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1

Going hog wild Thousands

Sanctuary’s sticky situation Students could lose one of their eating

of

college students

Spoke

and employees pigged out at the annual

Pond

Party.

NEWS Monday, September

if

they do not clean up their act.

NEWS

2^

GRT expands service to

college Grand River Transit makes bus route more accessible to residence.

10, 11

NEWS

2003

15,

spots

Conestoga College, Kitchener

35 th Year

1

No. 2

Teacher strike looms as talks break down says no need

Official By PETR CIHACEK

rethink things.

Teachers and support staff from Conestoga and other provincial colleges could go on strike soon as unsuccessful

negotiations

left

them without a contract. If that happens students may not finish their programs as scheduled or might be required to take additional classes once the strike is

put students’ welfare

“There might be political reasons to (strike),” said Conestoga’s executive director of human resources Debra Marshall. “But I think at this point both parties are

we

optimistic that

OPSEU presidents

local

meeting Sept.

15, but

are

not sure

it is

leader says there panic.

cuss.

However, Conestoga’s union is no reason to

“Nobody

is

talking strike at this

yet

“Workload and salary are big “We’re also

time,” said Walter Boettger, presi-

issues,” said Boettger.

dent of the local Ontario Public Service Employees Union

looking

(OPSEU). “We’re

talking

more

strategy than strike.”

between OPSEU and management broke off Aug. 31, which raised worries among some Talks

of the college

"The

fact

retirees. It’s

OPSEU

that the negotiations

a

Still,

both

be calm, saying that

they are just taking time off to

strike

time for negotiation. “If

the

and

the teaching

all

curriculum Boettger.

should happen,

strike

much

will

cease,”

said

“Everybody wants

to

avoid a strike.”

Magazine said

would

the strike

be stressful and have “a terrible impact” on students. But it would not be stressful for students only. Magazine said her job is to help students and it

would

the

is fair,

but the union has

They argue

a different opinion.

college

that

should between

teachers

receive a salary that

is

high school teachers and universiprofessors.

As high school

teachers receive increases of 3.6

per cent a year, in three years

wages would exceed those

of college teachers.

“For me personally it would be a tremendous conflict.” According to Boettger, the results of the provincial election

be important for future

many thing

issues, is

the

encouraging

that both parties

seem

to

Cambridge purchases land

talks.

By CHRISTINA

public.”

More money and quality of education are among the things Boettger is hoping the new government not

know which

not going to get

is

plan for Conestoga College, says

needed

who

Kevin Mullan, vice-president of finance and student services. The land between Fountain Street was Drive and Morningside at approved for purchase on Aug. a Cambridge city council meeting.

city at cost.

its

votes.

with 100 per cent certainty that we’ll not support the

can

“I

The city will hold the land for Conestoga College for approxi-

college will have the $4.4 million

party the union

going to support, he was sure

BRAMBURGER

The City of Cambridge’s purchase of 136 acres of land across Highway 401 is part of a long-term

Although he did

will bring.

expansion

for future college

“This government has worn out its welcome with the he said.

is

Even though they disagree on

First-year nursing student Lisa Herrick performs her best hoola

tims.

will

up

it

hoop attempt as she races to the finish line. The relay race, held Sept. 3, was part of an Orientation event held for first-year McMaster students studying at Conestoga. The event, organized by third-year students, had been in the works since last spring. See Page 12 for additional photo.

the strike was to make students vic-

has an impact on our negotiation,”

Marshall,

increase

(Photo by Valentina Rapoport)

Hoopin’

if

proposed

their

election.

the

and (neither

“The (provincial) government

year the possibility of a strike

bigger because of the upcoming

suffer

year over three years. According

ty

is

first.

if

side) wants it to occur,” said Marshall, adding that there is still

start,

The management proposes

go on strike even when they were without a contract for a year. However, this

to

new.”

salary increase of three per cent a

staff.

past, teachers did not

seem

to

of education.

to

sides

benefits

wants the management to improve the workload formula, which it says impedes the quality

stopped temporarily concerns counsellor Joan me,” said Magazine, who is the union steward for counsellors. “I’m very concerned for the students.” But Boettger said that in the

provincial

extend

to

that

comes students

pretty

when both parties will resume their talks. Once they do, there will be a number of topics to dis-

over.

“We know

will reach a set-

tlement.”

The

panic

to

tell

Progressive Conservative party.”

1

1

mately five years. It is

hoped

that at that time the

buy the land from the

to

Mullan says the college is expecting to receive funding for the new land from companies as well as individuals.

Continued on Page 3

Pondless pond party draws large crowd By

BRYAN MARTIN

because the party was announced a.m. and the festivities to start at 1

Conestoga

College

students

rushed out of school doors when they heard there

was

free pork, hot

didn’t

underway

get

“When we

$2

ing

The

event, held Sept. 4,

was

the

event was

moved from

the

area

near the pond to the recreation centre

due

to construction,

making

it

the Patio Party instead.

Tons of students lined up outside the gates eagerly waiting for the

directors of the event to give the

green light so they could open up

shop on the food. It

attended the event. students were a

out,

1 1

but

we could we came rush-

heard that a.m.

were kept waiting

another 30 minutes until

we

got

served," said Travis Paterson, a sec-

ond-year civil engineering student. Things didn't improve when stu-

little

upset

instead of just testing their instru-

school.

ments

to

1992 and usually performs at festisaid Doug Boudreau, w'ho plays the drums.

will definitely

Beatles

tribute

band.

St.

opened and

and drinking the beer. There was a live band at the event named The Cavemers, who are a

a

band again,” said

between

A

classes,” said Delion.

Belair Direct booth w'as on dis-

play at the event and had a free for students to enter and have

ing student, said the pig event

is

loved the event, but wishes the band

events like

was a bit closer to the crowd and there was more selection of beer. “What could be better. I’ve got meat, beer and ladies.” said

very impressed w'ith all the and I know they would be impressed with me if they saw' my chugging beer ability.” said Poulin. Carrie Gilmour. a first-year management studies student, said it was a good pig roast, but wishes the band would play more music

commotion calmed down

is

next year

Belair Direct was also offering Ontario college students a 10 per cent discount on their home or car

had been delayed a week because All the

there

if

come back

a big punch bowl spiked with rum.” Harinder Birk. a first-year student

and a

this

as soon as the gates

a great venue and

“I feel this is

never thought I'd be able beer wfth my friends

I

drink

lot of commotion once the water balloons were unleashed. Mike Poulin, a first-year market-

gate party with laughter, pork, beer

dent planners and found out they 14.

day.

draw

like a football tail-

awesome and wishes

of the blackout on Aug.

all

Gilmour. “I also think next year they should serve mixed drinks and have

The mood was

dents arrived to receive their stu-

people started digging into the pig

was estimated 2.500 students

Some

11:30

The

Catherines group was formed in vals

get food at

annual Pond Party, but this year the

until

a.m.

dogs, pop and, most importantly, beer.

1

"I

took place more often.

am

ladies

management

in

studies,

said

he

Harinder. Jeff Delion, a first-year market-

student, said he loved the atmosphere and thought the pork from the pig was delicious. “This is so much better than high

ing

a chance to win a portable stereo.

insurance.

Roger's

AT&T

was also

set

up

at

the event offering students special rates

on phones. One

rate

was

call-

ing your classmates for free. If students were to purchase a phone then they would be put in a M&M’s Meat Shop draw', with a chance to w in S50 worth of food. Additional story on Page 3 Photos on Pages 10 and 1


)

CSI changes funding of CJIQ and Spoke By CARRIE

Osborne described

HOTO

CJIQ and Spoke

receiving

are

1

funding from Conestoga Students Incorporated (CSI) in a new way

CJIQ can

“2002/2003 (school year) was the year we had a financial agree-

last

ment,” said Justin Falconer, president of CSI. the

CSI has donated

past

ue to work together. “We’ve always had a good working relationship,” he said. “Before they would give you a

going to cost $5,000,' he said. In turn, CSI will receive an agreed amount of air time. Another problem for both CSI

New posters cover Conestoga’s student lounge walls, but they are not advertising a new event but

lounge, solved the problem using a variety of methods. One year the lounge was closed for a few days with a'sign on the door saying closed due to the

rather a countdown.

garbage,

The poster says that if students do not start to throw away their trash by Oct. 1, food will be banned from the Sanctuary. Conestoga Students Inc. put the posters up so on the first week of school students knew what could happen to their beloved lunch spot.

CSI president

Justin

Falconer

said, “I think the last thing the

“When

it

comes down

CSI

down

wants to do Sanctuary or ban food from is either close

another council gave a visual display of garbage left

while

on tables by piling

of

all

is

on the

stage.

“We’re not even a place that’s equipped to clean the tables properly don’t have the

...

We

same

cleaning supplies the

the

it.

Justin Falconer,

to finding

CSI president

the least hindering

the solutions that could have

occurred.”

Previous CSI councils, during their own garbage crisis in the

“Anything that comes out of the is probably the biggest trash problem,” Falconer said, such as cups, bags and ketchup being

cafeteria

spilt

on the

floor.

NEED MONEY

this year.

“If there is a need,

will proba-

it

Osborne

bly be filled,”

contract.

be given through advertisements. “At the end of the year if we

alleviate this

“He’ll be in charge of son,

CJIQ

Spoke advertisement

liai-

liaison,

said.

The CSI will continue to grant Spoke $15,000 this year, but it will

$15,000 we

spent

haven’t

donate the

munication,” Falconer said. “He'll be making sure informa-

year for their advertising.

on

CSI

rest,”

will

Falconer said.

Web site development, as well as maintaining other forms of com-

tion is passed

will be billed through

“The CSI wanted

to

the

become an

advertiser in the true sense of the

to the students.”

Falconer said the new posidefinitely be an will improvement. This year alone CSI is putting on more than 50 events. “There's always something to do on campus, but people don’t

word, meaning they will book ads on a weekly basis and be billed for

The posters state that if the problem is not solved by the set date the

know

tent, the

Sanctuary will follow the college’s classroom food and beverage policy. That would mean all food would

advertising.” Falconer said the relationship

be banned and only resealable bottles would be allowed into the

“extremely positive.”

lounge.

they

“Spilling on the floor does not happen all the time but when it does it’s annoying. “Someone has to go get paper towel or else someone’s, going to walk in the mess and make it

worse.”

Falconer said thus far students are not co-operating. In the first

cafeteria has.”

a solution that addressed the health and sanitation issue, I think ban-

ning the food

it

really assigned to

problem CSI has hired a communication specialist, who will be on an eight-month

To

By JASON MIDDLETON

Osborne said. There will be no guaranteed amount CSI will spend on CJIQ

cial assistance),”

years),” Falconer said.

CSI warns students to clean up trash

they would prefer you

have a project or need a piece of equipment (before providing finan-

put commercials on (in previous

Sanctuary.

now

cheque,

and CJIQ in the past was actually getting commercials on the air.

“No one was

said.

But, both the radio station and the student association will contin-

it’s

(Photo by Jason Middleton)

Osborne

air time,”

$10,000 to CJIQ and $15,000 to Spoke. This year, CSI is acting as a customer for both, not a donater. “They (CJIQ) will come down and say they need a switchboard,

in the Sanctuary. Conestoga Students Inc. president Justin Falconer sits at a garbage-covered table from the banned be CSI has given students until Oct. 1 to clean up their eating habits or food will

air their advertisements.

However, Osborne admits CJIQ and CSI haven’t “always hooked up” to make sure the advertisements were done. “We’ve always offered them free

this year.

In

their rela-

tionship as a “marriage made in heaven.” CSI is the “No. planner of social activities” and

week of

school,

“it’s

been really disappointing. It seems people haven’t noticed it (the posters) or don’t care enough.” He thinks some students have a misconception that the Sanctuary

tion

1

it,”

he said.

“All of our events can have

between

“We

CSI

and

CJIQ

is

the ads,” said Christina Jonas, co-

ordinator of the journalism-print and broadcast.

“Although they have never had any control over the editorial con-

CSI had students coming them thinking that they did. Paying for ads on a per ad basis

to

should prevent

The

this

misconception.”

journalism

program

is

responsible for providing the edito-

just wanted to make sure wanted to partner with

us.”

Paul Osborne, manager of CJIQ and manager of the recreation centre, said CSI plays an

important role with the

radio

rial

paper on campus. “It’s

(CJIQ and Spoke)

benefit to everyone

he

station.

content of the paper and pro-

ducing the newspaper. Falconer said CSI values having both the radio station and the news-

...

a real

It’s great,”

said.

has the same cleaning staff as the cafeteria.

“We’re not even a place that’s equipped to clean the tables properly. We don’t have table, spray or wash cloths. We don’t have the

same cleaning supplies

the cafete-

ria has.”

“In the cafeterias the staff will

pick up after you.

We

are seeking energetic, outgoing

individuals for various promotional

positions with

retailers in

the

tri-

They

will clean

up your trays and throw out your garbage and they do it on an ongoing basis so it never looks that bad rooms.”

in those

“The Sanctuary,

unfortunately,

is

not included in the cleanup process

and surrounding areas with flexible hours starting at $9 PIT. If you are a well-groomed, professioncities

Resume

al

individual forward your

to

shariloouz@hotmail.com or Sharilou at 519-744-7348

the

(of

price

is

somewhere

bourhood of $10,000

it

have and the

in the neighto

$20,000 a

year.”

Falconer thinks the cafeteria, the source of the problem, should offer

some

call

We

cafeterias).

inquired into including

“I

assistance.

(Photo by Diana

wish the cafeteria would take

It’s

responsibility for the things they sell

and offer to clean our

without having to charge us.”

room

OSAP time again!

First-year accounting student

paperwork

of filing

an

O'Neill

OSAP

James Conely deals application.

with

all

the


.

News

A new

look

the Sanctuary

in

By AIMEE WILSON According to Falconer, the Sanctuary has not had any renovations ever since it was created in

The Sanctuary was revamped over the summer to give it a new

1995. “It really lacked long-term planning,” said Falconer.

professional appearance.

“We wanted

a professional night-

The CSI

club

atmosphere,” said Justin Falconer, president of Conestoga Students Incorporated (CSI).

was also reconsummer. New fur-

office

structed over the

niture was brought in for full-time and executive staff as well as divider walls between the desks for more privacy.

Conestoga College's den was shut down for the month of August while construction and painting

All

took place.

the

changes, according

Falconer, gives

Conestoga students

“We wanted a

are

profession-

come

nightclub atmosphere.”

al

in

CSI into

will

territory

the

Sanctuary,

“The goal was

make

to

Miller, vice-president

Miller was involved

Along with a new DJ booth, conwoodworking students, the Sanctuary also added new stage lighting and DJ equipment,

(Photo ,

equipped for live-to-air events put on by broadcasting students. A mural was painted, by a University

new paint in both DJ booth. The

the

entrances and on pictures featured

,

Justin Falconer, president of CSI,

shows

The $23,000 renovation

the pub

new mural

the

more enjoyable

painted around the bar

tors to

is

responsible for approv-

ing any changes and hiring contrac-

Due

for the reno-

ty,

do the

restorations.

the

the plans on

beginning of

July. If the construction

started

that

late

in

such as the double cohort, not

enough time was left to make all the changes to the Sanctuary. According to Falconer, the college

had been

the year,

the

Sanctuary would have been closed until mid-October.

The bar was planned

to other issues taking priori-

Wilson)

activities.

the Sanctuary

this year’s

Over

to

be two

and a half times bigger in size and constructed so it would no longer be closed in. It would have extended further into the room and shaped into a half-moon allowing for bet-

ter service.

to provid-

ing better service,” said Falconer. Therefore, since the bar was not finished, a smaller service window

has been added on the side of the bar to allow for heavier concentration of people on pub nights.

will

come

other

objective a

safe,

will

more

to

more

the art

be painted over the entrances

by Signart, including frosted decals on some of the windows, and a large refrigerator unit, provided by Coca-Cola, will be installed by the bar.

to

According to Miller, the renovations are a step in the right direction. “It’s long overdue,” said Miller, adding, “We’re livening the

close-to-

place up and changing people’s

Other than promoting a nightclub atmosphere. Falconer said

encourage

CSI council.”

the course of the year,

Sanctuary. For example,

“We were committed

their

in

“It’s really refreshing,” said Falconer, adding, “It’s reflective of

additions

was contacted about until

in

By Aimee

for students.

feedback

night.

The CSI development and maintenance fee of $16, paid by each Doon campus student, went

off

April 24 but they didn’t receive

and more efficient service during pub nights. According to Falconer, the college

vations totalled just over $23,000.

make

tion to the bar to allow easier

around the bar’s service window will be updated after every pub

Approximate costs

will

towards the cost of the renovations. Original plans included an addi-

of Waterloo student, around the as

of

look

Ethan

helping to design the exterior look of the Sanctuary.

structed by

as well

said

it

like a separate entity,” said

CS/president

window

know they when they

Falconer.

Justin Falconer,

bar’s service

to

a distinct look.

it

was

home environment.

attitudes.”

make Pond

Volunteers

Party a success for CSI, students By The

M CHEL LE TAYLOR I

first

week of school can be

a

Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) offered a few hours of relief from the pressure of classes stressful time.

paid about $650 to feed everyone

sible for

some pig

left

to

activities for

CSI, the just

feed rumbling stomachs, but to

school

spirit

"departmental

was

party)

a

and

break

way

to lift

down "(The

barriers.”

for students to

meet people from other programs,” Miller said. "Conestoga needs

I

Walkway

was one

to

of businesses

to the generosity

area,

in

have enough food for

Although Miller was thankful for community’s contribution, he could not stress enough the importance of Conestoga’s student volthe

unteers. “I could not believe

Team

Student

community

part of the event. Jessica

munity.

how

the

together for this

on

(STOGA),

Group

a volunteer

was a

section of CSI, great

how

students.”

Activities

the

significant

Wismer

Miller said. “Everyone stepped up

and Dolly Phan, both second-year marketing students, were just two

to the plate."

of the

event,”

Miller explained that Conestoga

Meat Packers donated the pig for a pound which is a fraction of its

$

1

normal $2

to

$3 cost.

"We

only

STOGA

volunteers running

errands including providing meals to the

"We

band Cavemers. help out with everything

we

can." said Phan.

be added over Highway 401

Continued from Page 1 was important that Cambridge

known yet what probe moved to the new

community by creating more jobs and launching the

is

not

grams

will

acquired this land for both the city

expansion of the Blair area.

location, but

and

The college plans to extend the Doon campus directly across the 401 to accommodate the expected

recreation centre and library will

It

for

future

students

of

Conestoga. Mullan says. "Opportunities could have less-

ened

if

they did not buy

RECYCLE

people came together. I'm mesmer-

Doon com-

some help from

%

Foods donated sauerkraut and even Home Hardware provided the char-

such a big event CSI managed to get

RE-USE

Schneider

Miller said.

ized by the quality of Conestoga

dations students, offered their secu-

police foundations student,

was

acquired at discount prices thanks

party throughout the day.

pulled

second-year

is

said.

coal for the barbecue.

were an important asset to the Pond Party. While some served food and drinks, others, mainly police foun-

a

not normally the

he

familiar with .security he had no problem helping out. The turnout was a surprise to him though. “It’s a really good turnout." he said. “I thought there would be less.” According to CSI, an estimated 2.500 students showed up for the

“It’s

Jardim,

is

roast,”

All the food at the party

the

type to volunteer, but because he

event running smoothly. Volunteers

rity skills.

Party, so

said sure,” explained Jardim.

In order to

While students enjoyed the free meal and activities, many individuals were hard at work keeping the

friends said they

needed help with the Pond

cohesion.”

Bruno

“My

Jardim said he

Ethan Miller, vice-

Pond Party was held not

the designated area with alco-

holic drinks.

with a tasty pig roast on Sept. 4.

According president of

He was responmaking sure no students

of these volunteers.

it.”

The construction of the new campus will create an economic spin-

off for the

increase

in

student population

if

and when more degree programs are added.

It

stay

As

on

it

is

expected that the

the current

Doon campus.

for transportation

between

the

two parcels of land, a walkway will be added to the bridge over Highway 40 1

PITCH-IN

CANADA

www.pitch-in.ca


'

Page 4

— SPOKE, September

Commentar

2003

15,

Your vote matters Earlier this

month Ontario Premier Ernie Eves announced

the long-

With resiawaited Ontario election sending voters to polls for Oct. 2. privatizing of dents having faced blackout issues, listening to talk and education services and the unfolding of gay-marriage health

could be responsible for the reconstruction of

rights, this vote

Ontario.

government and Despite the overwhelming issues at hand, the Tory time in the spotlight to bash their imporopponents, putting less importance on the issues that are more are they though as feeling are voters voters. As a result, some their competitors are using their

tant to

game not worth betting on. Ontarians need games and focus on casting their votes.

part of a political

While announcing

the election at

to overlook these

Queen’s Park, Eves wasted no

too inexperitime characterizing Liberal leader Dalton McGuinty as April 2002, in Harris Mike for enced for the job. Since taking over

many have

weak because of his

called Eves

indecisive stance. on the

reconstruction of Ontario’s energy market.

McGuinty, who currently has a double-digit lead resiover Eves, has focused his campaign on arguing that Ontario government’’ “cynical Conservative dents need a change from the

On

the

same

note,

province for eight years starting with Harris. had enough of being short-changed, he told have “Ontarians are telling reporters in Waterloo earlier this month, adding. People that has run the

me

that

more of the same

is

just not

good enough.

He may be right, however, what about his stance on the issues? “Somebody should tell Dalton McGuinty that if you want to be predurmier, you can't just say what you’re against,’’ Eves told reporters ever made ing a rally in Brampton. “He’s against every reform we’ve to improve the education system in this province.

Alopg with Eves and McGuinty, who are the most popularized canand didates, is NDP Leader Howard Hampton. Similar to both Eves also put a lot effort into discrediting his

McGuinty Hampton has

When I was

opponents.

“This

is

end of the

the

line for

you and the Conservative govern-

he told reporters, referring to Eves. to a Toronto Star poll that surveyed 1,002 eligible votissue voters are ers earlier this month, health care is the number focusing on, followed by education. Ontarians are worried about the shortage of nurses and doctors as well as the possibility of privatized health. Included in education issues are the misuse of the millions of

ment,’’

According

1

dollars the Conservatives have given to the education system over a

year ago. Teachers are

still

unhappy with pay, workload and

the talk

of banning teacher strikes. In addition, despite the recent blackouts, our

address electricity supply problems.

of electricity

Then

in

there

is

Ontario?

And

will

it

What

will

government has yet

happen

to

to the future

stay in public reach?

which includes the deduction of mortgage interest and

the possible increase in corporate taxes.

More

ing the Walkerton water scandal will also be

investigation concern-

among

these issues as

number of smog alerts. Also, let’s not forget the minimum wage which has been kept at $6.85 hourly in possible raise since 1994, or what some have called Ontario’s ridiculous insurance

will the increasing

rates that just

keep getting higher.

issues

seem

to

be endless and Ontario residents need some

answers now. It

may be

hard to sidestep the political tactics being used to win the

spotlight during this election but as residents of this province

have

to.

Do

your research, form your

in a decision that

own

planning

my

we

opinions and be involved

could reshape Ontario’s future.

America,

camp-

I still

think that a

more

ing trip last month, inhaling smog and exhaust gases was the last

provincial park should offer

thought I would do. How naive I was. Driving on a quiet country road toward Bronte Creek Provincial Park, I was excited about spending

minutes from the highway. The majority of parks in Ontario have a lake or pond, but it is not the case at Bronte Creek. Unfortunately, there aren’t too many nice things to be said about

thing

three days in the nature

away from

civilization.

However, when the

staff at the

park office told us that if we want to go swimming or hiking the only

way was like

to take the

busy

I

QEW to 1

felt

got a punch in the stomach.

was a joke, but a few hours after, when I was At

first I

driving

my

thought

Located near Oakville, Bronte Creek Provincial Park is just some 45 minutes from Kitchener, which makes it the most accessible provincial park around. But I could have as well put up my tent in my backyard and gone swim-

ming

in

it

beat-up car on the

backed-up highway to get to the pool, I was far from laughing. I just

than a

I

the other side of the park,

the issue of balancing the budget

promises of further tax cuts,

The key

Pick your camping destination carefully

was not expecting

this.

According to the park’s Web site, Bronte Creek includes a large pool, creek and trails. Indeed, there are six trails and the creek is just gorgeous. However, no one told us that we'd have to drive for around 10 minutes to get there from our camp site. Isn’t it false advertising?

one of Kitchener’s three And it would have

outdoor pools.

been

much

cheaper, too.

swimming pool

the park.

The camp

that is just

sites are quiet

and offer some degree of privacy. There are many animal species in the park and if you’re lucky you can even hear coyotes howling in the night. But, one of the cool things about camping is the break from driving and if you don’t have a car at Bronte Creek, you are confined to the campground

$20 per night to stay at the park and, unlike any other Ontario provincial park, you also have to

where, besides the 1 44 campsites, washrooms and an office, there is

pay to enter the pool. In its “generosity,” they charge campers only $2 while people who did not pay

the traffic

It is

the

$20 fee have

Wow,

to

virtually nothing else.

Therefore, unless being stuck in

camping

pay $2.50.

self a favour

a 50-cent discount, that’s

among your

favourite

do yourand avoid Bronte

Creek.

dandy!

As

is

activities, please

For information on Ontario’s you can check out

even though the Bronte Creek pool is one of the largest man-made pools in North well,

provincial parks

www.OntarioParks.com or 1

call

-800-ONTARIO.

Spoke Letters are

welcome

is published andproduced

weekly by the Journalism students of Conestoga College Editor: Michelle Taylor

Spoke welcomes

letters to the

editor. Letters should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be

Spoke Online

Advertising Manager: Blake Gall Production Managers: Petr Cihacek, Aimee Wilson

Editor:

Circulation Managers:

Photo Editors:

Jason Middleton Diana O’Neill Valentina Rapoport

Carrie Hoto, Halley McPolin

contacted for verification.

No unsigned

letters will

be published.

Faculty Adviser: Christina Jonas

500 words. edit any letter

Letters should be no longer than

Spoke

reserves the right to

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke @conestogac. on. ca

for publication.

Address correspondence to: The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

N2G 4M4

Web site:

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

Dr.,

The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College. Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a MS Word file would be helpful. Letters

must not contain any

libellous statements.


News

SPOKE, September

can be

'

/!;tv

,

G

difficult

,

AJ

,

— Page 5

2003

Balancing work and school

sIoout

01 MP my

15,

fhJP/Lflgl

By JEN NIFER

MENDONCA

With the college workload being it was in high school,

double what

As we welcome in another school we say goodbye to the money that we worked so hard to earn over year the

(Photo by Petr Cihacek)

sold out the

first

day

of school,

about 150 people security Al Hunter

were put on a waiting list and forced to use weekly and daily parking. Head of says it might take as long as a month before all waiting students get a permit. Parking spots become available when students either drop out of their programs or carpool.

may be

all

the other

time to consider getting a

part-time job.

Many to

students find

work during

it

necessary

the school year to

Bonnie Balmakon,

an

extension ^

Live longer with daily physical activity, healthy eating and following your doctor’s advice.

...

WWW porficipocnon. com

1

9,

a first-year

continue to work during college. I

need money constantly,’

said. “I can’t

mer

work,” she said.

to

Balmakon rely

said she

on very

ment

skills

is going to time-manage-

strict

to

work only

in the

“I think that

balance work and

she

sum-

because

have had

1

manage my time

to learn to

effec-

am better prepared to for a career in my field than people in my class who have not learned this tively

business marketing student, worked while in high school and plans to

®

my

in all

school.

cover their ongoing expenses.

Life i$ short. (ret

I worry about squeezing schoolwork on nights I go

“I think

books and

expenses that seem to add up in September have left your bank account looking less than healthy, it

worried about makfit into her sched-

is

ule.

summer.

If tuition,

As annual and semester parking permits were

Balmakon

ing everything

I

yet,” she said,

Balmakon said a drawback to working is she feels she is missing out on part of the college experi*ence.

“Sometimes the only option students see is to quit. With discussion and work they are able to stay, and that’s wonderful.”

Lynn Robbins

White,

Stu/Lent Services ctyunseiint-

“I'feel that

I

am

the fun,” she said.

missing out on

“Because

not living in residence

I

ed from the friends that

I

am

feel isolat-

am mak-

I

ing here.”

Student

Services,

Room 2B02,

has

a

located

in

variety

of

resources and counselling services available to help students

who

are

struggling with issues such as time

management and other academic, personal and financial issues.

These resources are

at the col-

lege to help students cope with

problems

that

could potentially

interfere with their

academic suc-

cess.

Lynn Robbins White, a counsellor

with Student Services, said stu-

seek counselling begin to feel over-

dents

should

when

they

whelmed. “Student Services offers lots of stress-management help as well as

time-management one-on-one workshops.” she said. White said if a student is having financial

come

difficulties

should

they

to Student Serv ices as well.

Counsellors

may

be able to help

students find alternate methods of

accessing

money such

as through

bursaries.

White said there

is

a

lot

Student

Services can do to help students

including

asswmasfKa ©&ss

©am

aasMPiPiisssr,

warn.

Just ask this star player. Or the mascot about to run him dou n. • •

www.OLGC.ca For more information

call

just

listening.

Sometimes just being able the problem out in the open

"Sometimes the only option dents see

is to

RUes

respecting

teams, payers, athtetes. personalities, or other

are able to stay, and that’s ful.”

PFOUNE wftdi are avateblefrom (he OLGC upon request These Riies contan trn4at»ns ol tabfcy. Sport beery products are net

atfifates in

any weyVfeu must be a

mrimum ol

18 years ot age to partrcCete

stu-

quit school.

These resources are also by the

helps,

she said.

“With discussion and work they wonder-

1-800-387-0098 pour renseignemerrts en franpais.

KNOW YOUR LIMIT. PLAY WITHIN IT! The Ontario Problem Gambling Helpline 1-888-230-3505.

PBCHJNEfc governed

to get

OLGC may

at

any tree and

at

fis

sete

deacon,

associated

refuse to issue tidreis

sponsored tx

tearng any

author by.

selection

or

endowed tv any soars

and may Ent the aggregate

wgerng

tns oeyw-

able on the college's

Web

www.conestogac.on.ca.

availsite at


continues with CSI vice-president of activities

‘Miller time’ By DIANA O’NEILL

stomach painted red and blue and got the students in attendance to break into a song and dance

his

He plans on bringing the students together and pig roasts are only the

chant.

“He doesn’t

beginning.

Ethan Miller

is

that box,

scheming up

the box,” said Falconer.

some fun with new approaches on how to enhance the current student community,

Falconer

Conestoga

incites

dent of activities Students Incorporated (CSI).

passion.”

The just Ethan’s

demeanour

management

whole

that blows

head coach for two Olympic teams but he also teaches Sunday school. As he sim-

been

the

Special

ply puts

it,

“I don’t

about the Bible, but about goodness.”

CSIpresident

people’s

strength

intends

to

of Miller’s ideas and ingest some of the 660 pounds of pork offered. “He’s the pig man! We wouldn’t have had that without Ethan and

Conestoga.

said

his

ideas,”

president.

“My a

Not only did Miller get the entire school talking about the unconven-

all

of the

Conestoga has to offer. By serving up more studentbased activities and cramming in as

much

that

social activity as he possibly

Miller hopes to make the school tight-knit like a community.

can.

“Ethan is bringing his unique approach to this year’s student activities,” Falconer said, adding, “He’s going to add flavour to the regular yearly program.”

not as-

Ethan

Miller brings the students together in

wacky and

wild ways, as vice-president of

doors of the college for entertainment and we shouldn’t. I plan on

them off the couch and getthem involved in some grass-

ting

potential

is

at

Miller explains, “We have underestimated the students capabilities by looking outside the

getting

of amazing people.” He plans on exploiting

fully

here

mass entertainer or mass babysit-

he achieved his ultimate goal of utilizing his ability to motivate

because they’re all amazing in their own ways,” said Miller, adding, “Conestoga has such a compilation

and he that

position (with CSI)

tional pig roast gathering, but also

people and create enthusiasm.' “I talk to everyone the same,

do

ter,”

Falconer,

Justin

know much do know I

Miller has a knack for finding

attended the recre-

ation centre party on Sept. 4 were fortunate enough to indulge in one

CSI

stud-

has a history of leadership roles. Not only has Miller

Justin Falconer,

who

third-year

ies student

you away.”

Students

confident that

fairly

lowers by the end of the year. “He this pure excitement and

appointed position as vice-presi-

“It’s

is

there will be a cult of Ethan fol-

as part of his recently

for

outside

think

just

he thinks outside, outside

roots fun.”

Falconer couldn’t be any more to work with Miller for the

pumped

a tutor

current school year.

“He’s so passionate about what he does and he appreciates the little things,” he said, adding, “It’s just Ethan’s whole demeanour that blows you away.”

“Our people are

a each

like

thick barley stew,

bringing their

I am struggling with understanding course material

own

flavour.”

Ethan

if

Miller,

CSI vice-president of activities

I feel I

am

having

trouble keeping up with

Although the 21 -year-old Baden high

Miller has a clear goal to raise the

school, he didn’t feel inclined to

student spirit and Falconer is looking forward to being his partner in

native

was co-president of

his

take on a leadership position with

Conestoga’s student body. That is until Miller’s long-time friend Falconer, convinced

him

alternative perspective it

among

to take his

and spread

the students.

Miller started the school year off

on an original note for new students. He planned something different for every day of orientation week. By the end if it all, he had

crime for that challenge. “This year will be exciting for the students,” Miller said, adding, “The plan is to have fun and see

some changes around

own

daily work.

My

marks reflect

challenges I

am

feeling

here.”

It’s obvious that he thrives off the energy of the students and he is not afraid to admit it. “Our people are like a thick barley stew, each bring-

ing in their

my

PEER SERVICES CAN HELP

WITH ONE-ON-ONE

flavour.”

TUTORING TO BOOK AN APPOINTMENT VISIT STUDENT SERVICE if*# i

wkW*.

2B04

CSI

activities.


News

OSAP online

SPOKE, September

College receives

more

is

— Page 7

2003

15,

user-friendly for students $750,000 funding Upgrades to system create less backlogs for being No. 1 By KATE BATTLER By TIM

A new computer made

receiving

a

little hit

and prevented most ol" the delay said a Conestoga College easier

less backlogs,

financial aid administrator.

According

to Paul

new system, which

know

the college has been rated

the 24 colleges with an average rating of 88.125. Conestoga showed an employment rate of 93.6 per cent for graduates

No.

for the past five years, but

six

entitlement, not just an estimate.

system has

OSAP

among

overall

MURPHY

“Personally,

he I

Although the power blackout that shut down most of Ontario on Aug. 14 slowed down the process, Matresky said their offices were running and caught up in a couple

said.

haven’t heard as

Matresky, the

many complaints

this

OSAP

the system being

down, or being

takes in

days.

Conestoga I

College

students

what most of them don’t

realize

is

the

college receives additional funding along with that title.

The college receives approximately $750,000 more for being the No. rated college in the

year about

months after the completion of which is the best in the

studies

province.

“We

put

I

applications and assists students,

slow.”

was implemented the summer. “From our end,

Matresky said the biggest problem this year was with the signa-

cessing

at

the start of

the entire pro-

system has completely

changed the way we look

at appli-

cations,” said Matresky.

say the process has

“I’d

ture pages.

A signature page is a declaration that the student’s OSAP applica-

gone relatively smoothly, and I’d say students are quite impressed

they

and gives permisAid Office information with the

tion is accurate,

“Personally,

I

haven’t

heard as many complaints this year

about

the system being

down

or being slow.”

Paul Matresky,

He

system were numerous hardware and software upgrades, but the end result was a more user-friendly system with to the

said

brought

in

when

signature pages

students

came

to

pick up their loan.

“From

a student’s point of view, a student walks in here right

now with their signature pages, we can edit their application and give them an answer within five minutes as to their entitlement,” said Matresky.

He emphasized

Conestoga

College President John Tibbits said the amount the college receives lot

is

nice and

we do

of different things with

money. However, he

said, “I

it is

their actual

a

“I'd say the process has relatively smoothly,

students

when

are

they

quite

coma

in

gone

and I’d say impressed here,”

said

money, he

The college doesn’t 1

than

being No. 2 or even No.

Matresky.

Every college

in

the

John

more

is

goes into a quality assurance fund every year which is used for

top eight

The money

No.

free

gets the same amount of money percentage-wise based on the size and population of the school.

improving the college ways.

hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. They can also go to the National Student Loan Centre from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Both offices are located within the Student Client Services Building.

The Key Performance Indicator (KPI) survey, which rates colleges, is a composition of graduate employment rates, graduate satisfaction, employer satisfaction and

money went

Canon i450 Colour Bubble

i450 printer required and

student satisfaction.

is

Jet Printer via mail-in rebate. Store

purchase

subject to applicable taxes. Printer mail-in rebate value

equivalent to Canon Canada Suggested Retail Price for the Canon i450 on date of purchase.

www.apple.ca/backtoschool ©

2003 Apple Computer.

other countries. iPod

is

Inc. All rights

1.

the college receives

Students looking to pick up their loans can go to the Financial Aid office between the

OSAP

and PowerBook are trademarks of Apple Computer. Inc, registered in the U.S. and and company names mentioned herein may be trademarks of their respective 2003. For Terms and Conditions visit www.apple.ca education/hed/promos t>ts

reserved. Apple, the Apple logo,

a trademark of Apple Computer, Inc Other product

companies. Offer available from May 30 through September

27,

KPI

8.

Buy an eligible Apple laptop and an iPod, get a $300 rebate and a free Canon i450 printer.* Canon

that the

for being rated

in

various

This year a large portion of the to hiring

42 new

full-

time teachers. The money has also gone to new Orientation sessions and the expansion of the LRC. “We put it where we think it’s going to make a difference,” Tibbits said.

Buy a bundle and get a bundle back.

of

happy

survey provides the ratings ’and shows recognition by giving the additional funding Tibbits said, but he would like to see more funding

more would for

Conestoga College came out best

*$300 rebate and

Tibbits,

College president

Conestoga

get any it

make a

difference.”

that

said.

for being No.

think

would

Conestoga has a higher percentage of full-time teachers than other colleges which costs a lot

some

were sent to the OSAP office in Thunder Bay along with applications, and others simply weren’t

if

rather technical, involving

Matresky

Registrar’s office.

financial aid administrator

The upgrades

share

here.”

in

where we

it

going to

province.

like to see a greater reward.”

sion for the Financial to

come

when

it’s


News

Funny Money packs Sanctuary By

because remember want your business.”

BRYAN MARTIN

Conestoga eagerly filled $100 during a

Cunningharti advised students to always ask themselves whether it is a good purchase and to be smart with their money. “It is important that all you students out there invest your money and get it into mutual funds as early as possible, because the rich

students College the Sanctuary to win

humourous

financial

lecture.

On a

Sept. 2,

James Cunningham, comedian from

30-year-old

Toronto, travelled to the college to perform his youthful Funny Money

get richer

he

show.

Funny Money based show aimed

is

a

and colleges across the country that are facing money problems The $100 was given to one lucky student after she was chosen from four other students to perform an

universities

plans to continue doing his act across the country.

He was first a comedian for six years and had a skit on students being broke which always received

embarrassing sequence of dance moves in front of the crowd. Cunningham first displayed the

a

The winner was an excited Holly

Money

like Financial Tips, students

James Cunningham gave tine

how

of students are stressed because of money problems. He says if they were to have a budget, much of

would

disappear because the students would then have a system to manage their money. their

stress

“Money is like very of you

beer, in then out

quickly,”

said

tips to

Funny Money, Sept. 2

ceries.

number

Funny

show.

Cunningham said he knew show something

Cunningham. “You have

a large

fans. This

called his

Johnston, a Conestoga student who plans to spend her money .on gro-

Cunningham says

good reaction from the

triggered the idea for his

three moves in front of the audience and received cheers from the

bing the bank.

and the poor get poorer,”

said.

Cunningham won the 2002 Canadian Organization of Campus Activities Lecture Award and has

financial-

at students from

crowd for his efforts. The moves were passing out the money, funky fisherman and rob-

companies

students on ways to save

comedy

rou

the Sanctuary.

in

to learn

be responsible with it.” Studies show 68 per cent of college and university students to

all

in

Ontario are experiencing some sort

of financial difficulty.

Cunningham says

during his stand-up

money

are

students

usually broke because they spend too much of their money on drugs, alcohol, shopping and eating out when they should make their own food.

Of all the things which students buy many could be a lot less expensive says Cunningham. The key is to look around for the best deals, he says, and only buy the things you really need and cut out some of the luxuries you have.

He expresses the importance of having a buffer fund. It consists of a reserve fund used for a rainy day, for example when your car breaks

down or you desperately need money to get out of a bind. Cunningham says students’ money goes towards tuition,

“These luxuries could be things like cable and cellphones. It is important to find out if you really need those things, and if you do, search around for the best prices

books, school supplies, rent, food, transportation, phone bills, clothes, laundry, Internet, cable and enter-

tainment.

he

if

dull,

would

not be interested. He realized he had to spice it up with a little com-

edy and simplify it for students. He has been doing his show for three years and has plans to continue doing

He

it

in the future.

performed

also

at

the

Conestoga Residence. Conestoga Students Incorporated Jody programmer events

Andruszkiewicz

Cunningham Funny Money

first

spotted

his performing act in 2001 at a con-

ference at Centennial College. Cunningham plans to return to Conestoga every year.

Local magician works his magic Childhood hobby turns into a career

it

By JE NNIFER

ORMSTON

Barney’s all-time favourite

Conestoga College students were by the astonishing tricks of Barney the Magician in the Sanctuary on Sept. 2. The audience cheered as Barney

entertained

Free!

a great

“It’s

cummerbund

and

bow

tie.

the into crowded Students Sanctuary to see this CSI-hosted event over the lunch hour.

He

called on three

the audience to help

throughout

great doing a job

like

because puts a lot of smiles on people’s faces and you meet a lot this

it

of people.”

Barney the Magician

student

www.paguide.com Physical Activity

Guide

show. Colleen

Ackert, 19, volunteered to take part in a wand trick that turned out to “I

figured

it

it

first

appeared.

out though,” said

Ackert, an early childhood education student, after the show.

Barney told the audience

that

was inspired to pursue a career magic after watching card tricks

he in at

a circus.

Later he admitted the circus story

enthusiastic

about

was false. Magic was a childhood hobby for Barney. “Then it became full time,” he

Chinese paper

trick.

said.

The audience was

<5 1 - 888 - 334-9769

members of him on stage

this interactive

Second-year

not be as simple as “It’s

job.”

Barney

took to the stage dressed in a black tuxedo, with the faces of various

Disney characters on his colourful

trick,

which he performed three times, was pulling a watch out of an empty bag.

particularly

Barney’s Cheers and clapping were heard as he pulled metres of colourful paper out of his mouth; later, this pile of paper magically transformed into a live bird.

There have been a

moments during

his

lot

of great

24 years

as a

magician, said Barney, a Kitchener resident. “It’s great

Highlights of the show also included balloon and card tricks, mind reading and pulling a white

because

bunny out of a box.

job.”

it

doing a job like

this

puts a lot of smiles on

people’s faces and you meet a lot

of people,” he said.

“It’s

a great

(Photo by Jennifer Ormston)

Barney the Magician dazzled Conestoga College students with his magic tricks Sept. 2. in the Sanctuary. His show consisted of card and balloon tricks, bunnies and birds.


.

News

SPOKE, September

New technology assists DARREN SMITH

By

more convenient can’t find space

Vehicle thefts increased last year and Al Hunter, head of Conestoga security,

attributes several

factors

problem such as having more than 3,300 vehicles parking at the to the

that type

we

of crime and what

do

trying to

reduce

is

arc

that,” said

best

hope

is

the lock config-

uration,” said Hunter.

enter or leave the

“They can’t

lot

without an

access card.”

one step being ensure student security on

lots are but

taken to

campus.

Work

three locations

month ago

a

on the

at

installation

of security cameras which are expected to be complete in three weeks.

One

feature that will help reduce

new gated Lot

theft is the

“This

“Ultimately,

see

to

I’d like

the entire college gated.”

12.

a card access gated lot,” said Hunter. “You'll need a prox-

head of Conestoga security

imity card to either get in or leave

would

I

He

money

lege

and

col-

enforcement costs

in

type of system would be

this

be

will

Lots 11,12 and

would save the

said this

The cameras

like to

see the entire college gated.”

to

be completed are

pan

zoom cameras which allow

till,

for the

giving security

KOWALYK

in

parking

13, as well as park-

ing areas 8 and 9 and on the far east side of the campus near parking

Lot

Work

1.

not

A

meeting has taken place to the reason Conestoga

College’s

own

Condor

88.3 CJIQ,

played

at

radio station. is

the cafeteria as

in

The

not being

has in

it

past years.

Mark

CJIQ's program problem during the summer. According to him. thjs has been an ongoing Burley,

director, first noticed the

issue.

go

to

will

one step

that

coverage of large areas. They’re

security has taken to ensure student

iris

safety.

allowing them

for

to

compensate

started a

month ago

volume

Emergency tions in

different lighting conditions and if the subject is two or three hun-

tall

to continue to

going

it’s

be safe

is

dition

degrades,

converting

everybody on Al Hunter

site.”

to

very well

lit

night so visibility really should

at

The cameras

are

programmable,

1

12,

will be

another

between Lots in

“These phones ple

He lots are

and

the area of Lots 8 and 9 as well as the far east of the campus in Lot 1 1

lution.

“The parking

be

two or three weeks. They be very visible being 10- feet with the school bus "crossing

One phone

through the participation of

will

ly reflective but will have a light on top and a strobe light that is activated when dialled.

in.

Being equipped with an automatic iris allows the camera to open the lens as the lighting con-

phones

installed in three parking lot loca-

yellow sign colouring scheme. Not only will these units be high-

“The only way

zoom

— Page 9

said the

more people

tie in to

directly

“They are also at locawhere they are visible to

Hunter.

taking responsibility in reporting

tions

suspicious

camera.”

activity -the better things will be and the most important thing for security is its connectivity to the college

communi-

being able to perform a preset patrol of certain areas and zooming

ty-

in.

ronment but the only way

will connect peowith security,” said

Technology does help in the campus but Hunter

security of the

attributes the greatest feature they

are digitally record-

to

ed and monitored. The recordings are kept from five to seven weeks.

it’s going continue to be that safe is through participation by everybody

have to the students. “I think probably the greatest security feature we have are 12.000 eyes. There are almost 6.000 students at this campus,”

on

said Hunter.

The cameras

“In effect,

site,” said

it

is

a very safe envi-

Hunter.

in

cafeteria

Some people have up or turned down the

secured.

either turned

investigate

ability

the solution but just

CJIQ gets back on the airwaves By CARLA

the

back and check issues of concern. Hunter said these cameras are not

ecpiipped with an automatic

not be an issue with the cameras, said Hunter.

A I Hunter,

is

that lot. Ultimately

expected

2003

security

in

black and white to keep the reso-

Most break-ins have occurred morning or early afternoon.

is

within three weeks.

dred metres away you can started

Hunter.

late

and

These cameras

“The

Gated

Hunter said that they work closewith regional police and a number of arrests have been made. “We are in fact on the 401 corridor so we’re very susceptible to

who

to truant park-

ers.

college every day.

ly

for students

due

15,

at their leisure.”

Kast said he likes to have music playing al home and doesn’t mind the

music

in the cafeteria.

nice to have some music playing as long as it’s not overpowering or too loud.” “It’s

Student Dick Van Alphen. 20, agrees that music is nice as long as it’s not blaring. “It’s

quiet without the radio sta-

tion,” said the first-year advertising

we have that

student. “It’s nice to hear

shame

kind of a

“It’s

that

this radio station

operated by the

is

students

...

and they

hear

can’t

it.”

Mark Burley, CJIQ program

director

it.

As a

background sound it’s niqe to have rather than just dead air.” The radio station is run by volunteers on the weekend and students during the week. Both broadcasting and journalism students have time slots to learn the ropes of working on the air. Most of their grades depend on their performances.

"We

Burley stressed that

would be

have the most listeners during the day in the cafeteria and the

nice for everyone to hear a bit of

Sanctuary," Burley said.

the

"It's

kind of a shame that

this radio station that is

the

students and

stuff that

is

we have

operated by

talks

about the

important to students

at

it

broadcasts because students

work hard on

it all

year.

Burley pointed out that the time

and

effort the students put into the

radio station

is

same

the

as

the

Conestoga College and they can't

effort put into other students’ pro-

hear

grams.

it.”

Burley suggested the box that contains the toggle switch for turning the radio off and on cafeteria

is

in

the

the site of the prob-

lem.

“The box used

now on,

it

We

isn't.

they

get

to

be locked and

turn the switches

turned off,” Burley

said.

“We does

don’t

that.

people.

It

It

know who

it

is

that

can be any number of

probably comes

down

to

a person hearing a song they don't

“It’s really

no different than when

computer programming students' work gets displayed at the end of the year. Just like the radio station, they’ve spent all year working on it.” The meeting to look into the problem took place on Sept. 8, at which time staff from both the radio station and the cafeteria the

devised a solution to help fix the problem. The box covering the control

like

panel for volume

turns

will be locked

and turning it off. Then nobody it back on.” Burley added the cafeteria is the

trol

box

in

the cafeteria

and a volume con-

will be installed in the food

place with the biggest captiv e audi-

services area.

ence.

will only be accessible Burley or one of the people working behind the counter. This solution will allow both par-

The box

John Last, the cafeteria's food service director, agreed thar the stem 'of the problem lies in the unlocked control box. “I believe what is happening is the controls in the dining

room

are

to

ties to either turn the

down depending on in the cafeteria.

(Photo by Carta Kowalyk)

volume up or

the noise level

Matt Ruiss, a second-year broadcast radio and television student, demonstrates his DJ radio station on the third floor of Conestoga College. Sept. 5.

CJIQ

skills at

the


News

Pond Party provides students

(Photo by Carrie Hoto)

Students, above, wait in line for some pig roast during the

Pond Party held on Sept. 4. Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) estimates about 2,500 students showed up for the event

throughout the day.

Mike

Tillich, left,

assistant pig

works hard preparing the pork for the thousands of students who arrived for a free roaster,

c

#

meal. (Photo by Aimee Wilson)

(Photo by Michelle Taylor)

Saman Ajamzadeh

Darren Palmer, and Jeremy Meiers, all second-year civil engineering students, and Chris Pignatelli, a second-year computer programming student, enjoy some beer during Conestogaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pond Party. The party took place on the Recreation Centre patio due (left

to construction of the

to right),

Learning Resource Centre.

(Photo by Carrie Hoto)

Laura Eaglesham, director of finance, serves up some of the 660 pounds of pork found at the CSI Pond Party. The event was a welcome back for students on Sept. 4.


News

with

some

SPOKE, September

15,

2003

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Page 11

stress-free food fun

(Photo by Kate Battler)

the Beatles tribute band the Caverners, up outside the recreation centre before he gets into costume to entertain the students at the

Rick LaBrie,

warms Pond ight,

who

plays the part of

George Harrison

in

Party.

students

nttnm artyTo

& Ine

line

up

to get a piece of

pork at

this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s event.

volunteered his time during the Pond

student, Nearv a second-year police foundations a refreshing bucket with Stepan eye on things" He is shown

o. ice coid

Coke. (Photo by Aimee Wilson)


Page 12

— SPOKE, September

News

2003

15,

Bumpy

week

first

residence

for

Virus disrupts conference centre’s computer network By

RYAN CON NEL L

onto the network.

Residents were without Internet week while Logisense, Golden Triangle and Conestoga

must have been a new student because we didn’t have any problems during the summer,” Kobylnik “It

Party animals and the Internet were the biggest headaches for college residence

management during

move-in day on Aug. 31. Approximately 530 new and returning students were welcomed into the Conestoga Residence and Conference Centre, including those

“(They) moved in, got set up on the Internet and that’s what caused a lot of problems.” New restrictions were implemented in August when Logisense Corp. was hired to control the

who

amount of

Residents were assigned one of three time slots during the day to move in, with close to 30 student volunteers helping with luggage,

controlling the

stayed in residence for college courses over the summer.

giving directions and other tasks. Resident general manager John

Kobylnik said the Internet’s inacwas the most popular complaint staff received from residents during the students’ first cessibility

week

computer entered the

dent’s

worked

technicians

said.

to repair the

network. Technicians were having

work on the problem because virus caused so

the

much damage.

can be used in the building.

By

Internet in order to be able to sign

amount of data

that

into the

can be passed along the Internet in a given period of time, residents are able

surf the

to

Internet

made

to the

all

were last year. Koblynik said Logisense was

like they

to fix the

residents continuously

their anti-virus

Microsoft

Web

site

so that these

programs can catch and remove the viruses without causing havoc to the network.

many network problems

after their first

Students were able to access the

week of

weekend

classes.

one who just moved in and connected their computer to the

dence last year. “There has been some upgrades,” Kobylnik said. “But we just had a lot of problems with people not being able to get on. It seemed like all the time we were contacting

Aside from the Internet probmanaged to enjoy themselves Labour Day weekend with a lot of residence parties. Residence staff and advisers had to monitor a lot of social activity

Internet,

Golden Triangle

during the weekend with

net-

completely shutting down the system. Kobylnik said it had to be somework,

d, Pulling

transferring

fire

their

.

,

virus

alarms under false pretences ,

is

management.

By

call

RYAN CONNELL

The sound of a shrieking fire alarm was a surprise midnight awakening for students at the Conestoga Residence and Conference Centre on Sept. 3. Residents and staff were evacuated from the building on the first

week back to school after a fire alarm was pulled in the hallway on the sixth floor.

Conestoga resident general manager John Kobylnik said he was

Kobylnik can confirm

who

At pulled

it

was

a stu-

pulled the alarm.

this

point,

yeah, a student

Kobylnik said. The residence and the college have strict policies toward students who pull the fire alarms under false it,”

pretences.

“(Pulling fire alarms) thing that

We

first

time.

Resident advisers (RAs) walked the hallways on move-in weekend to monitor party activity.

many

stu-

Kobylnik said management has residents' date of births on file so that if there are problems with certain residents and they are underage, then staff can confiscate all

their alcohol.

must have been a new student because we didn’t have any problems during the summer.” 'John Kobylnik, resident general manager

Kobylnik said there weren’t too with most students conducting themselves appropriately. The most common issue was

many problems

students

consuming alcohol

in the

hallways instead of being in a room which is against residence policy. Another drinking problem included catching students with beer bottles which is strictly pro-

“There were a lot of people around drinking,” Kobylnik said. “We were trying to control that.”

He

the

said

only damage that

happened was a vending machine was pushed over, causing a small amount of damage to its exterior. The machine was picked up within 10 minutes of being pushed over. Residence is still investigating who was involved in the vandalism by reviewing security cameras. Students can receive fines that range from $20-200 for disobeying residence rules.

On Labour Day residence offered fun activities and free food in the parking lot to welcome residents and encourage everybody new people and the RAs.

A DJ

to

meet

hibited in residence this year in order to limit the amount of broken

festivities

underage drinking was monitored more this year because

burgers were handed out. A Velcro wall and an air-blown boxing ring

college

more Grade 12 students entering were a year younger

RAs

because of the double cohort.

play.

glass. Also,

played tunes to brighten the

and free pop and ham-

were added

this year as well as organizing different games to

Connell)

alarms students

unable to go into too many details about what happened because it is still being investigated, but dent

lems, students

(Photo by Ryan taken seriously by both residence and college

,

Wake-up

(to fix it).”

the

update

Norton or McAfee as well as get their Windows updates from the

Internet at the start of the

resi-

away from home on for

that

programs such as

hired to handle the restrictions this year after having to deal with too in

own

problem.

future incidents with

Kobylnik suggests

the Internet,

more

bandwidth

network

To prevent

quickly and easily. Golden Triangle continues to be the centre’s primary Internet provider, but they are not in control of the restrictions

their

“It

bandwidth that

Internet

dents being

troubles entering the network to

Residence asked everybody to disconnect their Ethernet cables from their computers and not access the

back.

Students were unable to access the Internet beginning Labour Day afternoon when a virus from a stu-

for almost a

we

is

some-

take pretty seriously.

don’t want anybody messing

around with the Kobylnik said.

fire

alarms,”

Repercussions can be as drastic removal from residence and even removal from the student’s as

program at the “Something understand (in

is

residence)

college. that

that is

people don't anything they do

college property,”

Kobylnik said. “You’re not just dealing with us, you’re also dealing with the school. So anytime we have an incident, the college going to know about it.”

is

Name that

nurse

Third-year nursing students (back to front) Ellen Becker, Clinton Baretto and Christa Snow prepare for an afternoon filled with fun. This was the first year for Orientation for McMaster students attending Conestoga, which was organized by third-year nursing students. The event included a relay race where students raced to put on scrubs and catch water balloon IV bags.


i

News

GRT

SPOKE, September

15,

2003

— Page 13

expansion benefits students

HOWDEN

By JENNIFER

Conestoga students

who

rely

on

public transportation will have a much easier time getting around

town this year. Grand River Transit (GRT) has expanded many of its existing routes as well as added some new ones.

“Some areas of the city weren't receiving service and some services weren’t running often enough,” Grand River Transit customer Arlene representative service Matthews. “So changes were made said

make everyone happy.”

to try to

sometimes students can get sick and

know

“I

tired of

that

being

in

residence

A new Sunday bus

...

them

lets

and about

get out

on a usual boring Sunday.” Kathy Carr, broadcasting student

GRT

Matthews said

has received

on

ostly positive feedback

langes,

which

all

started running

the

;pt. 2.

happy with the she said. “They now

“Most people (.pansions,”

are

ive bus service

when

they didn

t

Tore and seem grateful for it. Despite all the positive feedback concerns lere have been some ^pressed.

people are confused over services that have undergone

Some ie

ame changes because r

it

to find the right route.

was hard-

Other peo-

say the

new

routes are farther

way from

their

houses then they

le

be making it hard for sento get to ors and disabled people ised to

hem.

One of the new services added Sunday Route 10 bus. Route 10

i

jne of the buses

used by Conestoga els from the Doon

It

who

campus to many

Before Route 10 ran on Sundays, were students living in residence the stranded. Now they can catch and then get on a connecting bus 10

or Kitchener Waterloo and spend the day there. Second-year broadcast student.

school months of September to April.

From Fairview Park Mall

know

“I

that

101 This bus will help students reach in only the University of Waterloo time the half is which 25 minutes,

live in resi-

sometimes students

in can get sick and tired of being A new residence,” she said, bus lets them get out and

.

every 60 minutes.

its

it

took prior to Sept. 2. The route runs almost non-stop the from Fairview Park Mall to

it

Sunday about on a usually boring day. The bus runs from 8 to midnight

- and back University of Waterloo - every 15 minutes Monday to

Route 10 run-

In addition to the

now

stu-

dents can catch the Express Route

dence.

is

stops along the way.

downtown

especially those

is

just

one

of the

2.

Sunday

often and

trav-

Conference Centre. This front of the Conestoga Residence and

Kathy Carr, 18, said although she has her own car and doesn’t usualthinks a ly need to take the bus she bus will benefit students,

ning on Sundays

Fairview Park Mall, making

to

Route 10 buses now stop in Grand River Transit on Sept.

is

most frequently students.

(Photo by Jennifer Howden)

on

runs more has

Friday from approximately 6 to 9 a.m. and 3 to 6 p.m.

Passengers can only board and designated exit the express bus at express stops. The designated stops include Fairview Park Mall, the Kitchener Transportation Centre on Caroline Street in uptown Waterloo following stops at the Waterloo: south camof University

and

at the

Biology II, Columbia Davis Street entrance, William G. Centre, and Engineering 1. Other transit changes include: a

pus

hall,

service to Waterloo’s RIM Park recreation complex; the openin ing of a new bus terminal

new bus

changes introduced by at Forest Glen Plaza; in routes redirected

Kitchener

many

Kitchener and Waterloo and

more routes

in

Cambridge

Chicopee. For more information on the route nearest you call Grand River Transit at 585-7555 or visit

their

Web

site

www.grt.ca

route

actual

changed.

The route has been extended to Bechtel and Pioneer evenings and weekends. Also, it now picks up drops off students right outside and

Conestoga Residence and Conference Centre. This means have to walk that students will not across from stop from the old bus

the

night. the recreation centre at stuCarr thinks the bus dropping is residence outside right dents off

a lot safer. “I

would be

terrified to

need more than a bandaid solution?

walk from

myselt at the recreation centre by night,” she said.

especially students, “Now make the females, won’t have to

walk

after dark.

The bus now does 15 minutes

Monday

the route every to Friday, 7 to

and every 9 a.m. and 3 to 6 p.m., time half-hour between those two every halfslots. The bus also runs hour on Saturdays. have Other new services that and 110 Route Express started are

Express Route

101.

These two

to help express routes are designed campuses their to students transfer at a faster rate.

Express

Route

110

travels

and minutes 30 Fairview Park every and to Friday, 7 to 9 a.m.

between

Doon

campus

Monday 3

to

the regular 6 p.m. during

you CAN VISIT A NURSE A DOCTOR OR MAKE AN APPOINTMENT TO SEE (INSIDE DOOR #3) AT THE DOON HEALTH SERVICES OFFICE We can also

help with

immunizations allergy injections and non-prescription medications prescriptions from a Doctor health resources and information first aid

to

reduce travel times and serve new areas. Also, some routes have undergone name changes such as Route 27 Chicopee, which used to be Route 10

blood pressure monitoring community referrals birth control counselling

pregnancy testing a place to rest

when you are

at


— SPOKE, September

Page 14

News

2003

15,

campus

Recycling important on Conestoga works on being environmentally DAWN HASSON

By

employee

Wood The physical resources department works tirelessly to expand Conestoga College’s recycling program, while remaining efficient with limited funding.

Sixty-two per cent of the college’s waste

recycled

is

“The cost

to pick

up garbage out

the waste container

into

same

the

is

it

that are

to pick

up

it

garbage out of the garbage can and empty into the

it

waste container

same as

the

is

the

as

emptying

picking up

it

into the recy-

Barry Milner,

manager Barry Milner.

Physical resources manager constantly

looking at ways to get rid of waste

environment

that are friendly to the

while staying within their budget.

shipped in are picked up by another

company

In

1991

physical

to include glass matecorrugated cardboard and

The

newsprint.

college also recy-

wood, metal, motor oil and computers. However, the program is always evolving. One of the recommendations that came forth in a recent audit was to cles

recycle

cling container.”

container,” said physical resources

is

program

with a paper

program

rials,

the recycling material and

into the recycling

Physical resources

in the late '80s

resources took over and expanded

picking up the recycling material

and emptying

college’s recycling

began

volunteers.

“The cost

tional cost to the school.

of a garbage can and empty

and skids

polystyrene

products,

which are a combination of materials that make plastic plates and cutlery. The college had to turn it down because the amount produced is not feasible and the costs could take money away from aca-

Cribs in the

demics.

program meet safety standards are

istry to

a composting program, but struck

down due

to

it

enormous

was

costs

to the school.

Humanity. The Mennonite community has also taken some of the college’s older desks for their

donated to charitable organizations such as women’s shelters. Also,

The public

when

new

styrene products were the cleanli-

schools.

computers the computer services

ness of the materials and finding a

school’s kitchens.

company who delivers them will come back and pick up the empty

space to store them prior to being picked up and recycled.

The college donates old

“Anything

home for,”

furniture,

other items, to Habitat for

for,

we

said

we can

that

find

a

try and find a home Cheryl Vogan, an

CSI

to reuse.

early childhood education that

the college purchases

boxes to reuse.

There

is

no money from the min-

run recycling, said Milner. health issues raised in

the discussion over recycling poly-

Another program suggested was

Milner.

win

“We

don’t see

it

as a win-

situation.”

Milner takes pride

Every year, top soil for the gardens costs about $300, which is much cheaper than administrating a composting program at three times the cost on little waste from the

among

on a budget

recycling program run by student

no addi-

at

The

in physical resources.

palettes

friendly while

in the school’s

program, which has been pushed along this year with extra blue bins

academics into a composting pro-

They’re the ones that take the stuff and actually put it in the proper containers to make this thing

gram

work,” said Milner.

“We

can’t

that’s

divert

not

money from

profitable,”

said

for the corridors at a cost of

“The students and staff are the who make the program viable.

ones

ADVERTISEMENT

CSI vice-president has high hopes for Conestoga

Sept. 18

Fine

& 19

Art

Fantasy place

Wildlife <

Sanctuary

By ETHAN MILLER

VP It's

of Student Activities

another mid-winter

hours

Monday

covers,

defenseless

sealed

pocket

of

in

Music

a

last

wild

dreams and heavenly warmth, immune from all worldly trou-

A

subconsciously anticipated buzz of horror fills the room,

bles.

Ethan

involved with CSI.

I

willpower and self-commitment, you thrust your helpless body into painstaking action, decimating

revolutionize

the seemingly impenetrable force

Poisonous

decrease departmentalization at the school by providing grass-

thoughts of approaching assign-

roots, participative, student-based

ments and exams flood your saturated brain, as your quivering foot touched the frigid, stale floor.

events that will build on the tradi-

of

Does

warmth.

sound

this scenario

average morning in the

you?

hope

I

like life

not, but the reality

Conestoga. to

“knight in

who

armour,”

come

activities

of

Oktoberfest

twist), live-to-air

pageant (with a pub nights and a

appreciation staff.

been as successful as attempting to hook a defibrillator up to a rotting tree stump. As the two per cent of the college population election

already know. I’m Ethan Miller,

vice-president

CSI

Time?...).

Management this

of activities for

(remember

is

my

I’m

“It’s

a

Miller

third-year

Studies student and first

year

and

is,

support

last

spirit

an

student

voted in the

at

our college.

at

being

party

and

“anger wrestling

dinner for

The annual pond

polar

plunge,

the

101” management show and the double

appearance of Tony Lee will also be sure to rock the boat. It’s time to get off the couch, out of the comfort zone and into the fun zone. Stop makin" love to the

tel-

and textbooks and get involved with your college - I guarantee you won’t regret it. evision

& Hangers •'Film

and

Some of these events include ’70s game show week, pig roasts, an

around Conestoga have

who

in

however, work

student

past attempts to enhance student vitality

shining

activities

I will,

increase

tional

will

Frames

am by no

means

the

day

9-5

Miller

causing your brain to teeter from fantasy to reality. Coaxing all

field

Giant-Sized Posters

9-7

morning: windy yet quiet, bone chilling and dark as a bat cave. You lie beneath the thick, soft flannel

$85-90

each.

Photography


,

News

CBSA By JAMES

The Computer

and is

Business looking for

women

good men and

to

fill

2003-2004 school

the

year.

The student-run organization, known as the CBSA. requires two students

from each

class to attend

meetings that are held once or twice a month. The student representative will then report to their

cussed

The student also give the

own

CBSA

executive their

the organiza-

Kunkle, says that

this

should be a good year for the because of the executive this

year

is

amaz-

Kunkle. “They are

all

very well liked and well respected

by

their peers

known

best that

are

for

held

throughout the school year. The bashes usually have a theme and

open

are

every student of the

to

college.

A weekend

trip to

Montreal was

another successful event put on by the CBSA and Kunkle expects this

ger than

A

last year,”

total

Kunkle

said.

of 69 students went on that was held the

last year’s trip

second last weekend in March. Kunkle says that student representatives will help plan and organize these events but volunteers are

also needed.

surrounds her.

“The executive said

is

bashes

“This year’s will probably be even twice or even three times big-

CBSA

ing,”

CBSA biz.

cov-

is

can

The president of

that

The their

that

CBSA.

representative

ideas for fundraising events.

tion, Jessika

program

ered under the

year’s trip to be even better.

feedback and present their

class’s

ating from a

dis-

that

meeting.

at the

that is available for students gradu-

were

on the issues

class

and teachers.”

CBSA

“Anybody who is becoming a rep will

interested

mation technology and media stud-

Posters will be around the school advertising student representative

ies.

positions.

number of fundraising events

fund the annual awards banquet.

in,

yourself.”

in

cause

increase

significant

parking fees

in

More parking spots By

Anyone that is interested becoming a student representa-

should go to the Room 1D14 D. tive

lots

say hi and introduce

dents enrolled in business, infor-

A

New

stop by the office and give us contact information,” said Kunkle.

come

Dawn Hasson)

in

“Just

are held during the school year to

(Photo by

in the orange lot at Security guard Alt Elliott points to a car without the proper parking pass checked their guards security of team a school, of week first the Conestoga College. During tickets were issued. week, following The warnings. issued and passes the assigned lots for

just have to

goal is to provide a higher quality education for stu-

The

— Page 15

which is held at the end ol the year. Funds also go towards a yearbook

the positions of class representa-

for

2003

looking

CLARK

Student Association

tives

15,

volunteers

for a few

SPOKE, September

CBSA

office.

DARREN SMITH

2 and to offset the price of new equipment. A1 Hunter, head of security at

spots in Lot

1

college, said there is no provincial funding for parking not

Hunter SuperBuild

cient,”

grant that

is

being on a waiting list for a spot students could still be accommodated by paying weekly or daily

These large spots were added to accommodate those who had vans

fees.

with side exits.

the

“We have to generate our and we own revenue ...

try

self-suffi-

said. is

a

and provide adequate and safe parking.”

government

A/ Hunter,

used for large addi-

and E wing. No money is made

week

the fine

is

“enforcement

is

really

neces-

which saves them money. These

own

“In

we have to be realisand we try and provide adequate and safe parking,” said about

first

college students return permits after they parking their find someone to carpool with,

security

revenue and tic

After the

$15 without a permit. Hunter said in order to be fair to those who have paid for parking,

Some

available to

support parking. “We have to generate our

hand-

in a fire or

icap zone.

sary.”

head of Conestoga

tions for educational use like the

A

Security was reasonably lenient first week of school unless

someone parked

the

SuperBuild funding. “We really need to be

of the campus as well as some having been enlarged to more than 20 feet wide.

E wing

the

Parking rates have increased this year to accommodate the 300 new

handicapped

for the

it

some cases our

clients

need

that type of access,” said Hunter, adding, “parking in the handicap

-zone without a permit

is

a

$300

fine.”

Hunter.

The number of handicapped parking spots has increased near

Parking has sold out at the college but Hunter said that despite

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

are then resold at a reduced rate depending on when

permits

purchased. said “It’s been my experience." Hunter, “that by Christmas time

we're able to accommodate every' one.”

Loneliness

first are living away from home Tor the vou are here from out of town; some w'he and doing are you one to report to about what _ time What a change! There's no time What day? your was "How ask. one to no also is Curfew-what’s a Surfew? There to say “I love you. would you like to have dinner?’ and

ManvY

nf

>

1

I

newspaper, government. Read Spoke, your school happenings on campus.

with to familiarize yourself

xtssrr.K. (Photo by

James

Clark)

the E wing Sept. ISA president Jessika Kunkle stands outside student reprefor lookout Kunkle and her executive are on the year. school the help plan events throughout ntatives to

your new community.

A Message from Student

Services


Page 16

— SPOKE, September

15,

News

2003

New awards new

Last year, a

available

pacemaker implant saved Max’s Now

to students

life.

he can spend more lime with

Itis

in

need

By TIM

grandfather,

MURPHY

Students in need of extra cash

have new award options (Spoke Photo )

$

Studying by the pond nications,

Pam

Startz,

AWSTMtt Please give to the

Head and

Stroke Foundation.

left to right) Cristina Areine, telecommucomputer engineering, and Patrick take advantage of the beautiful weather

First-year students (from

HUM

Carriere, electronics,

FOUNDATION

Awards

registrar of the Student

...

while studying out by the pond.

this

year according to the associate Office.

Janeen Hoover said the Conestoga College Achievement Award and the Entrance Award are available for students in need.

^2

The Entrance Award

TIPS FOR ACADEMIC SUCCESS

first-year

is

for

coming

students

directly out of high school, said

Hoover, and awards $500 to students admitted and regis-

KEEP UP.

It's

more manageable

tered in the

to

do a

little

every day on

first

year of a two-

or three-year ministry-approved

reading and assignments than to try to catch up on a week's worth of work on a Sunday afternoon.

diploma program. “The students coming in this year may not have seen it, as their high school

got

may

why we’re allowing applicants come in and apply up to Sept.

REVIEW CLASS NOTES.

Reviewing class notes as soon as possible after class increases understanding and retention.

to

17,” said

Hoover.

“The challenge

Transfer your notes or summarize information. Organize and rewrite your notes, make a chart, diagram or flashcards. Discuss or teach what you are learning to another person. Anytime you can interact with or think about the information in a new way you increase understanding and retention.

and

night person?

Are you a morning Can you study during your lunch hour the afternoon? Do you need to find

be productive in time after work? Setting aside a quiet, separate place in your home that will be your study place and always studying there is an effective strategy. still

ever done a budget.” Janeen Hoover, associate registrar Students must have an overall average of 80 per cent in Grade 12 courses and attained an

Ontario Secondary School Diploma. Hoover stressed that all Grade 12 courses are being looked at, advanced or general, and are considered regardless of admission requirements of any

STUDY WHEN YOU ARE AT YOUR BEST. A

some

is

students have never

ENGAGE IN ACTIVE LEARNING.

person?

not have

out for us in time. That’s

it

specific program.

“And then

to compliment that, have the Achievement Award, which is for students

we

who would

be returning to sec-

ond

third

and

said

year,”

Hoover.

SET REASONABLE STUDY GOALS.

The

After studying your effectiveness

varies

is

Award

Achievement slightly,

requiring

the

student to have an overall aver-

reduced. Take breaks often. The average attention span of an adult is approximately 30 minutes. Find your optimum attention span and study

age of 85 per cent at the end of the academic year. Both the

accordingly.

Entrance

Achievement

Award Award

and require

students to demonstrate financial need.

SKILLS THA T YOU NEED FOR LEARNING are

the

Each award’s application form requires students to detail

same skills

you have already developed by juggling multiple responsibilities: managing time, setting priorities, asking questions, and knowing yourself.

motivation

These are the

and desire

skills

to

that make learners successful.

them and the formula for success

living expenses during a typical

month.

“The challenge

valid with

any other

offer.

At participating McDonald's Restaurants

in Ontario. Offers at participating

may

MONDAY

TUESDAY

$ 169 ] Big

Mac*

show need,” Hoover

said.

vary from those shown.

Playing yourfavourites, every day of the week. McDeals every day of the week.

some

“Normally, a student should be able to

Restaurants

that

budget,” said Hoover.

is

complete. Not

is

students have never ever done a

Add

nrrsT M McChicken*

2

Cheeseburgers^

© 2001

M. FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

t Filet-O-Fish*

JA

Cheeseburger

McDonald's Restaurant of Canada limited. For the exclusive use of McDonald's Restaurants of Canada limited and

its

franchisees.


.

News

ATS By J EFF

SPOKE, September

15,

2003

— Page 17

addition costs $2.5 million

HEUCHERT

are presently holding class

in.

First-year students are current-

The ATS Engineering Complex undergoing at the Doon campus is construction to expand the building as a result of the new manufacturing degree program offered at the college this

are

The addition is being built accommodate the students in the new program. Next year, first- and secondyear students in the program will

being used for the college’s

still

Noise

from

resources the

says

at

$2.5 million and

.

that

makes a

noise will be done either

of physical College,

will result in the

and

The new addition

|

summer.

to the construction the road

link

struction

There

staff.

As

r.~ .

between parking Lots 8, 9 and 10 will be closed until the con-

two to three meeting rooms, a few specialty labs and rooms for faculty and four large classrooms,

that

into the early

Due

include

'i,.

last

20,000 square

will

'

five

throughout the entire school year

__

»

.

night or

at

building expanding approximately feet.

'If

of

lot

on the weekend,” he says. Construction began close to weeks ago and is expected to

costing

is

*

the school hours.

addi-

Corifcsloga

construction

construction

they’ve minimized the noise during

tion.

Putt, director

the

should not cause a problem for those students. Putt says, because

“Any work

David

Doon

other engineering programs.

to

new

the

campus. While construction takes place on the complex, classrooms inside

fall.

hold their classes in the

2A307,

classrooms

using

ly

2A309 and 2A311 on

is

is

a temporary

a comparison. Putt estimates

for those in

one of the new classrooms

Lots the

being built will equal in size three of the classrooms the new students

(Photo by Jeff Heuchert)

finished.

walkway

3. The addition ATS Engineering Complex at the Doon campus continued Sept. construction The year. next new manufacturing degree program will make room for students from the early the into and year school entire began close to five weeks ago and will continue through the

Construction to the

Lot 10 that leads to

and 9 and to the pathway to Services Client Student

8,

summer.

Building.

garden completes the Butterfly

cycle of Bv LESLEY Urban

sprawl has caused the

food) without the other.” Harper advises supplying wild-

for

flowers as well as traditional plants

for

for butterflies.

species.

habitats

Meadows,

instance, are disappearing, it

den. you can't have one (source of

LEACHMAN

depletion of natural

many

life

Certain types, such as the painted

making

lady,

difficult for butterflies to survive.

But, fortunately,

butterflies

are

pye-weed (Eupatorium macula-

easily enticed into urban areas. "Recreating a habitat for butter-

not only allow people to enjoy seeing them, but it may help reduce the extinction of some butterfly species," says Lynn Harper,

an employee for the nature Garden Mosaic. Butterfly gardens are simple to

41,

store,

(Spoke photo)

Conestoga students wait about 25 minutes.

in line

outside the bookstore on Sept.

5.

The

was

Conestoga paraphernalia lines the shelves

By KRISTEN

ed Conestoga College

MCMURPHY

The voices of Conestoga students have been heard. The bookstore has expanded

its

inventory to meet the requests ol

mom

and

dad sweatshirts. A wider assortment of Conestoga paraphernalia has also been added, ranging from coffee

mugs

to

back-

Mary Andraza,

supervisor of retail operations and

was

services, there last

a high

year for more selec-

tion in the clothing

and

gift section

of the bookstore.

This year, the store variety of in a

is

offering a

Conestoga College gear

“It

was

busier during

ori-

entation and registration

week.”

clothing

up

an average wait of about 25

is

minutes. “It

was busier during orientation

to

supervisor of retail operations

and campus services

store

Security staff is also at the door proper directing students to the lineups for returns and purchases.

The bookstore

the

women, infants and children. The bookstore has stocked its shelves with more items bearing

for

emblem and

has temporary staff working to keep up with the rush of or students wishing to purchase

The

main building

additions

store include a larger clothing line

the college

According to Andraza, the line-

return books.

Mary Andraza,

rainbow of colours.

New

to wait in line.

lineup.

According

campus demand

may

have

and registration week. Andraza said of the infamous bookstore

packs.

the students.

to

has includ-

In addition, the bookstore

is sell-

nursing optional general interest

ing books this year. Students interested

in

what the bookstore has

seeing to

but have

specific

require-

ments. According to Harper, your garden must be planted in the sun and have shelter from the wind.

Bookstore offers variety More

make

offer

inside

Door

ot

is

located in the

the college just

visit to

logs are a great source for flowers that may not be readily available,

says Harper.

But be aware vibrant colours may not attract butterflies. "Butterflies feed off

many

plants,

but typically exotic and cultivated as plants, like hybrid plants (such

roses or geraniums), don't ofler as much pollen as native plants, says

Sarah Coulber. the program's assistant of the Canadian Wildlife get

Foundation (CWF). plants native to your region and to the conditions your garden experi"Try

to

Coulber says certain plants must be provided for the adult butterflies larvae to lay their eggs on tor the

"The Monarch

(butterfly) will eat

as a caterpillar but other

milkweed plants must be provided adults to eat."

want

the carrots or parsnips will entice

black swallowtail. not just It is important to provide food sources but other aspects of the butterflies' habitat as

part

"Let

for

the

she says. "If you

butterflies to stay in

your gar-

w ell. r

be

of your garden

well diverse with types of plants as and as plant heights (trees, shrubs,

provide shelter." a water "Provide Coulber water source with a shallow dish of on or land to them for with pebbles

tall

grasses)

to

says.

mud

puddles which provide them

with minerals. "Another very important thing to remember is to avoid using pesticides (herbicides and insecticides). Even organic ones' can seriously

harm

sorts

all

of insects, including

butterflies.”

Harper says there

is

one

last

thing

be a butterfly gardener shouldn't without.

Coulber says providing a butteryou enjoyfly garden will give the ment. but will also complete life.

"Butterflies are important polliwe nators and without pollination,

would not have says.

(caterpillars) to feed off.

hirta).

Vegetable patches can also attract female butterflies. For example,

cycle of

ences."

1

Business hours are Monday to Thursday 8:30 a.m. until 8 p.m.. until and on Friday from 8:30 a.m.

4 p.m.

your local garden cenyou with most of provide will tre catathe plants you need and seed

"A

(Rudbeckia

susan-»

black-eyed

and

turn)

flies will

average wait tor students

require thistles to lay their joe-

eggs while others feed from

that

fruit to eat.

"Some people

we

she

also recognize

can't just turn wildlife habilawns, and (they) are try-

tats into

garden ing to return parts of their of into a habitat for all sorts wildlife."


Page 18

— SPOKE, September

Entertainment

2003

15,

Monster duo comes together By HALLEY MCPOLIN

disappoint

either

fan

base.

Besides a little too much history on a supporting character that

Caution: prerequisites for seeing

most of the audience would deem

this film are required.

unnecessary,

In order to get a full appreciation

there

much

isn’t

vs.

more

a fan could ask for in this

Jason, the latest instalment of both

film.

Robert Englund does a won-

Nightmare on Elm Street and Friday the 13th series, one should be either a) one hardcore Freddy fan or b) one devoted Jason nut. The movie, which made an impressive $36 million (US) during weekend, has been its opening described as gory, hollow, silly and

derful job reprising his role as

for surprise

summer

hit

Freddy

the

overindulgent.

Many

Freddy who, more entertaining always manages

Veteran Jason actor Kane Hodder has been replaced by Ken Kirzinger (who was actually the stunt co-ordinator in Friday the

movie monsters, while agreeing with these statements, would also argue that this is exactly what they

Manhattan)

were hoping for. Krueger and Jason Freddy Voorhees have grown into modernday Dracula and Frankenstein legends of their time. So, it’s no sur-

Monica Keena does

13th

the

with a brief

by Freddy himself,

who

not too

is

pleased with his present situation.

Wes

Ignoring

New

Craven’s

Nightmare (1994), as it really hasn’t got much to do with the actual series, not a peep has been heard from the claw-wielding villain since Freddy’s Dead: The Final Nightmare (1991). He’s been stuck purgatory stewing in his rage over his being forgotten

in a hellish

own

(Internet photo)

Freddy

vs.

Jason

is

this

summer’s surprise

hit at

the box office. credit

said aloud in fear of stirring old

crasher, Jason Voorhees.

make up

nightmares.

By manipulating the masked madman with the machete, Freddy

and a

has

An

MCPO LIN

organization

the residents of Elm Street, the name Freddy Krueger has become

nothing more than a whisper

dark - a

name

Deep

that should never

be

of Hades,

void

the

in

in the

Freddy decides he must find a way to remind people of his existence. Once the fear returns, so can he. Unfortunately, Freddy can’t do it

author Jane Urquhart. This

is

the

year One Book, One Community has taken place and, according to one of the organizers, Tricia Siemens in an interview with the Kitchener Record,

second

“The whole idea

is

to get

community interested reading and out to the

the

discussing

No

novel.

who

Urquhart,

is

regains return to

the

Elm

power he needs Street

.

.

.

to

but there’s

only one problem: Jason is having too much fun and is now taking the

Freddy so richly deserves. Now he and Jason must battle for supremacy, and what a battle it will be!

The it

movie

is

doesn't take itself too seriously.

It

best thing about this

incorporates

flick,

still

a

all

classic

factors

that

Freddy/Jason

including blood, gore, nudity lot of cheesy dialogue, while

managing

to pull of

some

hint

even travels from Elm during the course of the film so as not to

of a plot. Street to

It

Camp Crystal Lake

box

1

office for almost three

weeks. Yes,

and yes,

it’s silly

it’s

more funny than frightening, but famed Hong Kong director Ronny Yu (The Bride with White Hair) manages to balcertainly

ance these elements so perfectly you can’t help but appreciate

that

.

it.

Freddy

Jason

vs.

recommended

is

definitely

Freddy and they can handle

to both

Jason fans and. if it, the general public - baring in

mind

the

R

rating of course.

Great

novels

The Whirlpool, Away

Jane Urquhart, a Canadian author, has wrote

five nationally-cele-

brated novels including

The

Whirlpool,

andproduct design,

Conestoga College

The

Underpainer and Away. and The Underpainer - all of which have received international awards

-

will

novel,

be reading from her latest

The Stone

(Photo by Darren Smith)

Carvers.

New security system

In response to the expected demand, local libraries and bookstores have stocked up on copies of

Cora Yackobeck, from

the book.

tional in

Peter Findlay,

who

Staff

from

Toman

security,

may be

hard to see but she

Contractors work on the

new parking

of the trade while

art

those aspects of the

novel during the event. the

key characters

(in the

“Some

of

woodcarvers,” says Findlay. “The

whole idea

is

to get the

community

747-8733 or look online www.therecord.com/onebook. For information about Jane Urquhart’s The Stone Carvers, go to www.mcclelland.com.

discussing books.” For more information about the

event, call at

with

Alistair

it

should be opera-

Got a hot news tip?

book) are

meet

Last year nearly 7,000 members of the community assembled to

that

a few days.

Call

Spoke

interested in reading and out to the

favourite

enforces the $4 a day parking fee.

teaches mate-

libraries,

their

still

system and say

and product design at Conestoga College, will be displaying his own woodcarvings and

success can be attributed to the rare opportunity for readers to authors.

lot

rials

interpreting

Peter Findlay, faculty in mate-

along

the

at the

responsible for

nationally-celebrated

discussing the

books.”

read

The film’s strength is drawn from the nostalgic loyalty of the fans, which explains why a movie

One Book

for

MacLeod’s

book-reading session at the Waterloo Memorial Recreation Complex featuring Canadian

with

and

Mischief.

On Sept. 26, One Book, One Community will be holding a

rials

Lori

member

dedicated to

same page.”

libraries,

but dissolved and to the

all

including

promoting reading among adults is inviting Waterloo Region to gather together and “get on the

in

power

result, his

people of Springwood, including

five

By HALLEY

a fine job in

of heroine

role

of this nature could be number

by himself - he needs an errand boy to help him with his dirty work ... at least until he’s strong enough to finish the job. So, Freddy sets his sights on the most obvious person: the seemingly indestructible, notorious Camp Crystal Lake party

by the world. As a

Community gathers Canadian author gets promoted by local group

Takes match

friend Kia.

testify the

film begins

better

Kelly Rowland makes an appearance as

almost as long as their franchises

The

to

Destiny’s Child

prise that the anticipation of these

recap of the ghoul’s pasts, as told

Jason

VIII:

Freddy’s small frame and to give Jason a more “sympathetic” look. Brittany Murphy look-alike

two horror icons duking it out on the big screen has been around for began competing - and fans will movie has been a long time coming.

point,

this

at

to pull off a witty

quip.

of the

fans

threatening

than

at ext.

3691


)

SPOKE, September

Sports

and use fish. “With

By DESIREE FINHERT more humane

ning, said

May

Doon

May

drink a beer,

is

out

cast

something

sit

down

to

pump

from spin

differs

in a boat,

May

said

class

at

Oldfield said, she would like to students want in gener-

know what

which

bait

tishei to are eating. This allows the

mimic the natural food source when choosing a fly. As May said,

30

e-mails for course proposals. "Is there something I’m missing that s

fishing.

before casting

ft.

it

into

you against the fish." However, May is against this technique, saying if you don’t know how to use the pump you can

working on the winter schedule which must be completed by Sept. 19.

who

the

Continuing education Alexander McLean, 51, said he has fished for years and this course is an extension of what he already

hurt the fish.

“How would you feel if I stuck a pump down your throat and pulled who out what you eat?" said May,

before

said

(Internet

part

hardest

the

The

about running the con-ed courses is the resources. find trying to

is

Currently she is trying to locate a for the vocal lessons that

may

some good habits some bad habits,”

to learn

1

learn

is

run

problem

the winter. Another the lack of storage at the

in

is

“Everyone

has

their

haul

to

By JASON SMITH year has begun for the

A new

Conestoga Condors and

all

ot the

are college’s varsity sports teams

hoping

team made

game and the varsity hockey the playoffs by a sinmissed team Women's softball and point.

close

with familiar faces, as

women’s

numerous new ones, the nearby fields and the Kenneth E. Hunter Recreation Centre were

playoffs.

with energy, enthusiasm and

hope.

Classroom doors squeaked open

The

bronze championships

Students have been vying for softspots on the school’s rugby,

season.

and men's hock-

ey teams.

Many

cuts

have already been

made and many of be finalized by

the rosters will

the

end

of this

week. Marlene Ford, Conestoga s athdoesn't letic director, said she exactly what to expect this forward to see-

know

year, but she looks

ing

it

all

“It’s

year,”

said

some returning

“We’ve got players on each team, but by looktryouts, ing at the students out for there’s

some

ish

in

their

inaugural

it

potential for

all

of our

teams to do well this year. Although our faithful Condors witnessed a good stream of success to last year, everyone is hoping

was very

want

come

Conestoga's athletic department. hoping they do well

“We’re again."

will

great look to improve on last year s 17/ showing, beginning on Sept. season regular when the new •

improve as always. The 2002-2003 school year saw Conestoga’s male indoor soccer

The men’s soccer season will women's begin on Sept. 15 and our to busisoccer team will get down ness on Sept. 16.

compete in a golt Conestoga Sept. tournament on Sept. 16 and are tryouts badminton 17 and will

expected to begin during the week of September or the

week of

An

last first

October.

official date will

the rec centre.

be posted

just

begun and

If things are already healing up. you’re a sports fan or just simpl\

who successful for us,” said Ford, with experience of has eight years

The Condors rugby team

inter-

.

The year has

a big surprise to the

college last year but

Anyone

is contact hockey or ball hockey, encouraged- to sign up at the tec Oct. centre between Oct. 13 and

22

“They were

Wed. Oct. 22 5:00pm Co-ed Basketball Oct. 13-22 Wed. Oct. 22 5:00pm Non Contact Hockey Oct. 13-22 Wed. Oct. 22 5:00pm Ball Hockey Oct. 13-22 Wed. Oct. 22 5:00pm

co-ed ested in registerirfg to play nonvolleyball, co-ed basketball,

begins.

unfold.

different every

Ford.

and touch football.

fought hard and proud to finwin the in third place and medal at the provincial

of Conestoga’s varsity teams were already under way.

ball. soccer, golf,

Intramurals will begin on Sept. with co-ed slo-pitch baseball

16

Experience might not have been waron their side, but the rugged riors

eral

varsity sports however.

in

Condors the form of the first-ever rugby team.

each Sept. 2. sending shivers up sevfor tryouts but spine, student’s

REGISTRATION/SIGN-UP CAPTAINS MEETING Co-ed Volleyball Oct. 13-22

The excitement doesn't end with

came

Sept. 10)

ACTIVITY

run.

missed the

surprise of the year

ended

SESSION #2

Cressman, leads the team into batlong playoff tle, and hopefully, a

gle

well as

filled

to the quarter-finals

soccer also

face Studio. Some con-ed courses cancellation when public demand is unavailable. is low or equipment

(Registration for Session #1

hockey team

games beginning on Sept. 26. These games will most likely be cuts used to make the team’s final new head coach, Dave as

lost a of the playoffs where they

to fly high.

filled

it

varsity

two people registered because it is Glass taught at Blown Away

exhibition will take to the ice with

placing third in the provincial championships. The men’s soccer

As the doors opened to ring in halls the new school year and were

The Condors

after

photo

Conestoga College Grand River.

Intramural sports schedule

Condors are aiming to soar team win the bronze medal

10 hours

Other courses like Introduction to Glass Blowing will run with only

college.

a Stratford

Festival property manager.

at con-ed fly fishing course being offered the on time and includes practical

sewing machines in every week, said Oldfield about the sewing classes running this September.

keyboard

McLean, who

said

his catch prefers to research what

is

Oldfield

student,

knows. “I want

asks Oldfield,

cool and current?

water.

“It’s

courses and will receive

al interest

This means the fisher will cast the line behind and forward repeatedly until the line is approximately

fish’s to extract the contents of a fish the insects what see stomach to

Grand River and

he hopes to teach the Conestoga again next

spring.

weight of the

and not the

'time on the

tical

happen"

In fly fishing the

catch-anduse a

currently 10 hours, including prac-

bobber and wail tor

a

but interesting as who is cur-

include belly dancing, embroidery, and public speaking. The con-ed fly fishing course is

more

lot

line is cast

fly fishers will

a lot

first

said Oldfield,

working on the 2004 winter may which selection course

of people get bored with do spin fishing because what they

“A

release sport."

Some

is

money.

rently

years.

May, who works for the Ministry ol Ontario Resources’ Natural lot of “A program. Stewardship a

“Education .well,”

challenging than spin fishing and has been teaching the sport lor 10

is not skilled in landing a fish there said a lot of stress put on the fish,

as

are quality lor

in lhe.area.

said fly fishing

Conestoga

the courses offered at

a fish

and natural predators

a fly the fish

hooked superficially. "The majority of fly fishers use a create barbless hook, which do not you’re il and injury, an as much of

it

courses for the college's four campuses and thinks it is important that

happy including factors like water temperature, brightness, oxygen, rocks, depth

what makes

are

people treat

pop-

teaches his class to find

ulated fishing areas by instructing them how to think like a fish and

the second year run-

when using

is

on."

Former Grand River Troutl itter’s guide Steve May, 36, who is teachfor

going

Oldfield works year round putting educationcontinuing together

you are

fishing

fly

Gillian

Program administrator

to attract that

always looking for what

pas-

fishing instructor.

ing fly fishing at Conestoga’s

mimic

a

cals

ply fishing lime than other fishing and hunting fly spoi ls says Conestoga College’s

campus

— Page

offers fun alternative to fishing

Conestoga a

2003

a unique pastime

Fly fishing is

15,

at

support your Condors, out and cheer on our guys

to

and gals. Ford and the Conestoga athletics department want to remind all stuno dents that there is absolutely to charge to Conestoga students teams. varsity the watch any of You may be surprised that you 11

recognize a

lot

of the faces on the

the field, court, or ice as

same

that

walkyou see in the classroom or daily a on hallways ing down the basis.

“We’ve got a lot of home games coming up in September and October,” said Ford.

SESSION #3 ACTIVITY

REGISTRATION/SIGN-UP CAPTAINS MEETING Co-ed

Wed.

Volleyball Jan. 5

Jan. 14

5:00pm

Wed. Jan. Co-ed Indoor Soccer Jan. 5 14 14 5:00pm Jan. 14 Non Contact Hockey Jan. 5-14 Wed.

“So come and cheer (the Condors) on and hopefully we’ll here have some playoff games October as well.

in

-14

Contact 748-5220,

ext.

3452

for

more

information


Page 20

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Digital Edition - September 15, 2003