Condon

said the inspiration to

revive the year-end banquet

came

from her husband, a law and security alumnus. She said her husband was disappointed

when he

learned the

program didn't have a year-end banquet "He has been harassing

me of the students just like to

hibernate out in their rooms.” Events that residents can look for-

15.

people.

elimination draw will be held at

afford

and pool tournaments. Oberle said activity participation in residence is very low with onl\ 10 per cent of students going on

dents pay a fee as part of their tuition to participate in school events that are organized by CSI.

is

800

that are occasion-

money. Smaller events

dence may see the working relationship between CSI and residence negatively because all stu-

it

organized are euchre, poker

can't

students

that

attract close to

second-year police foundations and law and security students, who will each be able to brine one guest. The raffle and

trips or

don't live

staff organizes events

almost everyday, most being kept small because a lot of for students

ally

do

$40,000 and $50,000. In 1994 the grand prizes of the raffle draw were a new Toyota

pus, however, are unaware of activities held in residence because they

working together this year. “We’re (residence and CSI) after the same goal which is to help students have fun and get to know each other,” Oberle said. CSI and residence staff will be meeting every tw'o weeks to dis-

I

much as it takes,” said Faoro. The group hopes to raise between

doesn’t benefit them (residence).'' Residence assistant general man-

“We

college.

the college," Miller said. "It

elevators. In

they 'are

willing to

events,

said

Summer Faoro, a second-year law and security student, said she realizes that the students and faculty involved have a lot of work ahead of them to make the event work. “We know we have a large sum

to the

do.”

well spent Students

it

fundrais-

everyone,”

for

Condon.

More

money

to residence is

members auctioned

faculty

off as a date or slave.

from

CSI donations

lib-

be one of

as

We

on.

we make more money because more people come through

of ideas and the

this

“What the CSI does is put on so many events. There’s so much going

and

time,

if

sense the creativity and the Egleston is excited

just

people out to the

of

surplus

a win-win situation

cessful.

know what

was

It’s

everything works out.” Miller says Egleston is “a perfect addition to our workforce. “You can

created the position.

events the college benefits, the social system at the college benefits

says the position

that they didn't

“If

the doors.

someone who did

ing anyone to carry through with making sure people come. That's

CSI added because of

sive Andruszkiewicz more time to focus on co-ordinating events.

the

such a relaxed environment to work in. It makes it easy and time

activities,

this position will

was

promotions full-time. We’re always running into this dilemma in the CSI of creating these events, but not hav-

Ethan Miller, vice-president of

it.”

that

the idea of hiring

is

really flies

the

The addition of

dream job

it’s

booking and I er. would be the person who promotes all

this is his

“You have all this energy (in CSI office) but at the same time

the

to

He does

CJIQ and Spoke.

port.

He

that

is

a far cry from his previous job at Bell Canada as a tech sup-

and

relationship

event,

for

Egleston says

the events from the website.” Vie explained he lias a close work-

everything.

Egleston, 27,

CSI ads

all

ing

a police foun-

law and security and

eral arts teacher, will

the CSI’s website. "I really want to

to auc-

be a slave or a date

to

Camie Condon,

Recently he took a website course

made

and two faculty

for the last three years that

have been working here to

start

I

it

up again."

Condon available that

said raffle tickets are

now and emphasized

anyone

a ticket

in

is

eligible to purchase

any of the draw’s.

$10 or three for $25 and elimination draw tickets Raffle tickets are

are S25.


— SPOKE, October

Page 4

Commentary

2003

6,

Theft hurts us Whatever happened yours?

all

concept of not taking what

to the old

isn’t

an idea that has been drilled into our heads since child-

It’s

hood, yet such a simple notion seems to be beyond some people. Recently, the journalism and broadcast departments had the unfortunate

experience of not one instance, but two very serious examples of

how

theft

can affect a program. While most students were enjoying their sum-

mer

holidays, approximately $10,000 worth of equipment

was

stolen

from the department. The equipment, which includes cameras, a mixing board and microphone, are essential to the students and teachers in the course.

Somehow, some

managed

individual (or individuals)

to get past

two locked doors and snatch the five mini DV cameras from where they were stored over the summer. This seems to indicate whoever is responsible for the theft had been in the room before, leading to a

may

disturbing but apparent realization that access

who

students

program began

Just as the

we were

stances,

eras

sincerely need

were

hit

to recover

from these distressing circum-

with yet another blow: three

When

stolen.

be restricted to

it.

more mini

DV

cam-

students went to use the equipment in question,

they arrived only to find three snipped cables where the cameras

should have been.

unknown how and when

It’s still

these cameras were pilfered from

under the noses of students and teachers

alike, but

that this is an unnecessary inconvenience that

what

many

is

known

is

find distressing

and disheartening. There have also been some vehicle break-ins

would appear It’s

in the

Conestoga parking

which stereo equipment has been stolen from several parked

lot in

sad

that

to class isn’t safe

cars. It

“Can you believe how much tuition

anymore.

minds

at

ease in a place where they should feel safe.

Beware

Everybody has gotten the lecture: theft hurts us all. Stealing is wrong. But how many of us have taken into full consideration exactly what is wrong about stealing? Of course, it’s illegal - if you get caught, you’ll be in trouble. What

ting

honked

kind of trouble depends on the type of theft involved. Grand theft auto,

how

1

for example, will get

make

but does that

you

more trouble than shoplifting ... wrong than stealing a car? Retailers

in slightly

shoplifting less

lose millions of dollars yearly because of thievery, yet the term “petty theft” is

applied to die act of shoplifting. Millions of dollars does-

still

be too “petty” to most people, yet those individuals who help themselves without paying aren’t thinking on such a scale ... nor do they consider the fact that the cost of these crimes gets passed along n't

seem

to the

to

consumer.

Employee

that they aren’t getting, they

only

office. If they

knew

more than just money;

common form

it

this

of stealing.

When some

known

to close

down permanently

is

wrong, but not only because

get in trouble

if

always a victim involved, whether

someone It is

is

it’s

you get caught. Stealing it

be a

illegal or

is

because you can

wrong because

retailer,

theft.

there

is

employer or student.

taking something that does not belong to you and causing

friend and

is

why Conestoga

security is asking

students to be on the lookout for any suspicious behaviour around the school.

ing the

We all

same

need

to

we

signed on for in year one.

Letters are

Lot

in

an

when my empty beer

10

to

my

my

car.

We

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be

didn’t get the

memo

on Friday afternoons everyone city

must drive

like absolute

traffic to

pass so

for the

I

maniacs.

what kind of salad she

should purchase, a middle-aged

oncoming

shoved by me, pushing

could drive into the

Naturally,

friend.

me

man

my

into

because

was

I

supermarket, the truck driver behind

brought up to be polite and have

me

manners

sped around

fusely.

The fun

lowing

that

me

and honked pro-

didn’t end there; fol-

truck

irrational

Sorry guys, next time

car.

Obviously we weren’t the only

out in front of the

ones excited about the weekend.

we

just

jumped in my car and cranked up the Boys of Summer for the drive home.

The is

that

the

should

oncoming

I

was

in

man

replies,

in

your way. In

“Yeah,

I

want

how many

Honestly,

people can

traffic.

I

refuse to

people

a turning lane, so they

1

who

arrogant

run into in one day?

become one of

rant to the rest of the world.

lane that continued heading straight.

up.

I

have never had vulgar language

shouted

Chopper on Frederick

Street

aware I

at

of).

mean

those

are completely igno-

could have calmly proceeded into the

at the

turn,

to get

through here.” fly

ironic thing about the situation

decided to make a stop

pick up a couple of necessities.

I

it

apologized to the man. standing in the produce

department got

essary to scream “asshole” at me.

my

felt

I

my

was

was also conveniently

who

Sorry

nec-

case that

Price

nec-

was conversing with my

1

friend over

in the

another crazy driver

I

it’s

bottle

picked up

siderate state of the world,

While

that

and an empty Bavaria

Suck

These uptight people need As someone once said, if

to

relax.

But

world gives you lemons, make

I

just brushed

really,

it

off.

“not everyone in

the

lemonade.

is published and produced weekly by the journalism students

Advertising Manager: Blake Gall Production Managers: Petr Cihacek,

of Conestoga College

No unsigned

letters will be published. be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter

Editor:

Circulation Managers:

Jason Middleton Diana O’Neill Valentina Rapoport

Faculty Adviser: Christina Jonas

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke @conestogac. on. ca

for publication.

Address correspondence to: Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

Spoke Online

Aimee Wilson Photo Editors: Carrie Hoto, Halley McPolin

Letters should

Web site: Dr.,

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors to the editor are subject to

Letters

it

me while driving (that I am

Spoke

for verification.

N2G 4M4

Opinion

essary to disregard everyone around them and run around as if they are

the bottle

placed under the nooks of

Friday afternoons in the gro-

friend

unashamedly placed behind the rear tire of

On

cery stores people also feel

Editor: Michelle Taylor

letters to the

editor. Letters

Editor,

I

While waiting

were making our way

welcome

Spoke welcomes

The

Door

leaving Conestoga behind for the

We

to

contacted

departed through

becoming more

the only ones in the supermarket.

However,

weekend.

work together in order to continue hav-

quality education

I

is

Hoto

shining, students

my

like that.”

difficult to believe.

another beautiful

was

is

This statement

to

Instead of dwelling on the incon-

important that everyone co-operate to prevent these situa-

which

my weekend

days ahead. As class dispersed,

else to lose that something.

tions before they start,

the city

get-

definitely not

were smiling throughout the college and I was gearing up for the lazy

noticed

because of the overwhelming cost to the company due to internal

as

Friday: the sun

car

could result in pay cuts or even layoffs. Smaller,

was

Carrie

started

It

compensate by stealing materials from the infraction could cost a small business

at

had intended

minor

independent businesses have been

Ever}' theft

I wonder what were paying for?"

angry Friday drivers

begin.

5,

theft is also a very

of

Being called an asshole and

people feel they are owed certain things from their place of employment

Stealing

this year?

is

because of a few incorrigible individuals, students aren’t able

that,

to put their

even parking your car to go

not necessarily reflect the views of in

Conestoga College. beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters written or typed; a MS Word file would be helpful.

advertising

acceptance or rejection and should be must not contain any libellous statements.

clearly


News

Students take By JENNIFER

On

HOWDEN

23 a busload of students Conestoga Residence and Conference Centre hoping lady luck was on their side. The 52 students made the hour and a half trip to Niagara Falls, Ont. “Niagara Falls was a great venue for (the event). It just let people have fun. It was something the students don’t get to do on a daily basis," said Debbie Brock, the residenee adviser Scpl.

the

left

who

bus, carrying both students

residenee and those

who

don’t, left at about 5:30 p.m.

The

who

live in

was

ride

itself

uneventful but once

were

students

given

the

option of either going into the casi-

"I heard of a couple people being up $80 or $100 and then losing it all don’t think again. That’s about it. I

“That doesn’t include alcohol or it was just Brock said. People gambled more responsibly this year, when compared to last

going outside the casino,

$240

amount and they Brock said.

certain

over

didn’t

go

fun

on

that,”

Outside

had

students

Clifton Hill, the street filled with

other attractions.

Students seemed to really enjoy

the

Inside Lhe

at the casino,”

year.

The majority of the students made into the casino

any

with

money,” she said. Although there were no big winners, one student lost $240.

the

way

home

came

anyone

wandering down Clifton Hill, visiting the falls or doing all three. no,

their

and casino

lights

haunted houses, fun houses and

they arrived the fun began.

The

Niagara

in

— Page 5

2003

6,

"People said they would spend a

organized the event.

The

SPOKE, October

many haunted

Brock said

first.

money flowed

Hulk attraction and the midway. However, the main attractions were

as the

students played everything from slot

houses.

that this year’s trip

better then last year’s

went

and

was

that

it

no one got

in

really smoothly.

“No one

machines to blackjack. Brock said no one got rich off the

trouble,

casino night.

all

got

lost,

no one got

(Photo by Jennifer Howden)

arrested, that’s

that matters,” she said.

Just around the corner from Casino Niagara, Clifton

a popular tourist destination. Conestoga

is

Flill

students travelled to Niagara Falls on Sept. 23 to enjoy the casino and the popular midway.

Conestoga welcomes new fundraiser Orientation program By BLAKE GALL

with a degree in She began her fundrais-

University English.

When some

a school

funding,

it

is

in

takes

need of a

hard-

working, intelligent and friendly

ing career as a volunteer with the

Canadian Cancer Society while completing her studies.

person to get

it done. That’s the job of Ingrid Town, Conestoga’s new director of

development relations and alumni services.

Town, a mother of two, comes Conestoga from Wilfrid Laurier University where she worked as associate director in development

to

and alumni relations. At Laurier she oversaw the major raising of money for the school of business and helped raise

funds for a

new business

building on campus. “I’ve come here (to Conestoga) to put together an overall direction for fundraising for the col-

lege,"

Town

explained.

She started on July 28 and has been working diligently ever since.

Originally from Sudbury.

graduated

from

Town

Laurentian

“It

was a

because

I felt

positive experience like I was making a

difference,” she said.

She then began working for Big Brothers in Sudbury, where again she saw the difference raising money could make. Town also spent five years

working for United Way in Ottawa and Kitchener, where she met Monica Himmelman, alumni services officer at Conestoga College.

looking forward to her new position here and can’t wait to get the donations

Town

said she

is

coming in. So far, most of her time has been spent meeting with faculty, getting to know students and comwith corporations who support Conestoga. “I just want to let people know

municating

I

am

Getting to know everyone has been the biggest task for Town but she feels she has adjusted well.

She

also a Certified

is

By

DAWN HASSON

Student Services. “Students know the student procedures guide. They

Raising Executive according to a certificate displayed in her office. Only about 6,000 people in North America are honoured with the

tation

which requires recipients have seven years of fundraising experience and pass a fourhour exam to qualify. Sitting with a photograph of her

October, event is underway, with a new student life video in the works. The video will be used to help first-year students pass the time

certificate,

two sons behind

when

her.

Town

smiled

she spoke of the rewards her

“When you see the student walk across the stage to accept a scholarship, it’s a terrific feeling. I don't way

teach, so this is a

make

for

me

to

that education possible."

Town’s

know where

As phases

three and four of orienthe end of planning for next year’s

office is located

on the

upper floor of the student services building on Doon campus. She says she would love people to drop by

and introduce themselves as she looks forward to knowing the stuat here faculty and dents

never happens.”

The

video will be

ing students are making the video. Conestoga College’s standardized orientation sessions, which were put

faculty discuss counselling, disabili-

and other

services with the students. Phase

an introduction to the learn-

have been

so far to present the informa-

tion to students.

Any program

that

does not have strategies for student success offered in the first semester

must arrange

for the

presentation

with Student Sendees. Phase one is an orientation and registration

day for

dents before school

first-year stu-

starts,

it

being a free-

The idea for a better orientation when about came program Conestoga Students Incorporated (CSI) put forth a recommendation and joined the standardized orientation committee.

ing resource centre. class visits

life

next year and the

for-all.

three. Strategies for student success

About 80

new

day, instead of having

information on the support services available to them in phase

with

made

con-

is

The student

Also this year, first-year students were given tickets for their complimentary lunch on their orientation

into effect last year, provide students

is

program

Powerpoint presentation, which used to be done on an overhead projector, was introduced this year.

Broadcasting faculty member Steve Parr and a group of broadcast-

four

orientation

stantly evolving.

while they wait to receive their registration forms on their orientation

ty services, learning skills

If stu-

to find things.

dents are concerned about something they’ll come to this office and they’ll often tell me that they read the student procedures guide. That

wrap up by

day.

position offers.

Conestoga.

here."

constantly upgraded

Fund

and phase

two includes a Powerpoint presentapolition on student and program

It

was chaired by

Gregory', with CSI. service and fac-

who

representatives

ulty

provided

input on the design.

"There’s so

many people coming

into post-secondary institutions

and

for

many,

it's

the

their family." said Gregory,

constantly

striv

ing to

make

now.

time in

first

who

the

year experience for students

is

first-

better.

"The last thing I would do was walk into a door diat had a title on it when 1 didn t know what was available inside that door." Gregory said 7

cies. "It’s

made

a big difference." said

Carol Gregory', the co-ordinator of

of her davs

in

post-secondary educa-

tion.

Last year, a

new

pacemaker implant saved Max’s life. Wet'

(Photo by Blake Gall)

2S i

h Triuvn Ponpitnna Colleae’s

new

says the most development and alumni a. the coNege. members .acuity many students and

director of

know me

relations,

iif <•»> >y>rn*i

HKW

time with hii jir>mdfotka


Page 6

— SPOKE, October

6,

News

2003

Annual career

fair

benefits students MENDONCA

By JENNIFER

You could

Peer Supported Learning Groups Help First-Year Students Make the Grade in High-Risk Courses skills

energy

in the

of landing their dream job

at the

Career Fair on Sept. 24. More than 150 different companies and organizations, ranging from the Waterloo regional police

be great to be part of an organized study group that meets regularly and really works?

Wouldn't

it

Peer Supported Learning Groups are designed to pair the effectiveness of senior peer-facilitated learning with the power

tudy

feel the

hundreds of students filled Waterloo’s RIM Park with hopes air as

of collaborative group study. Under the leadership of a senior student, learning groups provide an opportunity to study with

classmates through a weekly one-hour meeting. In this meeting, the group will review notes, discuss readings and important concepts, develop problem-solving strategies, and learn tips on studying, time management and goal setting.

CBC,

to the

attended the

from

Students

University of Waterloo, University

of Guelph and Laurier had the opportunity to speak with compa-

ny representatives, ask questions about their chosen fields and most

hand

importantly,

out

their

resumes.

With the majority of companies ready to hire, students were ready to impress.

important to be the type of

It is

person companies want to hire, said Dan Mylark, a communications student at Laurier.

pitched a

“I

CBC,” he

show

idea to the

said. “It’s a little bold,

about having charisma

but

it’s all

and

setting yourself apart

from the

next guy.”

Cayne Garcia,

fulls

fair.

Conestoga,

second-year

a

business student at Laurier, said

Although the group leaders are tutors, in the case of learning groups they neither tutor, nor lecture, nor introduce material, as learning groups are not intended as remedial work for struggling students. Rather, they are designed to help students become more proficient at matching "what to learn" with "how to learn". The objective of a learning group is to get students to translate effective practices in their study and learning approach that they will

while he year,

him

not graduating this

is

shown companies he would

the Career Fair has

potential

like to

work

for in the future.

have no idea 1 where I would like to work or what I would like to do. This was an excellent day to see what types of jobs are out there. I feel a lot more “Admittedly,

focused than

when I came

here this

morning.”

While some students

felt

inspired

after leaving the fair, others got a

hard dose of reality after being told

carry to their other courses.

were not qualified for the

they

position they wanted. Jessica Martin, 19, a third-year

Learning groups are available

in

the following courses:

skuCstudys

Business Math 1

computer programmer analyst student at Conestoga, said she enjoyed the day but found it frustrating that a lot of employers in her field would only hire students with a university degree.

Financial Accounting 1

Martin said she feels she has received the same quality of edu-

Engineering Technology Math 1

(MET Math

1

not available)

cation as those in university. “It’s

not like they get a better

education in university,

For more information about meeting times and places for

The Career ticipating

Room

of

2B04.

just

Fair did not only ben-

efit the students,

learning groups, either ask your faculty or Student Services,

it’s

^

different.”

benefited par-

it

employers as well. Debbie Mason, a representative the

Economical

Insurance

Group, said the Career Fair is a great concept to meet potential employees. “As the baby-boomers are getting older, this is a quality program to get the next generation in,” she said.

The Career

study

Fair

takes

place

annually. If

you would

like

more informa-

about the companies who attended, visit the Career Fair webtion

site

at

www.partners4employ-

ment.com.

Life is short, (ret

an

extension ¥

Live longer with daily physical activity, healthy eating and following your doctor’s advice.

fe'J www.pgrtiqpocNw.CQfR


News

October By Jennifer

One will

in

howden

All

women

Canadian

nine

is

develop breast cancer

at

point during their lifetime.

One

in

27 will die from it. That is why October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. During October, organizations like the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation will be working extra hard to educate people about the disease, according to information on the foundation’s website.

One

thing being stressed

is

before

it

it

tions,

the

gets loo

best to

do

a self-exam at the

should receive an annual

mammography beginning

at

age

every three years will help detect

breast that detects breast cancers

the cancer.

before

is

recommended

that

women

perform a monthly breast

exam beginning

at

felt

women

It

is

essential

that

can

they

Mammography

is

be

felt.

the best screen-

ing tool widely available to detect

self-

breast cancer at

age 20.

With regular breast self-exam a woman will become aware of the

its

earliest,

most

breast

are

not

base of the

illumination

Falls,

Oct.

ions.

and

exam, preferably month. breast

clinical

the

in the

same

One in nine Canadian women will develop breast cancer.

To celebrate Breast Cancer Awareness Month many activities and fundraising events have been

1.

All are invited to attend the cer-

cancers

the

tower across from the Horseshoe

Canadians were able to witness a pink Niagara Falls when the Estee Lauder company light up the falls with pink lighting to launch the awareness month on

mammogram

treatable stages.

Some

at

The annual Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation CIBC Run for the Cure took place across Canada on Oct. 5. The Kitchener- Waterloo run was at RIM Park. The Celebrity Bra Auction starts on Oct. 14. Canadians can bid on ebay for bras designed by celebrities including Strania Twain, Anna Kournikova and Olympic medallist Catriona LeMay Doan. Winners will be notified the week of Nov. 4. The second annual Interiors by Decorating Den - Decorating For A Difference Design Seminar will be held Oct. 15 at the Brantford Golf & Country Club. Guests will view room makeovers and enjoy the latest in fall and holiday fash-

have both the screening

planned throughout October.

40.

A mammogram is an X-ray of the

It

breast

examination.

is

sional.

self-examina-

examinations

but can

recognized.

at least

clinical breast

mammography,

during a clinical

detected by

be reported to a medical profes-

mammograms and

annual

of her

be

Women breast

feel

formed after the menstrual period has ended when the breasts are less tender. For women who do not have periods, it should be performed at the same time each month. Any changes from the normal look and feel of your breast should

serious.

Monthly

should know the importance of self-examinations

same time each month. For menstruating women, it should be per-

importance of breast examinations. The exams can fight breast cancer

by catching

women

breast and changes will be easily

It

2003

6,

— Page 7

breast cancer awareness month

normal appearance and

some

SPOKE, October

emony, which

will

be held

at

dusk

The seventh Bachelor Auction Bid for the Cure 2003

will be held

and Awareness Day at The Sheraton Centre Hotel, Toronto on Oct. 21. This year’s theme is Primary Prevention, Stopping Breast Cancer Before It Starts. The day offers dynamic speakers, interactive infor-

on Oct.

17,

place

takes

mation sessions, a resource centre, raffle prizes and more.

Day

Last year, Awareness

pro-

vided more than

1,500 participants with a unique opportunity to

hear from and interact with breast cancer experts from across North

More

America.

was

raised

research

$235,000

than

cancer and education

breast

for

projects

programs.

Rounding out the month is the Dance of Hope on Oct. 26

Jazzercise

Thornhill Community Centre. The Dance of Hope has raised

at the

almost $300,000 for breast cancer over the past nine years. If

you want

make

to

a donation to

cancer research call the Cancer Canadian Breast Foundation at 416-815-1313 or visit their website at www.cbcf.org. breast

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But there is hope Recent research breakthroughs have brought us close than ever to Itnding a cure.

With your support, we will beat ihi and for all Please call th Huntington Society of Canada today disease once

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)

— SPOKE, October

Page 8

6,

News

2003

Kitchener the stage for world artists “People are loving

By PETR CIHACEK

‘They

Prier said there

passersby were astonished to see a tent by Kitchener City Hall and rubber gloves in the pool in

Some

and interaction

They probably did not know

“It’s an unusual opportunity because here we are at the City

that

Hall where a lot of administrative

City Hall hosts an annual exhibit

and bureaucratic things take place,”

displaying contemporary art proj-

he said.

from around the world. The hundreds of gloves floating in the pool and the tent that was set up just metres from City Hall’s main entrance were just two of the 20 pieces of art from Canadian and ects

park

The budget for was $200,000.

“We’re entirely non profit,” said Wright about CAFKA, a committee of eight local artists. “Most grants

in a

skillfully

arranged to create the image of oink water lilies. And the green tent represented a

new

is

a passport office for a

country

that

creator,

the

Toronto’s

Mark

more

like a

network

around the world. It’s not round to land; the borders go all around the world instead, so this

of people

ivay

composes

it

all

represented water

to 28.

The hundreds

of gloves

come from

City

the

of

the world’s

The thematic exhibit that took from Sept. 20 to 28 was organized by volunteers from the Forum Art Contemporary Diace

to

make

the project reali-

ty

Kitchener and Area (CAFKA). To mark Waterloo Region’s 150th anniversary, the title for this year

was Probing

into a public setting,” said

it

Newton, who helped organize

Ian

were asked

the event.

ping, landscape, borders

was displayed

and other

their in

map-

“What is

it

quite neat about

is

taking the art out of

the gallery and putting

artwork

a public

into

and around

City Hall.

“What

is

quite neat about

it

lot

is

it

setting.”

who

of people

work

said

Ont.

co-ordinator

the

Andrew

Wright, the

connection between the

an organizer

visitors

made

that

artists

and

the festival success-

think

this

tremendous

a

is

get

to

all

this

together and gel this organized,”

is

with

Ian Newton,

taking the art out of the gallery and

are con-

“I

accomplishment

around here,” said Newton. Besides the 20 projects, the exhibition also featured symposia, screenings and artist talks. According to CAFKA’s artistic

necting

Distance.

incorporate

to

“So people just stumble across it (and) we end up communicating with a

England and Germany,

U.S.,

that

putting

who came from Canada,

Artists,

the

the

into

urban themes into

reople.”

The Waterloo Region, Canada Council for the Arts, Ontario Arts Council and The Record are among those who financially helped

CAFKA

lilies.

called

is

explained

Prier. “It’s actually

Square pool from Sept. 20

of latex gloves float in the Civic

Bundles

Nomadsland,” piece’s

(Photo by Petr Cihacek)

symbolic pass-

port office.

“This

this year’s event

Kitchener."

were

they

as

pond

myself a

artist like

allowed within a gallery system.”

The bundles of latex gloves, which were the work of Chinese artist Ping Qui, made the Civic like a

an

“It gives

chance to work with the public in a way that we’re not normally

international artists.

Square pool look

was discussion was beneficial

that

for both sides.

week.

front of the building last

said Wright.

it,”

are very enthusiastic.”

Geuer from Almonte,

Juan

Geuer work at

presented

also

his

art-

the festival. “It’s a major

effort.”

The theme is

for next year’s exhibit

everything that would grant us

peace of mind.

To

find out

more

visit

www.con-

temporaryartforum.ca.

ful.

Local businesses display their goods By AIM EE

W ILSON

Vendor marketplace sets up shop

Local businesses set up shop in

we do

“This way,

it all

at once,”

“They (students) don’t have that 16-week

to

:o offer.

continuous heckling.”

“Students have money.”

From the

and chance to take part in

Sept. 23-25, students

faculty had a

vendor’s marketplace, hosted

Conestoga

by

Students

Inc-

orporated (CSI). “It

was

said Falconer, adding,

Also, according to Jody Andruszkiewicz, CSI events programmer, some vendors would be booked to appear in the Sanctuary the

same time

as entertainers.

CSI activ“You were surrounded by

“It

all

the

vendors that

was

to bring local

retailers to the student

vice-president

took part have visited the college

was the first time a marketplace was created where all vendors could present their product once. In the past, the Sanctuary

would

host a different vendor each week.

According to Justin Falconer, CSI president, a lot of students felt they were being cornered by a different salesperson every time they

went into the Sanctuary.

•Not valid with any other

hums

buy

I’d

He

to take

also said

Shop has expressed

inter-

“We want

to build off the success

of this one,” he said, adding,

enough of an income

to

make

“It’s

that

effort.”

was

wanted

find

to

in

my

and

spare time,” he

said.

Each business was charged a fee take part in the marketplace.

Miller,

lected

of CSI activities

and use

will use the

from it

to

the

money

col-

three-day affair

pay for

activities for

students.

Anyone who missed This resulted

in

a clash of envi-

ronments for both visitors. This prompted the staff of CSI to try something different. “We decided to eliminate all that. We didn’t want to curb our retail activities,” Andruszkiewicz said.

Falconer also said he

felt that this

time of year would work the best to

offer.

marketplace,

the

The CSI

before, this

at

looking into

businesses that were student driv-

to

presence.” Ethan

part in the next one. the Stag

who

Andruszkiewicz,

is

new vendors

responsible in finding vendors for

what

Waterloo Region.” Approximately 12 vendors participated over the three-day span.

Although

now,” he said, adding,

it

“I tried to think like a student

he student presence,” said Ethan ities.

do

also said he

three or four

market-

place.

en.

to bring local retailers to

Miller, vice-president of

more appropriate

Sanctuary. “It’s

est in attending the next

the Sanctuary He

host something of this nature in the

Sanctuary to show everyone at Conestoga College what they had the

in

At participating McDonald’s Restaurants

in

Ontario. Offers at participating Restaurants

rn v#

the event

will get another chance,

CSI

hosts

when

the

a second marketplace

Jan. 27-29.

Again, the marketplace will stay local

and concentrate on Waterloo

Region.

“CSI has an awesome commitment of staying local and supporting

local

businesses,”

Andruszkiewicz.

may

said

(Photo by Aimee Wilson Scott Southward, 18, a Wilfrid Laurier student, shows off some of the beer paraphernalia from Your Beer Gear, one of the vendors

at the marketplace, Sept. 24.

vary from those shown.

r#r#iFir#

©2003 McDonald's

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

Double Cheeseburger

\Quarter Pounder 9 J with Cheese

Restaurant of Canada Limited. For the exclusive use of McDonald’s Restaurants of Canada Limited and

its

franchi


News

SPOKE, October

Designing their cake and eating

6,

2003

— Page 9

too

it

By DESIREE FINHERT The students stir and mix, mix and stir, turning white globs of sugar and butter into colourful palettes of icing. Unfortunately, for hygiene reasons, they don’t get to spoon.

lick the

Conestoga

College offers an eight-week continuing education course in cake decorating.

Laura Dobrindt, 52,

Instructor

has taught the course at the Guelph

campus the

for 12 years and hopes, by end of the course, the students

are able to decorate basic cakes for

birthdays, anniversaries

and other

family occasions. "Basic things stay the same," said

who

Dobrindt,

has a masters cer-

from the McCall School of Cake Decorating in Toronto. "One tificate

year Spiderman's hot, the next year it's Harry Potter. That sort of thing changes from year to year, but the basics stay the same." Each week, the class will do a different cake project including

seasonal

which

decorating,

dents will be able to take

stu-

home and

enjoy with their families.

Dobrindt said she has decorated cakes since she was a teenager, following directions from a British

magazine,

and jumped

opportunity

to

take

school, she learned

the

at

classes.

how

In

make

to

make a

lot

design,

you

of flowers out of

gum

which are all wired, similar to what you do as a florist. You create a three-dimensional arrangement that goes on the cake," said Dobrindt, who also works as a florist. "In South Africa, they make drum cakes. You build panels paste,

around the cake,

in

royal

icing,

with windows that open onto a complete storybook. The cake will tell

a story suitable for a child's

like Little Red Riding Hood or Goldilocks and the Three

birthday,

Bears."

The cake-decorating course at beginners. for is Conestoga Students will not learn advanced

techniques like

cakes or

On

gum

Nov.

how

to

Guelph campus Sept.

Home

different cultural cake designs. "In Australian cake

(Photo by Desiree Finhert)

Student Evelyn Carvie, 32, practises icing borders during a cake decorating continuing education course

make drum

paste flowers.

6, the class will learn

how to decorate and assemble a 10inch layered wedding cake.

daycare worker

Marchment,

"I

want

to

Harmony

is

Housewife Carol Geremia, 59, do much with icing and would like to know loves to bake, but does not

how to decorate cakes for her children and grandchildren.

make my own wed-

ding cake because they cost $800

and I don't want to pay that much," said Marchment, who would like a simple, white, tiered

recommends

Dobrindt

and

practise

that simple

tions

work

When

that

her borders

and elegant decora-

ran on Feb. 8, but is not yet finalized. The Basic Cake Decorating course will be offered again next

and the next thing you know the

fall.

Laura Dobrindt, course instructor

have two nieces who are getand I would like to make a cake for their showers," said Geremia, who attends class "I

with her son. Financial analyst Steve Geremia, 32, doesn't like baking, but

is

tak-

ing the course to hang out with his

mom. "It's

just

something to do with

my

mother, and

my

wife really likes

cake," said Steve, squeezing a shell icing border out of a decorating bag onto a piece of wax paper. Icing is difficult to work with if it is

too

stiff

teaches

or too soft and the course

how

takes, patch

to

lift

off icing mis-

them and

start over.

Dobrindt warns against making royal icing in a plastic dish because, no matter how the dish has been cleaned, plastic is porous

and contains

oil

which

will ruin the

icing.

Handouts include a list of cake Cambridge, in shops supply Guelph, Kitchener and Waterloo where students may buy the tools and ingredients, some of which are not provided. Math professor Barry Ferguson, 45, thought about cake decorating (Photo by Desiree Finhert)

Laura Dobrindt, 52, demonstrates how She has been decorating cakes for 22 years. Instructor

to ice

a cake.

offer-

Advanced Cake

"The best part of teaching the course is when people go home

adding shaved chocolate, coloured coconut or lemon rind shavings for colour and flavour.

parties.

Conestoga College may be ing the new course. Decorating.

people's faces.

ting married

large

really nice."

go home and the next thing you know the neighbours ask them to do

She suggests

for

neighbours are asking them to do cakes," said Dobrindt. "If you can produce a product that other people are interested in than that's

Dhmmi

cake

mixes are easier to use than homemade recipes because the package can be doubled or halved as needed. Dobrindt has been decorating for 22 years and uses white cake mixes

occasions," said Ferguson, who has worked at the University of Waterloo for 18 years. "Actually, for one school anniversary two people and I decorated a cake in the shape of the

decorating

cakes. parties,

done some cake decorating

special

school."

best.

cooking for

"I've

for

“The best part of teaching the course is when people

cake.

Marchment

Conestoga College’s

18.

taking the course to learn how to decorate her own cake for her wedding on July 24, 2004. 24,

at

his office, his kids and his church for a long time before

for

attending the

first

class

on

Sept. 18.

Dobrindt' s favourite part of cake is seeing the smiles on

The eight-week

course, taught

Hoffman,

is

by

scheduled to


Page 10

— SPOKE, October

Two

News

2003

Mustang charges students’ learning

’88 By

6,

competition without these safety

DARREN SMITH members from

faculty

improvements. At a recent competition the team the

disconnected parts of the carburetor, decreasing its power output

Guelph automotive apprenticeship program of Conestoga College have gone beyond the classroom to

12.15

bring motivational learning to the

Hood, co-ordinator of the

program, said it was hard getting students motivated because the program had training outlined by

the car’s future

“We

(the college) have to ascerwhether they (students) have the skills the industry is supposed to give them,” said Hood. tain

opened doors

in

“We would

gram, came up with the idea of the racing car 2 h years ago as a

The

we can afford and what we can do.” Hood said racing is a sport for everyone. There are various classes including a street class for those

dents do on the job.

who

to see the

controlled situation.

Hood

Race (Submitted photo)

classroom for application. “I thought it was a good idea,” said Hood, “to try and allow them

Some

to do something different than what

automotive apprentices.

would normally

they

Conestoga College have worked for many hours on this 1988 Mustang. The car was purchased by faculty member Jim Palmer as a method to motivate students at the Guelph

run on a quarter-mile

Palmer purchased a 1988 Ford a 35 1 -cubic-inch engine. Every part of the vehicle has been rebuilt or modified by students. The welding fitters have boxed in frame components and the graphic arts helped design the Mustang’s outside. The automotive students rebuilt the engine and modified it and they have also rebuilt the suspension, brakes and

pleting

electrical

systems. The driveline was modified and prepared by Bill

means more money

Buckley’s students.

upgrade the safety equipment. “You have to have a fire suit,

Since Palmer purchased the Mustang, Hood supplies the tow vehicle and

Both share the which isn’t too

trailer.

insurance cost,

expensive, as the car at the track.

ered for

fire

is

not insured

The Mustang and

is

cov-

theft while in tran-

when it comes to racing any damage has to be covered by Hood

sit

campus

but

to

compete with

no real limits depends on the type of money you are willing said there are

a

track with a time of 12 seconds or slower. In

August a new engine was

put in the car, improving

per-

its

formance. It set a new personal record of 11 .54 seconds at 119 miles per hour. “It’s

a

much

Hood. These new

better engine,” said

statistics

the. super-pro

in

place the car

which needed to

category, is

roll

cage and a five-point safety harness for the driver,” said

He

said the

new

going too

fast for their class.

we want

go up to the next level,” said Hood, “we have to get all this equipment or they will not be allowed to run.” “If

The Mustang is subject National Hot Rod Association inspection every day

ty

The Conestoga

safety features

of racing

is

in

have.

senger area.

1 1

said that

when

they ran the

.54 seconds the inspector pulled

them

off the track as they

were

ones used for racing are not the

same as a regular car. The car is still able to function

it all

in

racer mainly per-

forms at the St. Thomas Dragway and Cayuga but next year they hope to race at Grand Bend. The Sept. 27 at St. Thomas was rescheduled for Oct. 8 due to bad weather and is expected to race the first

weekend

in October.

a

safe-

races.

You're going places.

Go Greyhound"

well.

were not required at the previous level but would have been nice to

Hood

it

to

Tires must have the proper mounting studs on them, as the

These inspections go beyond what a normal inspection covers. Some items needed are two return springs on the carburetor instead of one for a regular vehicle. Seats and belts must meet certain standards as

One major

Hood.

to

and

to invest.

of

do.”

Mustang with

want

to this sport

could be brought back to the

results

just

their street legal vehicle.

practical applications of theory in a real-life,

like to allow the car

work to its full potential,” said Hood, “but we have to look at what

shop work is monotonous and the projects done in the school environment are similar to what stu-

Palmer wanted students

to the next level of

to

l

to motivate students.

not certain.

competition but budget concerns create mixed emotions;

the automotive apprenticeship pro-

method

is

“We’re not sure what we are going to do at this point because of budgeting and finances,” said Hood. The performance increase has

the government.

Jim Palmer, a faculty teacher

difference in this type

must be no holes where wires pass

there

the firewall

through from the engine to the pas“In case of an engine fire

it

would

flash right into the cockpit,” said

Hood.

and Palmer. “If you’re in a racing situation

more dangerous,” they won’t insure

said

it’s

Hood, “and

it.”

Hood and Palmer cover event and expenses and the stu-

travelling

dents have donated

used surplus

STUDENT FRIENDLY FARES

equipment.

You’re going places in life, but right now you’re just going home for a break. With thousands of destinations and great everyday low fares, Greyhound gives you the freedom to go more places more often.

Conestoga provides a $500 donaeach year that covers some does not own the car due

tion

parts, but

Some part donahave been received from local suppliers in Guelph but there is no monetary support. Hood estimates $5,000 has been spent to

to liability issues.

tions

FROM KITCHENER* GUELPH

date.

-

“We’re running this thing on a shoestring,” said Hood. Although not part of the automotive program, the Mustang does -

$

5

65

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allow students to gain experience

on

parts that are

common

to

all

which is important since vehicle components are part of the vehicles,

program.

Hood

said

when

it

comes

do brakes, they do the brakes on the car, and the same can time

-be

to

said for the engine.

This year the Mustang raced

The pro category

is

in

month ago. for cars com-

the pro category until a

to

seconds. This adjustment

allowed them to stay in the proclass and taking third place at the King of the Track event. Hood said

students.

Stu

down

bringing the car’s time

For local info contact: (Photo by James Clark)

Curbing a bad habit Cigarette butts pile up by the curbside outside Door 4 at Conestoga College. Students say there would not be as many butts on the ground if ashtrays were more accessible.

15 Charles Street

West

GREYHOUND

585-2370 ( 519 )

1-800-661 -TRIP (8747)

www.greyhound.ca


)

Entertainment

SPOKE, October

2003

6,

— Page 11

Small Brown Bike pedals out of underground By DIANA O’NEILL

worthy of shouting about. Tragically Ending and Sincerely Yours are both mid-tempo tracks

Small Brown Bike is back on the music scene with their third lulllength album, The River Bed.

weaved with dense feedback and sludgy drums.

As you’re reading this, I’m sure you’re wondering, who? It’s OK, admit

it.

too had no idea

I

who

Brown Bike was when

Small

Neither track stands out, but they

do make for a mellow transition between the previous heavier songs. The final track, A Lesson to Remember, is the lengthiest and most dramatic on the album. This epic closer also happens to be my favourite. It could easily be dubbed as a cheesy piece of fluff, but

I

picked up (he press release and agreed to do the review.

The quartet of lifelong friends from Michigan remain underground, despite their 16 dates on the 2002 Vans Warped tour and

instead

snippets of their songs used for

MTV

promotional ads.

The

clever

Brown

Small

name

(Internet

The Michigan band, Small Brown

resulted

from a spray-painted Barbie bike and a freak Frankenstein experiment. The band, which was formed

the disc,

ers

-

Upon my

since.

acclaim

critical

before going to your high school 'reunion, or the dread of returning to

Gensterblum’s pounding drums. “We bury ourselves alive in a cold, steel van. This pain isn’t get-

The

ting better.

they haven't

cities,

changed. I'm not the same,” scowls singer and lyricist Mike. This opening song sets the

ever

mood

of the feeling you get

niscent

after an extend-

photo

album, The River Bed.

songs that flow with the

it’s

a sensitive and

coming

to

rest

of the

Sound,

and

other and

hard-hitting

drumbeats.

and helplessness evident on

this

record, especially after listening to

and has a dark paranoid vibe to it. It's the sort of song that’s written to console you after an ex left you in the dark. Clocking in under just

these two songs. With lyrics like:

jam

three minutes, the fast-paced

you remember the more spend half our

There’s a definite sense of despair in

When frontman Mike asks, “How much can you remember? The more

record, featuring distorted guitars

laced with razor-tongued lyrics

is

“I’ve tried to sleep at night and days just walk by without much light,” and, “There's something to

die for and

it’s

tearing

me

apart,”

it

hurts.

lives living with

other

the

half

torted guitar,

ness seems to bleed out of the

three-part harmonies,

citate you.”

Mike isn’t ashamed of wearing his heart on his sleeve and is willing to write songs that are

and intelligent songwriting.

speakers.

A

and

Silence

Declaration of Sorts are heartfelt

to

dose of throbbing basslines, dis-

declaring, “I will be there to resus-

in

is

overly-sentimental. With a healthy

the sense of displacement and sad-

Scream

We

each

remember or cope with a loss,” it inspires a tearful nod in agreement. Small Brown Bike tackles some difficult issues on The River Bed and manages to pull it off without coming across as pretentious or

builds up to a final shout-a-long

for the rest of the record. It's remi-

initial listening to

your hometown

ed period of time.

The second song, Safe

Deconstruct/Rebuild begins with Ben’s eerie-sounding bass and

The River Bed was released Sept. 9 on Smallman Records and has

their third full-length

crit-

or punk.

belt.

garnered

why

back with

Bike, are

time labeling

band under the conventional terms of hardcore, emo, power-pop

and bass respectively, Travis Dopp on guitar and Jeff Gensterblum on drums. They've been together for six years and have a solid fan base with the sale of 25,000 albums under their spoke er

difficult

this

is

tar/vocals

-

can understand

1

have a

ics

composed of brothMike and Ben Reed on guigarage,

in a

find

terms with death.

surrounding

talc

Bike's

I

retrospective attempt at

punchy drums and The River Bed proves that this band can put out a solid record fueled by energy

Couple’s love blossoms online By TIM

MURPHY

claimed

the first time at the airport.”

Having been married since

modern love

a

It’s

Meet Tanya,

2001, the couple says they are very happy together, and wouldn’t 13,

story.

a 31-year-old legal

change the way they did things for

and John, a 38-year-old building contractor, who shared an online game of checkers almost secretary,

anything.

But not all online relationships end happily. student College Fanshawe Kathleen Schembri, a 19-year-old from London, found herself chatting to a man from RE.I after a

four years ago.

Now

and

they’re married

live in

Southend-on-Sea in England. “We met on a Lycos Games website, where he invited me to play a

game of

checkers.

we

every time in

He

my

beat

game of pool on Yahoo Games.

ass

an e-mail interview.

15, 1999, the two exchanged e-mails and eventually talked on the telephone

thought

many months.

was so excited about meeting him, I couldn’t wait to speak to him “I

Exactly eight months afterwards,

John came

Canada

to

and they met face to face. “It was unlike anything I have ever felt before; it was wonderful. Obviously

and so

tos.

eyes on each other for the

first

"We must have hugged

the

at

go for at without 15 or 20 minutes. It was the letting

airport least

threw

denied

I

me

always told I

After

lie.

that

and he'd

month of talking

a

over Clayton Schembri began

who

for

“Meeting John gave

me

strength.

me my confidence gave me the friendship

gave it

not

in

my

life,"

8,

John and

1

tic

to

to feel intimidated

referred to her as

me

about plans he had met. It all

when we

really sweet

me

so

I

and roman-

became

less

that

The romance, however, didn t last long. Schembri received an email from the man's wife.

1

said

met

for

“I found a message

account

Paul, a 19-year-old high school graduate, met his current girlfriend, Ashley, an 18-year-old Wal-Mart

on Yahoo Messenger. They talked for a year, and began

cashier,

to feel attracted to

each other

in

March 2000. The two argued over Ashley’s interest in drugs and alcoand for more than a year they

hol,

didn’t talk.

“This September will be a year

married.

“She was angry

mad

stark raving

at

well,

first,

and

actually,

I

since

we

started

said Ashley,

talking

who now

again,”

lives with

first meeting face to face nerve-wracking according

Their

was

both of them.

“He was the same as I pictured. I was really nervous. I was shaking a said

lot,”

in. I sat in

she was said,

apartment.

weeks

Internet because

the

make up

a

new

it’s

easy to

www.teenadviceon-

site

night. I'd

school in

identity.

talked

all

talk until I had to go to the morning sometimes,”

“She has got a sexy voice on the phone.”

my

car in the parking lot

When

I

walked

blushing so much,”

in

he

moved to Paul’s home near Clifford for five months.

before they both

"We

really

from each for

said Paul.

couldn’t

adding he then spent two living at Ashley’s home

Paul in their Woodstock basement

After her online dating mishap, she warns not to trust people over

was fun though, we

“I

it

for five minutes.

don’t blame her,” said Schembri.

“It

Ashley.

was happening.” Paul said he was nervous as well. ”In fact, I drove by her work twice before I had the nerve to go

believe

haven’t been away that long.

Maybe no

more than a week since we met,” said Paul.

line.org.

The most important tip the when meeting someone

offers

the first time face-to-face

is

site

for

to take

someone with you. Meeting a

mall

spots,

in

a public place, such as

or a restaurant are ideal as

around wrong.

many

in

other people are

case something goes

Friends and family should also always know where you are going and when you are coming home. As Well, meeting during the day and having your own ride is important safety advice.

The

final

tip

online dating

is

the site offers for il

the person

seems

too good to be true, they probably

freaked."

marriage ended on 1999. and it was just one

later that

told

dates

to

Internet,

the

back,

“My

Tanya.

month

have

"He

sounded

should have ended years earlier.

Dec.

he'd never

a special person

was

John

did

continued believing

him,” said Schembri. “And when 1 asked him those questions he

his girlfriend.

and

and he always

So he continued being

it.

sweet and

Another twist the love story is Tanya was manned when she met

It

occasional person-

in the

best."

1999, a marriage she said

Clayton denied having a wife, and claimed somebody entered his account and sent the e-mail as a joke. She believed him. After receiving another e-mail from a woman claiming to be his wife, Clayton admitted to being

question like ‘do you have any

by Clayton,

in

husband.”

advice

never hurt me.”

time."

be his wife, asking me I was doing with her

list.”

kids, or a girlfriend?'

for at the air-

to

the hell

Schembri’s advice corresponds with that given by the relationship

“I

port,” said Tanya. “Nothing could have been better than laying our

what

keep talking so he asked me to add him to my Yahoo messenger

al

we had exchanged phowe had a rough idea of

who we were looking

it

She said she and the man, named Clayton, enjoyed the same sort of hobbies, music and movies, and he was “very sweet and charming."

again,” said Tanya.

15,

things in

said Schembri. “He would be interesting to

common,”

game on May

on Jan.

we had some

discovered

chatted,

for

A

married man. “We chatted while playing and

played,” said Tanya

After meeting during the checkers

Jan.

from

in

my Yahoo

someone

who

are.

But of course, sometimes love does entail risk.

Take for example the ninemonth relationship of a couple who met online more than three years ago.

The couple has asked tor their names to be changed for privacy reasons.

(Photo by Diana O'Neill)

Cheers! Students raise their glasses on Sept. 26 at O.T.s outdoor seating area. Enjoying the day are (counter-clockwise from bottom right) Julie Hinsperger, Shannon Keyes. Grady Meston, Leanne Beckher, Cathy Froude. Derek Standring and Nick Milbury.


Page 12

— SPOKE, Oct.

6,

Entertainment

2003

Nickelback’s

CD

latest

is

monotonous By KRISTEN If

MCMU RPHY

you’re a fan of Nickelback,

then you will like their

new CD.

If

you’re not a fan, you will probably

your eyes and shake your

roll

head.

Nickelback has done it again. They have produced one more CD packed with their same old predictable tunes.

The Long Road, released on Sept. 23,

from Up.

is

not such a long road

their last release. Silver Side

This is the first CD self-produced by the band, which consists of lead vocals/guitarist/songwriter

Kroeger,

guitarist

Chad

backup

and

Ryan Peake, drummer Ryan Vikedal and bassist Mike Kroeger. vocals

It

seems as though Krueger

feels

the need to maintain consistency his musical style. In the music industry this may be a good

with

eventually

but

thing,

gets

it

monotonous. In all fairness, there

is

remake

what-catchy

a

of

someElton

John’s Saturday Night’s All Right (For Fighting) on the album.

Reality takes over

TV

fall

lineup

Temptation Island, Bachelor and other By JENNIFER

shows

reality

offer lots of choice

when

ORMSTON

tation,

Kroeger must have it tough if his based on real-life experiences. Throughout the CD he touches upon bad breakups, long-

Conestoga

10 hours of television weekly; most would spend their

viewing hours watching based programs.

distance abuse; stuff

reality-

“It's just the

over

Fear Factor

same thing over and Sylvia

said

again,”

Dekermejian, 20, a first-year busi-

The Bachelor began

worth

is

on Sept. 24. This season’s lucky bachelor is none other than the loveable Bob Guiney, a former

it

is

gross and funny.

competitor for the heart of Trista The Bachelorette. on Rehn

Amanda Rose,

Although he was eliminated from that show, Guiney won over many

first-year marketing student Reality television fans should not

be disappointed because shows like

Cupid, Paradise Hotel, Temptation Island 3 and Canadian Idol, have

ended. The

fall

lineup

is filled

with

exciting reality shows.

Survivor began

on Sept.

seventh edi-

its

18;

this

season’s

be able to find the woman of his dreams this time around. The producers have added some surprises this season. For instance, viewers can expect to see one girl get voted off in the middle of her date, as

where

the end.

to the Pearl Islands

only possessions

wore

are the clothes they

The producer's

to the

decision

to force the competitors to leave

the rest of their belongings behind

an indication of surprises to

come. However, after three men got naked during a challenge in the premiere episode, will

it is

have

unlikely that to

rely

on

"twists” to maintain interest.

Conestoga College students are not certain they’ll

make

the hour-long

part of their viewing routine.

million-dollar two-hour episode. For those who had the stomach to watch it, the stunts included eating live leeches, diving for sunken

Many into

are

opposed

students <lo plan to tune

skeptical

about

Guiney’s

chances of finding true love. It’s amusing because of unrealistic

22

it is,

how

said Holly Ingram,

tree

love

first-year

student.

said

there,”

business

Ingram, a

administration

“But the fun part

they are probably

doomed

is

that

to fail.”

Fear Factor began another gory season on Sept. 22 with a special

MTV show hosted

“Down the road and ’round the we hope to God it never

after

one hilarious episode. For those of you who are too busy to devote any serious time to television in September, new reali-

within

Fear Factor

is

among the many people extreme

fish

parts

and

cliff.

lar

popu-

particularly

student body, like

as

show’s

the

ty

stunts.

shows

will continue to premiere

for the next couple of months. “It’s

just the

same

of viewers for

millions

Sylvia Dekermejian,

episode,

FOX

that

scheduled to

is

its

final

has planned a sequel air

in

late

The general idea of the first show was that a poor construction

October.

first-year business

administration student

It is

so out there, said Ingram.

“Some

of the stunts are so crazy

worker posed as a millionaire and dated numerous women who were unaware of his true identity. In the end, “Joe” chooses the woman he loves and she is let in on the secret. Insiders have said that in order to

you would never see them anywhere else,” she said. “I like the

find

adventure of the show.”

the premise of the show,

that

worth watching gross and funny, said

Fear Factor

Amanda

it

is

Rose,

“I like to see

is

19.

what people

will

do

for money,” said Rose, a first-year

law and security student.

women who

are oblivious to

FOX

has

been forced to recruit from somewhere overseas. Fans should anticipate a shocking twist at the end of the series.

American

Idol devotees will also

be delighted to

know

that auditions

Routhier, 20, a first-year marketing

underway and the third instalment of the program is planned to

student.

start in

The show

is

awesome, said Mike

are

January 2004.

ends,” Kroeger writes in the lyrics for the

song See You At The Show.

The band

gets

some

credit

for

determination.

Without a doubt, there is talent of member every Nickelback. Perhaps it is a hidden talent that each member needs to explore independently.

Switch

it

afraid to try

After Joe Millionaire attracted

thing

over and over.”

because

.

“I don’t think people can find

hit

a 200-foot

pounds of rotting

to waiting until

The Bachelor; however, they

Punk’d, the

launching an all-terrain vehicle off

with 1,000

filled

and drug

grunge-rock-metal

thrown into an overpowering

bend/

boots in a tank

relationships

typical

set of music.

by Ashton Kutcher, began at the end of September on CTV. In this popular program Kutcher pulls pranks on unsuspecting celebrities, including Justin Timberlake and Kelly Osbourne. You’ll be hooked

of the viewers with his quick wit and sweet nature; hopefully he will

pirate-themed show takes the castcontestants

fourth

its

edition

watching because

Routhier

Rose

Ingram

ness administration student.

show a

and then the crashing into makes it all sound

lyrics are

a couple of

also said they

viewers

album contains The

the same.

they will watch an average of six to

is

11-track

lyrics, although tedious, are not the band's downfall. It’s the constant bellowing of music, the brief hesi-

College students interviewed in a random survey on Sept. 23 said

location.

up for the band

the chorus that

mer favourites, plus new ones. The majority of

the

to musical style, but

definitely a step

The

This season viewers will mainly be entertained by the return of for-

aways

comes

lyrics that are overly angry.

begun.

tion

it

as far as creativity goes.

After another uneventful summer filled with the same old reruns, the new fall television lineup has finally

and been-there-done-that

original

it’s

The

borders the line between

track

up, boys. Don’t be something new.


Entertainment

Samsara rocks By CHRISTINA

at

SPOKE, October

BRAMBURGER She not only sings from the bottom of her heart, but the strength behind her voice

The Kitchener-based band con-

her skee-bop sounds and expres-

of vocalist Shelley Potzold,

sions keep you rocking.

Nick Kruppa, 23, bassist Ed Orso who insists lie’s 14, and Conestoga College student Scott Corman, 23, on drums. About 100 people attended the 22,

guitarist

party at

The Wax

all

Not only did he switch between

word

a Buddhist

bass and guitar with Kruppa, but Orso assisted Corman on the

that

drums with

much more

than just a

name, says Corman. "We're always going this

through

cycle of rebirth and

what we wanted

May

in

after their previous seven-

member band broke some

that's

to symbolize.”

The quartet got together 2003

The

up.

four-

case

naturally gravitated toward

“Practice,

and organizawhat we’ve got,” says

They amount

also

Samsara

to

have an

of

talent

has

such a short period of time. The band also credits their par-

in

all

given

them

Nick Kruppa (clockwise from top), Shelley Potzold, Scott band Samsara, recently played at The Wax in Kitchener.

the support they have

throughout

the

“It’s uniting

us

all in

a circle.”

become

family

a

the

in

never had brothers, but I this is what it’s like,” says

“I’ve

young age they wanted

of

Waterloo. lot,

explains

Corman.

Not only

is

Ambrad known as the party starter, but he also sells merchandise at the band’s shows.

members knew

four

All

to

at

“I’m

a pessimist desper-

ately trying to find

a

make

optimism

music.

Corman in

Shelley Potzold,

him was

members

all

we can

of the

be as

all

agree that

we

music for the rest of says Kruppa. “And also

much

of an influence as pos-

sible.”

David Ambrad, 20, a second-year marketing student at Conestoga College, has become a major part of

ficial

when

“I’m a pessimist desperately trying to find optimism in life. I’m find

to

not overpower and no one vies for

good

the

ly well.

He

teases the strings of his guiwhere his fingers don’t even know where they are going to tread next.

in

mankind. I talk about ironies and contradictions.” This is identifiable with lyrics

tar to the point

such as, “The sun is burning down your eyes/I’ve seen through your disguise/ And clearly you’re a soul

During various guitar solos, Kruppa had his time to shine, in which he’d put the audience into a

worth wasting” from the

trance.

first

Corman controlled the music with his wild, barefoot antics on the drums.

keep her personal affairs out of Samsara’s

The synergy between all four of them now is just rocking, says Ambrad. “When I first saw them live it pretty much blew my mind, it was awesome, it was so good.” All members contribute to the song-writing process, but

and

Orso

handle

most

harmony.

to

He

songs.

“As a band,

don't want to rep-

I

for,”

Potzold

of

just as hard to display her incred-

the

Although each member their

a

total

them

of

The next thing you know you're tapping your toes, bopping your

head

even

and

occasionally

swiveling your hips.

I’m in a strange heaven.” Potzold says to the audience while on stage. “I

feel

like

It

for the duration of the set.

band’s website.

For more information on the members of Samsara and to hear some music clips go to www.samsara.cd.

“Beating diabetes and treating

diabetes both

AT THE DOON HEALTH SERVICES OFFICE (INSIDE DOOR #3)

makes resea

cker.

allergy injections and immunizations

y

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health resources and information

y

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can also help with:

y

first aid

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from a Doctor

HELP

SOMEONE YOU KNOW

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birth control counselling

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isn’t until the

NEED MORE THAN A BANDAID SOLUTION? YOU CAN VISIT A NURSE OR MAKE AN APPOINTMENT TO SEE A DOCTOR

is

element, the reassuring

group hug at the end of the show that the four members can actually feel the energy beaming off one another. To purchase a copy of Samsara’s CD one must attend a live performance, go to Encore Records or The Beat Goes On. or visit the

show, the control

own

glances to one another energize

ible voice.

While attending

it is

blindfolded.

Potzold says. “I'm trying to

speak for us all.” While Potzold sings to complement the band, it is obvious at a live performance the band tries

knew his set so probable he could play

kept beat and

well;

resent anything they don’t stand

band will take your body.

We

room.

rely on any dramatic elements. He plays his instrument the way it deserves to be played and he does it amazing-

not to be too superwriting the lyrics.

tries

She also aims

to play

lives,”

in the

talented

control the level of

One person does

track of the EP, Sugar Crisp.

piano lessons.

“I think

our

band member

enrol

“That was a catalyst. People say if you can play the piano you can play any other instrument and it’s true.”

want

in life.”

says the greatest thing his

parents ever did for

him

Potzold

trying

background sets them apart from the young, common jam-bands that have emerged lately. The orgy of styles blends amazingly into each other to create the sound that is Samsara. Poltzold releases a dominating voice from her small frame. With a Gw'en Stefani-ish sound to her, you can’t help but sing along.

University

short

amount of time they have been

Potzold.

This picture says a

Orso,

incredibly

who

the others,

together.

Their jazzy-blues flavour combined with their classic-rock

at

Samsara’s routine.

The members of Samsara have

assume

The cover of the CD is a handdrawn image by Potzold, a fine

perfectly-timed

more attention. Kruppa does not

process.

student

Corman and Ed

incredible

which

where they are today

ents tor

energy

(Photo by Christina Bramburger)

drive

Potzold.

arts

four

musicians

each other. tion; that’s

his

wool-socked kicks to the cymbals. He backed Potzold up on vocals with his acute voice and brought many dramatic elements to the show with his jumps, kicks and improvised guitar playing when straps and strings broke. Samsara does not come with a show of lights and overly playedout hysterics. Instead, they show-

nirvana.

so

Potzold admits of

the singing and dancing.

an entire day.

symbolizes the cycle of life and death that one must undertake in order to achieve enlightenment or It’s

it,”

Orso exerts more energy during one song than most people do in

in

six-song, self-titled EP. is

know how Britney

“I don’t Spears does

Kitchener during which they debuted their

Samsara

you know

tom of her soul. Her rock star energy and presentation keeps you interested and

CD-release

first

lets

she’s singing from the very bot-

party, Sept 25.

sists

— Page 13

CD-release party

“We’re jacked! We are J-A-CK-E-D, jacked!” says Ed Orso of the band Samsara over dinner just before the band’s

2003

6,

research.

possible.”


Leaf fans have high hopes for

upcoming season By JEFF

The Maple Leafs could

HEUCHERT

upon Karel

who

Pilar,

also call last

year

in

played in 17 games before being sent down to St. John’s. The Leafs

will be able to bring out their blue and white clothing to support their

be one of their top defencemen last season, so he should see more ice

beloved Toronto Maple Leafs. Like every year. Leaf fans are convinced this is the year the

time this year. The only rookie with the poten-

The

NHL

season

is set to

begin

only one week, which means soon students all over the school

why

Cup back

Kondratiev.

man

Toronto, and

to

good offence,

has

received

already

high

this off-

praise from coach Pat Quinn, who says Kondratiev has a good feel

actually

for the defensive side of the

not? Aside from already hav-

ing a very

to

make the team is Maxim The Russian defence-

to

tial

will finally bring the

Maple Leafs Stanley

were hoping Pilar would turn out

defence, some-

game. With these prospects the Leafs

thing fans have been waiting for

shouldn’t run into problems late in

much

the year

season

improved

The

Leafs

the their

when injuries take there toll. The Leafs offence looks just as

too long. signing of defensive free-

agent Bryan

Marchment proved

to

the fans the

team

committed

to

is

good,

not better, than last year.

if

New

general

manager John Doug Gilmour

winning. Marchment split last season between the San Jose Sharks and Colorado Avalanche, where he played in all seven playColorado. for games off

Ferguson didn't

Marchment recorded only two

experience to the team. His greatest contribution might be his expe-

would fit into the team, but he redeemed himself by signing veteran Joe Nieuwendyk. Nieuwendyk brings 17 years of

goals and 12 assists last season, not it’s worry, don’t but

Marchmenfs

him

Marchment the

league

is

as

known around punishing keep play-

a

ria

who have

defenceman who away from his goalie’s net. His 141 penalty minutes from last

veterans

ers

never played in the finals, like Mats Sundin. The only questionable player

season reveal his style of play. addition of Marchment strengthens the Leaf’s starting

on the Leafs offence is Owen Nolan. Nolan made a huge impact last year when he had 12

blue line tremendously.

points in his first 14

will

The

The Leafs

are also hoping a

few

the Leafs.

impact throughout the long season. Last year Colaiacovo started the season on defence with the Leafs,

was sent back down to their farm team, the St. John’s Maple Leafs, after only two games. This

but

last

is

year playing with the Erie

Otters

World

in

the

OHL

Junior

and

in

the

Championship

where he recorded 10

Ed

When

Belfour.

in the

all

else fails,

game.

NHL

The

a beef? Spoke wants Write a

in

Conestoga College Class Rings

10 %

Off Sale

editor.

season begins Oct.

8,

Maple Leafs start their 1, on Hockey Night Canada against the Montreal

th

must be received by Tuesday at noon for the following issue. You can: e-mail them

1

to

spoke@conestogac.on.ca, drop them newsroom

off at

at

the

th

th

October 14 ,15 & 16 11:00 a.ra. - 2:00 p.m. Foyer Inside Door #4

Letters to the editor

Keep your memories on hand for a lifetime.

Spoke

4B14, or mail

them.

but the

season Oct.

to the

letter

fastens] to

hear from you.

for

Belfour always keeps the Leafs

(See address

at

bottom of page

4).

DROP BY THE RECREATION CENTRE TODAY AND TAKE PART IN A HEALTHY LIFESTYLE

CONESTOGA COLLEGE ATHLETICS &

RECREATION

Varsity Sports Your upcoming Varsity home games Men’s Soccer Vs Redeemer 4:30pm 14, Vs Fanshawe, 4:30pm Men’s Rugby Oct 18, Vs Fleming 2:00pm @ Jacob Hespler Oct 25, Vs Humber, 1:00pm @ Jacob Hespler 8,

IMPORTANT NOTICE! For entrance to the Conestoga College

,

,

Women’s Soccer Vs Redeemer, 4:30pm Oct 15, Vs Fanshawe, 4:30pm Oct

games

Do you have

Canadiens.

points.

Oct Oct

Rpnt ??

just before the

best goaltenders in the league,

expected to play more often, especially after the season begins to take its toll on the players. Colaiacovo had a busy season

year he

Now,

season is to begin, there are his surrounding questions Nolan does have a health. bulging disc in his back but says he’ll play through it. If injuries do hurt the Maple Leafs, fans can rely on one of the

of their defensive prospects, like Carlo Colaiacovo, will make an

Czerlau, waits for a free First-year architecture construction engineering technology student, Tom outside the cafeteMarketing Firefox from Derrick Hockenburry who was handing them out for

pogo

three Stanley Cups. Nieuwendyk understands what it takes to win in the playoffs. This should benefit the young players, and even the

for.

(Photo by Jeff Heuchert)

Pogo anyone?

playing for and winning

rience

produc-

offensive

tion they signed

feel

Recreation Centre a valid student card or

membership

card must be presented

at all

times. If you do not have one of these you will not be

CONESTOGA COLLEGE ATHLETICS &

RECREATION

Intramural Sports Sian Ups! Sign ups at the Recreation Centre Oct. 14 for the following sports.

Non Contact Hockey Ball

Hockey

Co-Ed Volleyball Co-Ed Basketball

7,

Men’s Hockey Oct 15, Vs Laurier, 7:30pm

Women’s Fastball Oct 7, Vs Durham, 5:00pm

granted access into the

Recreation Centre without

purchasing a day pass. Thank

you for your co-operation.

Individuals can sign up for each sport at the front desk. For Call

more

information

the hotline number:

748-3565 ext 3565

till

Oct 22


Sports

SPOKE, October

6,

2003

— Page 15

Young team By KATE BATTLER

ranked team

in the

bounced

province, 3-1,

men’s soccer team at Conestoga College may be in a

back in the Sheridan College, the No. 2 ranked team, by

rebuilding stage but they are giving

shutting

but they

The

them out 3-0. the team

make

This year 17 of the 23 players on the team arc first-year players and

to

there are seven first-year starters.

offs.

Coach Geoff Johnstone said the young team is talented, but experi-

next year

ence does count for a

lot

around the

league.

“They’ve done pretty well so

far,”

good exhibition season playing two games at a

The team had

a

Redeemer College They came out with

tournament. a record of 1-

.

They

also played Wilfrid Laurier

University and Rochester College

New

in

York.

The team seems

to

be maturing

and growing together really

fast,

he

hopes of making

two games that were played this season were away games and the Condors tied both of one against those matches, Lambton College and the other

The

first

against St. Clair.

The team against

lost its

Humber

home opener

College, the No.

1

it

into the play-

they tied or lost this year.”

Many

of the team Bojan Djokovic, also the top goal

Vukmanovic, and one other player. The Condors played Mohawk College on Sept. 30 and George Brown on Oct. 2 but the results of those games were unavailable at press time.

son,

final

which

two games of the will

sea-

both be played

right here at home, are against Redeemer College on Oct. 8 and Fanshawe College on Oct. 14. Both games start at 4:30 p.m. Everyone is invited to come out and cheer on Conestoga and help them make it to the playoffs this year.

(Photo

fastball start to

team

ment Though the drills continued much of a break, so too did

would be hear laughter on the

who

took to the field during a recent

from coaches and players

experts

not the case with the

team.

without

Scherer,

practice.

Always is

striving to improve,

head

coach Brad Scherer had the girls working on the basics, attempting to create an error-free team environ-

a

Hamburg and coach, said the

resident a Level

alike.

of

New

III certified

women’s team

is in

a stage of redevelopment this year as the majority of the roster is com-

posed of

his role in choosing

midget

fastball

Team Ontario’s

history

become a three-time

hard to believe the pain will ever When we People who have considered problems. to answer only like the end. Suicide may seem in their lives. If you are hope is no there that or desperate, may feel helpless, difficult

times,

it

may seem

suicide

thinking that

are

• •

life is

some warning

unbearable, or you are wondering

if

a

friend

may be

suicidal,

here

signs to consider.

Talk of- escape, having no future, suicide, death, or plans for suicide;

being alone, feeling hopeless or helpless,

friends; Feelings of - desperation, hopelessness, disconnection from family and with trouble grades, school/failing problems, work problems, Situation - relationship

Changes -

things, lack of physical energy,

lack of interest/pleasure disturbed sleep, loss of sexual interest, loss of appetite; outbursts, Behaviours — alcohol/drug abuse, fighting, lawbreaking, emotional giving dropping out of school, prior suicidal behaviour, putting affairs in order,

Physical

in ail

all-star pitcher

the year at Conestoga.

The legacy the Condors' assistant coach has left behind should serve as an inspiration to the players, and

Karen

Cardwell.

Williams,

Amanda

Martin.

Kira Jeni

Mary

to reach for the sky.

Gruttje,

Zettler

and Laura Schiebel.

With the regular season opening had a month to work out all of their kinks and Sept. 6. the girls have

aim for continuous progress

as they

towards a playoff berth. Before playoff's get here however, the girls are coming off a double

strive

Coach Scherer is also looking towards some of his players to pro-

header against Canadore on Oct. 4 and will be looking forward to

vide a leadership role for the team.

playing host to

One

such player is catcher Melinda Wilson. Wilson was batting .313 with three runs and one

RBI

the law, family breakdown, sexual/physicai abuse;

(Pitcher),

Girard,

Havens, Courtney Schuurs. Sherry

assistant

and a three-time college athlete of

remind them

Harrow

own

Fawn Day, Conestoga’s the

team consists of

Ashley

books of

how

well the female Condors perform.

in

y

This year's

Lynn Brass, Lee-Anne Smith. Jen Shannon Kelly, Melinda Wilson. Ashley Came, Stephanie Tawnya Wick, Sippel, C. Wightman. Ashley Harrow, Marrisa

team aren’t the only

factors in the final equation of

Conestoga College as a ball player. Her skill, knowledge and passion for the game allowed Day to

Suicide

TEAM ROSTER

first-year players.

“Our goal is to get into the playoffs and gain some experience,” he said. Scherer’s three years as head coach in the Conestoga dugout and

niche

are going through

Battler)

and running

off

coach, has already carved her

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

by Kate

Marcos Bordadagua gets his jersey pulled by a Humber College player during a Sept. 23 men’s soccer team game. The Condors lost the game 3-1

the smiles, laughter and love for the sport that could be seen and heard

2003 Conestoga Condors women’s fastball

is

team, as well as the goalie, Dino

Despite the unflattering

practice field of a ball club started the regular season with a 1-

4 record. But such

who

scorer for the

the year, laughter, smiles and fun filled the air at the local Conestoga ball diamond as the lady Condors

\>aseV>»l\

surprised to

three third-

year players this year, the captain

Women’s By JAS ON SMITH

just trying

Coach Johnstone is hopeful for when the team will have more experience. “They will win those games that

Their

said.

is

through the season with

it

The team only has

he said.

1

against

now

Right

their all.

it

game

next

right

after the first five regular sea-

son games

this year.

Durham

at

5 p.m.

on Oct. 7 right here at Conestoga’s Doon campus. The Condors also play at Mohawk College on Oct. 9 at 5:30 p.m.

away

and family, telling final wishes to someone close, a to a cheerful attitude, behaviour that is out of change sudden and unexpected prized possessions to friends

character

(i.e.

a cautious person

who suddenly becomes

reckless)

them to you suspect that a person may be suicidal, ask them about it, encourage not does someone with suicide about Talking share what is happening with them. through. going are they what about cares support suicide; it only shows that someone If

Suicide

a permanent solution to a temporary problem. you know, ask that any of this information applies to you or someone

is

you feel speak to a counsellor If

in

to

Student Services.

A message from Student Services

(Photo

by Jason Smith)

Coach Brad Scherer helps Tawnya Wightman with some batting techniques during a recent practice. Wightman is a first-year player

and a second-year police foundations student.


Page 16

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; SPOKE, October

6,

2003


Digital Edition - October 06, 2003