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,

We remember

No

hose who served A war veteran’s

windfall for colleges

Universities get lion’s share of

the double cohort funding.

memories remain years

vivid 61

OSAP needs

Second

after the

Students across the province

World War.

Monday, November

11,

voice concerns at Queen’s Park.

2002

Conestoga College, Kitchener

Lunch raises $1,125 By TANNIS

WADE

Valley granola bar for dessert.

“Three-quarters of the sales

option,” said Kast.

“I

Monica

very optimistic that

we

achieve, and even

Monica Himmelman, employee campaign chair

will

On

Himmelman.

Many

very optimistic that

will

surpass our goal.”

achieve, and even surpass our goal,” said

am

we

Himmelman, this year’s employee campaign chair. At press time the college had raised 60 per cent of its $40,000 goal for the campaign.

am

made

were of the rneat lasagna, but it was still good to have the vegetarian

“We have extended the time Irame so that employees that work at other campus locations have a chance to get their pledge cards

“I

top of the lasagna lunch,

Chartwells employees raise

money

year for the United Way.

students contributed to the

all

Way

by taking hookey ticklasagna lunch on

“Throughout the school year we encourage our associate food service workers to dress casual each

“Chartwells really deserves some recognition for the lasagna lunch,”

Friday for a $2 donation to the United Way,” said Kast. This year they have raised an

Himmelman

additional

United

indirectly

part in the Maple. Leaf et

draw and

the

Oct. 31.

said.

$350 by doing this. Conestoga Students Incorporated (CSI) raised $255 in a raffle for

“They have been

contributing a tot of money each year to the United Way.”

company who

runs the food services at the college, donated 100 per cent of the

Toronto Maple Leafs tickets. Staff and students can still make personal donations to the United

proceeds from the lasagna lunch to

Way

Chartwells,

the United

the

Way.

as they will accept contribu-

tions at

manager

any time, not just during the

of Kast, John Chartwells, said 15 large trays of

campaign.

lasagna were consumed at the luncheon. “We sold a total of 225 serv-

tinue to gratefully accept any dona-

Poppy

“T^e bottom tions

toward

cause,” said

line

this

is,

we

will con-

very

worthy

Himmelman.

Today millions of Canadians wear a poppy in memory of lost at war.

The K-W Poppy Fund is one of the many organizations across the

Joe by Oberholzer, the K-W Poppy Fund was unique because it combined three branches of the Royal

money

for

ex-service

members. Together. Branches 50 and 530 of the Royal Canadian Legion and Branch 412 of the Polish Legion started this nonIn

Andrea Ribeiro, of Kitchener shows her support for Canadian veterans.

December 1961 the organizathe by was joined

organizations contributed to the operations. a

symbol of remem-

brance, is distributed to local resi-

dents each year. This year 200,000 poppies were sent out across

404.

Waterloo Region.

S£on

after the

Army, Navy. Air

Association,

Unit

247,

Naval Association, Korean

That

chairman of the organization. also

helps pur-

The

K-W

Poppy Fund

relies

on

donations from recipients of the poppies.

The money

raised from

is

is

minds

Tony Martin?

the question

following

on many

ation centre.

College officials wouldn't comthe reason' for Martin's

munity health-care facilities, pay for medical research and training, build affordable housing for veterans and senior citizens, pay for bursaries for needy students and

ment on

provide support services to senior

resources, said reorganization

citizens.

common

$187,000 from countertop boxes and wreaths. The organization is operated mainly by volunteers so more of the proceeds can be given directly to those in need.

departure, but did say there was a reorganization of staff at the rec centre.

Debra

Croft, director of

human is

in a business.

always are “Organizations looking for successful new skills

and effective resources." •

Croft said she feels

it

is

impor-

College

Osborne began workGuelph's radio station CJOY where he remained for 12 years, during w hich time he hosted the sports program. From the Stands, did a morning show, and In 1984

ing

at

later

bectime news director

with a return address. To donate simply put a donation in the envelope and mail it back.

for

FM.

now

Osborne later moved to the Cambridge radio station CIZN-

managing

the centre.

years.

feels

Osborne

w as

from that

Prior to

he

when

time

“flipped"

process

an asset to the rec centre because of his strong background in marketing and broadcasting. will be

the

its \ ice-president and genmanager. This was during

as

also be responsible

Croft said she

at the

station.

Martin was not dismissed. Paul Osborne, manager of the

CJIQ-

the reason

for Martin’s departure.

FM

college's radio station 88.3

wouldn’t

officials

comment on

eral

will

Niagara

he graduated from College in 1982.

tant for people to understand that

Local residents received two poppies in the mail in an envelope

See Page 3 for additional story and photo.

in

the .J'ecent

departure of the former manager of Conestoga College’s recre-

envelope returns,

Royal Canadian Air Force. Wing

tion

Where

raised

Osborne has been involved

either sports or radio ever since

Last year the campaign raised

Veterans Association, Unit 52 and the Ladies Auxiliaries of all the

The poppy,

profit organization.

By MICHELLE TIMMERMAN

placed in public

“We supply our veterans and their dependents with financial assistance,” said Robert Westphal, curMoney

1954

Canadian Legion. Oberholzer became the chairman of the fund that worked to

is

chase medical equipment for com-

alive.

raise

Martin no longer with college

trust funds.

rent

country that keeps this tradition in

the main cafeteria on Oct. 31 raised $1 ,125 for the college’s United

campaign.

each campaign

will

Started

A Way

in

remains Waterloo Region

By BLAKE GALL

Canadian soldiers

(Photo by Izabela Zarycka)

charity lasagna lunch held

tradition

alive in the

Way

for United

which raised a total of $1,125,” he said. Both vegetarian and meat lasagna were available to students, with a slice of garlic bread and a Nature

today.

said

— No. 24

34th Year

ings,

The United Way campaign at Conestoga College has officially wrapped up for the year. Despite this, donations and pledge cards are still being accepted until the end of

included,”

be revised

to

the

.-kM

took

coming

to

to

station

FM.

about

a

two

Conestoga,

director of business oper-

ations for the the Ontario

Guelph Storm of

Hockey League.


— SPOKE, November

Page 2

11

News

2002

,

Colleges forced to Stretch cohort budget By REBECCA LEARN

go

will

to university. Still, the col-

leges are receiving less than seven

Ontario’s universities will collect

$70 million

to support the

double

per cent of this funding from the provincial government. Tibbits said another problem

cohort in this year’s budget, while colleges are

left

with a mere $5

million.

The colleges have

said the short-

age of funding will cause them to allot 10,000 fewer spots than they

is

system as a whole, rather than individual colleges. In contrast, he said universities are funded based on the

amount they grow.

Last year the province declared an extra $293 million in operating

funds to help colleges and universi-

through the double cohort. The colleges expected $76 million of ties

money, but the funding

now

is

Bountrogianni

Ontario’s Liberal

is

college and university

However, Tibbits said he thinks

the budgets flat of those schools

per cent, then

maybe

grow

per cent to the system.” But, he

added, the problem

year more

Conestoga College President John Tibbits, adding, said

did,”

“We need

to

be treated like univer-

sities.”

According

to Statistics

Canada,

of students going on to post-secondary education in Ontario, about 40 per cent will go to college while the other

60 per cent

five

they give five

colleges are growing by

this

and

Right now, he said, “if they think

more money

we grew

greater

than

have already seen appli-

Rundle

said

cations for this year rise by about

He

some more than

that

is

and they don’t get

their share

34 per

risen

The

cent.

colleges require

address the province’s Then, on top of

said,

to

skills

shortage.

growing than why should you get any money to grow?” While speaking in another legin islative assembly 2001,

that,

Bountrogianni said

that,

according

to the Association of Colleges of

Applied Arts and Technology of Ontario,

college

the

sector will

$60 million

per year across the system, Rundle

of the money.

Sandford Fleming, but this hardly seems logical in the grand scheme of things,” said Hamilton

must

while the enrolment has

to $3,475,

that

“If you’re not

said that they

Rundle said that over the past decade the funding per student has dropped 40 per cent, from $5,775

“The SuperBuild funding did not take into account where the demoand Trent and Sir Sandford Fleming received more space allocations than York and U of T. All the power to Trent and Sir

“The problem

said

growing.

graphic bulges are going to occur,

He

in colleges is

in

Kitchener-

a

in

much

universities,”

Waterloo Record article on June 21, because universities are in a

Additionally, on Oct. 21, the government announced it was providing $13 million in funding for the double cohort.

cost of living increase, and give

than Laurier or Waterloo

this prob-

release.

of

space.

their populations

and discuss

years.

think you’ll find

that they

spoke about

media

in a

economy

the

to

better

the college presidents

being allotted over the next three “I

ACAATO,

significantly

10 per cent.

the system’s going to

to the schools that are

Ontario.”

for the

have additional funding to hire teachers and provide new teaching

He added that he thinks it would be cheaper for the government to hold growing, except for a

Committee of Presidents

train students for

well-paying careers and contribute

that he thinks the ministers will sit

application pools.

that aren’t

“These programs

on an enrolment plan.” He added

some

are declining,” Tibbits said.

need $291 million by 2004 to meet the double cohort demand. Howard Bundle, chair of the

lem

critic.

“the funding next year will be done

down with

are

Marie

Dr.

Bountrogianni in the legislative assembly, according to the Web www.thedoublecohort.ca. site

growing, “Some some are not growing at all and colleges

had expected.

that

money

that

is

given to the college

MP

Mountain

they need “another $65 mil-

position

to

raise

know

don’t

“I

why

ting every year for years.”

Tibbits said that Conestoga will

receive $464,000 of that money,

$30,000 more than the

and buy equipmeet the demand of the double cohort and increased popu-

which

ment

school usually receives.

lation growth.

light

“Applied educational programthe sort provided by col-

ming of leges

is in

high demand across the

province and globally,” he said.

they

announced it as if it were for the double cohort,” Tibbits said, adding, “It’s what we’ve been get-

lion to hire faculty to

private

funds.

is

“They were to

just trying to high-

general public that

the

spending money added it is the

we’re

‘Hey,

here,”’ he said, but

same formula

that they’ve operated

with forever.

Child-care worker receives provincial recognition By DIANA O’NEILL

tion for the pivotal role they play

development. “They mentors for stu-

in a child’s

One of

Mother Hubbards of Conestoga College was recognized on Oct. 30 as part of child-care the

(staff) also act as

dents that are interested in pursu-

ing

careers

in

worker appreciation day. Violet Nemec, lead hand at the Doon Childcare Centre, was acknowledged for her hard work and dedication as part of the invalu-

added.

able team.

other workers.

Nemec

Nemec

the

field,”

she

said that offering quality

means ensuring a level of professionalism when dealing with the children, their families and child care

The 33-year-old

children are in turn affected by the

works with 14 other employees, 12 of them full-time and three parttime. Nemec, as well as other staff members, looks after 77 children in total; six infants, 15 toddlers, 28

team’s efforts and everyone feels

preschoolers, 12 kindergarten stu-

better.”

dents and 16 school-age children.

said the recognition has

an “overall effect on the atmos-

phere

the centre, because the

at

morale

high.”

is

She added, “The

The Ontario Coalition

Nemec’s position

for Better

hand

as lead

Child Care teamed up once again with the Canadian Union of

is

Public Employees to celebrate the

properly

second annual child-care worker appreciation day. It was an oppor-

upholding

tunity to raise the profile of the

After working 12 years at the day care, Nemec admits that every day is different. Being the mother of an eight- and six-year-old, she loves being around children and finds it “very rewarding to be able

role

essential

child-care

that

workers play. The early childhood education department at the college provided the daycare with a potted plant and a letter of appreciation for their efforts and their ongoing dedication to children. Birdena Hamilton-Armitage, student co-ordinator of the

ECE,

said

employees deserve recogni-

to ensure that everything runs

smoothly and

that the centre is

staffed,

the

all

the

while

Day Nurseries

Act.

to

make

Nemec

a difference in their

life.”

has learned to take every-

body’s individuality and work with what they have. “Everybody’s different and that’s

(Photo by Diana O'Neill)

Nemec was

recognized at the child-care worker appreciation day on Oct. 30. been with the Doon Childcare C( intre for 12 years,

Violet

not a bad thing,” she said.

Over

the years,

ECE

has real-

working working with families, team members, out-

ized that

with children. their

Nemec

isn’t just

“It’s

side agencies and people in the community,” she said, adding, “It’s

important to maintain a

common

bond of respect with each.”

Nemec

being a part of the team. “Child-care workers have worked felt for

hard in the past to

make

it

clear

they’re not just babysitters,

that

stressed the gratitude she

Nemec has

but professionals.”

Counselling foundation donates $150,000 to help program By IZABELA ZARZYCKA

When money was needed came

dation

When

the

a foun-

to the rescue.

career development

program at Conestoga College needed funding to launch practitioner

four

new

courses, the Counselling

of Canada came month with $ 50,000. The foundation was formed in

Foundation through

1959

last

1

create and enrich counprograms and improve the

to

selling

technical skills of counsellors.

The

to the rescue. In

shorter period of time and obvious-

tion gave

ly build a lot

1995 the organiza$250,000 to the college to help start the program. Bill Jeffrey, dean of health services and community services, said the college “keeps a good affiliation with the foundation.” The money that was received by the college will be used to create four new courses. They will be tools and techniques, youth,

and immigrants. Each course will al skills

they need to be successful

in their field

and educational

activities that

ben-

efit the

It

not the

first

Due money

public.

is

come

issues

provide students with the addition-

foundation engages in charitable

time that the foundation has

women

to

of work.

the

large

received,

the

amount of additional

courses can be introduced “in a

more

quality into the

course and into the program,” said

He

added that the tools and technology and women issues courses will be ready by January and the other two courses will be completed by spring. “This program does not stop,” said Jeffrey, adding that the program runs year round and right through summer. The career development practitioner program is designed for people who would like to have a career in high school counselling, Jeffrey.

also

employment counselling or work a counselling firm.

at

The program

consists of 12 dif-

ferent courses,

which can be taken

wish

to learn in a

classroom atmos-

online, with the exception of tech-

The program “has one fulltime professor and a number of

niques one and two.

part-time professors,” said Jeffrey.

For these

courses students have to show up for four days to apply

for class

what they have learned. There are 150 students enrolled in this program and they come from all over Canada. Jeffrey said that there are students from British Columbia

who

are taking this course simply

by logging on

to their computer.

The online course because

it

saves time,

is is

some

Students require a degree or diploma to be accepted into the program and receive a certificate upon graduation.

CORRECTION In the Nov.

4

issue of Spoke, an

ice resutfacer at the rec centre

was

named a Zamboni.

popular

incorrectly

flexible

The correct brand of the ice resurfacer was an Olympia. Spoke

and provides the comfort of home. However, the college does offer in-class education if

phere.

students

apologizes for the error.


News

SPOKE, November

War hero remembers the By B LAKE GALL

months he spent fighting

2002

11,

— Page 3

sacrifices

way

his

through the entire country.

Once

a year

Canadians devote a of the men and

memory women who fought

day in

to the

the

First

our country

for

and Second World

Wars.

On

quest

freedom and

for

memories

are vivid and difficult to

talk about.

Some in

his

world peace Bratherton saw fellow soldiers die for their country. His

of those people reside here Waterloo Region and deserve

moment

recognition.

Walter

However, people sense experience and

Bratherton,

Kitchener remembers his efforts

in

fighting

Bralherton’s

Germany

in

became

father

home. He decided

the war.

the

they meet him.

While

of

78,

his

strength

to sign

ill

In 94 the Second World War was declared. Anyone 2 years of age or older was drafted to fight for

Canada and see

Canada.

he was granted 30 days’ leave.

1

1

1

at

up for

Pacific duty so he could return to

Upon

his dad.

his return to

Canadian

soil

Bratherton was supposed to be

“Sooner or

later

sent to the United States for jungle

who’s

bomb dropping on

training but the

going to care

Hiroshima resulted

in

dis-

his

charge.

what happened?”

He

Gerry Such,

considered himself lucky to

be out of the war so quickly.

His time spent

presiden t of the

was

Royal Canadian Legion,

short

but

fighting in any

Branch 530

in the trenches

the

effects

war are

of

great.

1946 Bratherton joined Royal Canadian Legion in Clinton. However, he said he In

the

Bratherton,

who was

only

17,

decided to go to London, Ont. to

never stuck with

He, along with other troops, was

England for

it.

Bratherton’s wife died 12 years

enlist voluntarily.

ago and upon remarrying a few •

training. After

years ago, he got involved with the

long hours of preparation soldiers

Royal Canadian Legion, Branch

moved

530

sent to

into Italy,

Bratherton recalls 14 months of fighting in Italy before

Germany. He spoke

moving

into

briefly of the

about

nice to

Bratherton.

sit

around and think

old

the

The

trenches fighting for freedom.

Gordon, 82, of Waterloo

ted coming to Canada but still remembers the scenes of war at home. She recalls watching the tanks pass her house each morning to go

had.

Canadian soldiers

fight but not always return. The Last Post, a song for soldiers

troops are constantly' on his mind.

in Waterloo;

“It’s

boys,”

said

faces of his fellow

Remembrance Day is an important time so “we (veterans)

He

feels

aren’t a forgotten few.”

Miem agrees.

Gordon

recalls

passing through her small home in into entry awaiting Holland

Germany. It was there that she met Jack Gordon. Miem spent just three fnonths with Jack but she

fell

in

In August 1945 Jack and Miem were married in Nymegen, Holland making Miem a Dutch war bride. Jack is deceased but Miem's memories of the war are as clear as day. In August 1946 Gordon boarded

the Mauritania to

(Photo by Blake Gall)

Greg Polanick had his Second World War nnodel ships on display at the Why do we remember? presentation at the Royal Canadian Legion, Branch 530.

IN In Flanders fields the poppies

Between

the crosses,

row on

That mark our place; and

The

larks, still

come

to

Canada

be with her husband. She arrived in Halifax then trav-

elled to Toronto

by

train.

Together Jack and

Miem

raised

five children in Harriston, Ont.

Gordon says she has never

530. She wants to keep the ry of her

husband and

regret-

Why

row,

If ye

We

dawn, saw sunset glow

In Flanders fields

their, efforts.

Greg Polanick, participated

in

and now we

lie

19, of Kitchener

the

presentation

with a display of Second World War model ships, books and photographs.

do we remember?

“It

(Remembrance Day)

is

some-

educate elementary school students

thing that should be remembered. It shouldn’t be phased out.” said

about the war.

Polanick.

The presentation was created

More

to

than 900 students visited the

legion to learn about

Day from

Remembrance

Oct. 28 to Nov.

1.

At

the

He

felt

never be forgotten. a poppy,

check out

to

“On Nov.

artifacts

hold

break faith with us

it

who

students

agree that the heroes of war must

from the Second World War and view a video showing soldiers in the veterans,

the

learned a lot from the presentation. The veterans and their families

presentation students got to speak to

The torch; be yours

in the sky

are the Dead. Short days ago

loved,

and

it’s

1 1

do,” said Such.

high.

die

shall not sleep, though poppies

remember and wear

the Canadian thing to

Take up our quarrel with the foe; To you, from failing hands we th?vw

blow

bravely singing, fly

Loved and were

the other

Bratherton and Gordon both took in a presentation this year

called.

“Sooner or later who’s going to care whaf happened?” said Such. That’s why he wants children to be taught about Canadian veterans

memo-

part

In Flanders fields.

lived, felt

all

He enjoyed answering

FLANDERS FIELDS

Scarce heard amid the guns below

We We

many

of war, brings these pictures back to Gordon’s mind. She is also a member of the Royal Canadian Legion, Branch

event was a huge sucthe questions the eager students

felt the

cess.

soldiers alive.

love.

to

Gerry Such, president of Branch 530,

grow


'

Page 4

— SPOKE, November

11

,

.

Commentary

2002

Health care can’t be ignored the quality of our health-care

Canada we pride ourselves on

In

system.

what distinguishes us from our American expected answers is the superiority of most the of one neighbours and

Ask

the average citizen

that system.

But recently, Canadians have begun to feel that medicare is being eroded and fears have made us take another look at the system we pride ourselves on.

We have become concerned with

long waiting

ments, out-of-date medical equipment and the

lists

for medical treat-

demands of an aging

population.

We

are also facing doctor shortages

and the closing of

hospitals.

So what can we do about the problem? Prime Minister Jean Chretien’s federal Liberal government has chosen to address the issue through a royal commission and a Senate committee report. On April 3, 2001 the Royal Commission on the Future of Health Care was established under the leadership of Commissioner Roy

Romanow. According mission.ca,

commission’s

to the

its

mandate

Web

site,

a universally accessible, publicly

www.healthcarecom-

long term sustainability of

to ensure the

is

funded health system offering

quality services.

Romanow presented an Commons on Feb. 6, 2002. His

full

report

is

82-page interim report

expected

month.lt

this

is

the

in

House of

suspected that he will call

for an increase in federal spending.

committee led by Senator Michael* Kirby has recently recom-

A

mended that Ottawa put an extra $5 billion annually into health care. This could be implemented through a tax hike or increased insurance

THE DOCTOR SHORTASE REACHES RIDICULOUS LEVELS

premiums. At a recent conference held

in

Waterloo, The Record reported that

the cure for our ailing health system will

come from

following in the

footsteps of other countries.

Violence too close for comfort be the

admit

my

neck were standing on

About 250 medical professionals from across the province met for the three-day symposium at the Waterloo Inn. Keynote speaker David Gratzer, a Toronto physician, said the problem with health care in this country is that it has remained stagnant throughout times when our population and medical advancement is

am stuck in a state of denial. When I turn on the evening news and see a story flash before my eyes

Michelle

are

about a sniper shooting, a

Timmerman

took

changing

bing or any other form of violence,

He

rapidly.

said that in order for us to optimize our health in this country,

we

ITl

first to

it.

I

can’t help but think

it is

happen

should not be a concern.

28 edition of The Record

examples of China and Switzerland, who overcame the same problems Canada is facing through partially privatizing medical

abruptly brought back to reality.

care.

particular edition about

He

cited the

These countries have also offered incentives for responsible use of

So any way you look Canadians are going

care

to

at

have

it,

the results appear to be the same:

to dish out

more money

in

order to sus-

is

is

one area of our society

paramount

only solution, then

come up with

There were two

to

that cannot be ignored.

Adequate health

our nation’s well-being. If spending

we

will just

money

is

the

have to dig deeper into our pockets and

The

man

home

first article.

in

random

people

at

gun

to

places,

vious record,

the

man was

sen-

guess

me naive if you wish, but I am stuck in a dream world,

I

a fairytale land of sorts where noth-

ing bad ever happens.

this

car with gas, go out to dinner or go

acts

to the bank.

shopping without fearing that

little

my comfort. No jail time for received a con-

ditional discharge after threatening to bring a

far-away

meaning he would be on probation for two years and could not return

for

man who

in

tenced to a conditional discharge,

was

over death threats, was about a

building.

the extra cash.

articles

I

of violence that took place a

Kitchener

our health-care system.

This

flipped through the Oct.

I

too close to

medical services.

tain

But as

Call

co-worker. Because he had no pre-

bourhood.

place

articles

always thought

I

home.

Opinion

neigh-

that will never

something

things that never happened close to

something

must move forward to privatization. Gratzer said most Canadians resist the idea of privatization because they have heard the horror stories about the American system, but this

in

Events like the ones in the

fatal stab-

my

their

ends.

I

work and shoot

random as they left the The man made the threat

following a dispute with a fellow

A

world where you can

Too many guns, says chief of weekend deaths, stated that over the weekend of Oct.

may

26 there was a

ings in the U.S.,

The second

in

article,

total

80 minutes

Each of

of four slayings

in the

Toronto

area.

chill

a

and the hairs on the back of

more people

are

living in fear for their lives.

And now we

live

in

fear of a

copycat to the sniper. Will

I felt

it

time you perform

think ever since the sniper shoot-

I

club or restaurant.

After reading these articles

last

your

such a simple task.

the slayings occurred fol-

lowing disputes outside of a night-

be the

fill

in

it

happen again, but

our community?

we

It is

this

time

a question

don’t want answered.

Spoke Letters are

welcome

Spoke welcomes editor. Letters

letters to

should be signed and include the

and telephone number

is

Editor: Shannon McBride Advertising Manager: Sarah McGoldrick Circulation Manager: Marcy Cabral

the

name

of the writer. Writers will

be

Photo Editors: Michelle Timmerman and Denis Langlois

contacted for verification.

No unsigned

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College

be published. Letters should be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter

Production Managers: Mary Simmons and Kathleen Deschamps

Spoke Online

Editors: Tannis

Wade and

Nicole Childs

Faculty Adviser: Christina Jonas

letters will

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 ,

E-mail: spoke(a)conestogac.on.ca

for publication.

Address correspondence to: The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

N2G 4M4

Web Dr.,

site:

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

May by a payment from Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) in exchange for the inserThe views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers in Spoke are not endorsed by the CSI unless their advertisements contain the CSI logo. Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a MS Word file Spoke

is

mainly funded from September to

tion of advertising in the paper.

would be

helpful. Letters

must not contain any

libellous statements.


News

m

SPOKE, November

Former student gives back This

the fifth in a six-part Conestoga alumni who are nominated for the 2002 Premier’s Awards, an annual, provincial awards program created hy the government to acknowledge the important economic and

mind things were improved

is

to Ontario.

Award

as far

as discipline and drugs go, both

with inmates and staff.”

Despite his extended stay in Cyprus, homesickness was not a factor.

“What is home? referred to Canada as home when was in Cyprus and Cyprus as home when 1

social contribution college gradu-

make

— Page 5

2002

,

to college

series on

ates

11

1

win-

am

ners will be announced Feb. 24,

1

2003

lived out of an

in Toronto.

Canada.” he

in

army

“I’ve

said.

duffel bag for

the last 25 years.”

By TORI SUTTON

The taxing job of working

in

a

high-profile position in a country

When

Harry Stavrou graduated

of 750,000 people took

from the eriminology and law enforcement program at Conestoga College

Stavrou found vate

-

This lack of privacy and other

of time.

Now more past he

life.

back, but unlike in days

returning for any extended period

is

than 25 years

no longer

is

instead he

is

knowledge

later,

a student

1

busy sharing his vast with students in

contributing starting

police foundations programs.

again, Stavrou

who

Stavrou,

also earned a cer-

machine shop practice

on teaching as a

(Photo

Harry Stavrou, a

LASA and

teaching this

after

Conestoga College,

police foundations teacher at

fall

working

years

for five

guest lecture on terrorism to one of

is

degrees in political science

Afterwards, he was asked to teach a course part-time at

Stavrou has reclaimed his place at the front of the classroom this September after a five-year absence during which time he returned to

Stratford.

Letting his strong interest in the

armed forces and police work lead him, Stavrou made an about face and joined the military, specializing in terrorism and security. Not only did he investigate service and

criminal offences, he worked with numerous police forces regarding

of their specialized response teams, including those responsible dealing with terrorism the

training

and hostage-taking

situations.

After leaving the military,

it

was

Don

Conestoga

Stavrou takes pride in teaching

changed Stavrou’s career path.

his students to the best of his abili-

Douglas,

who

at

taught Stavrou in the

early ’70s invited

his

him

the school.

Soon after, a full-time position became available in the Law and

he applied for the job. “Teaching was something I never thought about,” he said. “I never

over flu shot. The next vaccine Canadians may be lining up is

one

that protects

them from

smallpox.

Believe virus

is

it

or not, the smallpox

once again getting attenbeing successfully

After

tion.

eradicated in 1979, the highly contagious and often deadly disease is

being treated as a possible bioterrorist threat.

However, he realizes now that teaching is one of the most fulfilling jobs he could ever have. “I love it. The feeling you get knowing you are helping out,” he grads call to

tell

This past summer, four public forums were held in major cities across the U.S. The forums hosted

by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), posed ques-

With the recent

terrorist

and

bioterrorist attacks in the U.S., both

^he

American and Canadian gov-

Cyprus

to

work

and policing, he knew the need for help was there.

knew they wanted a criminologist to work with the Cyprus Police Service,” he said. “So I got some more information, and I got the job.” -

A one-year leave from the school quickly turned into five years.

began working

at the police

He

travelled overseas multiple times

the last few

in

head-

New

to a poll published in

England

Journal

of

Medicine, 61 per cent of Americans would want to be vaccinated if it

were an available option.

Practices

mends

that

Soon

Development

and

Research

representing Cyprus

Division,

in

dealings with Interpol and Europol.

Europe regularly and even back to Canada on one occasion, attending conferences on organized crime and other issues. The most important was the Anti-Mafia symposium in Italy where major heads of the organized crime units were present from all over the world. It was after officials noticed his good work that Stavrou began an even more challenging position. He agreed to take on the job of director of Cyprus’s prisons department. “There were some major problems in the prison system,” he said. Although he will not say whether

he feels he corrected the main problems in the system, he admits

some

making

to

changes.

assisting with policing organized

“There

Services (DHHS) expects to have stockpiled 286 million doses of the smallpox immunization by the end of

Human

and

December. That would be enough to protect every American citizen. Tara Madigan, media relations Canada, says

officer with Health

nation guidelines for smallpox. Their main concern was should the public be vaccinated for smallpox in the event of a smallpox outbreak

According

in the country.

he became the head of the police’s

quarters in Nicosia, specializing in

sen

Though Committee

the virus.”

in

the Canadian government has cho-

Canada The Russia. Communicable Disease Report published Jan. 15, “there are concerns, however, that other countries may have access to

homeland

tions concerning the current vacci-

the

that

finds himself

weeks attending in his

no doubt

is

significant

in

my

military

Being back in Canada is giving a chance to relax and get away from the celebrity status he had

him

achieved in Cyprus.

He

is

enjoying

newly found private life and shorter workdays, unlike the 1 8- to 20-hour days he put in while in

his

Cyprus. “I will be sticking to my desk for awhile. This will be the only thing I am piloting,” he laughed.

Having travelled to numerous countries and explored many positions in his field, Stavrou finds

it

hard to pick which one he enjoys the most. “I love the military, policing and teaching equally,” he said. “I have

been very fortunate to have them all. If I had to do it all again, I would do exactly the same things. I wouldn’t trade them for anything in the world.”

“I’m happy with what I have done in my life. If I died tomorrow, I would die a happy man because I have achieved

my

goals.”

for possible bioterrorism threat

immunization.

Organization Health (WHO), remaining virus stocks reference were sent to two laboratories in the U.S. and

2002 stated

me

they have gotten good jobs, it makes me very happy. “There’s no amount of money

or bioterrorist attack?

WHO

Conestoga

at

still

conferences as a specialist

The position took him across

“I

After the official eradication of the disease was declared by the

World

students are

with the country’s police force. The position there did not exactly fall into his lap, but through his extensive knowledge of the country

it.”

“When

if

not succeeding.

his

Security program. Stavrou applied for the position and the rest is history. Even now, he is not sure why

said.

he said,

all,

not getting jobs, then the program

to present a

classes.

considered

After

ty.

ernments are re-examining their smallpox regarding policies

Move

for

Tori Sutton)

just returned to

crime groups

that can top that feeling.”

that

Douglas,

Canada prepares Bv SHANNON McBRIDE

teach

field.

a routine visit to an old teacher,

from the University of Waterloo. During that time, he used his machining knowledge to help pay his way through school, working at Cooper Energy Services and T. Ctay Manufacturing Co., both in

Canada. Despite

Cyprus.

in

tificate in 1976, he put his knowledge to good use in industrial environments. After completing a Bachelor of Arts degree at Wilfrid Laurier University in 1985, he went on to earn bachelor and master of

arts

By

career.

After earning his machining cer-

to

leading a jet-set lifestyle, having

at

the college in 1976, never planned

to

eventually

factors

drew him back

Conestoga’s law and security and

tificate in

toll.

“Everywhere 1 went, people knew me. 1 was on the news and in the newspapers,” he said. “Even if I was in the most remote place, someone always knew who was.”

1975, he did not foresee

in

Stavrou

its

hard to have a pri-

it

Advisory Immunization on (ACIP) still recomonly scientists and labthe

personnel be vaccinated before a confirmed report of the disease, the U.S. is still taking oratory

major precautions. The U.S. Department of Health

“search

a

contain”

and

infants

pox

were immunized for small-

as part of a series of booster

the possible

immunized in 1977 and Canadian Forces had their last

tion clinics for those health-care

being

Currently, Health Canada has 365,000 doses of the vaccine, but

Madigan

said there

that the vaccine

is

cine to protect Canadians in a multiple outbreak scenario." she said.

would be vaccinated. “This method was recommendHealth World the by ed Organization and is proven his-

AdvisoryNational The Commission on Immunization

Madigan

Part of the reason

Canada all

why

Health

says they won't vaccinate

citizens

is

the risk that

comes

with getting the shot. “One in ever)’ one million people vaccinated

Madigan

will

die

from

it.

said.

But this never bothered the government before. Up until 1972,

(NACI)

is

vac-

currently working on a

plan for immunization that consults with key public health

new

Canada. The plan, which is to be completed by the end of November, includes immunizing not only laboratory workers. but also first responders. The

officials across

objective

is to

vaccinate a prelim-

of 500 emergency paramedics and other medical workers who would be in

inary

figure

workers,

Facts about Smallpox;

a possibility

could be diluted to

of an outbreak the ring of people who have been in contact with the

torically,”

workers.

shots in 1988.

immunize more people. “Our goal is to have enough

said.

need of immuniza-

shots. Health workers only stopped

approach. Rather than vaccinating every Canadian citizen, in the event

virus

contact with a potential outbreak. The plan also deals with first

WTiat Smallpox

|

is it? is

a highly

infectious respiratory disease.

How is it spread? Smallpox is spread directly from person to person through airborne droplets released from •

the lungs of an infected person

through coughs or sneezes. What are the symptoms? • The symptoms of smallpox are high fever, fatigue, aches

and pains, headache and a rash covering the entire body. How is it treated? •

There

ment The

is

no

specific treat-

vaccine,

if

received

within four days after exposure, can lessen the severity of or even

prevent the illness.


.

— SPOKE, November

Page 6

News

2002

11,

.

CSI president lobbies for government

Students,

officials

Provincial

for

Jon Olinski, president of the College Student Alliance (CSA), as well as president of Conestoga

Queen’s

Hamilton Mountain. Bountrogianni had a lot of insight into OSAP

Students Incorporated, highlighted a position paper created by his

issues.

organization, which has seven rec-

WADE

By TANNIS

Having a doctorate in education Member of the being and

and media gathered at Park on Oct. 30 to discuss the Assistance

Student

Ontario

"I

Program.

The

and

who

made

Marie

Dr.

Universities

Bountrogianni.

Colleges

for

is

doing,” she said.

’Colleges are severely underfunded and minor changes can be

panel of four speakers, including Critic

disgusted with what the

government

press conference featured a

Liberal

am

(MPP)

Parliament

would make

also sponsored

OSAP

the

to

life

criteria that

easier for a lot of

CSA

The

is

zation that advocates on behalf of

Ontario’s college

They

students.

from different colleges

OSAP

at

Queen’s Park on Oct. 30.

my

application,”

minister of training, colleges and universities

called College Education Breaking

already soaring tuition rate for col-

the Bank.

leges.

in

CSA’s position paper asks

themselves by saying that they are always meeting with representatives from different colleges and universities across the province to

discuss

the

institutions that should

fill

cedures surrounding OSAP,” said Olinski.

assistance to students.

OSAP

didn’t get

I

to take out a

the students that

the job niche yet they don’t

Executive director, and only

full-

CSA, Thyagi

of credit from the bank,” Gropp said. “And even now I am in

time employee of the

danger of running out (of money)

gets through to the Ontario govern-

before the school year

ment.

line

is

that students should

“This is an alarming fact especially considering that during the 1990s college students experienced

their

OSAP

before the

at

start

DeLanerolle hopes

up.”

year.

currently

the

be support-

Bountrogianni.

I

$9,350 for a two-semester school

is

They graduate

are

have enough money to lobby the government for funding,” said Dr.

$40,000

Cindy Keleher-Hanson, a mature student from St. Lawrence College, traveled from Kingston to speak out about OSAP. She told the audience

The maximum

know why colleges when they are

taken for granted

ed.

“Because

surrounding

issues

the

program-related costs as eligible expenses thus providing more

for a single

the

OSAP.

Ontario government to recognize

was forced

defended

caucus

Conservative

“I don’t

One recommendation

what the government

planned on doing about OSAP. Members of the Progressive

when Gropp

Photo paper, camera equipment and developing costs add an additional $8,000 per year onto the

least

message

their

“All of the recommendations in

our paper are

real, tangible

mendations.

We

are

recom-

not saying

give students free tuition or even

be able to access

interest-free

them

two weeks

to

we

loans;

improve the

just

criteria

want and

other basic procedures involved in

of the school year.

“There are supplies and books

Snowy weather catches

/I VISION PROBLEMS

the

OSAP process.”

drivers off guard

(nw ifvitittn.

REOXilllZETHE

By CARLA SANDHAM

SIGNS OF STROKE

Mother Nature gave Waterloo HEART AND STROKE FOUNDATION

tu lie &tu;. ».

WHEN YOU

TROUBLE SPEAKING Ttmoonry

of

t r-ofottru-ncefsianci^ *p««th

CKTIiCII 9ii£

didn’t even consider

press conference had access to a copy of the CSA’s position paper

said.

College Student Alliance, speaks at a press conference about

Toronto, was denied from OSAP. “Because of the nature of my program there are a lot of fees and expenses on top of tuition that in

reviewing

the

During question period she spoke of the press conference earlier in the day and asked the

Humber

student at

yet?”

isn’t in

After the press conference. Dr. Bountrogianni brought the matter

assistance

said.

“The loan maximum

also the president of the

to legislature.

post-secondary sector. Everyone in attendance

at

OSAP

audience. Ashley Gropp, a creative

OSAP

student with no dependants hasn’t been changed since 1984,” he

is

jumped

period, inflation

because their

across the province, and a broad network of stakeholders in the

He continued by highlighting major points from the CSA paper and used his experiences from being the current student union president at Conestoga College.

who

same

first

about 20 per cent as well. Two students joined the panel to share their personal stories with the

College

a non-profit organi-

identified 1 1 recommendations, seven of which are to do with changing existing criteria and pro-

Olinski,

before the

photography

teria.

“Together our organization has

CSI president Jon

that

need to purchase day of school,” she -said. “What happens if people need to pay their rent and they can’t students

that

Olinski pointed out that during

ommendations to the Ontario government for changes to OSAP cri-

councils

(Photo by Tannis Wade)

a 132 per cent increase in tuition levels.”

have a membership of 15 student

people.”

the event.

OSAP changes

se^imediate medical attention

DIZZINESS

ifwtibawattifof

iillMlrai

lliege synit^oBis.

eiptdiUs' viddf Guiy of tbt above

Region

its first

taste

of winter after

dropping two to four centimetres of

snow Nov. 1 While some people jumped

for

joy at the sight of the white flakes falling, others battled the snow’s repercussions on the roads.

Canadian Forces

Army

The Lord Jesus Christ is the Learn about Him.

more

Innis, who was driving near Woodstock during the snowfall.

summer

name and to:

Staff Sgt. Scott Diefenbaker, of Waterloo regional police, said 75

Bible Study,

crashes were reported in the region

Zion United Reformed Church, 1238 Main

throughout the year.

Sheffield,

that day. “It

was a

little

more than double

St.

ON LOR

IZO

the daily average,” he said.

Eighteen accidents resulted in

minor personal injuries, while 52 crashes caused vehicle damage only. The other five were hit and

CLASSIFIED

CLASSIFIED

couldn’t see the road

correspondence.

address

Call 624-4393

“I

than three feet in front of me,” said

Please send

employment

ble.

Bible Study by

and adventure. Full-time

student,

said driving conditions were horri-

a

challenge

programmer/analyst

er

difference.

Reserve

Employment with

Daniel Innis, a first-year comput-

CLASSIFIED

CLASSIFIED

runs.

PART TIME STUDENTS

Children's International

Summer Villages

has adult

leadership travel opportunities

Wanted 75 low income earners looking to change

Learn$ave can help you turn every $10 into $30 for school, training or their lives.

starting

your

own

business.

Call 743-2460 ext 411.

Leam$ave

is

Lutherwood

a project of

CODA

and

summer 2003. Candidates

must be 21 yrs or older and have an interest in peace education, culture, children fun.

CISV

is

and

a non-profit, vol-

unteer organization. For

more

information attend one infor-

mation night C.I. in

at

Grand River

Kitchener on Thursday

is

sponsored by the Government of Canada.

for

November 21 November 22

OR Friday at

7:30 pm.

www.cisvwaterloo.org.

(Photo by Valentina Rapoport)

However, the short-lived winter weather extended beyond Waterloo Region and caught many other motorists off guard.

Erom

first

snowfall

certainly

and

winter

feel the first

came

rather

“I’d

preview of

too soon.

no

snow

until

Christmas vacation,” said Balazs Igli,

dent.

an electrical engineering stu“It’s

bad

for driving

and

I

changes things,” Diefenbaker said. He added once the snow falls motorists should get up earlier,

don’t like having to walk to school

down, brake sooner and become aware of the bad condi-

es assistant at the college, agreed,

tions present.

lasts too

slow

However, some people want ignore the inevitable

to

snowy condi-

snow from

her car at Conestoga College after the snowfall on Nov. tions

Dufferin County north to

Huntsville and east to Northumberland County, 130 accidents were reported by noon Nov. 1.

“The

Third-year nursing student Kristen Planta cleans the

from residence in it.” Shirley Donezyk, a career saying the snow

came

1

snowfall is always exciting. They added they are looking forward to participating in winter activities.

Bryan Smith, from Environment Canada, said the region’s first snowfall was actually later than usual this year. He said about one centimetre of snow usually

servic-

too early and

long for her liking.

career services officer, said the

Smith also said the winter

first

fore-

cast will be “milder than normal”

due

However, she and Sara Free, a

falls in

the region in October.

to the El

Nino

effect,

which

the

region should begin experiencing

by December.

I


News WADE

would have

1

gel

Outside

College

the

Allianee oirices

Student

loan

a

go

to

OSAP

and

pay

my

increase

her

to

order to

in

wanting

Not

to

Keleher-Hanson's

already climbing debt load, Cindy

rapidly.

rcfuserl to apply for

hands shook The brisk autumn morning,

combined with

Now,

ing in her stomach, did nothing to

Cindy

41 -year-old

St.

Lawrence

paper

position

proposes

recommendations Ontario government for seven

changes

to

the

to

specific

Ontario Student

the

Assistance Program (OSAP). told her heart-wrenching

Cindy

I

became

"1

bring up

only

OSAP.”

One

of the recommendations in eSA’s paper states that students must be able to access their OSAP loans at least two weeks prior to the

the

current mandate in place for

OSAP

son

provides students with their

money on

loan

good enough Cindy said. things that I need to

“This simply

in

fees that

any other maintenance

came

up.

of funding, the organization could no longer cover all of her

To do

costs.

to ;o

cover

would continue uui costs but maintenance cosis mamienancc

said they

my

really

mation will be

lost,”

she explained.

Cindy needs a home Although it is not

this,

computer.

situation

bad and

that

required for her course, her special needs make it a necessity to ensure success.

ous learning also suffering

because

lems,” she said. After hearing Cindy’s story executive director for the CSA, Thyagi DeLanerolle wanted to help.

is

it

disabilities,

Cindy

“Thyagi is sending me home with a computer,” Cindy said with an awkward smile. “Then she is going to work with the president of the

is

This has caused her to rely on cheques from the govern-

for a while.

years.

want myself I

complete school to better so I can get a job I love that will

to

speaking

WADE

Ashley Gropp looks

like

came came any nor-

mal college student. Her passion for art shows through in her funky clothes and unique jewelry. All Ashley wants is for the Ontario government to hear her story. She spoke at a press conference at Queen’s Park on Oct. 30, Student

Ontario

the

about

Assistance Program (OSAP).

“My name is Ashley Gropp and 1 am a second-year creative photography student at Humber College in Toronto,” she began. Ashley had always had an interest in photography while growing

Her decision to specialize in the craft became final while she was in Grade 2 and living in her hometown of Brussels. Ont.

up.

1

knew my

career aspirations were around commercial photogra"I

Humber

phy, therefore

s

program

was a great fit, she said. Ashley applied tor college and OSAP at the same time. She was tatic when she opened her "

«

cp'.ance

from

Humber

that

in the mail.

But her dreams

screeching halt shortly

to a

OSAP

was not granted any

funding,” she said. “Their reasoning was that my parents made too

much money and

we

therefore

fell

lifeguard

full

time in the

During the school year when the pools were at local pools.

she

closed

restaurants

worked and

at

various

a community

at

newspaper. parents try and help as much as they can with my education, and now my younger brother has start-

“My

in the middle-income bracket.”

one of four children in her family. Her two older siblings had already gone through the twice system post-secondary

Ashley

a

as

enabled her to work

summer

after.

“I

training

special

is

before her.

are also in tight situations.

Ashley

said.

whatever assistance

their

childhood education. Around the

was taking

ents are helping with his

baby as

history

my

and

brother

then

set

out

tor

Both of them got through their education with loans from OSAP so Ashley assumed it would be the

same

for her.

"I think

my

siblings got

parents can manage.

OSAP

“My

brother par-

well." It is

teacher's college." she said.

fees, forced her to take out a line of

from a bank.

led

my

credit

contributing factors

$40,000 line of from the bank which my dad

me

to take out a

co-signed for,” she said. “He also helps me by making the required interest payments for

because

I

am

unable to do

heavy and

Currently. Ashley's

difficult for

Ashley's parents

to gi\'e their kids as

they w'ould like

to.

much money Their home

as in

Brussels has had two mortgages w hich places their obligations else-

expenses

living

equipment supplies, ink “.All

where.

like

heat,

I

rentals,

film,

is thank god my only tw o years in length couldn't afford to go an>

post-secondary education. .Ashley worked while in high school. Her

related

expenses combined with her standard tuition and ancillary

diploma program she

is 1

longer than that." she said.

Bv

feels that

OSAP failed to recognize

her family’s true financial situation with their mortgages and four

dependents.

“OSAP

also failed to see that

on

$16,000

in

top of tuition there

is

prosram-related fees that are accu-

mulated over two years." The College Student Alliance, represented by their president Jon Olinski. spoke out about

program

fees at the press conference. s posiHe pointed out the

CSA

College called paper Education Breaking the Bank,

tion

includes for

seven recommendations

changes

The

fifth

to

OS.AP

criteria.

recommendation

in the

paper states that the OS.AP needs assessment must recognize program-related expienses as eligible

expenses and provide

adequate

financial assistance to students to

and more.

Because Brussels is drive from where Humber is in Toronto. Ashle\ needed to relocate. The cost of rent and other li\ ing-

because

digital

can say

because the criteria was ditterent se\ en and nine years ago w hen the\ first applied. she said. Knowing she w as going to pursue

a two-hour

hydro

and food. “Right now I am paying S2.000 in tuition. $8,000 in program-related fees and $6,000 in rent." she said. Fees include photographic paper, developing costs, camera and other

prouram

"

me

so.

per w'eek. This meagre income is not even enough to cover her basic

first

my

time,

cover fees

Both Ashley and her brother

ed his

also has a dependent and

same

OSAP

day of classes.”

demanding w'orkload at school allow'S her to work only six hours

receive

sister

assistance sooner than the first

who

“All of

hear her voice as a representation of many others who are experiencing similar problems. “I am struggling to make ends meet and I hope the Ontario

up for other students

to stand

credit

are also having a hard time going to school,” she said. By speaking at Queen’s Park, Cindy hopes the government will

the press conference

was

year of college too,”

took law enforcement and then got her diploma in early

“My

at

“My situation is not unique. I am sure there are hundreds, if not thousands, of other students who

government hears my story and recognizes the importance of the recommendation made by the CSA around providing

These minor contributions will definitely help Cindy through her schooling, but her main goal for

Photoqraphy student demands Bv TANNIS

a proper desk and print-

er.”

have already been living off tax-

money

me

to get

ment to support her for many

Lawrence

student association at St.

from chronic degen-

disability

payer’s

physical prob-

accommodate

erative disc disease.

“I

my

may sound

she told the audience with a waver in her voice. But it only gets worse. On top of being a single mom struggling to provide for both herself and her son and having numer-

my mind or all of the infor-

fresh in

know my

is,”

She needs to type out her notes after each class, as she eannot study from her handwritten notes. “I have to do it while it is still

Halfway through her program, Cindy was told that, due to lack

“They

“I

financially, she also has a number of leeuming disabilities tbat inake school even more difficult for her.

was well on her way. At first, the program paid for her tuition as as

Marie Bountrogianni.

Dr.

isn’t

“There are have for my courses before the start of school.” Cindy is not only struggling

St.

Kingston. in the form of gvarvt-S €tott\ tV\e vocational rcViabilitation services program she

day of

first

Ashley Gropp and Cindy Keleher-Hanson tell their personal stories regarding OSAP at a press conference on Oct. 30 at Queen’s Park. Gropp is a creative photography student at Humber College in Toronto and Keleher-Hanson is in hotel restaurant management at St. Lawrence College in Mountain, Kingston. The event was sponsored by Liberal Education Critic and MPP for Hamilton

for a lot of people,”

began her post-secondary education in 1992 when she enrolled in a general arts and

Lawrence College With financial help

the

school.

first

sciences

(Photo by Tannis Wade)

beginning of their academic year.

The

at

Resources

Canada (HRDC) she said. The grant covers

“At least with this program you can get your money before the start of school, which is not true with

me.”

program

first

her tuition and books.

by working small retail jobs, but education was still very important

Cindy

pro-

now because

school

in

Human

a

grant,"

a sin-

my

enrolled in the

Development

her voice.

in

“I struggled to

am

of

gle parent,” she started with obvi-

ous nervousness

1

year of the two-year program.

from across the province.

“At the age of 19

myself so

for

management gram at St. Lawrence.” Cindy is currently in her

numerous jour-

that included

well

1

hotel restaurant

story to the small audience in atten-

to

later.

have always been a great can make almost anything.” should she said. "But 1 knew

work

at

Queen’s Park on Oct. 30, sponsored by Liberal education critic Dr. Marie Bountrogianni. The primary focus of the day was to publicize a position paper prepared by the College Student Alliance (CSA).

nalists

years

10

giving college yet another

1

was held

press conrerence

dance

almost

is

cook,

her soul.

The

was

"1

try.

College student was about to bear

A

OSAP and

forced to drop out of school.

the buttertlies danc-

calm her nerves.

The

— Page 7

tuition,” she said.

Toronto, Cindy

in

2002

11,

mom fights for better OSAP

Single By TANNIS

SPOKE, November

the time .Ashley completes her will

ha\e

incurred a debt of $40,000. She

co\er these expenses. “If all of the factors

in

my

situa-

w ere taken into consideration a student like me. w ho is definiteh’ in need, more than likely would have from the assistance received

tion

Ontario government.


8

Page 8

— SPOKE, November

11

News

2002

,

Arnold makes his Bv MICHELLE TAYLOR Arnold rides a bus and a subway to get to work every morning. Typical for Toronto comJelf

muters, but this particular

people. The 39-year-old Arnold, supervi-

technical

of the

sor

assistants

pathologists’

and

staff

the

at

Coroner’s Building located at 26 Grenville St., has been involved with or assisted with approximately

shark

the

So, Arnold

Grade 13 and took marine biology at

the University of Guelph, but

things were about to change. “As I progressed through my first year or

two,

realized job opportunities

I

were going

be few and

to

While off during the summer, Arnold acquired a job at a hospital

my

job was

Bom and raised in Brantford, Arnold was an only child. His mother worked at the Brantford

in forensics. “Part of

General Hospital as secretary to the director of the laboratory. His father worked for Gates Rubber of Canada as a shipping receiver. Arnold attended Prince Charles Public School and North Park

continued working at the hospital laboratory for four summers. When he returned to the

Collegiate.

he was young he wasn’t

interested in forensics, but

remem-

bers watching medical and legal television shows.

used

to

tated

watch a

shows

“My mom

lot

and

I

of police-orien-

like

Streets

of

Francisco,” Arnold said.

He was

also interested in science

and did

well academically in high school.

Besides science and crime shows, Arnold was also into sports playing, hockey and lacrosse. “I was into martial arts quite a lot,” he said, “as well as scuba diving.” However, his main interest was sharks.

12 or

“From the time I was about 13, when the movie Jaws

out it sparked my interest in marine biology.” Arnold became a

came

doing autopsies. ing and

I

found

it

fascinat-

didn’t bother me.”

it

He

“People

come

John Andreasen never imagined he would one day be studying in Sydney, Australia. It all started during his first year at Conestoga College, when he stopped to talk to a representative from the University of Western

Sydney,

who had

an information

set up in the hallway. had no idea. All I knew is that I would be going into general business,” Andreasen said. The 22-year-old former materials

booth “I

who

management

student,

ed ue

has decided to contin-

last June,

graduat-

his education through the uni-

versity link offered at

College.

Conestoga

Leaving on Feb.

Andreasen

will

attend

19,

the

ill. So, after he was done school, he was hired on full time. “I had a good education with enough experience to get me going,” Arnold said. “It was

sweet.”

He

year.

though my education was complete (after college),” Andreasen said. “I had also set a goal that I would go to Australia within five years. That (studying at UWS) just happened to kill two birds with one stone.” Conestoga College currently has university linkage arrangements with a number of schools. These links give Conestoga graduates the opportunity to obtain both baccalaureate and graduate degrees quicker. Schools involved in the arrangements include: UWS, Northwood University and “I didn’t feel as

started

a pathologists’

as

a couple of assistant and years became a senior pathologists’ assistant. Just two and a half years ago he became chief supervisor. Recently, he was promoted to after

manager of the forensic

acting

“I’m

still

UWS

at

are actually saving

compared

to

money

students that attend

com-

“While

it’s

very expensive,

it is

a

two years of university. Since Andreasen graduated from a three-year program, he could continue on and obtain a master’s degree from UWS by studying for

as

an additional year.

in a higher expense.

for

and when

I

go then he said.

and

faster root,” he said. Kelly argues without a link agreement, students are not given

much

I

would

be

UWS

because he just finished paying his first-semester tuition fee of $5,800 and he is in the process of paying $2,300 for his flight. According to Ron Kelly of Representatives, a Hamilton-based

UWS

expect to pay between $16,000 and year.

to

attend

UWS

This includes

all

for

one

expenses

such as tuition fees, airfare, living costs

and a student visa which costs

$290.

Having

money he

saved

only

will need,

half

the

Andreasen

is

looking for a student loan that will

Building.

Arnold also was a flying instructor 10 to 12 years ago while still working as a pathologists’ assistant.

“My

Andreasen hopes

in

studying

at

UWS

will help make his resume more noticeable to employers. “Seeing you have a university on your resume that is totally different from everybody else’s is going to

In addition, he also believes the

him

trip will benefit

greatly

“I’m sure

will

I

better outlook

me

on

come back he

life,”

a different perspective

world ver-

them

(students) to a

new

world,” he said. “You’re not going

come back the same person.” Having 10 to 15 per cent of its student population made up of

to

very expensive,

a degree that ends up to be a cheaper and it

is

faster route.”

Ron

Kelly,

KOM representative

international

UWS

students,

has

proven to be popular among Canadian students in the past. According to Kelly, more than 1 ,000 Canadian students have studied at

UWS

in the past four years.

“The success at

few things to consider. who work in this industry don’t usually come here by acci-

are

a

“People

he said. According to Arnold, the work is very high powered and graphic. “Unpleasant is an understatement.

dent,”

We are dealing with people who have been killed in accidents or murdered in many cases,” he said. “Sometimes they may not have been seen for a while, so they tend not to smell so good.”

Someone who

UWS,”

interested in

investigative side to them, Arnold said. You need to be able to work with people. “This is not a oneman show; it’s a huge team effort.” The Coroner’s Building is an educational place as well, so you need to be open-minded and be willing

to teach people.

On family.

of everything his life Arnold still finds time for

top

involves,

He lives in Markham with his

wife and two young daughters. His

wife

sociology

studied

at

University of Guelph and

stay-at-home

is

the

now

a

mom. Although his bus

and subway ride takes him 75 minwork and 90 minutes tc get home, that doesn’t seem to faze him. “I have a lot of time to think when I’m sitting on the subway.” utes to get to

Australia roommates will be a friend and former classmate who also graduated from management studies at Conestoga College. With less than five months to go before he leaves, Andreasen feels as though the trip is

still

far away.

“I can’t start counting the days it’s still

too far away and

I

get too excited,” he said, adding,

“I’m also excited about going

to

ratio has

been high

Kelly said.

who

Upgrading

plish in Sydney.

travel to

also

neighbouring countries.

Hoping

to

one day have a career

in investment banking, Andreasen

he could move into now, but has decided feels

his career to

attend

UWS instead. “I could go out and get the job I want now but this (attending UWS)

said.

who have been he has heard noth-

is

after school.”

is

contact

Andreasen

“Depending on my cash flow, I want to go to New Zealand, Thailand and surrounding areas,” he said, adding, “There’s definitely also going to be a lot of surfing

to Sydney, said

in

not

is

looking forward to seeing major tourist attractions, such as the Great Barrier Reef, and hopes to

with other students

is

his education

the only thing he plans to accom-

benefit.

A

is

forensics usually has a bit of an

Being able to complete a degree faster and cheaper is not the only

Andreasen,

i

pathology, Arnold said there

sic

with a

said. “It

Kelly agreed. “It takes

!

university.”

sus the eastern world.”

obtain a baccalaureate or

on a

personal basis.

graduate degree. This often results

it’s

said.

because

said.

od

to

was

intention at the time

will give

to all

Ontario colleges, students should

“I’m still heavily involved in a photography studio I essentially run myself.” His skills in photography landed him yet another job as photographer for the forensic pathology unit at the Coroner’s

in terms of the western

KOM

office that represents

do weddings anymore.

attend university for a longer peri-

defi-

he’ll

doesn’t

lege diploma and must therefore

“While

Andreasen doesn’t think

$20,000

recognition for their col-

between now

the lottery

enough, Arnold is also an avid photographer. He started a photography business a few years ago originally as a portrait/wedding studio, but it took up a lot of his weekends and so he

to

stand out right away,” Andreasen

degree that ends up to be a cheaper

win

organizing

for

to relocate.

rest.

in the

two-year program receive credit for one year of university and those coming from a three-year program receive credit

I

review cases, autopsies begin. “It's my job to oversee the whole thing and make sure everything runs smoothly,” Arnold said. “I’m

continue studies

will

a

able to afford two years at

one

assis-

getting close to

local universities after college.

his bachelor of business administration in just

who was

retirement, fell

in Alberta.

“If

to

If that’s not

assistants

pathologists’

full-time

tants,

college, year university D'Youville College, where nursing students can gain bachelor degrees, and Athabasca University college graduates

morning meeting

the

priate.”

middle of figuring the money thing out,” he said. However, according to Kelly, students who attend the link program

from

After

“I’m responsible for co-ordinating it and deciding if it’s appro-

Around Christmastime, one of the

“So we

nitely stay,”

of

here by accident,”

and pathologist’s

Arnold spoke

Western Sydney (UWS) where he will work to gain

University

in this

help him pay for the

UWS,

across Toronto and local units around the city.

sions

regional

and tours.” Arnold also answers a lot of phone calls and inquiries. “A lot of filming goes on down here,” he

Saginaw Valley State University,

At

crucial because

slide presentations

both in Michigan, Buffalo State College, a fully accredited four-

ing

is

police and visitors often want to attend. He speaks to police divi-

supervisor of technical staff

Conestoga graduate By VALENTINA RAPOPORT

time of autopsies

Jeff Arnold,

with some people who put him in touch with the supervisor of pathologists’ assistants at the time. “Barry (the supervisor) was from Brantford as well and knew the person who had trained me at the said.

all

arrived and

Toronto,”

who work

takes

said.

with.”

Arnold

He

charts

industry don’t usually

Coroner’s Building was affiliated

hospital,”

photography. When asked what characteristics it takes to be in the field of foren-

early and organiz-

also responsible

of Guelph, Arnold focused his major on biology and minored in biomedical science. “Some of these courses were geared towards pathology and toxicology, things that could be related to medicine in a way.” At the end of Arnold’s fourth year of university, he took a tour of the Centre of Forensic Sciences (CFS). “Because Fd been doing autopsies for a number of years, I knew about the CFS,” Arnold said, “which the

tour,

in

from bodies that have summarizes them for a morning meeting. Scheduling the

work

ing the day’s work.

perfect,” he said.

University

During his

work

to

the

A typical day for Arnold involves arriving to

Arnold said. At the time Arnold was dating his future wife Andrea. Her family lived in Toronto so Arnold could have a place to live on the weekends he was asked to work. “It was

between.”

laboratory. This sparked his interest

15,000 autopsies in his career.

When

weekend

far

I

be an airline pilot one day, he “Things didn’t work out.” According to Arnold, the economy took a “nose dive” and a number of years ago the airlines followed, so that is when he took up

colleague’s illness.

and seemed to fit into the group. Within a week of returning to university, he received an important phone call from his mother. “Barry had called and wanted to know if I would be available every other

Brantford after

left

the dead

pathology unit and dispatch office at the Coroner’s Building due to a

mon.” Arnold spent a couple of weekCoroner’s the visiting ends Building in August of that summer

expert in Jaws.”

com-

muter doesn’t have the typical Toronto job. He works with dead

Matt Hooper,

among

com-

already had something in

shark “fanatic” collecting shark paraphernalia such as jaws, teeth and books. “I had this vision of

being

living

part of a personal agenda,” he

Anyone wanting further on UWS can visit an

informa-

at an internacan also give students an advantage over others who

ing but

good things. “What I’ve heard from people (who have been to Australia)

tion

studied locally.

degree

sounds like so much fun,” he said. Andreasen will be living in a townhouse near the university with

between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. Students interested can also reach the KOM by logging onto consultants

willing

five

degree obtained

tional university

According

to

Kelly,

employers will see a

UWS

as a sign that the student

is

many

other students.

Among

his

tion booth at the college

ww w.kom @ worldchat.

informa-

on Nov.

1

,


News

SPOKE, November

11

,

2002

— Page 9

Marijuana popular with Conestoga students By NICK HORTON The names of the students in this story have been changed to protect their identity.

Whatever college you

attend,

whatever post-secondary education you choose, drugs won’t be far away.

Conestoga College has 5,300 full-time students. To say drugs are not present on campus would be turning a blind eye to the obvious. In fact, the types of drugs

most

commonly used on campus may surprise some. Marijuana, the drug

of choice for

common

ly

many

students,

the

in

is fair-

Conestoga

College residence.

would say 80 per cent of people in residence have tried smoking “I

pot,” said John, a dealer

who

lives

for

Other drugs of choice include

magic mushrooms, also known as zoomers, and shrooms, which are widespread around the college are a Mushrooms campus.

among

students because

substances;

different

five

cannabinoids, (marijuana, hash) cocaine, (cocaine, crack, ben-

amphetamines, zoylecognine) methampheta(amphetamines, mines, speed) opiates, (heroin, opium, codeine, morphine) and phencyclidine (PCP). “At least a third of the people at rez have done them (mushrooms) at

some

last

point

year

when

.

. .

was a point entire floor was

there

this

on mushrooms,” said

in residence.

favourite

they are fairly inexpensive and produce a psychedelic high. For many drug users mushrooms represent the line between a natural psychedelic high and a chemically induced high. Psilocybin and psilocin are the primary psychoactive substances in magic mushrooms and are not usually tested for in the standard drug test. The standard drug test checks

Joe, a dealer

in residence.

Another drug around campus, more so last year then this year, is It is meth (methamphetamine). also

known

crank,

as speed, crystal, glass,

and yaba. As the name

“speed” suggests, amphetamines mood, heighten endurance

elevate

fatigue, thus explain-

and eliminate

ing the drug’s popularity with students.

“Last year there was one guy

who had

meth, he didn’t even go to

school here.

He

lived in this

“This year there

a lot

is

ecstasy going around there

With the high costs of books, rent and other

tuition,

living

a wonder any ^iiuary student can afford to go to school, necessities,

it’s

5tuclentawards.com

wants

to

help bridge the money gap for students. As a free scholarship search service, it is devoted to helping high school seniors, university

was a

of

bit

K

dent like myself, there were a few drawbacks to the site. I found the questionnaire long and redundant. Many of the questions seemed to be irrelevant, but because of the specificity of some of the awards, the questions were necessary.

Who knew you could get an award or scholarship for being

cial assistance.

up

a member and personalized lists of scholarships and awards, which

activity?

Awards on the database can range from hundreds to thousands of dollars and are awarded based on a number of factors. Unlike many awards, which are based solely on stuperformance, academic

receive

are sent directly to their e-mail. All you have to do is complete a

eligible for a

that

in

.

.

possessing, or trafficking marijua-

na

the college has an

illegal,

is

obligation to enforce the law and

“We

link.

bom

outlines your interests and

.

its

students.

try to deal

with these situaIf we can

campus

it’s

a certain city or being hobby or

interested in a particular

also found the

number of

to actually see the little

awards

links 1

am

ridiculous. In

order to access your award matches, you must first wait for them to be calculated, and then click on a

QUIZ

What

As you

down on

scroll

the

next page, past a welcoming message and an ad featuring a picture of a credit card with your name on it, you find yet another link to your award matches. Finally, three Web pages later; you get to your personalized list of scholarships and bursaries.

One

thing

I

really liked about

PB4UGO G04THNX 6ALDY INUDATl Answers: Pee before you go

Go forth and multiply

Sexy lady that one

prospects at risk or

future

their

academic prospects

For many years, marijuana use

is

Almanac 2001

It

also seen as a blatant disregard

for the law.

Some

with

disagree

students

is

one

of them.

“A

of people are afraid of

lot

drugs because they don’t know a lot about them, a lot of people are

Most of the problems happen on campus are because of drunk people, not people that do

ignorant

.

.

.

that

drugs,” he said.

“You don’t have to look further then up and down the boulevard between the college and the residence after a Biz Bash,” said Frank, a drug user who prefers to smoke pot than drink. “ This is not because of speed freaks or chronics, this is because of students who are drunk off of beer the college sold them.”

woes

site was the number of scholarships available. It seemed to me, there, out it’s if

Web

studentawards.com has informa-

on it. Each award has a

tion

link, that provides criteria for the award and detailed information on how to apply for it. Most awards have

links

sponsor

to

sites

for extra

information.

The Web

site

for online right at the top of the page. I found this helpful since

stmcture that

is

to follow.

they are the easiest ones to apply for and usually the ones with the shortest deadlines. The rest of the

ing students deal with financial

alphabetically

awards and have country flags beside each of them to illustrate who listed

are

may

apply.

Another thing

I

liked about the

uses a simple concise and easy

While there are a few blinking ads on each page, they are mainly geared towards helpdifficulties.

Studentawards.com is a helpful and informative Web site for students in all areas, be it high school, college or university.

CLASSIFIEDS

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— The Old Farmers

at risk,”

said Hunter.

was that it listed the scholarships and awards you can apply

outgoing, enthusiastic indi-

knew

don’t want to see them put

their

the site

are these

actual license plates?

I

We

with financial

this is all helpful, espe-

hard part out of searching for scholarships. New users can sign

detailed online registration profile

these stereotypes and John

try

resolve the situation on

of study.

While

I

coke because they don’t know what is in it.” Although students often use chemicals, marijuana is still the dominant drug. “A lot of people peoseem to enjoy smoking pot ple should be able to enjoy marijuana if they want,” said John. Marijuana has been around for ages and will more then likely continue to be, but as long as growing, to

an advantage to students because

and college students find information on scholarships, bursaries, grants and other forms of finan-

become

being unruly and disrespectful.

(ketamine),”

said Jake.

cially for a struggling college stu-

to

John seldom sees cocaine, “Occasionally people do lines, sometimes it will be rolled up into joints. A lot of people don’t want

tions in a helping way.

hobbies, sports, interests, heritage fields of study. There are also specialized scholarships and bursaries for students of single parent homes, mature students, part-time students and seniors. Thousands of dollars set aside

Studentawards.com takes the

has been associated with students

more

last

field

go funds scholarship for unclaimed each year because students don’t know about them.

here,” said Hunter.

year

...

dentawards.com features many scholarships which use factors like and

they don’t get a criminal record.

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room

and would do at least a gram of meth a day. There are holes in my wall and I have a brand new door,” Jake said, pointing to two rather large rectangular patches on his wall and a door different from his roommate’s. Jake says he is not a dealer at residence. “I wouldn’t include myself because I don’t deal, I just know people,” he said. A1 Hunter, head of security for Conestoga College, confirmed the presence of meth on campus. “We have seen some meth, more so last year. We have also seen some of the newer drugs like ecstasy,” he

Cocaine, although a popular drug among students, doesn’t have a dominant presence at the Conestoga campus. “I have never seen or reported any cocaine, not to say it’s not

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.

Page 10

— SPOKE, November

News

2002

11,

m

Unwrapping the pleasure Most

By JASON MIDDLETON

wake up. The condoms

industry

ular flavoured

condoms.

remember be good sex. Just

time to

it’s

condoms

varieties, as well as the ever-pop-

you thought the words safe sex were no fun and meant latex and If

decreased' sensitivity

stores that sell

have normal, ribbed and coloured

safe sex can

still

bigger

is

Get the Facts

and better than ever. There are a multitude of condoms

(from Health Canada)

including ribbed, studded, flavoured and even glow-inavailable,

Store latex

the-dark varieties.

The

condom made by

nightlight

light,

Global Protection Corp. is the first FDA approved glow-in-the-dark

condom

to prevent both

applicator that

condom

the If

is

pulled

down

as

put into place.

is

pleasure

increasing

what

is

Condoms

an ingredient

article,

these foods could

The

article,

kill.

which was sent

eral e-mail accounts,

tame could be It

to sev-

claims aspar-

fatal if ingested.

also states

it

can cause lupus,

are best for you. (Photo by Jason Middleton)

Condoms come

in all different

shapes and

Shown

sizes.

age.

doms.

Do not use a condom after the

you’re looking for then the Pleasure Plus condom is for you. It has a large loose pouch of extra latex positioned

near the head and on the underside

the Emory University School of Medicine found that 69 per cent of women and 68 per cent of men preferred the Pleasure Plus con-

of the condom.

doms

the

leading brand of pleasure condoms. A 1996 survey in the Journal of

The loose pouch rubs underside of the penis and

enhances stimulation. A clinical study performed

is

concerned

happen

is conproduct

this will

the remains on store shelves. to

“Having seen pretty scary that the foods

we

if

happen,

this

eat

it is

at

is

it

so available in

on a regular

basis.”

She says she stays away from aspartame and plans to discourage her daughter from ingesting it. “Be very wary of consuming it in large quantities or don’t consume it says Angelo,

at all,”

who

has been

to Trojan-Enz, the nation’s

Diet soda

used in drug because it

also

is

rehabilitation helps people

clinics

move from a drugaddicted body to a healthier body, she says.

However, she says people should be aware of the negative affects of diet drinks. For example, diet ginger ale contains dyes that can dull the white of teeth. And, because aspar-

tame

is

taste

buds

overly sweet,

it

they are ingesting, but should focus

sugar.

But not everyone is convinced that aspartame is deadly. Linda Barton, a registered dieti-

The

written

article,

by

when heated that may cause symptoms similar to what people

a toxin

suffering

experience. thol in

multiple

v/it'a I'

sclerosis

men-

also claims the

“Food can affect your happiness and it can affect how you sleep.”

the founder of the U.S.-

Mission

International,

a

Possible

volunteer agency

concerned about the health issues of

cian

in

Kitchener,

shouldn’t believe read.

mal-based studies

aspartame.

says

people

everything

She says there in

some

are the

they ani-

literature

Angelo says the man, who suffered from Down's syndrome, was told to drink diet soda by his par-

do not prove aspartame. "To give a similar amount of aspartame to a human, you would have to fill a storage room with it and eat it everyday.” She says many foods have been lobbied against in the past and aspartame is the new item on the hit

ents, rather than regular soda,

list.

Jennifer Angelo, a child protection

worker

with

Children’s Aid

the

Owen

Society,

Sound believes

aspartame caused the death of one of her clients.

to

that

“You used

hear the same thing

encourage’ weight loss. After a while, he began experiencing

about milk,” she says, “and people

seizures and later died in his sleep

who

as a result of a grand seizure.

drink

it

to

have happy

it

lives.”

Barton believes aspartame can be

to

eat

from her

“Water

office.

“Aspartame doesn’t have the same insulin spike as sugar does, so

it

doesn’t inhibit the ability to

bum fat.” He says tute

found

sorbitol, a sugar substi-

in

hard candy,

is

better

than both aspartame and sugar because it is more natural Newell says he continues iv/ ingest aspartame and does not discourage people from using it as part of their diets.

is

system.”

She says a healthy way of living could include aspartame, as long as the person

is

getting the nutrients

And people shouldn’t only focus on the dangers of the foods they eat, but also whether the food makes them happy, she says. “Food can affect your happiness and it can affect how you sleep,” she says. “You have to make sure you get enough protein and energy throughout the day.” Rich Newell, the owner and oper-

of

ator

Enriched

Bodies

in

Waterloo, agrees with Barton and

viewed as danshould also be aware of the potential dangers of

says

if

aspartame

gerous,

is

people

other foods.

“Given what

is

going on

day-to-day food,

I

convinced that the

in

our

am

not even

fruits

and veg-

the pesticides and

idly.

off the drink altogether.

to diet, so they

condomsiitinl

cleanses your

it

She says people who drink regular it

pleasure

involved.

as

etables we’re eating are safe, given

find

the

www.hc-sc.gc.ca /englisIi/iyh/products,f

healthy and fresh as they can,” she

beneficial to certain types of people.

may

increase

you

replacing.

is

encourage people

The doctors blame the aspartame found in pop for his death and say it also made the number of seizures he experienced increase more rap-

soda

can

interest-

into the picture

foods.

registered dietician

ness.

based

add fun and

condoms

and vitamins they need from other

Linda Barton,

formaldehyde that can cause blindis

“I

excellent because

aspartame could change into

Martini

instead on what

says

Betty

Martini, states aspartame turns into

When you ing

ed on the package, or if there is no expiry date. For more information go to

falsely trains

ance to

it.”

the decreased pleasure.

manufacturer’s expiry date print-

to think they are eating

substitute

Aspartame is a low-calorie sugar found in diet sodas, gelatin desserts and gum. It can also be added to coffee or tea, instead of

Human and Psychology Sexuality found that the number 1 reason for not using condoms was

not a sweet debate

something sweet all the time. Barton says people shouldn’t focus on the amount of aspartame

and symptoms of multiple sclerosis.

Always use condoms according to the directions on the pack-

are flavoured and glow-in-the-dark con-

working with the society for four years. “Especially with children because they have less of a resist-

seizures, anxiety attacks, depression

are available in

packs of three and 12. Try several brands of condoms in three packs until you find the ones that

Angelo

some of

in

as heat shortens their shelf

replaced every few weeks.

tinue

Grocery stores are stocked with foods and drinks that can keep people healthy and the immune system strong. But, according to an Internet

room

Even if stored in this environment, condoms should be

Aspartame By DENIS LANGLOIS

at

life.

pregnancy

and disease. You must first expose the condom package to light for approximately 30 seconds before unwrapping it in preparation to “rise and shine.” The glow lasts for close to 15 minutes, but can be recharged by being exposed to light. If fumbling around in the dark is a problem there is always the Hot Rod condom that includes an applicator to make putting a condom on The speed strip applicator easier. condom comes packaged like a normal condom but includes an

condoms

temperature, out of direct sun-

beneficial to switch

can wean themselves

Newell says lose

if

what

not.”

people are trying to

weight, aspartame

substitute for sugar.

is

a

good

Snow days Amanda Gariough and Jenny Rade, first-year graphic design students, show off the snowman they made during a sudden snowfall on Nov.

1

^


News

ANDREA

SMITH

R.

helped stuof their mid-terms when they threw their second biz bash of the year Halloween night. The Spine-chilling biz bash was held at Sammy’s Garage, located

400 King

at

the

St.,

stress

Two

bash held

duct tape

tificate

Duce says see

is

his favourite thing to

the crazy

all

costumes

The

traditional “love

shack” was

held in the Forbidden room.

Biz bashes have always been at local

pubs

in the past.

clothing as they can.

bash,

(Photo by Andrea R. Smith)

Bash

Biz

partiers

show

their

there

is

(left

Halloween

to right) Chris Prichard, Scott Ingram-Cotton, spirit

on Oct. 31

at

Dru Adamson and

Cliff

The curtain

Boehmer

was the

first

biz bash to be

which lowwas closer to

meant it residence and allowed ered costs,

all

ages to

an unforeseen change,”

said Duce.

Sammy’s Garage.

CBSA

“The

on

formal

will hold a semi-

Nov.

28

the

in

Sanctuary,” he added.

attend.

“All biz bashes in

second semesbe held off campus unless

There are three more biz bashes A Blast From The Past on

this year.

on Feb. 6 and an Aloha Luau biz bash on April 10. During the Spine-chilling biz bash, buses ran from residence to Sammy’s Garage all night for $1. Two buses made three trips each which carried about 300 people. Jan. 16, Valentine’s

The

first

bus

left at

will

drop whether you

are dressed or not.

Four couples competed but Jen and Mike were the winners with eight pieces of clothing swapped. They won a gift certificate from

character.

held in the Sanctuary,

One

and one guy have 30 to 40 seconds to switch as many pieces of girl

one, the Shagadelic biz

was held on Sept. 26 and featured students dressed up as their favourite Austin Powers

stu-

dents invent.

hard feelings,” he said, refusing to

ter will

for best costume.

Runner-ups received a gift cerfrom Dominos Pizza and a gift package from Sammy’s Garage. Other great costumes included Big Bird, cousin It, two cows. Wonder Woman, a hockey player and a referee.

in

elaborate.

It

girl,

Caughill was wearing nothing but duct tape, right down to her purse.

Adam Duce, president of the Computer and Business Student Association (CBSA), said the reason they took it off campus was because of a conflict between the CBSA and the CSI. “The two organizations worked everything out and there are no

last

Raptors tickets were given Andrea Caughill, dressed as

to

the Sanctuary.

The

— Page 11

CBSA.

Kitchener, con-

trary to the first biz

held

2002

Prizes were handed out all night. Sponsors included Sammy’s Garage, Dominos Pizza and the

Student Association forget

,

witches and ghosts.

The Computer and Business dents

1 1

Bash a ghoulish good time

Biz By

SPOKE, November

9:15 p.m. and

ran every half hour.

More

Dominos

than 460 people attended the biz bash, raising approximate-

Pizza.

Tickets to the biz bash were $4 in advance and $5 at the door. This was an increase from the Shagadelic biz bash which charged $3 all around.

ly $1,200.

Almost everyone was dressed in costume, including angels, devils.

Positive discipline

Duun daycare

ctl

KATHLEEN DESCHAMPS

him or

An example would

her.

be,

understand that you are upset, but let’s think of something else to do that will make you happy.” “I

With the recent news story of a in the United States caught beating her child on videotape, the question on many people’s minds is, what is the proper way to discipline a child? While there is no straightforward answer to give parents, the Conestoga College day-

woman

care centre follows strict guidelines

when reprimanding children. The policy for disciplinary from the Day action comes Nurseries Act. Its main message is that discipline should be hand-

Nemec

says that this method

works well because

it

gets

child to co-operate without

the

mak-

ing them feel bad about themselves.

Nemec, who has two children of her own, says she practises what she preaches. “I believe in natural

consequences,” said Nemec. “If they are fighting over a toy, I simply

tell

this is not your’s to

them,

play with anymore.”

[riiuiu uy

ed out positively.

Nemec, the lead hand of Doon Childcare Centre, says

Violet the

child first must be able to acknowledge what he did. “We try to sit down with the child and explain what he did wrong on a developmental level that he will

“We

try to sit

down

with

the child and explain

the

understand,”

said

know

even

if

what

he

wrong on a

on the Doon campus, they first must sit down with Nemec and have an intake interview. During

new peopCe * Lookup for people who you can relate to * Loo^ng to taf^aSout issues in the community * Loo^ng for a place to ed^press your views * Loo^ng

Childcare Centre

According

Nemec, a good way

to

to get children to positively vent

anger

their

to

is

have them play

“This gives them something to do socially acceptable.” said

Nemec.

The daycare frowns upon any negative impact on the children. For instance, the word “no" will rarely pass teachers lips. They do not even use the popular method of time out. If a child is misbehaving,

squeeze the Play-Doh as hard as we can.' Then they are focusing on

simply take the child

to meet

with Play-Doh.

discipline.

discuss the situation with

Kitchener.

Nemec,

that’s

will

in

lead hand of the

Doon

"I'll

say to them

‘Let's

Come

else."

Being physical with children does not always have to be associated negatively.

Nemec encourages hug

the children

the teachers to

when

appropriate.

out to meetings of the

Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgendered Students and see what Location;

something

ivnyUnuG/

Door 5 on Oct. 30. The will have their work used

by Jan Vermeer. Bisch and his classmates

level that

time, parents can discuss the methods that the daycare uses to

this

originally

the making of tabletops for Del Dente’s restaurant

parents initially decide to

centre

aside

in

was

really

send their children to the daycare

they

First-year graphic design student Jim Bisch displays his artwork outside painting’s design

understand.”

will

Violet

he does-

happened?”

When

did

developmental

Nemec. “How

can you punish a child, n't

what he

>Diiciniiuii

Talent on display

its all

about.

Doon Campus

Date: Thursdays Time 4:30 p.m. For more information and room location contact Jamie at 20056KUL(^conestogac.on.ca or inquire at Student Services

V

--

--


Page 12

— SPOKE, November

11,

Feature

2002

‘Love thy neighbour’... not By LAURIE VANDENHOFF

able will happen, and they will be

/

forced to

Neighbours. They are the people you shovel sidewalks for and bor-

row sugar from. Neighbours. They

who like

live it

Like the couple

good and the bad. Amalgamation was a hot topic in Waterloo Region over the past decade. However, the city of Waterloo has opposed the idea repeatedly, where Kitchener was somewhat supportive. be, the

Mayor Carl our money where

says Kitchener

Zehr. "We've put

our mouth

We've invested a significant amount of dollars in arts, culture and heritage. "Waterloo, because of its size, has not been able to do that." Zehr has always been a dedicated backer of amalgamation because of what he sees as significant posis.

sibilities.

"While we (Kitchener) have been successful with a number of things economically and socially, we're missing the boat in terms of what we could become if we were speaking in one voice." But Waterloo Mayor Lynn Woolstencroft says Waterloo residents don't see it that way. "People from Kitchener call it Kitchener- Waterloo and people from Waterloo call it Waterloo," Woolstencroft points out, referring to her city's attitude toward merging with Kitchener. in

is

echoed

many ways.

makes

the city

warm," she says. Bigger is better... It is no secret that Zehr has long been a supporter of amalgamation. However, he believes the councils are split on the decision and the people are actually warming up to the possibility of a merge.

"The public is ahead of the politicians," he says. Zehr sees the RIM Park problems as a reason for this, referring to

of

its

sign

kind

is

the

in

the only city.

"They (Waterloo) want

keep their distinctiveness," says John English, a history professor and coto

author of Kitchener: an Illustrated History,

about Waterloo's

resist-

ance, adding that residents enjoy

lower taxes and costs. Kitchener's

give the city

higher expenditures

more

assets. "It

owns

system and gas system," says English, adding. Kitchener also pays for the Centre In the Square and has better public hydroelectric

libraries.

"Kitchener has provided the entire

community with

the arts

and

cul-

complications over a deal with MFP Financial Services of Mississauga. Waterloo's municipal government signed a deal with the implication they

would be

receiv-

ing an interest rate of 4.73 per cent

on a loan they needed

to build a

recreation facility in the city's north

But in actuality, they were paying 9.2 per cent, making the end.

total "I

much more

than expected.

think that has changed people's

toward what a. city of Waterloo's size can do." Zehr's dream of converging with the other cities in the region almost happened in the late '90s when a attitudes

number of regions across Ontario amalgamated. However, the

unifi-

now from

Waterloo, and don't you forget

"I

surprising

"It's

because

it

didn't

it

happened

happen

to other cities

that are less joined than these two,"

says English.

English believes amalgama-

Still,

tion

is

time.

inevitable, but not in his life-

a government

requires

"It

and he does not

willing to push

it,"

foresee

with

that

the

present

provincial forces.

.

in

to Waterloo

told Woolstencroft "We're

it."

'my kinda of thing," she says of her

"There's this really funny

.

city'

citizens' dedication to the city.

But as Zehr points

out, the cities

are utilizing each other every day.

"People cross boundaries back and forth for employment, entertainment... a slue of things"

As long as Kitchener continues to have a stronghold on arts, culture

But

like Zehr, he sees the benefits kind of union would have. "In general Kitchener would like to see a larger community and it would make more sense," says English, adding, Waterloo is alfaid of losing their distinctiveness. It's all the same difference... Zehr, however, acknowledges the differences but says that each has these within the boundaries of their this

cities.

can point out differences with-

in Kitchener that are just as stark as

Westmount

(volunteering)

who grew up

moved

can count on my hand every every day, how I waste time, day. energy and money because we have two layers of government and seven niunicipalities in the region." Oil and water don't mix... The different levels of government also make it hard to decipher what each is responsible for. While the police and fire departments have merged, the cities still

an active volunteer for Waterloo. Woolstencroft, a volunteer in Waterloo for almost 25 years, can "It

Kitchener and

increased efficiency.

Kitchener

trees in the city.

and

avoidance

"cost

Region and the issue has died for

Waterloo."

remember planting

more

the time being.

According to Woolstencroft, a former teacher at Conestoga College, one out of seven citizens is

The Waterloo

never passed in Waterloo

cation

"I

This strong patronage

its

strong loyalty to to the city and

or not. ture,"

one.

never fully accept the possibility of amalgamation.

K.n (

next to you, whether you

become

Probably for many years to come though, Waterloo will hold on to its

vs

are the people

Kitchener and Waterloo are an example of what neighbours can

one

K-W

in

general

in

He goes on

is

to

to point out

the different communities that exist

within

his

city,

comparing

Forest Heights to Stanley Park or Bridgeport. Zehr believes that these are "four very distinct communities within the city of Kitchener," functioning to

under "one governance." According to Zehr, the diversity between the cities is "skin deep" and they are not as grand as people think. The voice of reason... But what worries Woolstencroft most about amalgamation is the loss in government that could occur. One of the goals of a merge would be downsizing municipal government to reduce costs. But Woolstencroft believes councillors provide a vital role in the commu-

"We

see what each other's best

practices are, and

who

are

it's

the council-

accountable,"

she

we have fewer of them and more people, it's going to be the people with wealth and power who get their way." Zehr, on the other hand, considsays, adding, "If

many advantages the governments will enjoy. "We believe ers the

there

also

home

is

a synergy in being a larger

governance."

He imagines

government where "community becomes even more important and stronger." But Zehr acknowledges, there won't be a huge savings in money. a large

City Centre is located in the heart of the to the municipality's inayor ana uaunuii.

have different bylaws enforced by regional departments.

For instance, in Waterloo parking not permitted on the city streets from 2:30 a.m. until 6 a.m. for more than three hours, any time of the year. However, in Kitchener the law is

a

maximum

of three hours unless

But

to

an outsider the issue

According to Zehr, a see the region as one.

'why the separation?"'

It

is

also

More

i

is

hard to understand.

time of the day from March until

purposes).

is

Why can't we be friends...

come

enforced on complaint basis.

It

the flip-flop will continue.

otherwise stated. This applies to any

December (the laws are different for December until March for snow

citv.

and services, such as the hospitals which are all located in Kitchener,

is

removal

nity.

lors

(Photos by Laurie Vandenhoff)

The Waterloo

lot

of people

"When

they

here, they can't figure out,

The

contest about

who

is

better

might seem foolish, overrated and odd to them, but to the people who live in the cities, the reasons exist.

though, region-

However, they are different for

wide bylaws were adopted. The smoking bylaw that began in January 2000, for the most part, ended smoking in public venues. The debate continues... The word amalgamation is echoed again and again in council meetings, newspaper articles and on the lips of the region's citizens. Waterloo continues to fight the issue, while Kitchener seems dedicated to making it happen. But eventually as these two cities grow even closer together, as

everyone because it has become a battle about identity, and it's per-

English speculates, the unavoid-

even

recently

sonal.

a

Each of these cities is different in number of ways, but being neigh-

bours has also meant they share a lot too.

For the time being, they remain neighbours, each maintaining their individuality but using each other

whenever it is needed. Like good neighbours, they are respectful to one another, even if they don't always want to be, and if

they don't always agree.


3

Feature

two

ing the tale of

I

Kitchener's major industries con-

was

tinued to grow, while Waterloo

A

substantial part of being neigh-

growing up together. For Kitchener and Waterloo that holds

bours

is

true, as

they originated at approxi-

mately the same time. Being differ-

number of ways has made how the two

ent in a

interesting to see

it

got their start and to see

cities

how

a small settlement based large-

still

on agriculture. According to English, a history

ly

professor

with

toward

of the heavy

result

ence

German

influ-

According to John English and Kenneth McLaughlin, authors of an Illustrated History,

Kitchener:

were German

Mennonites.

As

a result of the Grand Trunk

Railway,

Berlin

bloomed

into

a

prosperous community of 4,000.

A

its

neighbour.

Waterloo's "really

came with

the

universities," says English.

The

great divide...

Even

in the area at the time.

the original settlers

industry,"

today, the type of

economy

one of the major differences between the cities. Kitchener is devoted to industry, while Waterloo is largely feed by education and technology. Changing times, however, have incited an economic transformation. Eor decades Kitchener basked is still

boost the population

in

compared

where

to Kitchener

Waterloo, it

only

War, what is it good The First World War

for...

that started

in

remained at full speed, increasing manufacturing profits and incomes. "The First World War had divided the community of Berlin and isolated it from its neighbours; the second renewed the City of Kitchener and drew it closer to the national economy and the national mood," wrote the authors of Kitchener: an the

same

time, Waterloo

heavy economic

Kitchener's

ample supply of manufacturing facilities, all the while Waterloo remained an agri-

were immigrants of Germany. But in a 2000 survey of more than 100.000 residents, only 16,000 were German. The same survey tallied

cultural centre.

offices in the area.

receive

foundry, a marble works and a slip-

idea of co-operation in insurance expanded and was applied to life

In 1912, at 15,000 people, Berlin official

city,

while

Waterloo had only 3,500. But the city learned by example and negotiated with the Grand Trunk Railway for an extension

Mabel Dunham says the

from Berlin

Abraham

tler,

Erb, christened his

settlement Waterloo, in

in.

A

commemo-

This wise decision helped welcome industries and open up oppor-

town

locat-

tunities for the small thriving

"patriotic surveyor"

chose

by the end of the 19th century. But even before the introduction of the railway, Waterloo was already home to a number of breweries and distilleries; this due to the

township

it

the

name of the Region

al

of the

in

memori-

victory

British

over

Napoleon.

By

in 1877.

was

ration of the

ed

first set-

the time of

1850s, Waterloo

its

inclusion in the

was

just half the

German

influence

at

O'Keefe,

Carling

size of its neighbour.

County

Mutual Fire Insurcmce Company initiated by Cyras Taylor in 1863. His

with only a handful of Mennonite settlers at the turn of the century. A history written by the late B.

but like Kitchener, Waterloo began

started with the Waterloo

with flourishing button factories, tanneries, furniture factories, a

became an

the time.

Joseph

E.

This helped launch Mutual Life of Canada and other similar 40,000 organizations. Today eight insurance companies have head

insurance.

Today Waterloo's

it

its

in the early '70s major industries closed

and "nothing really replaced

Kitchener had nearly

alone in their success. According to English, Waterloo's population grew to nearly 9,000 after the war. "Before that it was

peared.

"Kitchener's major indus

1971

These factors have also given the cities very'

is "Waterloo one of the wealthiest communities in Canada," says

English,

Kitchener resident.

"And Kitchener in the

Joneses...

Laurier

College in

over

the

Catching

Today

University

out as Waterloo

1911 and slowly grew next several decades,

The

clock-

tower

in

Kitchener's

eventually becoming a university,

Victoria

funded by the government. The University of Waterloo

from the

in

Park started

WLU

associate facul1959 when purchased the land close to their

ties

is

city’s

original

original school. Despite initial plans,

they never

became

Kitchener

is

also

city hall. affiliated.

home

to a high-

ranked educational facility. Conestoga College, at 35 years old, ly

St.

Mary’s Hospital

tal^n the

city.

in

downtown Kitchener

There are no hospitals

in

is

one

of three hospi-

Waterloo.

up the

with

Kitchener's pop-

versities entered the spotlight.

provides a strong educational plat-

is

bottom 50

and insurance prospects, it was when the city's two uni-

started

different

distinctions.

per cent."

Wilfrid

are pretty

gone."

surrounded by farms, it was an agricultural community." In addition to its growing indusalso the time

totally disap-

Electrohome has

two

ulation

of the eight insurance

larger than Waterloo's

is still

almost 200,000. But with more than 100,000 people, Waterloo is at

trying to catch

up with a growth

rate

of 9.5 per cent from 1991 to 1996. At the same time. Kitchener's

was six per cent. But Waterloo residents are not worried about becoming a major

"We have

a kind of village

tude," says Waterloo

atti-

Mayor Lynn

of "The city Woolstencroft. Waterloo has been more deeply affected by the number of people who have moved in and it became a cosmopolitan very quickly."

The

have been hit hard by the economic changes that occurred," he says, adding, "The rubber industry closed down, the shirt industry closed down, Schneider's had cut back and

in

people. But they were not

it,"

has traditional industries that

all

to progress quickly.

was a

more prosperous town. But

"It

one

metropolis.

residents.

didn’t last.

well

(WLU)

rich culture,

Until the 1960s, Kitchener

Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose... For years during and after the Second World War Kitchener enjoyed a phenomenal industrial growth. The population continued

tries

its

technology centre and distinguished community. They have helped set Waterloo apart from Kitchener, in the type of business it houses and the

tries

1941

number of

universities are

partly responsible for

offices in Waterloo.

In

includes a

technology and tradebased programs.

says English.

in the glory of its

incorporation until 1857,

that

business,

the benefits of industrialization, but

census V\c\ci it\ \8"7\ sKo-wcci tViat 78 per cent of Berlin's residents were of German dissent and 30 per cent

its

form

is

offices in Waterloo.

Meanwhile, Kitchener enjoyed

such as Schneider's Foods, Waterloo was gaming a reputation as the "Hartford of Canada." The city received this distinction after a number of insurance companies branched out and located head

per factory.

companies who have head

Canada,

traditional

industries,

It

(Photos by Laurie Vandenhoff) Clarica, formerly Mutual Life of

wealth of

Unlike

23.000 English inhabitants. Waterloo's beginnings were similar but not as successful. It did not

n

industrialization

also experienced

Kitchener ende'l the 19th century

PI

The Second World War did not have the same impact. Kitchener's

growth.

a 500-acre park and recreational facility located in the northeast end of Waterloo and has been open for two years.

|g

General Horatio Herbert Kitchener who won accolades during the Boer War.

Around

is

mMm

with Kitchener, after the British

illustrated history.

RIM Park

taken them

home. However, industries barely helped

1914 created turmoil in Berlin. A large anti-German attitude echoed around the world as well as Canada. Berlin now had to face the consequences of its heritage. Pressure ensued to change the city's name. Finally in 1916 it was replaced

1890s spreading north

1

called Waterloo

grew very quickly

after the

— Page

Labatt's are a few of recognized names that have

the

continued to creep higher.

the years.

1

of

2002

,

Seagram and

Waterloo and a local historian, the centre of the two cities was the same as today, but, "Kitchener

they developed and expanded over

Kitchener was established in 933 under the name Berlin as a

University

the

at

1 1

different cities

how far diversity has

Looking back on K-W’s history shows By LAURIE VANDENHOFF

SPOKE, November

between Waterloo goes beyond the average differences one might see between two cities. It has become a deeply seeded feeling of residents, making amalgamation a Kitchener

distinction

and

tricky issue.


.

— SPOKE, November

Page 14

1 1

Student Life

2002

,

Group provides support By AIMEE

W ILSON

Society can often lead a person to feel isolated

when

identifying

their true sexuality.

mainly due to heterosexnot understand and the accept cannot therefore Thi^. is

uals

who do

of homosexuals. Therefore, coming out

lifestyle

can

.involve confusion, denial, anxiety

repression of feelings.

and Jamie Hendry. 22. a first-year food and beverage management student,

taking the initiative to

is

help gays, lesbians, bisexuals and transgenders deal with this impor-

with questions and concerns. Whether homosexual or straight, everyone is welcome to attend the support group. "The more people that turn out. the more fun it will be." Hendry said. According to www.emptyclos-

when being homosexual becomes

ets.com. there are seven stages in the coming out process. Since

issue

every individual is different not everyone will follow the stages

with other homosexuals.

exactly as presented. Stage

they get to college and universi-

is

with your sexuality.

identifying

This

1

happens when a

typically

person realizes that he or she is attracted to members of the same sex.

Stage 2

is

internal

When

identity

person

tant life-changing experience.

acceptance.

Hendry, with the aid of Barbara Kraler. a counsellor with Student

accepts their sexuality, this

a

is

usu-

ally a big step in their life. Stage 3

support from outside

less

of an issue and more a part of

life.

to

William Pensaert.

a volunteer for

Gays and Lesbians

According

(GLOW), having

of Waterloo support

group for

a

of

or university

a college

at

gives people a

type

this

way

to socialize

“People usually come out when ty,"

Pensaert said.

time on their parents.

It

is

their first

own and away from

Having a gay and lesbian

support group will provide a "supportive setting,” Pensaert with other Socializing said.

homosexuals sense of

will give a positive

self.

GLOW

a social, peer support

port group at

weekly supConestoga College.

sources and

The meetings

will consist of dis-

pride

cussions, information and a place

when

meet new friends. ‘T want to try and promote awareness, education and help out

usually start to go away. Stage 5

port

students,”

This is when the individual wants to start dating. Stage 6 involves telling

outlet for students at Conestoga,”

give students

the family,

Services,

is

starting a

to

Hendry said. It will “somewhere to go and someone to talk to.” Hendry hopes the support group

will give people a place to turn to

is

finding

who you

in

taking

is

are.

This

is

depression and sadness

fear,

includes

Stage 4

relationships.

which

is

usually the

hardest process for an individual

who wants

to

come

out. Finally,

Stage 7 involves balance. This

is

coming out

for

is

group located Waterloo.

It

at the

University of

consists of discussion

groups, social events and a sup-

phone line available to the whole community. “I just hope it provides a good

Hendry

Those interested in support group can contact Hendry at 20056kul@consaid.

attending

(Photo by Aimee Wilson)

the

estogac.on.ca or Student Services.

Jamie Hendry, a 22-year-old food and beverage management student, is starting a gay and lesbian support group.

Students should be aware of sleep patterns Napping more than an hour confuses the body and could make you miss a By JASON MIDDLETON

how

If you find yourself crawling into bed and catching a quick snooze after you get home from class, chances are you’re not getting enough sleep at night. College, university and high school students should be aware of

long these naps last. Chris O’Neill, the chief technologist at the Paris Sleep Lab, in Paris, Ont., said, “Napping is usually the result of not getting enough sleep, or enough

The tigate

Although napping helps the body catch up on missing sleep, O’Neill warns that, “If you’re going to nap, the most efficient nap that you’re going to get is an hour

sleep well the next night.”

good sleep at night.” is where they inves-

long.”

Napping for longer periods of time confuses the body’s sleep pattern, which causes you to think bedtime is later in the

treat sleep-related disor-

(after school) that’s not a

“If you’re sleeping four hours

sleep lab

and

ders.

nap anymore,” added O’Neill. “You’re

Not drinking

isn't a bad thing of cash and you remember everything about the night before.

a pocket full a really bad night out at the bar. But in fact, that's not the case at all. Sounds Rather, it’s cool to not have a drink at a licensed event. Far too often, minors who attend college gripe and groan about not being able to attend pubs or licensed events because they aren't 19. And then because they think they aren't allowed to be at that event, they drink in their rooms or homes and end up having not as good a time like

they were at the event. That does not have to be the case. All events the CSI hosts in the Sanctuary are all ages events. Any student who pays a student fee, regardless of whether they are 19 or not, are allowed to participate in any event hosted in the Sanctuary. The CSI does not believe in punishing a student for their age. It's not fair for us to take your money and then not allow you to have a part in how we spend those dollars. But being a minor does not banish you to some corner at our events either. We want all of our underage students to come out and participate in our licensed events. Minors are not going to get served, but they are going to be given the same treatment those people who are of age

as

night.

Accounting Kristina

co-op

because he is doing homework. O’Neill said, “In a perfect world we would sleep when it gets dark outside and wake up when the sun comes up in the morning, but we don’t have that perfect world anymore.”

student

Kuyvenhove goes

to

bed between 12 and 3 a.m. every night. She takes an hour-long nap every day after school and

From the Sanctuary No hangovers,

sleeping and you probably won’t

to

if

says it helps energize her for the evening. “If

I

go knock on

my

naps for one hour per day. He said he naps because he’s “tired

from not sleeping enough the night before.” Vanstone thinks that you get

high school because you do not go out as often, but says he stays up late sleep

“Napping

in

is

usually the

result of not getting

enough sleep, or enough good sleep at night.” Chris O’Neill,

friends’

doors (in the residence) at 4:30 all of us will be sleeping or taking naps. It’s quite funny actually.” Wes Vanstone, a first-yetir electronic engineering technician,

more

night’s sleep

Paris Sleep

Lab

He suggests people sleep for as long as possible, and develop a you go to bed same time every night and wake up at the same time every sleep pattern where at the

morning.

Avoiding alcoholic beverages a couple of hours before going to sleep helps to improve your sleep cycle.

get.

When

I was entering post-secondary education many moons ago, I was an underage student during Frosh Week. It meant I could not drink at any of those events for that week. It meant I could have access to the event and drink all the pop or bottled water my wallet could handle.

week as one of the best times of my life. I got to let and have an amazing time partying it up with everyone. All of the Frosh leaders thought I was crazy. But at the same time, I was the guy they came to for getting people excited because they knew I didn't need alcohol to do all sorts of the crazy things you see during Frosh Week. They knew that I was having a great time and didn't need any alcohol either. ’^Flash forward a few years and lo and behold, I don't drink anymore. I don't make any secret of the fact that I don’t drink either. Rather, I'm proud of that fact. And I still have a great time at any party because I just don't need any alcohol. So take heart everyone who is not 19, you don't need to drink to have a good time at a CSI And

to be honest, I often consider that

“loose, talk to tons of people

event.

To have a good time,

all

you need to do

is

show up and

let loose. It's

a recipe for fun. (Photo by Jason Middleton)

Jody Andruszkiewicz CSI events programmer -CSI advertisement-

Wes

Vanstone,

1

8,

catches up on

some

sleep on Oct. 31

Vanstone says he naps for one hour per day. The Sanctuary Conestoga College is a popular place for students to catch

in

up^

their sleep.

W


5

1

News

SPOKE, November

1

,

2002

— Page

1

Alternative medicines gain popularity By LESLEY

LEACHMAN

recalled,” she says. “Also,

new

pill.

Sometimes

about

can be dini-

it

know what

to

cult

introducing a

is

to

“1

and

take

homeopathic remedies

because they do not interfere with

However, some people arc letting go of the everyday remedies and turning to alternative medicines

the body’s natural ability to care for itself,” Gcorgas says. “I think that

Homeopathy, for instance, is becoming more popular. "Once you get to know how well they work it’s hard to resist using them (homeopathic remedies),” Maria Gcorgas, 44, of says “They arc simply ALbcrfoylc.

I’m telling my body to be quiet. You need to respect what the body has to say. Pains are its way of

couldn't live without

“People do need to educate themselves on which remedy (is best lor you),” Georgas continues. “You shouldn't take them like cough drops, homeopathy is something

right

is

instead.

jnbealable.

1

if

and

hem

in

became

first

But

her

first

iccause hat the

at

the

same time she

say the tional)

I was interested in the idea body can heal itsell il given

tells

“Some people

don’t believe in

effectiveness) but

(its

Furthermore, some people don’t cines because they haven’t

Homeopathic remedies are a nattreatment based on the use of

(when taking them).”

who

Also, there are critics

think

medicines are noth-

works with the body’s natural defences and doesn’t seek to just restrain the symptoms. Additionally, Georgas feels that

ing

there are a lot of benefits to taking

“To this (the critics) I would say: get two people to fall down, bruise their legs and give one a homeopathic remedy and the other a sugar pin and see who improves,” “Homeopathy is Georgas says. ^

it

ventional medicines. “There is no possibility of an

of overdose. There is no danger the U..V that uiai later idici years yeais four rour finding mdmg out

Residence Getting

my

lost,

people and

in the

have

just

girl

mon

to introduce

who showed up

students as well

-

same

I

I

The

stresses, frustra-

I

would

be.

difficult I

pleased,

as

it

was

great,

I

I

could come I

could eat I

desired

could stay out as late as

wanted;

I

experienced

1

independence, freedom and sleep

I

deprivation.

I

I ’)

j

December hit. I could way to live. It wasn't that 1 was tired of having independence, I was just weary of living in the same room with a rooi te I had nothing in com,^nd until

not think of a better

m

its

ups and downs

have met some great have the independence

I

-r frf^f^rlom Ho of privacy and more freedom to do what I want.

Although

my

own. roommate and

last year,

common and own bedroom

so

I

are friends

we have

because

I

this year,

I

things in

have my have a lot

this

year in residence,

be my last have no regrets

will I

living here for the past

two

years.

It

something that I feel every student should experience, if for noth-

li livinff else, for the experience of ing ing with fellow students. stressful It has been fun, boring,

and

which is really no anywhere else, residence I have met friends

frustrating,

different than living

but at

is

that I will

keep forever.

same things

I

missed

rest

my

of

first

year in resi-

highest they had ever been and

go through on a

whenever and whatever and

really nice to see.”

dence went by quickly. School was the going great, my grades were

who go

students

was not nearly as I

ideas,

my friends and the freedom of living parents. in a building with no

These similarities enabled me to meet people easier than ever before, and living without parents

it

with, doing the

ready to return to residence.

was

and go as

new

Fortunately, Christmas came and was the end of the holidays, I

daily basis.

thought

to

Georgas says. “And people are becoming more and more aware of different remedies, and that is

by

been an experience of a lifetime. I have not only lived with roommates, both good and bad, but I have lived with hundreds of other

and joys

the times, but it will eventually come over here.” “I find that people are becoming

open

more

microwaveable food.

Aside from the dramatics of moving in, living in residence has

tions

Canada) about 10 years behind

every night and spending hoards of money that I could not afford to spend. Oh, and I was sick of eating

tow truck.

through the

Tricker. “I think that we’re (in

Opinion

CAA truck driver!

would

from

VandeVen

The good thing that came out of rememall of this, is that I was bered. If someone did not know I

My

Kate

most likely the only student that can with say she moved into residence

myself as the

I

of living on

am

she Maria Georgas, 44, holds a variety of homeopathic remedies been has Georgas Aberfoyle. in home her at illness uses to treat years. using homeopathic remedies for more than 20

-

CAA I

. .

.

highway

tow truck began my life home in 2001. Nevertheless,

me.

“In Germany, herbal remedies some are much more popular doctors even prescribe it,” says

Yet, again

away from

of a

cines will continue to increase in popularity.

car breaking

the side of the

and arriving to residence in a

the help

Georgas

has

life

(Photo by Lesley Leachman)

Furthermore, both Tricker and feel that alternative medi-

pill.

homeopathic remedies over con-

down on

always tested thoroughly and you don’t always know what you’re taking,” Peer says.

improve without the help of the

that alternative

teal;

treatments to cope with her disease. “They’re (herbal remedies) not

more than placebos. If you think you’ll get better, you will

hose of the disease being treated, body’s power to t stimulates the

that in

scle-

13 years ago and says she wouldn’t consider using alternative

rosis

However, Tricker believes that most remedies are safe. “Herbs have a history going back thousands of years and by now people know what works,” he says. “If you follow what is done in the past, you should most likely be safe

arge doses create effects similar to

iny quantities of remedies

Florence Peer, 59, of Puslinch,

was diagnosed with multiple

to

applying a remedy the child stops crying and goes back to playing,” she says. “You can see it work.”

iral

been

as conven-

tional drugs.

it

you have

same ways

tested in the

see it. If you have a child that has just been stung by a bee, after

laturopathic doctor.”

believe in what a doctor you can equal how much you

believe in taking alternative medi-

thy’s effectiveness.

a

same thing about (convendrugs. Sometimes how

improve.”

some people question homeopa-

"1 he right conditions,” she says. eally wanted to try homeopathy so

need to sec lor

much you

feels

people need to respect.” Despite homeopathy’s growing popularity, it still has its critics and

year of university.

truly

are

they

that

themselves,” says Tricker. “As lor them being placebos - you could

wisely.

interested in

made an appointment with

is

believe

“I

effective, but people

if

you should use these remedies

that

read books on natural healing

"1

it

mind.

you what’s wrong.”

telling

hem.” Georgas has been using homco)athic remedies for more than 20 ^cars

kept taking Tylenol,

1

as

research

a

.54,

has been learning

about herbal remedies such as echinacea for about 10 years, also feels that alternative medicines arc more than Just an influence of the

for you.

which medicine

who

engineer,

hurling them.”

it

like

mind power.”

just a

Terry Tricker,

a child

finds an open bottle and swallows them, you don’t have to worry

seems as though every year

It

medical science

if

more than

was

using

were

you

product

life

TOBY KEITH

full.

Partying, bus trips to bars, watch-

drinking ing movies and playing

games

pretty

first-year

in

much sums up my residence;

oh,

and

going to classes. " Leaving at the end of the year was behind sad. It was time to leave not

*1" COULD START EVERY SENTENCE YOU NEVER KNEW THAT MEMORIES CAN BE eREATj f UT jmEN THEY RE NOT™ THE B^T GOES ON. UNLOAD YOUR MEMORIES. 3J5 FAIRWAY RD.

end of the summer I was interested glad to be reluming and moving back. to see who would be

By

My

in

new crowd

is

much younger

than

1.

<CAMA0!AN TIRE PLAZA)

aaim-ien

PLAZA) 370 HIGHLAMD HD. W. {FOOD BASICS

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S.

uremia

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Page 16

— SPOKE, November

Life

2002

11,

Keep your home Bv SARAH McGOLDRICK With Halloween over, our minds will soon be turning to Christmas. Each year we deck the halls with twinkle lights and sweet-scented

Our homes

candles.

fill

with the

aroma of freshly baked gingerbread men and Christmas cakes. But with these seasonal pleasures comes the risk

of

Students can be even

fire.

more vulnerable

as

money

a priority rather than

One of

the

is

often

safety..^

most popular and

inexpensive ways to decorate a at Christmastime is candles.

home

Yet each year people die as a result of unattended candles. Fire Kitchener However, Department public education officer Jim Kolb says this is not the

only hazard that students should be

concerned about. "In winter, generally unattended

cooking

is

the

No. 1 cause of he said,

fires

ture

due

be a

risk.

to cigarettes

continues to

has seen the number of cigarette-

go down. However, warns of the potential of falling asleep while

related fires still

risk

be' very

smoking or leaving a

cigarette

“The number

1

cause of

fatal

smoking. careless is Cigarettes will kill you slowly by

fires

smoking or quickly

if it ignites

an

Kolb said everyone must be prepared in case of a fire. He said it is important to have a smoke alarm outside every bedroom door and in the case of stu-

bedroom as well. “Students are rooming and

dents, in the

he said.

it

all

important measures. “Most people will never have a fire, but it is those who know

what

to

vive,”

upholstered couch,” he said.

rises, so

department,” he said are

fire

unattended.

high,”

must rise to the ceiling then come back down to go under- the crack of the door, then go back out into the hall and up to the alarm.” “You have to know what to do. Knowing where exits are, having a meeting place and calling the

“Smoke

Kolb said that since he first began his career 27 years ago he

he

must

burning safeiy

fires

do

he

if

there

is

one

that sur-

said.

Kolb said the best way to prefire is to take away the com-

vent

ponents that If

may

lead to one.

you have any concerns

regarding the safety of your current accommodations or would like more information contact

Department

boarding.

fire starts in

the Kitchener Fire

the

smoke smoke level

Fire Prevention Inspections at

What if a bedroom? For

alarm to

start the

the

741-2495.

oamn

{rnuiu uy

iviuuuiuiiui\/

Around the holiday season, candles in many homes are left burning unattended. Fire departments are warning people to use caution when dealing with open flames.

in the residence,”

Kolb added

many

candles have the cause of

that

become

increasingly

fires in the

home.

we had

“Last year

six or

seven

days prior to Christmas that were started by candles,” he said, adding candles in 10

the

in

fires

bedrooms, which for many students is also a study area, can also be dangerous.

“The candle and there

gets

knocked over

study material

is

all

over

The student may be in a deep sleep and by the time the alarm goes off in the hall you have met your maker,” he said. Health Canada warns that candles

the place.

with flammable decorations such as paper spirals or foil should not

be used and that

all

candles should

be kept in a flame-resistant holder. Kolb warned that space heaters are also a major concern for stu-

on their own or have who controls their heat. “You may have the case of a stingy landlord who is controlling

dents

who

live

a landlord

the heat.

The student buys a space

heater which throws off a tremen-

dous amount of heat. They leave it on when they are away during the day and you have a fire hazard,” he ,

said.

The

City

Department

how

of

Web

to properly

heater.

heater

It

Toronto

Avoid the

Fire

site offers tips

on

re-gift.

Let everyone

TELUS

know what you

Mobility

phone

really want.

Ask

for

a

with IX capability, the latest

maintain a space

Ask

a cool phone.

warns to always use a Canadian has a

that

Standards Association label.

It

also

says to never place clothes on the heater to dry.

He added that when the student is away from home they should

in

for

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I

Fashion

#

How Due oulci

OK.” “When you bend over and you

can see your whole

employees not release their last names. to store policies,

low

late

naval to their butt dimples, or is

it

5

the

more commonly new cleavage. such

Celebrities pears,

Christina

jnnifer

Lopez

referred to,

Who

and

as

Low-rise Jeans are taking over the at Thrifty’s in Fairview

material,” -Michelle

wear

lelvcs

“We

ark Mall.

make you look

jw

shows off

it

hot.

the lower half of

body," she added.

ly

same

the

is

it

lachine

story

Park Mall,

Fairview

in

Jean

at

inety per cent of the Jeans avail-

low-rise

are

ile

styles

lichelle, a senior associate.

nly carry

one

style that

omfortable.

is

the

They

are

coming back,” Michelle

kind of like

at

my

typical

is,

‘“I’m

daughter leave the

those,’

in

The

Jean Machine

‘They’re

or,

split

(parents)

way

which have compensated for the low-riding pants and offer tons of styles in the low-rise thong.

For

50-50. “You get

who

lSicK.i

at.

it

Just

in

Pairview

depends on

make

(Internet photo) Britney Spears is one of the ceiebrities who “spearheaded” the trend to wear ultra-low jeans in public.

Pop singer

next.”

Nicki agreed. “It’s (low-rise) not something that’s going to go away so fast.” She added, “Flares are getting smaller, but the waistlines

five or 10 years,” Michelle said, adding, “I think a wide-fitted or a straight -leg Jean is

for possibly

(low-rise) too sexy.”

Advertisers

low-rise

are

there

Jeans? “I think low-rise will be around

the person’s age. Courtney agreed. “For anyone under the age of 15, it’s

men

underwear, but Just not as many choices as there are for women. Or of course there is always the option of commando. Low-rise is hotter than ever right now, but what’s next in the way of

don’t care and

Pantorama

Park Mall said

in the 70s.”

However, depending on how low you go, the visibility of your underwear might become a problem. For women there are numerous stores, including Bootlegger and LaSenza,

then you get the ones who are saying those are too low and not appropriate for school.”

fom the Dirrty video (Aguilera’s lew sexually provocative music

low-rise Jeans.

the

Teenage girls love these Jeans. However, their mothers and fathers

some

what you are trying to portray vhen you leave the house,” she aid. added, “If you stay away

in

lot

said, adding, “It’s (low-rise Jeans)

response was

)n

and give them more shape. more guys are coming

definitely

At Costa Blanca, Jessica said the

styles

in

these Jeans

look so sexy and attractive practi-

will stay

below

the belly button.”

Jessica had a different opinion. it (low-rise) a year. They

“I give

(jean companies) have something in all the time. I think

new coming

will

high-rise

the

be

coming

back.”

Fashions from the past are back and popular decades and

Bv SINEAD McGARRY

gence dying

attraction of ethnic clothing

The

industry

fashion

the

lominate

wardrobe items such as and two-piece ogging suits have resurfaced and re now trendy, combining comlort

imaginable.

A

lew

rage

the

for

nos."

veause of the comfort and affordibility.

The vintage

shirts are a uni-

pleated or cuffed

lowing feminine fabrics and the

fading IS

allow' this shirt to

"Fashion

history

Some of

be worn

repeating

is

the peasant

tops

have are identical to ones hat my mom used to wear." said

hat

1

K.rista

nent

Lonergan, a career developat student practitioner

Tonestoga.

The

perfect

accessory

plete the desired

to

com-

hippie chic look

is

airquoise

Jewelry.

The

natise

American-inspired Jewelry can be

uom^^ any outfit. The turquoise ^eeei^JI,

meaning

"stone

of

Gap. the

fit.

double-

are av ailable

changed the

meaning of business casual. "Khaki pants have brought forth varietv for men and women. They have forced Jean companies to rein-

casual or evening wear.

tself.

hems

the pant that has

in

and

of embroidery

ittractiveness

the

individuals

or dress pant. Slim

al

free-

The Indian-inspired

as the "chi-

option of wearing an alternative to jeans. Khakis can be worn as a casu-

item for an outfit because it be worn with Jeans or dressy

Jacks.

known

introduced by

as

its

“anytime wear

the

They have given

crsal :an

is

pant khakis, also

trendsetters,

all

fashion trend that continues

popularity

and becoming the

iverage T-shirt

in

stores with tie-dye curtains, bedspreads. socks and everything else

ind simplicity.

replacing

scene. Tie-

is

and ’80s and has resurfaced

Staple

leasant tops, tie-dye

are

enjoying a resur-

bands. This method of free expression and design dominated the ’60s

aday.

Peasant tops

is

the fashion

in

one of the oldest forms of fabric design and is extremely simple; all you need is a white T-shirt, fabric dye and a bag of rubber

aplured the hearts of trendsetters n the late ’60s and continues to

^

'

“A

said.

So, how low is too low? “If your thong is visible, they're too ow,” Michelle said. “It depends

J

taller

too tight and too low,”’ Michelle

added.

ij

According to the Web site, lowJeans on males make them look

rise

the ideal butt “high, round,

not letting

them. 'Stretch is in, it’s huge right now. Lhai and the tighter the better,’’ she material

stretch

lave

for

shapely and firm.”

house

Most of

The

offers

five inches.

is

made

response

that they are

in the low-rise style

zipper Diesel

shortest

for

don’t exactly like them.

Michelle said the great thing

men

than the typical zipper length.

you’ll

totally in this year.”

said

igh-rise," she added.

bout low-rise Jeans

is

inch

full

seven inches, three inches shorter

Fashion magazines such as File said the low-rise Jean trend has

"We

actually

is

is

women

“Booty

butt.

love

I

zipper for

doesn’t hurt to look good in

"They (low-rise

Thrifty’s.

at

ans)

These Jeans are a

denim brand, two low-rise styles for men in the summer of 2002 and has added three more since. The shortest

But Michelle added one area it is your

but they are still low" said Courtney, a sales associ-

sc,

too.

also launched

look good.”

have higher Jeans

/ailable,

e

said.

men

&

ing to www.ae.boston.com. Diesel,

and “If you

classy,

(low-rise)

it

but

the high-end Italian

right size, style

id heavily inlluence girl’s styles.

for

called

is

lower than the 501 brands, accord-

doesn’t matter as long

it

you have the

women,

leg Jeans.

looks best in these Jeans?

“Honestly

set fashion trends,

Jeans

Co. has two lowrise styles for men, the 527 low boot-cut and the 529 low straight-

Michelle said.

Britney

as

new campaign

Co.’s

Levi Strauss

tively they’re not at all (too sexy),”

Aguilera

— Page 17

2002

Dangerously Low, and targets not only

However, you can wear a pair of Big Seven Jeans, which arc the low-rise Jean of the lowest Machine has and pair it up with a casual sweater and still look good. “If worn properly and conserva-

enough to turn Super low Jeans elow the hipbones are what’s hot. lids want to show everything from

&

low-rise

Fairview Park Mall.

this year.

eads anymore.

j

Strauss

you’ve

butt,

gone too low,” said Jessica, a sales associate from Costa Blanca in

ulti-

Midriff tops aren’t

icir

,

cally every girl wants them. Levi

video), you’re

Low-rise jeans are hitting an

1 1

low should you go?

HOTO

By CARRIE

SPOKE, November

program, Krista Lonergan. 22, of the career practitioner

Park Mall

in

Kitchener.

Many

of the stores

Turkey." has been spotted on many celebrities, replacing expensive and llashy

diamonds on the red

eaipets.

alTordable Jewelry and ctunes in necklaces, anklets, rings and hair

It

is

Teles ision icons like John Ritter,

know n

for his character in

Three

s

for

peasant

Company,

popularized

the

full

selour track stsle in the 70s and Jennifer Lopez has followed in his footsteps, reins enting the aserage

«ym wear The

vent

shirts at the Fairview

into

a

stylish,

casual

set.

traditional tracksuit

was

the

cotton track pant with elastic waist

and hooded

worn

basic Jean style.’ said Delaney, an Old Navy

the

Darcy employee.

have fashions from the past.

two-piece Jogging

accessories.

shops

in

sweatshirt

the gy

m

that

was

or for lounging

around your ow n home. Cunently. the super soft, velour suits with flared pant legs and /ip-

up hi'odic N dominates the runway'' and streel^. Tic-dsine has been around for

The fashion to

recvcle

earlv

industry

continues

chithing trends

decades.

Irom

The peasant top

turquoise Jewelry are dominating the '.ireet-vvear of today but Ici! warmers and acid-died jeans

,ind

could dominate the trendy of tomorrow.

wear


.

Page 1 8

— SPOKE, November

1 1

,

Entertainment

2002

Toronto sex show, as they browsed through the various stands or purchased prod-

By JASON NOE If

you

like sex, sex

and more

sex,

then Toronto was the place to be the first weekend of November.

The Everything To Do With Sex

Show

rolled into the automotive

Exhibition Place with building product demonstrations, seminars, at

dealers, fashion shows and adult film stars. Admission was $20 per person and you had to be over 19, due to the adult nature of the show. The extravaganza is Canada’s largest sex show and was attended by thousands of people from around Canada and the U.S. But who goes to these types of shows

ucts,

ranging from videos to toys. didn’t have to

you buying anything, because they were simply given In

some

worry

areas,

about

out for free, including

condoms

and lubricants.

“There just

is

more than

sex here.”

Stephanie,

Max model

show

caters to

Davidson, showing various motorcycles, a free hair-care clinic and

many

alcohol distributors.

The Brick Sheet House, a manufacturer of brick wall facings in Toronto, was promoting their

products. “Absolutely everyone of all ages comes to these shows,” said Ian Shaw, an employee of the company. “People are more comfortable coming here than going into a dingy adult store on Yonge Street.”

But, they were outnumbered by sex-related exhibitors trying

many

either sell or promote their products. Glasse X, manufacturers of glass sex toys from Fort Wayne, to

steady

There was also a huge assortment of displays scattered across the first floor of the building, including several that had little or

the Toronto show at revealed the show attracted people of all ages. There were groups of

nothing to do with sex at all. The Cranberry Resort and Country Club in Blue Mountain, Ont. was

young men showing each other the Hustler magazines they’d just bought. Nearby were a number of girls

membership registration for the upcoming winter. Across the aisle, artists from Henna Tattoos were drawing tattoos for

“The same with these shows, it crowds of all ages.” Ketzenberger and his partner Todd Taylor are heading to Las Vegas

searching for kinky clothing or

lin-

patrons. Other non-sexual displays

for

gerie at one of the displays. But

included Wildcard Promotions, selling hockey pictures, Harley-

“We’ve even had repeat customers said stuff,” our buying Ketzenberger. “Most of them are

and why? Looking around

at

the

crowds

sitting

around a table

couples seemed to dominate the

offering

had a display of items selling from $89 to $200. “Our customers Noah said age,” in range Ketzenberger, one of the Glasse X Ind.,

salespeople.

attracts

show

another

in

January. (Photo by Jason Noe)

Hannah Harper, an adult film star, signs autographs for fans at The Everything To Do With Sex Show in Toronto on Nov. 2. She

very open-minded.” Les and Katrina Tremblett from

Georgia were selling adult toys. for Good Clean Fun, a

because they don’t

distributor of sex products across

out,

Canada and the U.S. “Everyone is here for the same reason and there is no pressure to buy,” said Les. The main stage featured fashion shows with the latest in sexy clothing, for both men and women. Following that was a fetish fashion show that dazzled the crowds showing models in masks and latex costumes. No one was allowed to video or photograph the models unless authorized. At one point between shows, members of the crowd were invited on stage to

crowd.”

glass sex toys.

all

singled

next to the Legend Toyz display.

of a huge

She has appeared in several magaincluding videos and zines Penthouse, Mile High Productions and Hustler. Harper’s centrefold was featured in the May 2002 edition of Hustler. She posed for photos with fans and talked to the

feel

part

“People are more comfortable coming here than going into a dingy adult store on

Yonge

Street."

get an autograph.

Brick Sheet House

who

Harper,

man and

the show, offering free sign-ups for people of

everyone.

busy

here,” said Stephanie,

the afternoon and adult film star

show

Max

one of the “People come

Hannah Harper signed autographs

ages.

models.

just

continued signing her

From

you missed it, the be held again next year over the same weekend. all

day. If

will

ACC

Our Lady Peace rocks the Conestoga ChHstian Fellowship

during their

Study

group

1

DOS

rock/alternative

live

- and

all

for free, thanks

Best Buy, which gave away

14,000

Where:

tickets.

The only way that you could get tickets was to win them on Edge

at

and post-secondary campuses. I had my doubts but the concert was definitely worth it. I thought that not many people would attend because the tickets were handed will

costs

They received many

Charger.

even though the seats were not as full when they performed.

review

proved boring. up to 45 minutes. the crowds got restless they entertained themselves by starting a wave and cheering for Our Lady Peace (OLP) to start. The concert began at 7:30 p.m. Stereophonies performed first and Treble Charger left the stage at 9 Intermissions

10,000 proved

The

lights

astounding.

me

wrong. they used

Who

would

were have

guessed the band could look so good in complete darkness with only flashing lights, of yellow, orange, blue, purple, green and red.

ine

terns that took your breath away.

Singer Raine Maida, guitarist

Mike

drummer Jeremy bassist Duncan Coutts

Turner,

Taggart,

it

them money, but a crowd of

along to their favourite songs such

attend a concert because

Treble

Band

and auxiliary keyboardist Jamie Edwards lit up Toronto with their powerful sound of familiar tunes. Loyal fans passionately sang

out free. Usually only true fans

were

bands and

cheers from the crowd as well,

continuously scanned the crowd all night with different pat-

hottest spots such as nightclubs

interested or with questions. Enjoy the fellowship of friends.

R.

All the colours you could imag-

Best

and

Smith

Buy handed out some of Toronto’s

tickets

all

Stereophonies

102.1 or be at the right spot at the right time.

For

Andrea

flickered

favourite

their

to

When: Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.

Opening

latest concert.

and ladies screamed so loud sometimes it was hard to hear the band. Fans couldn’t believe they were watching

a.m.

Clumsy.

The band put on a remarkable show at the Air Canada Centre (ACC) on Nov. 1 Lighters

One Man Army, 4

as

Our Lady Peace didn’t need fireworks. films or pre-taped messages to make the crowd go wild

adult film stars to

variety to keep a person

enough

a large line of people throughout

all

more than

said at the

fashion shows, the event featured

Confidential, signed autographs to

is

a lot,” smiled sweetly

Overall, The Everything To Do With Sex Show had something for

sex

“There

god,

“Thanks

videos.

employee

'

“Oh my

you’re hot!” said a passerby who stopped to look at one of her

Ian Shaw,

photos.

Models from Max, a talent and model agency, were touring (Photo by Jason Noe)

.

they’re

Penthouse, Mile High

for

But it wasn’t just models that you could meet at the show, some adult magazines were offering autograph sessions from some of their stars. Sunny, from Club

sionals.

Noah Ketzenberger (right) and Todd Tayler from Glasse X are shown at The Everything To Do With Sex Show. They manufacture

has appeared in magazines and videos Productions and Hustler.

They work

practise sexy posing with profes-

Bible

all

Some When

p.m.

lasted

OLP

didn’t start until about

9:45 p.m., 15 minutes late. The crew of Edge 102. 1 took the stage

during the wait and they

entertained the

crowd with

their

sick sense of humour.

As soon

OLP hit

as

crowd roared I

believe

bigger

its

many people became

OLP fans

after they left the

concert that night. 1

did.

the stage the

approval.

I

kn(^

m

that


Entertainment Week of November 11-17

placeable.” Harris did sign on to

By JASON NOE

play in the third film.

The

Libra September 24 October 22

Make

reasons to celebrate.

Dumbledore

you make the most of

21

-

November

An achievement

Someone you have been admir-

school

ing will be in close contact with you this week. Good things will come out of this new friendship.

November

Luckiest day:

After the success of

at

to give

going

is

21

work or you a

rea-

to

him again playing

fans

work

wizard

pay off. Luckiest day: November 13. will

if

he

Harris found a

at

last year’s

Who

him

months and he was hospitalized in August after

April 20

-

Sagittarius

May

The

of the movie

title

you are having difficulty controlling your finances, seek advice. Someone can suggest a different method of saving money.

you pay close attenwhat your intuition is

Make tion

sure

to

telling you.

A

strong gut feeling

could prevent you from a major error.

November

Luckiest day:

m

M

Gemini May

21

-

June 21

Good news will come from someone who you respect. Either a material gift or something else spe-

If

he picsenicd lo you. Luckiest day: November 14.

Capricorn December 22

new

the producers not to think of recast-

life.

do

so.

more

The

thing

last

stress in

your

Luckiest day:

are

November

13.

January 20 February 18

you need

is

setting goals for yourself Luckiest day: November 17.

Keep 12.

will take

you by

of events

But a

change.

the

February 20

-

March 20

debut an achievement. novel River Thieves is a tale of life at in the turn of the century Newfoundland and all the hard-

August 23

Several things going on in your difficult. life are making things

You

have

will

problem

at a

to

deal with one

time to

Luckiest day:

16.

make

things

November

12.

about a friendship. If

Daniel

Rd7ti1s''a third-year

a decision

studettt:who

more than

km studied

clairvoy^tfssues for four

one person needs your attention, consult the

you.

one who’s

closest to

November

13.

YOU

KNOW...

the;

iheit

jcanK eflllie

^

W

I

Harry Potter debuts

this

week.

and our own

about love,

lust,

own

writer’s first

novel was shortlisted for the 2001 and the 2002 Prize Giller

Commonwealth

Prize.

Crummey

.

has written four books of poetry, and a collection of short stories,

up

in

Newfoundland and

is

cur-

rently living in St. John’s.

sions have devastating effects for of the Indians and the members the expedition. Secrets and histo-

slowly revealed through;

ries are

are

characters

as

rNTRCtyJCnONi to

Ltj

ARNINS STYLES

15 THERE Ot'JESEST WAY TO LEAW'

from

the story

tells

the perspective of many characters in the novel. The char-

own

Every individual underdeveloped

secrets.

The novel

o

also paints an accu-

of

picture

rate

history and

own

in

life

Newfoundland at the turn of the century. The island is cold, bleak and at most times, lonely. Furthermore, each character’s life with the is inexplicably entwined wilderness and the ocean and the

f t

novel and for the people in the novel their lives. Bath it is a major part of water is frozen in the mornings,

houses are

damp and people seem

from hypothermia

suffer

to survive.

They

in

some

abilities

l

I

steps in discove ' ng wlw you are.

e:

w

often e>ist between a 3n.rr,on Students lea-n in many ways Mismatches 1 nnr teiithirg styles If st udents under-stur«l lea -ning styles ord s tondard then-onm cur lailc. their Studying to Ihey

leart,

k

most el •ectively.

t

-ley

beaming effectioelv and

tailoring s udying to you-

neacs means

leern. Tf n >m;dent responc.s choosirq stndv techniques that help you .wrt to corslruct r^les more o’visuol images then to words they may talking to people than when better learns jcenst more vLsi cl woy If n

ma

I

Ahen

s-iidying

’’''Y

regularly.

is

and

is

to

also a

dominant theme. The characters in environthe novel depend on their

ment

W

others. T'lei e

h

theme of the

a major

developed

no 'bes' way' to leuif.. There ae styles are suited to different ard styles, t lea-ning maiy dif or p'ofile is mode up cf o combinat on different sitjutions. Veur leuitiing of trails, lecrniro s'lyleS a"K pa lear-ning styles. Jjsi like aei-scnali y hcM you learn S one of the fir^t your personal characteris-ics Knoiving

needs is

is hitfhly

in

are fishermen,

They depend trappers and on the fish they catch" the cows they

Determining your lecrnirg style takes work

anti

«^ot ta be worth while, you need to understand

self-exploration

krowng you-

profile

Per

i*

mr

-hat style ycu cen use techniques do foryxL If yot knew your leornins areas whi developed highly ycur cf ad>/antoce take compleirenr it. They ones. Ycu moy have nelaing you th-.aiigh ycur less-devekped fnm mory differen- styles even though some we

e

rhcrecteristics

doninont

V/hef s important

s

thot ycu use what works fer ycu.

farmers.^^

100 Years

Ago

14 per cent of jeltie

stories

The Newfoundland

However, the wilderness

DID

kthe

It

The dangers of cold are incessant and seem to be always pending.

,

Luckiest day:

his three sons.

Canadian history and the difficulties of settlers and the natives.

The consequences of these mis-

The cold

-

Jpumalism make

movie because

betrayal and sordid pasts. sheds light on a hard time in

It’s

cold.

September 23 to

own

dealing with our

The novel revolves around a number of expeditions commissioned by the Crown to establish contact with the Beothuk or Red

acters have their

Virgo

You have

1992. Recently,

different

better.

November

Luckiest day:

our

life,

quite

is

Crummey

Pisces

surprise.

of

in

developed.

valuable lesson will be learned as a result

for the third

he’d be out of the hospital by then. Harris was born on Oct. 1, 1930

Crummey’s

Michael

out the n6vel

August 22

turn

him

Games

he had roles in Gladiator and The Count of Monte Cristo, along with the Harry Potter movies. He was divorced twice and is survived by

Writer portrays Canada’s dark history

their

An unexpected

ing

Indians.

Things happening in your life which are beyond your control are just keeping you on your path.

^ July 23

Dumbledore, but there will only be one Richard Harris,’’ said producer David Heyman. “In truth he is irre-

By JEFF MORLEY

Aquarius

life.

-

will find a

ships that that entails.

July 22

November

“We

in Patriot

-

making for you, fewer

work and school

i

A

BBC

that

secrets.

Luckiest day:

peer will be disrupting your If this person can be ignored,

told the

they will reluctantly look for a new replacement for Harris, but it will

January 19

Cancer -

12.

things difficult hours at work is the best solution.

cial will

June 22

November

Luckiest day:

17.

Thomas

he was responding well to treatments and would be released from the hospital soon. Harris even told

not be easy.

Oscar nomination for his portrayal of a farmer in The Field. Hams starred with Clint Eastwood in Unforgiven and with Hamson Ford

September, his

early

agent, Sharon

CNN

the spring. Filmmakers told If

In

scenes.

Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, and is scheduled to begin filming in

November 22 December 21

20

steady boozing. In 1990, Harris received another

complaining of a chest infection. The producers of Chamber of Secrets allegedly used a double for Harris to complete some of the final

Harry

is

In 1982, Harris gave up alcohol after drinking two last bottles of wine, following decades of

sober.

Harris’s health had been deterorat-

as the

^

1962.

a cocaine overdose in 1978 and was ordered by doctors to become

ing in the last few

questions

in

Peter O’Toole and Richard Burton during the 1970s. He nearly died of

important in each

is

also earned a best-actor

from the Cannes Film and an Oscar nomination.

But Harris was also known for his heavy drinking with actors

of them.

wizard?

Taurus

if

Dumbledore

about the third movie have been asked.

Bounty

you said yes and you did it, then you were committed if they did seven, and 1 would have to do seven.” So far, only four novels have been published and Professor

that

1963, his performance

Harris also starred in The Guns of Navarone in 1961 and in Marlon Brando’s version of Mutiny on the

idea

last year. “I just didn’t like the

generation of

will replace

He

star.

Festival

white-bearded

the

the Harry

be a total of seven. “It wasn’t because I didn’t like the material or the people involved,” he said

Harris

in the series, but

all

award

didn’t.

new

his

The Sporting Life where he played a rugby player made him a

Potter movies because there could

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. He apparently took the role in the movies because his niece said she would never speak

-

son to celebrate. All of your hard

11.

hospital

movie,

Potter

He made

the stage and began act-

1950s. In

was

Harris enjoyed the role, but

accepted the role again as the professor in the upcoming movie,

Scorpio October 23

April 18

London

Harris died in a

name on

in

hesitant to appear in

on Oct. 25 of Hodgkin’s disease

Limerick, Ireland.

in

going to

Columbus.

Harry

third

It is

ing in British films during the late

Potter instalment.

Harry

Aries March

— Page 19

be directed by Alfonso Cuaron, who is taking over from Chris

the age of 72.

deal with one thing at a time. Luckiest day November 16.

it.

the

in

who

will

Professor

of

role

the

play

life will make you feel helpless. The only way to feel better is to

sure

recent death of actor Richard

Harris raises questions on

-

Several things going on in your This year your birthday will be of extra special. You Will have lots

2002

11,

Richard Harris ‘irreplaceable’

Horoscope ^

SPOKE, November

homes

in the U.S.

had bathtubs

or Father s Day yolks a month using borax or egg nite leading cause of death in the

There was no Mother’s Day Women washed their hair once

Diarrhea was the third States behind tuberculosis and pneumonia

Th^Old Fanners Almanac 2002

raise their

and the animals they trap for own welfare. Their fates are

bound ness; a

by the cold and by the wilder-

way of life

Ontario,

at least,

However,

that

few people

can relate

in

to.

this is also a stor>'

about

style and stort using Find out more about your learning to work smarter, not techniques that complement it.

Uam

harder!


,

Page 20

— SPOKE, November

11

News

2002

,

CD

Harrison’s Bv HALLEY McPOLIN

his garden.

After the video, partakers enjoyed

decadent hors d’ oeuvres, champagne and coffee while wandering through the greenhouse and listening to the new album. At the end of the

avid gardener and loving

husband

and

.taining all

new

session everyone invited

material since the

1987 record Cloud Nine.

Brainwashed

will

gnome had

recorded before Harrison’s death in 2001 and, although left unfinished, put into the hands of Harrison's

All Things

those

As

approximately 1 1 a.m., allowed a first-time glimpse at the album and its contents for those lucky enough to attend. It began with an introduction to the record and a short video with interviews from Lynne,

George himself, the making of the

and

At one point George, who always loved gardening, explained how alien he felt to this world when he stepped outside of had

Must

Pass,

from any former Beatle

who, completed the album. “George talked about how he wanted the album to sound,” explained Jeff Lynne in an exclusive listening session video, which took place at Allan Gardens in Toronto on Oct. 29. “He told Dhani a lot of things he would like to have done to the songs and left us little clues. I wanted to make them (the songs) as “good as they could be; I think we stmck a tme balance.” The listening session, which began at 9:30 a.m. and lasted until

record.

to

who recognized it: George had

still

consid-

ered one of the finest solo pieces

long-time friend and co-producer Lynne and son Dhani Harrison

describing

own symbolism

its

many throughout his yard and several appeared on his 1970 album cover

Jeff

Dhani

The

gnome.

garden

miniature

record

hit

Nov. 19 and will give audiences a unique and poetic look into the last days of a celebrated musician. The tracks were written and stores

was given

small potted plant and a

own

their

member

a

of The Beatles

George was always considered the “quiet one.” This was partly because of the overbearing personalities fellow band members John

Lennon, Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr. However, as friend and musician Paul Simon would say

“He wasn’t

He

particularly quiet.

demand That

Just didn’t

across in

that

comes

much of Harrison’s solo many of Lennon’s

work. While

songs called for public attention

-

unity against war, oppression, pover-

and other public

ty

interests

-

songs of protest were

Harrison’s

closer to pleas; observations of the injustices in the

world around him

his personal and spiritual impressions. Harrison didn’t ask for an audience, he sang only for those

and

who would

listen.

new

Harrison’s

Brainwashed, these

album.

a continuation of

is

reflections.

“You couldn’t

my

dad’s real, true

cram more of

around, looking for

turning

dad: Ts that

all right?’

And

my

there’s

no one there to tell you.” “The weirdness of his not being there was hard to take for the first few days,” agreed Lynne. “But once you got into a song and listened to the vocal up front and big,

you could feel the vibe he put into it. Then the weirdness went away and it was like he was around, guiding us in some way.” that will be Stuck Inside a Cloud and is Dhani’s favourite. “The title could mean a veil of

The

single

first

is entitled

ignorance, something everyone on earth experiences and is ultimately trying

get

to

explains.

rid

Dhani

of,”

confuses you and

“It

My

(Internet photo)

dad’s shortens your vision. favourite number was seven, that’s

George Harrison’s posthumous

why

George describes some of the more somber reflections of his existence. George, who was first diagnosed

the song is the seventh track on the album.”

On the whimsical track Pisces Fish

be heard.” an impression

to

is

Dhani, who admitted working on the record after his father’s death could at times be difficult. “It was the most surreal thing ever. I kept

released

to date.

shortly after his death,

one album,” said son,

self into

the setting at

priate.

George Harrison. It will also mark the release of George’s first album con-

father

made

Allan Gardens, inside a lush greenhouse, seem that much more appro-

This month will mark the oneyear anniversary of the death of legendary guitarist, ex-Beatle, spiritualist,

It

expected this month

George sings: life it seems like

(Harrison’s star sign)

“Some days

my

in

fiction/Some other days quite serene.”

it’s

Dhani believes

really

this is

a

reference to his father’s excursion

through

was

life:

“The

first

part of his life

as hectic as anyone’s has ever

with cancer in

courageously

disease

death last yeaf^

he was in the garden and he enjoyed nature, planted trees and wrote music. Those two contrasts

cal scars

made up

title

tal

Marwa

Blues, influenced heavi-

by Indian Looking for ly

raga,

My

and the darker Life, in which

until

his

well as that, in his wife Olivia their

home and

times by a several stabbed deranged fan. Both survived the attack, but

a great balance.” There are many contrasts on the album itself, such as the instrumen-

As

1999 George and were attacked in

been. Then, for the second half of his life,

1997, battled the

it

left

more than physi-

on the musician and

his

family.

Dhani characterizes the album’s track as the “truest song on recora.” Brainwashed the describes aspects of society that Harrison feels sway our vision

away from truths

in

the life.

more meaningful “You’re brain-

CD

is

a celebration

washed by

for crowds, long lunch lines

& class

corporate industry. You’re brainwashed by the news media. The

song

is

saying that there is an which is thinking for

alternative,

yourself and self-realization.”

The song fades into a famous Indian chant, sung by George and double-tracked by Dhani.

of people,” said Lynne of the chant. “It was Dhani’s idea to put it at the end and (Dhani’s vocals) are brilliant. His voi«“ exactly like George’s.” This album is a magnificent

,

commemoration Harrison’s

life

cal gift to his fans.

cancellations!

PROGRAM

Wednesday, November 13

pm

Conestoga College & 24 Ontario Colleges for an open House at the Conestoga College Recreation Centre on Tuesday, November 12 from 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm.

The general public 3500

or

more High School Students

Conestoga College

at

to visit with

will

25

Ontario Colleges and learn about

Conestoga College Programs.

of

and a

COLLEGE INFORMATION

2:30

be

is

“It’s

sometimes sung by great crowds

PROGRAM

-

Dhani by

the military,”

VISITOR INFORMATION

am

life.

explains, “you’re brainwashed

BE PREPARED

VIP/CIP2002

8:00

of

also invited to join

Interested in volunteering your time for either of these dates? Have any questions or comments? Contact Jan Stroh at 519-748-5220, ext. 3279.

George

final,

musi-


Digital Edition - November 11, 2002