Page 1

Cross-Canada marathon man Rick

Casey

will

Clean out those lockers! Students are reminded to empty

be

their lockers before

they leave.

biking across

the country to raise

These students

awareness about mental illnesses.

experience at

Monday,

2003

April 21,

like

it

hot

Pre-service firefighters get practical fire

department.

Conestoga College, Kitchener

34th Year

— No.

14

Students claim sexual harassment Unhappy By AIMEE WILSON

Two

victims of sexual harassment. teel they have been pushed aside by the college. Victoria and Jasmine (pseudo-

with college sellor acts as a resource,” she said. In any type of case, if the student

responsibilities,

to

respond.

to

is

willing to take the next step and involve a third party, they will be

receive a copy of the response. From here, the co-ordinator is sup-

there to assist them. According to

posed to meet with both parties and reach a resolution.

nyms), said they have been sexu-

Victoria and Jasmine, the counsellor called back to check up on the

ally harassed since January.

situation.

“Since January there have been three girls that have been continually harassing us,” they said,

adding, “Almost every day they have offensive things to say to or about us," they said. The girls said they have been called “hoes,”

“whores,” “bitches,” and “sluts.” Jasmine and Victoria also said rumours have been spread about them and the harassers have even tried to stop their friends from being around them. Although Conestoga College has a human rights policy, Justin Falconer, Conestoga Students Incorporated vice-president of

response

to

Stage 4 only occurs

is no Other would get involved to

resolution

Once more, the girls went back human resources for a second

attempt. This time, the girls spoke to

and asked The victim then gets

Debra

Croft, director,

human

“We

resources.

suspected that she had already made her decision about what she was and wasn’t

going to do about the problem. She looked as though she was distracted or had better things to deal with

parties

after

which

report

allows

days of meeting with both parties, is made by a vice-

president.

wouldn’t want the students to think they weren’t heard or it wasn’t important, I

when we

talked to her,” they said. Croft said she gave the girls two

suggestions on how to deal with the situation. The girls could either approach the harassers verbally or in writing and explain they were

upon

infringing

the

social

because Debra

stan-

As of now, the have not yet met with the harassers and have yet to write a

policy at the college for students

letter.

who

“We have not spoken to them one-on-one because we were

didn’t

fall

the

human

never in a controllable or stable

According

enough environment, although we have said to them indirectly to

include matters

told

them the

situation, they told

us

times,” they said. Croft

also said she

had given the

girls a

copy of the student procedures guide to refer to. She also suggested the girls see Catherine Koch,

deal with students, only faculty.”

on

plaint

girls

to

file

a com-

March

28.

resources to

Unfortunately, the response they

received wasn't what they were

hoping to

for.

them

"When we

explained

the situation, they told us

name

to

a

few. Croft said she only deals with

sexually harassment cases based on those grounds. “It was still an issue I felt it was important to be

resources with the inten-

In the

Conestoga College human

rights policy 2002,

it

outlines four

resolution

Stage

1

take individual action. states

is

the

informal and

it

Gregory also reinforced harassers

one-on-one,

states to

involve a third party.

person causing the problem to stop. Stage 2, also informal,

that the

students were either to meet with the

the victim should ask the

It

now almost

is

and the

or

girls still feel

ordinator. This occurs if the prob-

was very concerned about the situation and they have no com-

lem has not been resolved

us," they said, adding, "It

with her. Together, they looked through the student hand-

been made, the victim should know within five days if the complaint will be pursued under the policy. If the complaint is followed, the harasser will be given a copy of the complaint, as well as being informed of their rights and

They went

to a counsellor in

involves assistance. This

Student Services and explained

victim

the

harasser. Stage 3

situation

According

step-by-step.

to the victims, the part-

time counsellor

who

they spoke to

plaints

book but

after speaking with the

counsellor they ing

still felt

like noth-

was accomplished. According

Carol Gregory, a counsellor with Student Services, “A counto

ten

is

is if

the

unable to confront the

is a formal writcomplaint to the policy co-

Stage

2.

plaint has

Once

the

after

formal com-

Falconer. Therefore, by switching

the response.

makes us

confused and wonder why those girls chose to focus on us."

The students say harassment

ijj

the sexual

persists, they plan

on

involving a third party. Overall, their

initial

impression on

they were dealt with fying.

to a customer,

Conestoga Students Incorporated

Spoke or CJIQ

was

how

unsatis-

any potential bias

is

removed. Currently, the donation

(CSI) has decided not to donate

money

is

made

2003-2004 school year. “We want to go from a donation

exchange for the insertion of advertising in the paper. However, if ads are not booked, the money is

relationship to a pay-per-use rela-

still

to

tionship,”

Justin

said

for the

Falconer,

28, the

CSI executives

voted unanimously that they would not donate $15,000 to Spoke and

$10,000

to

CJIQ

in the past. "It's

ing

it

away,

different

as they have

in

guaranteed.

CSI has been given four weeks

make

vice-president of academics.

On March month later unhappy with

a

Both girls have been affected deeply by this. “One of the main ways it has impacted us is that we have begun to hate the fact that we have to come to school and pay to be harassed by people who don't know a single thing about

counsellor.

By AIMEE WILSON

think they weren’t heard or

process.

The policy

CSI alters funding of Spoke, CJIQ

dealt with," said Croft, adding, “I

approaching the harassers.

students, only faculty,” they said.

resources told them to speak to a

involving race,

and gender,

Conestoga Students Incorporated has decided that they will not donate $15,000 to Spoke and $10,000 to CJIQ next year.

policy.

these areas

tion of

that basically they don’t deal with

human

rights Croft,

human

in

to the victims,

to

they were never told to talk to the

The

however, said they never

steps

According

religion

under the protection of

chair.

girls,

file

take those allega-

tions seriously,” said Croft.

Falconer directed the

(Photo by Aimee Wilson)

matter

the

felt

received the procedures guide and

“We do

a report.

human

,

wouldn’t want the students to it wasn’t important, because it is.” Croft said she had gotten the impression the girls had left

chair of school of business, to

Victim of abuse

is.”

it

Croft,

human resources

director

Croft said she

many

stop

that basically they don’t

and

a final decision

girls

“When we

An

written

is

victim

the

dards of conduct.

by sex-

3.

harasser to comment. Within 10

one outlined specifically for students. “There is no clearly written are adversely affected

there

investigate the circumstances.

investigation

academics, feels there needs to be

ual harassment.”

if

Stage

done

to

a final decision whether or

not to provide funding for Spoke

next year.

“We

have

concerns,”

said

Christina Jonas, co-ordinator of the

not like we're tak-.

journalism-print and broadcast pro-

coming

gram. adding, "We feel that the CSI’s funding of Spoke is money

it’s

just

way,"

said

in a

Falconer,

adding, "It's coming as a customer,

well-spent.

not a donator."

to reach every college student at all

According to Falconer, CSI doeswant to be seen as controlling what Spoke puts in its articles.

five campuses providing a great forum for a CSI message.” Jonas

Falconer said as a donator, there

they have dealt with this issue.

n't

is

always the chance of bias entering stories or swaying the opinion of writers.

"You

can't put 20-year-old

students in charge of thousands of dollars to

and expect they don't want how’

influence

reputation

is

their

personal

portrayed."

said

Spoke has

the potential

also said that this isn't the

Falconer agrees

first

time

paper

the

important for the school.

“It

is

pro-

vides the truth to students." he said,

adding,

"It's

a very important sen-

encourage a customer relationship." Continued on Page 2 ice.

I

just w'ant to


— SPOKE,

Page 2

News

April 21

Clean out your lockers MORLEY

By JEFF

ends, Conestoga stu-

As school

dents break for the

summer to work

or travel and have fun. However, many students don't clean out their lockers before they leave.

Last year Conestoga staff spent a week cutting locks and cleaning out lockers. Head of Security

full

Services, A1 Hunter, said that 479 lockers were cleaned out and 135

had personal property only staff,

for

students can also lose a sig-

amount of

nificant

Security

(Photo by Aimee Wilson)

them. Not

in

week of work

a full

is it

property.

Services has removed

textbooks, projects, clothing, tools and sometimes moldy lunch bags.

New

technology a plus

Bv AIMEE WILSON

vehicles

the

is

mounted

in

between the driver and passenger

may have

noticed sev-

Ministry of Transportation

eral

Emissions Vehicle and Enforcement Unit vehicles parked outside the college on April 10.

seats.

It

consists of a wireless lap-

top computer and

printer,

which

allow the transportation officer to access any information regarding the driver

when

they

make

“This technology

difference.”

transportation enforcement

Alkema.

were giving

graduating

presentations to

stu-

dents of the police foundations and LASA programs on the new state-of-the-art

If

anything

ordinary, the

officer

ministries

equipment newly

is

computer

out of the

will bring

it

up immediately. This ensures the officer’s safety and to make sure they

are

identifying

the

correct

people.

For example,

if

the driver pres-

ents a false identification, the

com-

installed in the vehicles.

puter will alert the officer.

“This new technology will make a difference.” said Harry Alkema, transportation enforcement officer

According to Alkema, other ministries and police officers have been using this same kind of wire-

and enforcement

The

project

is

less

business analyst.

called

The Road

Users Safety System Renewal. The new technology installed

ers.

“Ontario has the safest

shockproof.

“Ontario has the safest roads in North America,” said Alkema. This is mainly because Ontario enforces strict road regulations and laws. “When you’re on the safe,”

In

technology for about five

The

to

he said. September,

know

you’re

Career Services

wireless system has only

been developed for the Ministry of

-

all

ministry

of

the

new technology

installed

in

them.

Room 2B04

Woodworking Engineering Technology 3rd year students and graduThe Production Manager of Shawwood Industries located in Nova Scotia,

turer of solid pine

RTA

furniture

2003.

Shawwood

Industries

is

a manufac-

and they are currently the exclusive supplier

to

IKEA in North America. If you are interested in obtaining further information on 12 noon in this company, please attend the Information Session scheduled at resume! your bring Please Centre. Rooms W9 and W10 at the Woodworking a Summer, Part-time or Full-Time Job? - Remember to check out workopolisCampus.com - the Web site employers are posting job opportunities Looking

on

for

charities.

that

is

much of it is donated to Clothing goes to the

Salvation Army,

while textbooks

To obtain further information or the "Access Code" into

our

office.

for this

Web

site,

please

come

school

is

the

host to

students

lockers in the

Hunter

are reassigned

semester.

fall

reminder

a

that

said

notice will be on the overhead for the week of exams in the hopes that will clean out their

more students lockers.

Student Services to help out those

their property.”

“We

hate to see students lose

Meetings to be held to address funding issues Continued from Page

lege’s radio station.

1

and CSI are in up any misunderstandings and con-

Falconer said CSI will buy air time on CJIQ for advertisements. CSI also plans to install a DJ booth

cerns both parties have.

inside the Sanctuary over the sum-

As for CJIQ, an agreement was made between the radio station and CSI four years ago when the radio

mer. If plans go through, Falconer

of

Osborne said they will cover the money lost by selling commercials. “We’re getting more and more

Further meetings between Spoke

was

to clear

in the initial stages

According

to

Paul

said the booth will be used in col-

laboration with CJIQ.

well-known,” he

Since the

said.

as a surprise.

station is for educational purposes,

“We’ve always had a working relationship with them (CSI),” said

CJIQ cannot market through traditional ways due to CRTC regula-

Osborne.

tions.

According

come

to Falconer,

when

the

was in the production stage, CSI president at that time

station

the

agreed to donate $40,000 to get the station

up-and-running.

At

“We’re always open

new and

CSI didn’t have the money for a lump sum, therefore an agreement was made that $10,000 would

time,

be given over four years. The $10,000 each year was used to cover start-up costs, which con-

to

exciting projects

that they (CSI) have.”

the

Paul Osborne,

CJIQ manager Osborne

said they will continue

sisted of equipment, the building of

encourage CSI to use air-time. “We’re always open to new and

CJIQ

exciting projects that they (CSI)

the studio and rental space.

space for its transmitter antennae on the Global TV tower in Paris, Ont. CJIQ has a partner-

just for you!

through-

is static

summer. However,

the

out

go to the CSI to sell again. Things, such as calculators, are given to

rents -

think the college

however space is limited. property the For

all

April 24,

students that are disadvantaged. Hunter says that some students

new

Osborne, manager of CJIQ, the agreement has expired and this

Events:

be on campus Thursday,

will

they leave for the summer.

returning

decision didn’t

ates.

to clean out their lockers before

property for as long as possible,

production.

Attention

ices,

moved or gone back home. Security Services will hold onto

already

station

Upcoming

head of security servwants to remind students

Al Hunter,

many summer programs and is quite busy. As a result, locker space has to be made and

many of them have

the works

transportation vehicles will have

years.

in

Alkema, it costs According $10,000 to install one wireless system in a vehicle. The equipment is both waterproof and to

road, you want

it.

who owns

Staff then tries to track the stu-

unclaimed,

North America.” Alkema

standing offences, etc. “Everyone has a record,” said

Harry Alkema,

The two

In the near future, photos will also be accessible on the comput-

in

property and determine dents down, but

the last three years.

roads

says

officer

police

retired

that his staff tries to identify the

Transportation and the Vehicle Emissions Enforcement Unit in

the

transportation officer to bring up information on the driver’s licence plates, the driver’s profile, any out-

will

The

a stop.

The new technology enables

make a

a lot of

took out an almost new camcorder.

Computers provide driver information Students

(Photo by Jeff Morley)

books that are still that in the wrapper and tool kits have not even been opened.” Hunter also said that a year and a half ago staff opened a locker and

“We find

ship with the is

CBC

and the money

also used to cover any annual

maintenance

CBC does for the col-

to

have,” he said.

According to Falconer, the debate whether or not to donate to Spoke

and CJIQ lasted for

The money came from the

six

weeks.

for both

donations

student fee budget.


News

SPOKE,

— Page 3

2003

April 21,

Wall retires after

almost 28 years here By NICK HORTON At a time when the world is full uncertainty and problems are

of

arising

faster

nice to have

you

at ease,

then

solutions,

it’s

someone around to put even if it does mean a

practical joke or two.

Liberal

studies

geography professor Bob Wall is one of these people.

Unfortunately,

and faculty

come September.

After working at Conestoga College for almost 28

Many

(Photo by Diana O'Neill)

Rick Casey, a disability services counsellor at the college, is planning on biking across raise awareness of the support needed by people with mental

Canada

to

illnesses.

ment

has a real strong commit-

what he calls an open door He wants to make sure stu-

to

policy.

know

dents

their

approachable,

Journey of awareness College counsellor to ride across By DIANA O’NEILL mere 20 days, Rick Casey plans on riding a bike across In a

of the

was initially left out decision making because she

was

technically

that the family

1

Canada. Accompanying him on the long journey will be his daughter’s stuffed animal. Penguin. Casey, a Conestoga College disability services counsellor, has decided to cycle across Canada to

considered

an

was we had

to

Barb Kraler, Student Services

“The end

result

wait until she was so very ill that we were appointed her decision

own

makers. Then through our

we

resources,

man-

acted as case

agers to find her the appropriate

Casey

“We

support,”

needed by people with mental

encountered barriers in the system

The 50-year-old

journey

his

May 4

Victoria,

in

ill-

will begin

B.C., on

of

to coincide with the start

said, adding,

delayed getting Kyla

that further

As Casey and

his family

day as part his incredible 8,000-

fessional help at the earliest stages

kilometre trip across the country.

of diagnosis in order to stabilize

due

in

a personal one,

is

sense in the

part to find

untimely death of

my

daughter,” he

through the complex system,

one, due

sense

in

in

death of

is

a personal

part to find

the untimely

my

daughter.”

Rick Casey, disability services counsellor

In September 2001, 19-year-old Kyla Anne Casey died from a pul-

monary embolism while she was a patient

Shortly

I

in

a

mental her

after

health

16th

unit.

birthday

vital

the disorder

from

it

was

and attempt

through

this

part

we were running

of the

into polit-

Casey's self-described journey of "hope and healing” shows his conviction in finding meaning in his family's tragic loss. With the endorsement of the Canadian Mental Health Association (CHMA), Casey is ready to begin at

various

will

branches along his route. “If

we do

for the

schizophrenia.

port."

need of community sup-

he said, adding,

"we

will

never develop services to support

tered

many bumps in the road of mental health care system. When Kyla was first diagnosed, her

those

the

access to the best treatment this

was unable their community

family

to find support

in

to assist in giv-

who

are

ill

and deserve

country can provide."

Casey on his

will

own

be relying primarily resources,

which

ing her accessible treatment. This

include cost for his equipment,

became

fare

further complicated

by

Kyla's age at the time. Casey said

friendly faces every

kilometres or so

humour have made life for the around him much less

people

stressful.

much

as

time laugh-

ing in this office as anything else,” said sociology professor Geoff

Johnstone.

“He

rude, he

is

loud and that’s

is

he

is

obnoxious, he

why

I

love him,”

said.

Shadd shares a similar opinion. “You can tease him, you can ride him, and he

He

you.

II

always come back

said.

contributions

to

Conestoga include more than

just

teaching. He just finished his term as chief steward of the union and

has previously been on the governing Board of Directors at the college.

Wall is known for being ready for anything and preparing things ahead of time. “Bob is the type of guy that if he

Although Wall is retiring, there is hope he will come back to

still

teach part-time.

he would like to, hopehe does,” said Johnstone.

"I think

fully

“All I know is, whatever he does decide to do, you won’t be able to find him. He is going to be in over his head and then start digging his way up and once he does that, look out,” said

Shadd.

80

...”

tion.”

With

of

help

the

Student

"My

air-

hope is to have friendly faces every 80 kilometres and food.

house for Casey’s cycle across Canada on April 17 at the college. She expressed how vital it is that the college show support for what Casey is attempting. “He’s a dad, a social worker and an advocate for a

(Photo by Nick Horton)

Social Services co-ordinator Madeleine Poynter

Queen’s Golden Jubilee Medal awarded

By NICK Conestoga

Casey has a positive vision of

HORTON College

being

hope and healing.

Ontario for five straight years

awareness that those persons with a mental illness need and deserve better treatment and to raise funding for comto raise

munity supports and services highon the political agenda.

er

some small way

this ride will

serve to reduce the stigma often associated w'ith those with a mental

ill-

ness and cause people to reflect on

how we then

I

treat

w'ill

mechanism

those

who

be happy. for

are different,

If

it

increased

creates a

govern-

isn’t

the

a

No.

receiving

college

faculty

a

is

in

Queen’s

a

Golden Jubilee Medal.

On

March

her

Poynter,

co-ordinator of social

Conestoga College, received the award, which is in commemoration Queen of Elizabeth II's Golden Jubilee. It services

at

was created

to

mark

the

50th

anniversary of the accession of

Her Majesty 6.

1952.

It

to the throne is

who have made tribution to nity.

awarded

on Feb.

to those

a significant con-

Canada,

their

commu-

or to their fellow Canadians.

Poynter was awarded the medal for her significant contribution to

YWCA

of Canada for four and volunteers on the national and local level. She received the award in the the

years

March 28. much of the

mail ing

Madeleine

28.

ment funding.

better than she received."

1

nor

fluke,

member

Who knows

I would be ecstatic. w here this will lead." he said, adding. "The selfish part for me is that 1 w ill have had time to grieve the loss of a daughter w ho deserved

off

volunteering. She has been on the board of directors of

named

is

shows

volunteer work.

community

w'hy this will truly be a journey of

“One reason

for

Poynter awarded medal

personal dream that has turned into

at

has a quick tongue,” he

Casey

“If in

not raise the awareness

encoun-

family

Wall’s practical jokes and sense

of

have

to

a real awareness campaign.”

some of the psychotic symptoms of his

is

ments.”

He

Casey and

“My hope

Services, Kraler organized an open

CHMA

mood swings-and

went on to say he sees Wall not only as a friend, but also as a role model.

maybe a family won’t same posi-

boundary issues between ministries and the cutbacks in the health-care system were so evident,” he said, adding, “This appeared to be worse in the mental health field due to its low priority in terms of funding by both the provincial and federal govern-

be speaking out

a form of mental illness that

studies

it.

“All

his trek across the country.

includes severe

Charles.

liberal

to recover

Kyla had been diagnosed with It's

Anne

said

find themselves in the

to receive pro-

bipolar/schizo-affective

disorder.

adding, “So

health-care

ical

“My journey

dearly

He

Dwayne Shadd. Shadd

such as anger and loss, towards something good,” she said,

only became more evi-

it

how

ordeal,

said.

be

will

is

said liberal studies profes-

Wall’s

better,”

professor

tions,

were led

dent

journey

thinks it’s extremely important that Casey embarks on this healing journey. “I have so much respect for the fact that he is channeling all these different emocounsellor,

sor

he

professor

stuff for

help.”

Canada’s mental health week. The Paris, Ont. native aims on travelling an average of 80 kilometres a

“My

or so, that will listen to my story not to mention offer me encouragement.”

adult.

increase awareness of the support

nesses.

Canada

missed,

get

“We spend

miss Wall’s commitment to the college and his students, along with his honesty and unique sense of humor.

his

already done.

is

has great integrity and a desire to

is retiring.

will

Bob

December because September

students

will see his face less

years. Wall

were coming back next year, he would be working on his stuff for

“I

at first not think-

envelope.

didn't recognize the enve-

lope. so

Soon

I

didn't open

after.

it

for a day.”

Poynter realized the

envelope contained more than she I had package and was very surprised. I had not know n I had been nominated." During the fall semester of 2001. Poynter took a sabbatical from her job at the college and volunteered for the of Kitchener- Waterloo as the staff co-ordinator of their Week Without Violence campaign.

first

believed. "I thought

better see

what

is

in this

YWCA


Page 4

— SPOKE,

April 21,

Commentar

2003

Ban cosmetic pesticides that harm our health and Pesticides are dangerous chemicals Canada have recogacross municipalities environment. Many pesticide use against action nized this fact, and started to take Products Ac Control Pest the updated The federal government theregisup tightening and taking children into consideration t does not go the a£ However, for pesticides.

,

tration process

be banned in Canada. enough. Cosmetic pesticides need to in Toronto last week up The debate over pesticides heated to ban pesticide use bylaw a proposed health when its board of on lawns bv June 2005. ,

Toronto

is

direction.

A

this health-conscious not the only city to move in states May 2002 Natural Life Magazine article

Canada have banned cosmetic almost 40 municipalities across in T 0Va Halifax^utmouth of municipality l pesticides. The Que. Hudson, 2000. in Scotia passed a pesticide ban bylaw

when

Canadian town to prohibit pesticide use, tor banning residents from using chemicals bylaw a passed entire the that seems it Now esthetic purposes in 1991. announced last year has followed suit, since Quebec

was

it

the first

province

pesticides in all day-care facilities, by 2003. Pesticides will not be property public schools and permitted on private green space by 2005. to ban pestiThese governments did not arbitrarily decide cause health problems Pesticides reason. good had they cides For example, according to the that

it

would ban chemical

and wildlife. methyl Club of Canada’s Web site, www.sierraclub.ca workplace to due deaths bromide was responsible for many

CNtVs 2*-H0Uft NEVU COVERft^t

for our citizens

time for tolerance

Sierra

to 10 per cent of the exposure. This chemical also caused five world’s ozone depletion. out by 2001. 1 he Fortunately, Canada phased this toxin

cancer, lymphoma and childSierra Club’s site also said breast been linked to pesticide have hood leukemia and brain cancer Cancer Institute in National the from study use. According to a and garden, home the the U.S., when pesticides are used in childhood get to likely more times six children are up to

leukemia.

.

a government committee found sound evidence to outJuly 2000 article from Natural Life law cosmetic pesticides. said a federal Commons Standing Committee on Environmental and Sustainable Development recommended new cosmetic pesticides should not be registered, while current

Even

A

ones should be de-registered. So, when the government updated the pesticide act last March, why didn’t they take the committee’s recommendation to ban cosmetic pesticides? In a Natural Life article from May 2002, the environment minister stated that banning pesticides one. That’s a is a provincial and municipal power, not a federal cop-out. If the government had the authority to ban methyl bromide, then it can ban other pesticides. If almost 40 towns and cities across the country, including Halifax and the entire province of Quebec, have banned cosmetic pesticide use, then the federal government can take more action. They need to ban individual chemicals and place more restrictions on the registration process for pesticides. With cancers like lymphoma, breast cancer and childhood leukemia linked to pesticides, the government should not allow cosmetic

Meanwhile, cities like Halifax, Hudson and Toronto should be commended for their efforts to put the health of residents and the environment ahead of the pleasant appearance of weed-free lawns and gardens. Other Canadian municipalities should follow their example.

pesticide use to continue.

It’s

responsible for spreading the dis-

The recent severe acute respirais tory syndrome (SARS) outbreak

ease.

plete

alarming.

But what is

I

find

is

also contributing to this

rise in ignorance.

the attitude shift towards Asian-

Canadians across the region. The flu-like illness, which is believed to have originated in China, is now being linked to

mation

Diana

more appalling

Not only that, but the comlack of knowledge and infor-

O’Neill

The prime minister took it upon himself to show people that it’s

Opinion as the gay plague, after

it

OK to go about their daily

was

dis-

but

lives,

remain cautious. On April Jean Chretien lent hissupport

still

Chinese people as a group. Paranoia, fear and ignorance are

covered that the second sufferer of

wrapped in a harmful little package and being directed towards this demographic. What people do

French-Canadian.

hit

The SARS outbreak is not a laughing matter. Not only are peo-

attempted to expel the misin-

not comprehend,

that

is

SARS

could have originated anywhere. It’s

scary and unfortunate that

the Greater Toronto

Area

is

facing

the fast-spreading infectious disease.

Now, more than

not the time to ize.

ever,

this is

label and general-

What’s needed

is

some

toler-

ance and understanding. Just the other day I overheard people saying that

SARS

is

the

They were

new “Chinese disease.” so amused by the clever little ring it had. Wow, they rhymed - how brilliant! It

reminded

onset of AIDS

when

me it

of the

was labeled

the disease

ple dying

was a homosexual

this illness, but

from

Chinese-owned businesses, especially in the Scarborough area, have been

An

well.

facing the fallout as

April 4 issue of the

Toronto Star reported that than two weeks,

some

in less

10,

towards businesses that are being

formed

to the

SARS

scare.

He

by eating lunch

beliefs

Chinatown. Other members of Parliament

have done the same and showed their support for the Chinese business community.

Health officials have been

SARS

ing that

is

stress-

not an illness of

seems

that people

staggering drops in sales that

ethnicity, but

range from 30 to 70 per cent. This

just aren’t listening. Chinese-

is

a sign that people are letting

fear take over actions.

The

and dictate

at a

restaurant in the heart of Toronto’s

restaurant

and store owners have reported

due

their

article also stated the

it

Canadian groups remain the

target

of racism and stereotyping.

We

all

need

to

remain calm and

Chinese Council of Canadians has

tolerant while this unfamiliar illness

received several messages that sin-

rears

its

gle out that community as being

need

is

ugly head.

What we do

not

race bashing and ignorance.

Spoke Letters are

welcome

Spoke welcomes editor. Letters

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College

Reporters: Petr Cihacek, James Doyle, Nick Horton, Lesley Leachman, Jeff Morley, Jason Noe, Diana O’Neill, Carla Sandham, Brandi Stevenson and Aimee Wilson

letters to the

should be signed and include the

and telephone number

is

name

of the writer. Writers will

Faculty Adviser: Christina Jonas

be

contacted for verification.

No unsigned

be published. Letters should be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter letters will

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca Web site: www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke ,

for publication.

Address correspondence to: The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

N2G 4M4

May by a payment from Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) in exchange for the inserThe views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers in Spoke are not endorsed by the CSI unless their advertisements contain the CSI logo. Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a MS Word file

Spoke Dr.,

is

mainly funded from September to

tion of advertising in the paper.

would be

helpful. Letters

must not contain any

libellous statements.


Feature

SPOKE,

April 21

In

photo at

,

2003

— Page 5

and, using water application techniques they learned, put it out. Students are strategically placed along the fire hose to stabilize the student they call themat the spout, who could be overwhelmed by the water pressure. Another platoon, as from tank the prevents This side. other on the cool tank the keep selves, also sprays water to

p re - S ervice

towards a flammable

firefighters inch

liquid fire

exploding.

firefighting

Fiery fun Students experience

left,

pre-service

students gather at

fire house at the Cambridge fire department. At this station teams prepare to climb up a flight of stairs with a line of fire hose to practise an

the

real-life firefighting

indirect fire attack, using

By CARLA

SANDHAM

On

previous

Cambridge Pre-service firefighting students

during

knowledge

their

tested

hands-on training exercises at the Cambridge fire department on April

1 1.

co-ordinator,

The program

Doug

were climbing ladders and hanging from ropes. Richard said students learned to properly anchor a rope and experience what it is like for a victim to climb out of a burning building and come down on a rope.

Richard, said practical experience the course. is a big component of

“Feeling what is

as

it’s

like first-hand

much a part of learning as how to do it in lectures, Richard, who was a Waterloo

hearing said

firefighter

coming

24 years before

for

to teach at Conestoga.

Every Friday for the past six weeks, 36 pre-service firefighters geared up for a variety of fire training operations ground scenarios.

During the labs, which were held tire either on campus or at the about learned grounds, students confined spaces, search and rescue operations and suppression all by doing. They also experienced highpressured water working with fue hoses and got up close and

it’s

Capt. Grant Dix, of the Brantford trainfire department, assists with

he

said.

And Cambridge

the

"After spending four hours learning theory, everyone looks forward on to doing something different Fridays,” she said.

Richard

said

these

training

exercises keep students active.

The

is broken down into and each team partici-

class

platoons

pates in one of the three to tour stations before rotating to another scenario.

Carla

can’t beat hands-on training. “When they can see how

it’s

done in a controlled environment we hope all the practice will kick in

when

the bell rings,” said Mills.

On

April to a

exposed

students

11,

flammable

were

liquid tire.

also got a taste of a small a cement building at the

They in

grounds.

By combining what

fire tire

they

the fires in a realistic situation. said the scenarios are close

Dix

staged for to the real thing, but are protection.

dents

in

it

cool.

Photos by

Lieut, training

Marty Mills added you

officer

agreed and said the practical training is the best part of the course.

women

keep

they can learn from their mistakes,"

thing.

three

They are

“This type of training allows us so to stop and talk to the students

one of program, is

tightly.

for the students.

would

it.

photo below, students grip

ing at the fire grounds and said practical experience is important

techniques, students extinguished

Mary-Lynn Bross, who

In

uid, to

a great feeling,” said

chance to actually do

water pressure.

spraying water onto a tank, which contains flammable liq-

learned in class and about these types of fires and water application

Marty Skowron, a pre-service firebetter fighter. "There is nothing it in the do to how learning than classroom and then having the

of

the hose

smoke and

personal with real fires. “When you smell the see the fire

the

to

visits

grounds, students

fire

a fog-

steam technique. In above photo, another team of students handles 900 kilopascals

It’s

ence.

He

ever be the

added nothing same as the real

not the real thing, but stubenefit from the experi-

still

Richard said the exercises

help students acquire the

become

skill set to

firefighters.

added even though the students need a lot more training, what they are doing now will Mills

reduce the training fire departonce ments will have to give them they're hired.

And Bross

said, "Friday’s

made up my mind want

to do.'

this is

lab

what

I

Sandham


— SPOKE,

Page 6

April 21

,

Feature

2003

aboard!

All NOE

By JASON

anytime soon.

Goderich-Exeter Railway engineer Dennis Fleet began working 1974, and still enjoys sitting behind the controls for the railway in

tion for

CN

Rail from a friend, and

filled

it

out.

It

view

in

was confusing.

the

Exeter Railway based

The

Goderich-

in Kitchener.

is owned by company, RailAmerica,

short-line railway

the parent

enjoyed

“I

years. Fleet has

landed him an inter-

London, and he was hired immediately as a brakeman because CN Rail was actively hiring. Fleet worked his first day for the railway in Kitchener, and he said it

of a locomotive.

Over the past four been working for

You

didn’t

it,

but

it

was

doing or where you were going,” he “You had five trial trips when

said.

first started,

I

switching

and

my

first

Budd

the

Kitchener.”

regional railway companies includ-

work on every type of

ing lines in Chile and Australia.

nable on

CN

Ontario.

He was

in

November

In

1998, the Goderich-

different.

know what you were

Boca Raton, Fla. RailAmerica owns 46 short-line and located

From

managed

Fleet

there,

job was

plant

train

in

to

imagi-

Rail across southern

a brakeman on

Exeter Railway took over operations of the Canadian National

freight

Railway London,

enough work ended up going to Oshawa and worked there for three months,” he said. “Down there we switched tire factories. General Motors, and several other plants.” In 980 Fleet had the opportunity to become an engineer, after working the last six years as a brakeman and conductor. He was required to attend a two-month training pro-

line

from Georgetown

Ont.

The

line

to

passes

through Kitchener, and

is where was working for CN Rail at time. On the last day before the

Fleet the

takeover of the

from

line. Fleet retired

CN

and went to work for the Goderich-Exeter Railway. He also began another chapter in his career, one that already stretched more than three decades. “It

was

my lifelong dream to be an

engineer,” said Fleet as he operated a Goderich-Exeter Railway locomo-

Kitchener. “I started off going on a steam engine in 1953, when I was five years old, running

tive

in

from London to Samia and back.” His father had friends who

worked on CN Rail at the time, and they managed to give Fleet his first ride

on the steam

train.

with short-line railway

In 1974, Fleet received an applica-

For 29 years, he’s been living a childhood fantasy and has no intention of quitting

new life

engineer finds

Train

From

that

day forward. Fleet knew he wanted to be like the men he saw working on that locomotive.

trains,

local trains,

“When

passenger

and work

trains,

trains.

there wasn’t

in Kitchener, I

(Photo by Jason Noe)

1

gram

at the

CN

Goderich-Exeter Railway engineer Dennis Fleet began working brakeman. Fleet was ly

Rail training centre

thrilled to final-

become an engineer

for

CN Rail.

a lot warmer, a lot dryer, a lot

“It’s

Gimly, Man. was all classroom work for two months, then it was six months on-the-job training, running with engineers,” he said. The engineer has the benefit of

and you’re not amongst the moving equipment, because I had a couple incidents where I was almost killed,” said Fleet. “Working on the ground I was almost crushed between cars that I was switching.

operating a train from the locomo-

One of the scariest things I’ve ever seen was one of the guys almost

in

“It

which Fleet feels is better than being a brakeman. The brakeman has to do all the required work outside, and that can be a dangerous job if you are not safety conscious. tive cab,

After six years of working as a

safer,

chopped

getting

in

two between the

couplers of the cars.

He just

barely

missed (being killed).” But train crews also face another obstacle

when

trains

the general public. Fleet

-

they are operating

They gate

are the

if

first

alive or injured. Fleet has

in

A locomotive engineer also has to worry about operating the engines and cars he is controlling, and this can often be stressful

if

the train

is

heavy. Fleet has operated a variety of

over his career, but sometimes is difficult to

handle.

before they a nerve-racking experi-

ence for train crews when they collide with vehicles or people at rail-

stopped,” he said. “You have to start planning three miles in advance

way

when you want to stop the train. Most trains are good handling trains, but you get the odd train that doesn’t respond to what you want it to do.

to

crossings

crossings. In

most cases, the

conductor and engineer are the first ones on the scene of a collision.

“It’s

They’re harder to control, harder to brake, and harder to get going.” In

1998, Fleet retired from

CN

Rail after almost 25 years of service

sold several of lines

to

its

smaller railway

short-line

companies

across Canada. Short-lines can provide better customer service to shippers, and are aggressive

when

CN

Rail’s

attracting

1998, but has since gone back to work.

you

as

lines. Everybody helps each other, where at CN you got the big bosses up top telling you what to do, and

they don’t help

When

you

at all.”

began working for the railway there were five men assigned Fleet

They included an

to operate a train.

engineer, a fireman (acts as a brake-

man), a conductor, and two brakemen. But now the short-lines operate with just two crew

members, an

engineer and conductor.

“The conductor has to do all the ground work by himself and the paperwork,” said Fleet. “Of course, back in the old days a conductor just ran the train

and did all the paperwork. The brakeman did all the work.”

From 1998 aged

to

work

to

short-line

2001, Fleet manfor

several

companies

for

a

other brief

period, as well as the Goderich-

Exeter Railway. In

January 2001, Fleet retired

he decided to return to operating

worked on with CN Rail. Over the last eight years, CN Rail

in

treats

company would be

Fleet

Engineer Dennis Fleet said it lifelong dream to be an engineer. He loves it so much he can’t give it up. He retired

“A big company

in the company. He joined the Goderich-Exeter Railway because he still loved working on trains, and

the short-line

was a

better,

from working on the railway to build his dream home near a beach in Ontario. But after a year of being away from the locomotive throttles,

operating on most of the same lines

(Photos by Jason Noe)

you

treats

said.

hard to control a big train. It takes a long time to get them started, and a long time to get them

It is

short-line

a number, and they don’t give the help they give you on the small

he gets one that

trains

“A

they treat you like a person,” he

several of these serious accidents,

respect trains.

arrive.

advantages than disadvantages.

still

been

1974.

and they are always traumatic. "The worst one I ever had was up around Chesley, Ont., when we hit a car broadside and killed both people in it,” he said. “There was a little girl in the backseat, she bounced out and ended up in the field. All she got was cuts and bruises.”

trains

daily basis, as motorists try to beat

people to investi-

those hit by the train are

believes that most people

do not He sees this on a

for railways in

new

business.

locomotives

on

the

Goderich-

Exeter Railway. “I

missed

reasons

I

enjoy what

it,

and

that's

one of the

came back because I

I

do,” he said.

Fleet currently

week on

train

works fives days a 433, which runs from

Kitchener to London and back.

It

delivers automotive frame cars to Rail in London.

counterpart, Canadian Pacific, also

CN

managed

He plans on working for the next few years with the Goderich-Exeter Railway before he retires again,

to sell off several

of

its

smaller lines to short-line operators during this period. Ironically, most

of these smaller railways employed

after he turns 60.

many ex-CN Rail and CP Rail employees who had either retired

around a

or quit the national railways. Fleet

enjoys

working for a short-line company, and feels there are more

Or he may

stay

longer on the railway for the pure love of it. little

“You have to be born into it. I was born into it,” said Fleet. “I’m a natural for an engineer.”


1

News

SPOKE,

April 21

$5,000 award up and

By PETR CIHACEK

2003

,

— Page 7

grabs

for

www.millennium-

at

criteria,

scholarships.ca/incourse.

Did you know eligible

si.

tion form,

a

new national in-course award/ The competition is fierce as only

must be submitted to the Financial Aid and Students Awards Office in

Conestoga students have a chance to win the award. But ii you

the Student Services building.

six

4.1

The national award was introduced by the Canada Millennium Scholarship Foundation as an Millennium its of extension

arc a full-time student with a 77 per cent average who is returning to

WB V / ’

7

Besides two copies of the applicatwo letters of reference

you might be

that

get $5,000 through

to

.1

/

September and who has a merit award before,

school

in

never

won

you should give “It is

Janeen awards

it

a great opportunity,” said

Hoover of Conestoga’s office.

“We

move forward

IH

Excellence Award Program. ‘The awards recognize academic achievement, demonstrated leadership, commitment to innovation

a shot.

community Sheamus Murphy,

applications

six

renewable for a second year, up to 200 awards of $4,000, each also renewable for a second year, and up

time in an undergrad-

full

to

program leading to a first degree diploma or certificate. You can download the six-page uate

(Photo by Brandi Stevenson)

program a pizza party on April 9 as thanks Services director John Kast threw the advertising Wakutzs design won for Dooners, and logos for Dooners and Coz-E-Corner. Erin

Food for

designing

was selected

for

new

cafeterias are getting

Each student

in

new

looks.

the

program

cept for Dooners.

entries initiated

The logo design became a

and selected

for their favourite.

space. logo, to identify the new old the replace to Kast also wanted

ning.

He

would

getting a student to design school uic amwi. involved in the get them invoiveu

this semester,

of end -

required

her students’ work

end,

it

States

war

is

coming

to

in the school.

difficult

STARS MEN’S SHOP

lnffclStrUC" „ ~ electoral r\r political infrastrucor nnlitical no

an

This country back together again. more and may be more important

war

is in

Jeff

Morley

itself.

a state of chaos.

political With no regime there is a vacuum and essentially no law. The and two major cities, Baghdad

runBasra, are currently without Widespread ning water or power. rampant looting and chaos are

throughout

the

while

country,

revenge killings are occurring. the At the onset of the war, Americans were bent on changing the regime

in Iraq.

The war was

a

ruthchance to rid the country of a less and cruel dictator.

The new

centre of

power would

reflect the will of the Iraqi

people

democracy and the principles of consistently has Bush freedom. and Iraqis who said that it will be the will have the

whom

freedom

to vote for

the they think should guide

country.

However, the U.S. has already of a started to lay the foundations

temporary, overseeing administrarebuildtive body to supervise the ing of the country and political

infrastructure.

its

tattered

President

George Bush and his administration

have consistently said that

value anywhere! but you won’t get better

this

P

More problematic institu-

would only be a temporary

However, many predict

tion.

that

country will the rebuilding of the years. maybe but months, not take president and British Prime

The

disagreed Minister Tony Blair have reconstruction. of issue the on further Blair would like to see in the

United Nations involvement

believe rebuilding of Iraq. They legitiadd could the organization

macy

the to their efforts in

Arab

has vast experience in The infrastructure re-establishing order, machinery, while also

UN

political

maintaining its

it.

many Arab

The

UN

could use tacili-

delegates to

country. tate progress in the However, Secretary of that Colin Powell, has said

State.

UN

aid

reconstrucBritain alone lead the tion of the country.

exactly

the United States

how

to

go about

is

it.

more they

try the

DISCOUNT *Fairview Mall *Downtown Kitchener

the longer in the

unsure

Iraq has

*Conestoga Mall

counan

will look like

occupational and colonial force. Resentment of the occupational grow if will not take long to forces the

conditions

in

Iraq

are

Canadian Forces Army Reserve Employment with

not

improved quickly. MiddleOther countries in the events East have been watching the America as closely, in Iraq tries to rebuild the

own

country in

image. While the Iraqis

now

Full-time

throughout the year. Call 624-4393

may that

no longer welcome. States must move

The United

quickly to repair the

caused.

Nations' Iraq

help,

damage

With the

the

summer employment

its

be cheering it may they have been liberated, libtheir until time only be a short erators are

a challenge

and adventure.

unfold

have

little else. Powell is welcome, but and would like to see America

Still,

is

the United States stays

in the streets

country.

and

10% STUDENT

by the war.

rtnininn

find cheaper prices,

You may

widespread chaos has plagued is still disthe country, and there the Iraqi among sent and distrust is still aid Humanitarian people. people only trickling in and many displaced and uprooted have been

ture,

the job of the United administration to put the

The country

available. will train. Scholarships

.

is

difficult than the

-

TO APPLY; www.workforstudents.com/cdn. K-W office opening April 14th.

Reyner

,-vl

that the

for

help international

Romer gave Kast the finalreviewed all of the entries Kast ists, pile. and pulled Wakutz’s from the said she is excited to have

Iraq reconstruction will Now

KP1

a reflection of innumerable

students to Looking for energetic, spirited PT summer positions company expanding locally. FT and Prior experience no available in customer service/sales.

After

but said they

.

in the

attention condors

my first thing that came in added head,” she explained. She because she was surprised she won, finalist. original an not was she

Kast also gave the whole reward class a free pizza lunch to hopes them for their hard work. He the by up be will the new posters

ranking

1

CLASSIFIEDS

the

some

It is

No.

Ken Dawson

Wakutz said she did not plan her logo ahead of time. Tjust designed

voted

staff

it

.

to celebrate its

a more personal

touch.

Watters and Wakutz will receive winfree food coupons for

said he thought it

which gives

class

five finalists.

Then, the food services

services director John Kast. After Coz-E the E-wing. cafe was named or Corner, Kast wanted a sign,

sign.

awards by September.

good decisions by everyone involved with Conestoga. green colour However, can anyone tell -me who selected the lime 6? Door E-wing’s the canopy over

similar shape to the college’s crest,

said Kast.

it,”

project for the 26 students. Romer and Kast sorted through the pile of

by food

to get their

indicators for the fifth straight year.

meaning of the words. The Z and the E of Coz-E form a three dimensional corner. The corner is also a

and they took it from there. “Joe and Deb have been superb co-ordinating (the contest) and I m sure the students enjoyed

To the Editor: The college should be proud

fall.

Watters said she got the idea for her design by thinking about the

gram co-ordinator Deborah Reyner and creative teacher Joe Romer,

designed a logo for the cafeterias as part of a contest. Misty Watters’ creation won for Coz-E comer, and Erin Wakutz had the winning con-

The contest was

scholarships. Students are supposed

as

well

logos

will definitely be ready for the

So, he brought his idea to pro-

Thanks to the advertising program, Dooners and Coz-E Corner

as

Coz-E-Corner.

Cafeterias get By BRANDI STEVENSON

form,

900 awards of $4,000 each.”

Altogether, $4.9 million will be handed out through the 1,200

detailed information on the awards

new

Misty Watters’ creation

Dooners

application

said

the foundation’s

public affairs officer. ‘There will be up to 100 awards of $5,000, each

from Conestoga students. We need 6.” all the applications by June Canadian be a must An applicant immigrant landed or citizen enrolled

service,”

and

are allowed to

they

United

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— SPOKE,

Page 8

April 21

,

News

2003

CSI says year a success BY JASON NOE

is

a quiet study period.

Andruszkiewicz Despite the cancellation of the

pub night of the semester,

last

Conestoga Students Incorporated (CSI) believes this year was an overwhelming success. The bash was scheduled for April 4, but was cancelled because of a severe ice storm that swept across Ontario.

“We

decided to cancel the event

about 30 seconds after they informed us the college would be closed,” said CSI events programmer Jody Andruszkiewicz. “If the building is not going to be open, we can’t exactly hold a pub night. The weather was so atrocious.”

Andruszkiewicz explained the CSI spent an hour trying to figure out what they were going to do with all the arrangements they had made. “The beer order was on the way

when they decided

to close the col-

Andruszkiewicz. “I caught him on the way and told him to turn around and go back, the weather was out of control.” lege,”

said

CSI thought about reschedno alternative night to do so. They did not want to move it to a weekend or TJie

uling the party, but had

Friday night, because of a lack of students on

Also,

campus

at

those times.

remaining Thursday booked with the CBSA awards banquet in the Sanctuary, and exam week, which the

nights were already

woman promotes

Local

anti-hate

of normal pub events, and only concentrate on theme parties at cer-

for the CSI and Conestoga students. He is already looking ahead, and is planning to make changes to next year’s bashes

Andruszkiewicz said the best themed event was the toga party in September, when the pub officially

will be hosting an anti-violence

in the Sanctuary.

opened.

and discrimination workshop as

for

“There are three things students can expect in the bar next year,” said Andruszkiewicz. “We are going to redesign the bar this summer so the Sanctuary is a destination, not an afterthought starting in

“We’re attentively planning on keeping the toga, Halloween, Mardi Gras, and luau parties as our

part

Employees for Excellence and Education (EEE)

women

this

was a success

themed

four

By LESL E Y LEACHMAN

year.

events,”

This plan includes constructing a

would be of interest to the faculand staff who will be attend-

ty

The Women’s Resource Group

of

the

conference

on June

said

modify.”

at

Conestoga College

ture of student life this year. In his

Sanctuary.

three years being a student at the

“The next thing we- are going to do is offer more of a beer selection,” said Andruszkiewicz. “Attentively, we have targeted Molson Canadian, Labatt Blue, Coors Light, Miller Genuine Draft, and we are still going to keep the Brick lager. We are going to price it so students can afford to drink in

College, he said there

Pressman believes these methods are more effective at promoting change than simply teaching

past one

the

proud that,”

He

or two

years. I’m been a part of said Andruszkiewicz. to say I’ve

the Sanctuary bar.”

a tremendous year.

Andruszkiewicz said that profits collected will be put back into the bar and student life at the college. “The third big thing is that you are going to see a lot more variety

the students for

in the events,”

he said.

“We ’re maybe

only

going to do four five themed events next year. My one major failing this year was too many themed parties.” Andruszkiewicz believes the CSI is prepared to increase the number

her work-

it’s

and

violence,

unattended in the

“These things can be language

them out of

the pic-'

ture or things that diminish the role they play.”

more than a decade. She also takes part in the prejudice activity for

Every year the Women’s Resource Group sponsors a workshop for the EEE conference and this year they selected Pressman to be the speaker.

The EEE conference runs from June 10 to 13. Pressman’s workshop will run on June 1 1 from 8:30 a.m. until noon. Those wishing

chairperson, Joan

says

she

felt

Pressman’s workshop on antiviolence and discrimination

support,

if

Holocaust Education committee in Waterloo Region.

Magazine,

He thanked

all their

“But

facts.

The group’s

CSI has finished

believes the

not just

are often the targets of

discrimination

even

is

says.

Pressman is a local educator and has been involved in anti-

in

shop.

involved in getting student life started again back at Conestoga in

women,” she

that leaves

message across

was almost

conference.

a topic that)

Pressman, will be using experiential exercises and direct testimony of victims to help get her

Andruszkiewicz further added the CSI was able to establish a cul-

no student life. “There were tons of students

EEE

“It (is

Barbara

speaker,

one sits now, installation of a new DJ booth for parties, and new lighting in the the old

ing the

classroom.

11.

The

Andruszkiewicz. “We’re only going to add, and where we went wrong this year, we’re going to

the fall.”

new bar where

times throughout the

tain

to attend

must

sign-up in advance, as this workshop only has space for 40 participants.

because the bar could not have done as well without all their help.

Memorial nameplate honours LRC worker

something you have to build every year,” said Andruszkiewicz. “I’m really happy with the over“It’s

on

all

way

the events ran this year.

This was

my

first

time programmer.

year as a I

knew

full-

B y LESLEY LEACH M AN

there

“She’d always tell me ‘Oh, I saw something that was just right for

would be bumps.” Those who leave us forgotten.

WHAT WOULD YOU

will not be

The Women’s Resource

Group has

PET SHOP BOYS? **p.

ing a workshop for International

Education students when they first come to Canada. “We’re (the college) getting a

The Women’s Resource Group

number of students

announced that they plan to place a memorial nameplate inside a book as a thank you for all the work she

very sheltered backgrounds,” says

did for them.

Women’s Resource Group member Kim Radigan. “And then they come here and all of a sudden they are being thrown into social situa-

and they come from somewhere where that is not normal. “We hope to give them some education around what is appropriate behaviour in dating, what sexual harassment is, and those sorts of

all that

it

wasn’t

public to the rest of the

employees that she had died,” says Barb Kraler, a member of the Women’s Resource Group, at a meeting on April 8. “And I think the employees would see it as a gesture to all the

Earl

your used

come from

“She (Earl) had been away from

(college)

Fjn

that

the college for a while (because of

made

MM

Also discussed at the group’s meeting was the possibility of hav-

Learning Resource Centre (LRC). Former LRC worker, Anne Earl, recently passed away from cancer.

her battle with cancer) and

SELL

you!”’

certainly not forgotten a who was their liaison in the

woman

TRADE FOR THE *2r

message

year

feels

work she

helped

did.”

the

Women’s

tions,

things.”

Radigan says she made a few calls to see if any other organizations have developed something

Resource Group with purchasing books and finding resources. “She was very nice to deal with. She was always so good with help-

Also at the meeting, the group discussed their sponsorship of a

ing us find materials,” says Kraler.

during orientation week in August.

that helps deal with these issues.

Women

in

Technology workshop

Welding students win awards

t|

CDs & DVDs

at

The Beat

Goes On

'

a Beat Goes On

K.

DOYLE

diploma-level welding engineer-

ing

Three Conestoga students have earned national awards for their skills and hard work. Curtis Brown, Murray Geerlinks and Mike Willman were all recipients of the

USED £20 OUTLET

R.M. Gooderham bur-

sary.

385 Fairway Rd.

S, Kitchener {Canadian Tire Plaza)

370 Highland Rd. W, Kitchener

www. beatgoeson. com

By JAMES

402 King

St, N,

Waterloo

(Food Basics Plazai

(Beside Burger King)

41 5 Hespeler Rd. S, Cambridge

(519)

893-2464

(519) 744-101 (519)

884-7376

«s tram rmmh*) (519) 622-7774

(Acr

There are only 10 bursaries handed out annually, making this an

outstanding achievement for Conestoga College. The Southern Alberta Institute of Technology

was the only other school

to

have

multiple winners.

all

in their final

The on

at

bursaries are awarded based

achievement

excellence

of

academic

in

welding-related studies, production of a 1,000word essay on a topic related to the welding trade and a clear desire to pursue a career in the

welding fabricating industry. The bursary, worth $2,000, is presented by the Gooderham Centre for Industrial Learning on behalf of the Canadian Welding

Bureau.

Brown, Geerlinks and Willman are

technology program Conestoga’s Guelph campus.

year of the

The

presentations were

April 15.

made on

Digital Edition - April 21, 2003  
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