Issuu on Google+

.

Another vehicle

Graduate helps those in need Dana Highley’s dream has come true,

With the

has increased parking

thanks to the

Must-have

Conestoga College paramedic program

Monday, October

21

Doon

fall

lot

patrols

and winter fashions

Which fashion group do you

fall

under

vintage, tribal or the career look?

Conestoga College, Kitchener

2002

,

theft at

theft of eight vehicles, security

34th Year

— No. 21

Help make a difference By JASON MIDDLETON Monica Himmelman wants Conestoga College students and

funded by the United Way,” including Catholic family counselling, the Red Cross and the Canadian National Institute for

faculty to get in the way.

the Blind.

The United Way that is. Himmelman, who is this year’s employee campaign chair, hopes

paign will take place on Oct. 31

that

year’s campaign,

Oct. 23 to Nov.

Last year students could get a a chocolate bar for $5. Chartwell,

1

have more student donations to United Way,” said

the

Himmelman. have events run-

to

ning throughout the week-and-ahalf

campaign

with a lasagna lunch. piece of lasagna, garlic bread and

in

help raise awareness and I’d like

She hopes

to

encourage

stu-

the

company

cafeterias,

that runs the school’s

donated the food.

Most of the money raised comes from canvassers, who give all full-time Conestoga College employees a personalized envelope containing

United

Way

dents should care because “they

receive

their

in

live

nity

this

community and

the

Way makes

your commustronger and safer

a better,

personalized

were

there

choose

can

also said that stu-

United

a

pledge card.

Donors

dent donations.

Himmelman

cam-

for the

which runs from

part

“I'd like to see a student event to

to

The wrap-up event

this

take

students

services

the

in

which

area

will

money. Last year 60 volunteer can-

vassers throughout the college.

Any

members who con-

staff

the

United

Way

are

place to be.”

tribute

This year’s campaign goal for Conestoga College is $40,000.

entered into a draw to win prizes donated by two college alumni.

Himmelman Way is

United

stresses

that

the

not just for “poor

Mike Shipley donated Toronto Maple Leaf tickets and Mike Reilly donated a decorated foot-

people.”

“One

to

people have used

in three

stool.

Violet Boutilier,

tions they

hope

a United

Way

to receive.

voFunteer, displays the

The United Way’s goal

is

thermometer chart that

will

gauge the dona-

to collect $40,000.

College residence enforces safety rules Bv KATE

D.

VANDEVEN

enforced for the

safety

of the

students.

Because of

hazards, the rules

The Conestoga Residence and Conference Centre is already

clearly state that there are to be

beginning to feel the effects of the

hot plates in

double cohort. With an increasing number of minors and a hundred more stu-

remain shut

dents housing in residence this rules and regulations are year,'

issued.

starting

to

change

well

as

more

becoming

as

fire

no rooms and doors must

at all times.

If these rules are

ings

As all

broken, warn-

and possible fines will be well, for insurance purposes,

guests are required to sign in

upon entering

the building. This is

not only to ensure liability, but also for the safety of all students

should there be a

fire.

Kobylnik said the problems in the parking lot are becoming numerous. He reiterated that he thinks one of the contributing factors may be because of the increasing events being held outside of the residence.

Resident adviser Jason Arnold, 20, said

some common

problems

ular bar nights, will aid in reduc-

number of reoccurring

the

ing

he deals with in a night include students drinking in the halls, doors being left open and loud

problems residence deals with on

music.

year

Arnold, who is a second-year business administration manage-

ment

studies student, thinks that

security

patrolling

the

halls

on

busy nights, such as the ever-pop-

strongly

enforced.

a nightly basis.

Another resident adviser, thirdaccounting student Matt Hodgson, said he thinks being “stiffer on fines” will cut down problems.

Hodgson, 20, said that resident advisers are enforcing rules such no drinking in the halls and signing in guests by giving stu-

as

dents

John Kobylnik, the general manager at the residence, said the couple of weeks were first

warnings

repeated

and

management to hand out fines when necessary. However, first-year business

bringing

“crazy.”

in

administration

While Kobylnik does concede

student

Christa

that this is usual for this time of

Campbell said she understands the rules are for the safety and

the year, he said that because of

security of the students, but she

number of students and the increase in the number of minors, security was

the increase in the

brought in for the

first

patrol the halls at night

thinks

time to

in the halls.

to according Fortunately, Kobylnik, the presence of security helped to alleviate some of the

as

Kobylnik, possible security cameras in the parking

parking

lot

guests and

concerns. All of these

have regulations that are strongly

more

resi-

one time and additional security walks b\ resident advisers are all methods

are being dealt

in

lot.

dent advisers on duty

with on a daily basis, including hot plates in the rooms, open doors,

s^n

many.

Unfortunately there is no pleasing everyone, but according to

problems and things eventually calmed down. However, there continues to be

to

obey

Campbell said that students moved away from home to get away from rules and regulations and now they seem to have twice

of these problems included after-hour parties and drinking

forgetting

to

the rules.

Some

issues that

residence acted more like

would be more inclined

and deal

with problems.

some

if

a "landlord to a tenant." instead of as “parental units.’" then students

Rob Scott, 20, of Uxbridge. Ont.. signs in at the front desk of the Conestoga Residence and Conference Centre. This is to ensure the safety of the students, should there be a fire.

at

being used to help stop reoccurring problems and help maintain a safe environment.


1

,

— SPOKE, October 21

Page 2

News

2002

,

Number

Professor’s prized truck

so

Doon campus

stolen from

lot

of vehicles stolen

year from

far this

lots

higher than normal

By STACEY MCCARTHY By STACEY MCCARTHY

When

Richard Farrar didn't see

his truck in the

parking

There have been eight vehicles from Doon campus this year. The latest was a truck taken from

his first

lot,

stolen

thought was that perhaps he had

parked it somewhere else. But when he saw his cooler and part of next to where

it

had been,

his

hopes

were dashed.

can’t quite

commit himself

number

mal.

He

So

to the

is

security, said

already above nor-

said the average

number of

usually

around a

stolen

dozen a

Doon, says he

at

that

cars

Farrar, the latest victim in a rash

of vehicles thefts

2.

A1 Hunter, head of

column lying

truck's steering

his

Lot 8 on Oct.

is

the

vehicles

of choice

idea that he’ll soon have to start

have been Chrysler minivans or

looking for another vehicle.

smaller

"I can’t get

now.

I

excited about

don’t have

asm, but

I

much

know I have

it

to get

some-

at

been driving a rental

from

classes

his

’96

Chevrolet SIO pickup truck was stolen on Oct. 2.

(Photo by Stacey McCarthy)

was about a quarter

"It

to five.

1

could remember parking next to the median, but I couldn’t see it

Richard Farrar, an accounting professor at Doon campus, had his truck stolen from Lot 8 on Oct. 2. Farrar said the college

need

may

to increase security in the parking lots.

But Farrar said that when he saw his cooler on the grass, he knew what had hap-

what are they going

pened.

they’re

“I’m angry and disgusted that this was done,” he said. “My truck was six years old, but I took good

thefts)

(the truck).’’

care of

it,

babied

it.

and I had some done on it.”

things (modifications)

While Farrar said the truck was only a four-cylinder, it “was ideal for what I wanted.” When asked if there were any leads yet, Farrar shook his head. “None, nothing. Basically everyone I've been talking to says not to

my

hopes up.” Farrar said while campus security was sympathetic, they were just going through the motions. “But get

Dodge

like

of theft

instances

higher this year. Hunter said

Doon, has car to and

since

why

sure

thing lined up," he said. Farrar, an

accounting professor

vehicles

Shadows. Hunter said the theft of these smaller cars is something new to the campus. While he’s not

right

enthusi-

not

much

to

do? There’s

they can do.

guess

I

used to them (vehicle by now.” Farrar said he had mo idea there were so many thefts on campus. “Even so, I would think that my vehicle, being six years old, would be immune. “But I know they’re (Chevrolet trucks) in demand and hard to

come by,” he said when asked why his truck might have been a target.

Farrar thinks

another form of

security should be used in

parking

lots.

He

Doon’s

said that because

people pay parking fees each year, they should be entitled to

some

extra

security

for their

vehicles.

“Even another person patrolling,” he said. “Maybe some cameras or

it

are

has

regional

police

busy.

He

said

burned, “because that’s one

But whatever it is. I’m still going to have to shell out (money) because you never get back the value on a used vehicle,” he said, “even though I did have mag (magnesium) wheels

and a tonneau cover on nice looking vehicle.”

it

-

it

was a

In addition to extra patrols, securi-

keeping

in

touch with

other colleges in the area and with

"We’re working with the

police.

Waterloo Regional Police and they have been very helpful and co-opera-

Hunter

tive,”

campus

They were on minutes after an a few weeks ago.

said.

just

attempted theft

The

theft

was

when

foiled

a

the incident, followed the fleeing

by now.” “I’m caught between waiting and starting to look for a new vehicle to get though.

and one each from Lots

Hunter said there are thefts occurring all over the area, which is keeping Waterloo

cars

I’m going

8,

5.

ver’s seat.

stolen

know what

and

1

2 and

our location (next to Highway 401). That’s part of it, but it’s not just a Conestoga problem. It’s also an east end of Kitchener problem.”

have found a number of

don’t

Lots

female student, walking towards

police

I

There have been three vehicles from Lot 12, two each from

stolen

always been a problem at Doon. “It definitely has to do with

even gates.” Unfortunately, these measures won’t bring back Earrar’s truck whfch he said, “could be anywhere

kind of in limbo.

around.”

ty services is

year.

far.

“These things don’t necessarily happen under cover of darkness. They happen when the lots are full and while people are moving

stripped

and burned

close to the Six Nations reserve

near Brantford. The vehicles are

way

to

get rid of any remaining evidence.”

As

well,

four vehicles stolen

from around the region have been found in Doon parking lots this term. Hunter said he believes these abandoned vehicles are the

her van, saw someone in the dri-

“She called

out,” said

Hunter, “and the person fled to a

nearby vehicle with someone else in it and then fled the scene.” A faculty

member, who witnessed

managed to get both a description of the car and the vehicle and

plate number,

which was an

out-

of-province plate.

Hunter said he believes there different groups responsible for the ongoing thefts. One seems to be targeting Chrysler minivans and small

may be two

Chrysler products.

“That

may be because

the igni-

tion systems are fairly simple to defeat,” said Hunter. The other nc said, seems to specifically target

GM trucks and vans.

work of joyriders. Because of the increased thefts he said, “We have extra patrols, and we’re making an effort to get

late-model

information out to students to be

parking lots. “If they see something suspicious, they should tmst their instincts and inform us immediately. It takes only minutes

extra vigilant

-

especially in the day-

time.” According to Hunter, the thefts have occurred

most of

between

1

a.m. and 2:30 p.m.

To help prevent

further thefts.

Hunter suggests that students be on a higher level of awareness in the

hotwire a

to

car.”

Nursing students get

Awards, Bursaries

heavy dose

Scholarships

By IZABELA ZARZYCKA

M M

Award Criteria: awarded annually to dtree students re^stered in the first year Tlie award will Ire given to t)f any tliree-year Bu,sities,s program at Conestoga Ccdlege student who is either a Canadian Citizen or permanent resident and who: •

is

their first year of studies in Septe^nlier 2002 directly from hi^i school into one of the following programs; Business Adn-uiiistration Accounting, Managenieiit Studies, Marketing, Matetials Management, Financial Plamting or Computet Piogramtner

Has entered

Anaiysx

• •

sciences and in nursing courses,”

Has achieved an overall average t d 80% in Grade 12 .subject-s; Has demonstrated leadership during the past two years of high school; Has demonstrated volimteerism either in high school or in the community.

The

The value of rhe award

is liSOC.CX^

to

earfi

Complete the application form (See

Provide your own letter outlining your your vrdunteer work

reverse) activities that

Provide a transcript of your High School marks

Submit y'our

McMaster University also teach at the Doon campus. The teaching fac-

31,

20C2

difficult.

Monteith

faculty

said

from

McMaster University all work together to make the degree program possible. All three schools

ulty is divided almost equally, with

same program,” said dean of health sciences. The curriculum is “heavy in

Conestoga. They work together to

“are doing the Bill

Jeffrey,

CLARIFICATION

about 50 per cent from McMaster and about 50 per cent from teach the program

and graduates

from the course receive a nursing degree from McMaster University.

The admission requirements meaning

the

requirements are based on those

on the Kitchener methadone

required for entry into a university.

clinic indicated that Tylenol

can be

addictive. It

2,

are

In the Oct. 7 edition of Spoke, a

should have stated Tylenol

3 and

4 can be

1

addictive, not the

regular painkiller.

Spoke apologizes

October

this

been available since September 2001 at the Doon campus. Conestoga, Mohawk College and

story

demonstrate leadership and

and ail supporting documentation to Janeen Hoover, Associate Registrar, Awards/Ftnandal Aid, SCSB, Doon Campus.

'Ihursday,

the heavy load

higher, Monteith said,

Deadline:

it is

program

of rhe three rerlpMenrs

application,

added

of science courses that makes

elor of science degree program has

Guidelines for Submission of Application: •

orative B.Sc. nursing program. Jeffrey

four-year collaborative bach-

’Value of Award: •

Bonnie Monteith, level one program co-ordinator of the collabsaid

Nursing students at Conestoga College can now graduate with a degree.

The Mac Voisin Scholarship

science

four-year program

in

n IE MAC VOISIN SCIIOLARSI IIP This scholarship has been established to honour Mac 'Voisui, a Kitchener business leader 8c Meat Shop chain of franchises. and entrepreneur, who founded the

of

derstanding this

for any misun-

may have

caused.

must have completed Grade 12 and have six university Students level

credits. Also,

two

Grade

12

students need

science

credits

including biology, chemistry or physics and ha^e successfully

completed courses.

math

and

English


.

News

SPOKE, October

21

,

2002

— Page 3

Breakaway from home and save money By

ANDREA

R.

Breakaway Tours

SMITH

second language -(ESL) classes, said she might visit Florida with her family like she does every

you

will take

on a fantastic journey that will give you a great vacation away from school for New Year’s Eve. The company, which specializes in

year.

Other students are not so lucky. might have to work. If not, 1 will probably go to Toronto,” said Lindsay Knechtel, 25, a manage“I

organizing tours for students,

will take

$229

you

to

Quebec City

ment studies student. With the Quebec City package, students can have a fun-filled

for

GST) based on quad

(plus

occupancy, which includes transportation by bus and a hotel. Students interviewed at Conestoga College believe the trip

three nights at a hotel in the beautiful city

The deluxe motor coach bus

would be a good experience and said booking it with Breakaway Tours would be good value for their money. However, they added

leaves Dec. 29 and returns Jan.

The

for

New

ary,

to ring in

local parties

who

1.

roimdtrip

wristbands that give you deals

Mont

2003.

However, Tram Nguyen,

includes

and free nightly shuttles town Quebec City. People can pay extra

Year’s Eve.

Most students plan

ticket

transportation, bus, hotel, itiner-

they cannot afford to spend too

much

of Ste. Foy or Beauport.

Ste.

Anne

to

to

downgo

to

for daily skiing

and snowboarding, Stoneham Ski resort for night skiing and snow-

19,

currently takes English as a

boarding parties or to

AHL

hock-

Breakaway Tours

ey games.

planned

A

Vieux Quebec walking tour, a Beaupre coast driving tour and lots of shopping are also included for no additional charge. Despite the varied activities offered, one Conestoga College student suggests more. “Rock climbing, history museums and clubs would be great things to do on a vacation,” said Vladimir Gutierrez, 22, an administrative accounting student. In the past, Breakaway Tours have had bands like Blink 182, Third Eye Blind, Tea Party and Choclair perform for their clients. This year students say they should have more house, hip hop or hard rock bands like Sum 41 The bus leaves, from Toronto but you can get a bus from Kitchener for an extra $10. For

for

also has trips

spring

break to City

Daytona Beach, Panama Beach and Acapulco. “1

think they should pick places

are less expensive,” said Knechtel. adding she would prefer

that

places that are closer to home. “I think

places like P.E.I. would

be a great experience because it is said society,” such a small Gutierrez.

Anyone interested in the trips who is under the age of 18 must have parent/guardian permission.

A

(Internet photo)

Take a relaxing

Beach

with

Daytona Breakaway Tours. trip to

other bus distance costs, contact the

CSI

office.

$75 deposit is required. For more information or to sign up contact Jody Andruszkiewicz, events co-ordinator for the CSI. You can also call 905-501-9774 or 1-800465-4257. Or you can visit the

company’s Web site www.breakawaytours.com.

at

Broadcast buddy system helps students connect By BRANDI STEVENSON Students

in

broadcasting students get to know each other. They also had an orientation party in the Sanctuary on Oct. 7. “It breaks the ice,” Thurnell said, adding

broadcasting,

the

radio and television program are

more than

just classmates, they

are buddies too.

that they

Mike Thurnell, program cois

“a combination of peer tutor-

ing and orientation.”

Every first-year student is matched up with a second-and third-year student.

He

said

it

is

designed to make first years more comfortable with each other and college in general.

college can

be

a

“Coming

was that third-year students would leave the school to go on co-op placements in second

this

to

unique and

somewhat stressful situation new students,” he said.

plan more events in

The buddy system was initiated about four or five years ago, but did not run last year, Thurnell said, because it wasn’t going as well as they hoped. Originally, first years were only paired up with a third-year student. He said the problem with

buddy system

ordinator, said the

may

the future.

for

leaving the buddies abandoned halfway through.

semester,

The system was reinstated after two third-year students approached Thurnell. They thought it was a good idea, and matched up new students with a second- and a third-year student so they wouldn’t be abandoned again.

Thurnell said the students ask advice of each other, and support

one another. He added there large social aspect to

is

a

Everybody knows

as well. each other in

broadcasting

“so

the

it

field,

it’s

one way of starting to make connections and starting to make contacts that will be very useful throughout (their) life, not just during (the) three years (they’re) in college,” he said.

(Photo by Brandi Stevenson)

Mike Thurnell, broadcasting, radio and television program co-ordinator, says students are enthusiastic about the buddy system.

PEER SUPPORTED LEARNING GROUPS SCHEDULE !

Tuesdays: 11:30-12:30 12:30-1:30

Financial

Accounting 1

Meeting Times Course Mondays: Business 2:30-3:30 Room 3A405 Microeconomics 3:30-4:30 Room 3A405

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Tuesdays:

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Wednesdays: 9:30-10:30 Room 1D15 Room 2E23 3:30-4:30

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Wednesdays: 2:30-3:30 Room 1D17

Thursdays: 3:30-4:30

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Fridays: 11:30-12:30

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Concepts

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2:30-3:30 3:30-4:30

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Room 2D04 Room 2D04

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Mondays:

in

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Room 3A405

Wednesdays: Room 1D17 3:30-4:30


Page 4

— SPOKE, October 21

Commentary

2002

,

HA

Volunteers essential to Oktoberfest’s success

ALWAYS

be commended on a job well done now that North Bavarian event has come and gone for another year. largest America’s Thousands of people visited the area over the past eight days, and

economy

and millions tune

on the

in

CTV

This year the food drive collected

1

SIGN IT.

I

AWAY MY ISOUL WHEN I

I

SIGN UP

miH A NEW

the event raises a sub-

stantial amount of money for local charities and organizations. The Onkel Hans Food Drive took place at Canada’s only recognized Thanksgiving Day Parade on Oct. 14. It's estimated that close to 300,000 people watch the parade each

year,

GOOD ONE

A

.

tourists.

In addition to contributing to the

THAT'S

|HA.

\

SISNING

I

Oktoberfest organizers should be recognized for their efforts. Oktoberfest brings millions of dollars of revenue into the area annu-

number of

FEEL

LIKE I'M

Officials are to

ally thanks to the large

^

HA... I

V.

^

CLUB!

television network.

1,900 pounds of non-perishable

food for local food banks.

The hundreds of volunteers who either organized the parade or followed the parade down King Street collecting food, should be thanked for donating their time and energy to better the community. Another fundraising campaign held

event

at the

is

FAT BUST

the official sou-

FITNESS

venir button campaign, started in 1969.

The buttons

feature

a

variety

of scenes

and characters from

CLUB SIGN UP

Oktoberfest.

This year’s button depicted Oktoberfest’s mascot Onkel Hans, and

was designed by

loqal artist

Chuck Temple. money raised went

Buttons sold for $2 and the

to a variety of local

charities.

$30,000

sold, collecting almost

were

In 2001, nearly 15,000 buttons

Nfeo/bz.

for charity.

No

one can deny

that alcohol plays a part in the celebrations for

Oktoberfest.

And

organizers should be acknowledged for doing as

much

They know

catering to the people patronizing the festhallen

know

discouraging drinking and driving afterward

is

is

a

even

so

more important.

all

why

offer the

are so

many of

For the 17th year Molson and Grand from 1 1 p.m. until approximately 2 a.m. on both weekends of the event. Designated drivers had the option of taking part in the Pepsi-designated driving program available at some festhallen. When a driver registered at the hall, he or she enjoyed complimentary Pepsi all evening, and the driver was then eligible to win valuable

Centres, Exclusively

prizes in a

draw held

at the

end of the

Oktoberfest organizers also provide financial support to the Waterloo

is

done as an additional precaution

local citizens arrived

An

home

rewarded with a booklet

who were

with

filled

gift

your membership, no matter what. This includes

air.

Countless hours are put into Oktoberfest by hundreds of people to

make

cising,

it.

stopped by police were

event of such magnitude does not appear out of thin

sure guests in the local area feel

welcome and safe. made for itself, people will

Because of the solid reputation the event has

continue coming back to the area and patronizing local businesses.

The community owes

a thank you to

all

who were

year’s Oktoberfest, as they, are responsible for

making

to

if

you get

suspend

it

injured,

or you want to go on vacation. To try and be fit and stick regular schedule, those of us

want

to

lift

Most people

it

into their heads

that they can’t lose the their

•For people

who do

not have their

body

ideal body, achieving that

weight on

own, and they need

to throw

These are the people most

sus-

ceptible to paying absurd amounts

money at fitness clubs and instructors who will be like watchdogs and

of

help them

do

achieve their goals.

is

something they always think about.

money

Only

if

will

it,

a goal.

to achieve

the person it

work

Be prepared

is

motivated to

for them.

go

to the

gym

and

and how much

won’t be able to cancel

lives

in

get

often not

is

attainable.

to a

weights and do cardio-

want included

gym

or no gym.

most of the money they

the

spend, but the goal

who

away and pay from $230 to close to $600 a year to do it, depending on what luxuries you

a role in the success of this year’s event

consider-

be able to pay for your member-

K-W area a

should be congratulated on another job well done.

is

But other people can’t be with someone 24 hours a day. They can advise on what to eat, when to eat,

for awhile,

vascular exercise must sign our

desired tourist destination.

And everyone who had

you want

involved in this the

money

weight by eating healthy and exer-

you have to sign one stating that you must pay the full amount of

vouchers and discount coupons

a lot of

the first year without

Most fitness members to contracts, meaning

make

provided by sponsors.

An

This

ing in most cases, you can lose

paying for

not right for everyone, and that’s so many people are skeptical. It is probably everyone’s intent to

make

or

sure guests and

to

safely.

estimated 8,000 drivers

Women’s

GoodLife Fitness clubs, you’re stuck, and you can’t get out of your

clubs hold new

Regional Police for their R.I.D.E. program. This

is

why

Because once you start at a populike Family Fitness lar place

membership

festival.

quit.

us, includ-

ing me, so skeptical of them.

River Transit provided free rides

So many people have started and They are just not motivated to use the membership they paid for. That’s why a membership to a club

same services at generally the same prices and they all guarantee the same results, They

ble to see the event ran smoothly.

must, but

Fitness clubs help shed dollars not pounds

as possi-

your membership.

to eat, for an extra

to

and know

ship,

that

you probably

Enjoying everything

it.

modera-

They can help you use the equipment and show you proper

tion

techniques, and for an extra fee,

week

work with you one-on-one

keep in shape and keep an

fee.

to help

you achieve your ideal body. But they can’t make you do anything.

in

and exercising a few times a is

probably the best way

body weight, while

at the

same

to

ideal

time,

keeping your hard-earned money.

Spoke Letters are

welcome

Spoke welcomes editor. Letters

letters to the

should be signed and include the

and telephone number contacted

No unsigned

is

name

of the writer. Writers will

Vanessa Laye Spoke Online Editors: Marc Hulet and

Hiller

-

Julie

Tori Sutton

Faculty Adviser: Christina Jonas

be published.

the right to edit any

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca Web site: www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

letter

,

for publication.

Address correspondence to; The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

N2G 4M4

Production Managers:

Photo Editors: Stacey McCarthy, Daniel Roth, and Janine Toms

Letters should be no longer than 500 words.

Spoke reserves

Graham and

Editor: Julianna Kerr

Advertising Manager: Laurie-Ann Vandenhoff Circulation Manager: Lisa

be

for verification.

letters will

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College

Dr.,

May by a payment from Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) In exchange for the inserThe views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers in Spoke are not endorsed by the CSI unless their advertisements contain the CSI logo. Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a MS Word file

Spoke

is

mainly funded from September to

tion of advertising in the paper.

would be

helpful. Letters

must not contain any

libellous statements.


News

SPOKE, October

21

,

— Page 5

2002

With complaint comes compensation By ABBI DAVIES The American dream of fast, easy money has spilled over into Canada in recent years.

One

get-rich-quick

scheme

and true

tried, tested

the frivo-

is

News of

lous lawsuit.

that is

81 -year-old

California resident Stella Liebeck’s

McDonald’s which she was

against

suit

civil

restaurants,

in

awarded $2.9 million for

spilling

scalding coffee in her lap, prompt-

many Americans

ed

lowing

to consider fol-

“The driving force behind

the

proliferation of ‘frivolous lawsuits’

United States

in the

New

explains

with the

lies

ready availability of the trial,’’

civil

jury

Brunswick-

based attorney. Lutz Longstaff,

Why

commentary The Land of his

Silly

in

America

is

Lawsuits.

“Fortunately for Canadians

we

are

not plagued by such a plethora of

due

home,

civil

action

is

extremely restricted.”

The jury

on

restrictions placed

trials in

and the Hamilton district franchise. Tim Hortons admits that the bandage fell off of an employee during mixing of the batter, but argues that any of the injuries that Finlayson suffered were not the

three-quarters to reflect Hunt’s

civil

our country has not

be responsible.”

is

“excessive” amount of money.

case

is still

Still

own

more Canadians have decid-

Hamilton on Nov.

Edward

a

at

sued

Starbucks coffee chain

in

1995 with

14,

“When

Skwarek

sonal

part

of his

you lose weight, gives you necessary nutrients, makes the skin more

more water. The time-old recommendation

supple, and even helps to get rid of

of water per day. However, scien-

have recently determined that formula does not take into account other sources of water.

tists

this

water retention.

www.galaxyof

health.com says that water helps people to lose weight by suppressing the appetite by filling the stom-

water daily the body will remove the fluids it does not need. Subsequently, the water around your ankles, hips, thighs and stom-

even food. Heinz Valtin, a kidney specialist, published the article and

ach will slowly flush out of your body. With a regular intake of water your body no longer has to

believes that people are drinking enough water. Many believe that caffeinated beverages like coffee

work process.

against

He

hydration

the

asserts that the evi-

dence condemning caffeine due to its

diuretic effects

enough.

He

is

not substantial

believes that the alter-

native sources of water should be

included in the total intake. In fact, Valtin cautions against

hyponatremia or water intoxication. This occurs when a person drinks too

much

water.

The

kid-

neys cannot keep up with the body’s intake of water. As a result, mental confusion, seizures and even death can occur. Water intox-

becoming more frequent endurance athletes, military

ication in

is

and others. In October 2000 a 19-year-old man almost died according to an

recruits

The Hamilton Spectator. The man drank 50 bottles ot water in three or four hours, became ill and was taken to hospital where he article in

suffered a seizure. In

October 1999

marathon runner died in the Chicago Marathon from too much a

store

it.

In addition, water

is

was awarded $780, (XK)

In

$1.5

anatomy was

honour of the lawsuit

Stella Liebcck,

a

lawsuits

frivolous

list

in

filed

by

of the most the

United

candidates

the

Kathleen Robertson.

over a toddler,

She

after tripping

who was

running

Robertson broke her ankle as a of the accident. The owners of

result

In November 2000, Granzinisky bought a 32-foot Winnebago motor home. On the way home after his

actually Robertson’s

compiled annually.

is

this

while inside a furniture store.

The winner of the 2001 Stella Award was Merv Granziniski of Oklahoma City. States

for

Auston, Tex.

is

the store

were astounded by the vermisbehaving child was

dict, as the

own

son.

Lawsuits such as these, however,

Grazinski, while driving on the free-

American phenomenon. In Germany, a bank teller tripped a

way, set the cruise control on 70

mph

security alarm after realizing that the

and then

go

in

trip

left

his

new motor home,

the driver’s seat to

the rear of the

to

Winnebago and make

are not just a North

man

robbing the bank was hard of

hearing.

The robber

is

now suing

the

himself a coffee.

bank for the exploitation of

While he was in the back the Winnebago left the freeway, crashed

ability.

and overturned. Grazinski sued the

event held in Nagano, Japan have

company for not clearly stating in the handbook that cruise control

been ordered

simply maintained the speed of the

to

vehicle,

and that

it

does not actually

drive the vehicle for you. Grazinski

his dis-

And, organizers of an Olympic

spectator

heavy

to

pay damages

who missed traffic.

to a

the event

due

Damages were

paid to the spectator as compensation for his mental anguish.

weekend. people who enjoyed feasting on turkey /\iid while I am with the majority of the and mashed, potatoes and all sorts of other wholesome goodness, there was a

by The American Physiological Society on the Web site www.theaps.com, the recommendation does not include coffee, soft drinks and

an

resident

ices.

One of

year’s Stella awards

my Uelly is full from all t^he eating I Uid over tne course of tlie XhanKsgiving long

ach and by getting rid of water retention. As a person drinks more

to

the

crushed when it got caught between the toilet seat and bowl at a Manhattan Starbucks outlet,” according to a Citizens Against Lawsuit Abuse (CALA) Web site entitled Best of the Worst Erivolous

article released

According

deprivation of his husbandly serv-

include this information.

Give thanks for everything

Please don’t sigh when you read this. But, you should be drinking

site

was awarded $1.75 million and a new Winnebago. Shortly after, the company changed its handbooks to

From the Sanctuary

of water a day, drinking water does have its rewards. Water can help

The Web

in

million “alleging that a highly per-

she bit

By JEFF MORLEY

is

for

“The 37-year-old Skawrek is asking for $1 million for what he describes as dire and permanent injuries to the affected organ. His wife Sherrie is demanding $500,000 as compensation for Lawsuits.

first

ed to sue American corporations

water each day?

to drink eight eight-ounce glasses

The

before the courts.

Really? Eight cups of

also

seeking an

order to receive larger settlements.

Anne Finlayson was eating Tim Hortons restaurant girlfriends.

in law,

Tim Hortons

says that Finlayson

fault in the matter.

three

who “may,

of anyone

fault

which she Fatly refused. The judge assessed the damages from the accident as $1.2 million but reduced that figure by

biscuit, she bit into what she assumed was a piece of ham,” says Marhie Ko, author of You Sue What You Eat. After a few more chews, she became j^oncemed and

a

Tim Hortons store, the employer who baked the biscuit part of the

to

the fact that the availability of a in

launched a $L25-million lawsuit in 2001 claiming negligence on the

home when they saw that was intoxicated. It wasn’t enough that they offered to pay her cab fare and for her accommoda-

into the last piece of her cheese tea

trial

taining absorbed blood. Finlayson

she

to drive

It

was, she alleges, a bandage con-

driving

to

‘silly suits’ ... this is largely

jury

spat the object into a napkin.

tions for the night if she agreed not

her footsteps.

in

completely stopped Canadians from getting in on the act. A Barrie, Ont. woman sued her employer after she drove home drunk from her office Christmas party. In February 2001 the Sutton Group Realty Ltd. was ordered to pay $288,000 to 52-year-old Linda Hunt. She argued that her employer should have stopped her from

great for

your muscles. Donald Robertson, a nutritionist and dietician, writes that water soothes and relaxes the

muscles and helps to make them work. It also increases blood flow and efficiency. When dehydrated the body will start using water internally resulting in water being taken out of the blood volume. This causes the blood to be thicker and harder to circulate while also off the capillaries, the smaller blood vessels in your body. Donaldson says that these condi-

closing

group of students who weren't so foiininate. Now the purpose behind this week's Prom the Sanctuary isn't meant to bring the and how we student body down. Rather, it's supposed to remind us of all we have luck. nan give to those who don't have such good supposed to bring This year's CSI food drive, held aU through September, was students on campus increased awareness about the student food bank. For those who need to use the food bank, the food drive was designed to ei^ure they a next meal. wouldn't have to worry about whether or not they would be having in even one brought who someone for The CSI even tempted students with $500 can of food with their CSI orientation bag. was not The hope was that there would be an overwhelming response. Sadly, this really matter. The the case. The number of students who brought food in doesn't The students CSI can't thank them enough for giving so freely of themselves. enough. students who use the food bank can't thank these didn't However, it's not those students who gave but rather the students who give any food that need to help out. be able Understandably, those students who need to use the food bank might not to help out in that regard.

However, there are students out there who can help other students out but the student choose not to. Contrary to popular belief, it is cool and okay to give to one can donate is do can food bank. In fact, it's encotiraged. The coolest thing you bank food the of food. If all our students and staff each gave one can of food,

hypertension, high cholesterol and

year around. aren't as fortuAll year long, students will be encouraged to give to those who might not seem it mounting, costs other nate. With rent, tuition and all sorts of

heart disease.

likp there's

have

tions

Water

is

been

implicated

also great for the skin.

in

It

helps to Hush out impurities in the

body and helps you sweat when cool

off.

Moreover,

trying

to

makes

the skin supple

it

and young

looking because the skin cells are

would be

full all

a chance to donate. There is always the chance to donate. And it's never too late. want Thanksgiving might have come and gone but Christmas is on its way. If you the food bank. to maiTP a fellow student's Christmas a little better, donate to have to ask our we that bad too just It's bank. It's cool to donate food to the food students to be cool.

But there

is.

-Jody Andruszkiewicz CSI events programmer

hydrated.

So. drinking lots of water a day may not be necessary, but -drinking lots

of water within reason does

water.

not hurt.

However, while we may not be required to drink 64 to 72 ounces

For more information contact the K-W Health Unit at 883-2000.

-

CSI advertisement

-


good education

his prosperity to a

-

the

is

Performance Award for work done above and beyond expectations. Kingsbury has not confined him-

himself

graduates Ontario. Award winners

to

be announced Feb. 24. 2003

How would

feel to retire

it

is

He

life.

Business whirlwind Tim Kingsbury has been nominated for a Premier’s Award. Conestoga College has alumni nominated in

•‘Conestoga College has changed life,”

he

have been

said.

in

“How

successful

I

way -

almost every

of the six categories this year.

each

from a business standpoint and in a lot of ways a political standpoint can be traced back to the late 1970s

He

currently the chief technolo-

is

officer for

The Great Gulf Group

gy of Companies. He is the to assume this role, and

Conestoga College.” Kingsbury said he started his postcollege career with an unfair advan-

at

ble for

all

first is

person

responsi-

information technology

matters.

tage.

From January 1997 to September 2000, Kingsbury was president and chief operating officer of Simple Solutions. Among other duties, he

having all the aces in your he said. “My education

‘It’s like

hand,”

became

my

life’s

advantage.”

Prior to graduating from materials

was responsible

management, he had 9 job offers. Kingsbury has made a tremendous contribution to the business world 1

over the

last

20

organization,

for

planning and operational direction

of the company.

From October 1996

years.

R.

SMITH

Labatt Blue Line

Students at Conestoga College agree that Labatt Blue Line would save them

money

long-distance

but say the free

service

needs more

publicity.

Board of Education. He trustees representing

As a member

of the board,

to July 1998,

year on the board, Kingsbury was elected chair of finance. this position, the

is

available to

anyone over the age of 19. It allows most Ontario residents to make unlimited

long-distance

calls

in

selected towns and cities.

pay my parents for long-distance calls would be great,”

“Not having

to

Are

3^011

anxious about public

net expenditures of

more than $20

development company formed

profit organization provides shelter

in the

for physically,

1970s.

Out of college, Kingsbury went to work at Bell Canada, and stayed there until September 1996. His time saw him appointed to various positions within the company. Each position offered him increased responsibility and was an integral role at the company. While at Bell, Kingsbury was the at Bell

and crisis services emotionally and sexually abused women and their children. While a member of the board of directors, Kingsbury was involved in successful fundraising projects and negotia-

James Aikins, 20, a student in the robotics and automation program. “They should make more people aware of its service. If I had known about it, I would be using it.

said

“It

to

would

me.

I

definitely

could

call

be of

my

interest

grandpa and

FGngsbury does a great deal of

community

public and

other people far

he

Michael Laurin,

19,

Meeting times

to

be determined

from students’ timetables.

To

-

Shawna Bernard

register, bring a

copy of your

timetable to Student Services,

Room 2B02 by Wednesday, October 23rd.

trips

constantly. They’re part of the puzzle.”

Kingsbury said most of his life has been a matter of good timing. “You don’t plot your career,” he said. “It opens up and you take opportunities.”

He said success is about time management and surrounding yourself with great people.

-

“Associating yourself with smart people, dynamic people, and weird

people in some regards, is really the key thing,” he said. “And deciding what you want to accomplish is really important.”

,

Kingsbury looks for challenges and a chance to work with a good incredibly important to

It is

that

“If

he

interested in his work.

a challenge,

it’s

tackle

is

it,”

he

we

should

said.

of business

case of Labatt Blue. Of course, you never get something for nothing.

The only

hassle

is

a short advertisement that you must

studies, says his

listen

parents

you

don’t

really

like

him

before

to

make any

calls.

Blue

“Labatt

making

long-

distance

calls

Line could really

costs

improve

because

it

much

too

service

got

money. Labatt

Blue

Aikins

have been

would help on I live

bills

a

lot

they

of the

Rodgers

beginning of the call,” said Julie Rebelo, 21, a student in the law and security program.

Of

the six students interviewed

Conestoga College, all but one said they would be interested in

the service.

up

Line would not

James

said

Blue

“Labatt

the country,”

be of interest me because

robotics from and automation. “It would save lot

rid

at

because in

calls

their if

advertising at the

Line was introduced earlier this Since then more than summer. 25,000 people have registered and

a

Facilitators

often,”

Cunningham,

week of October 2Bth.

wife, Julie,” he

management

“It

He

my

drag them on business

money

away more

Accept a “0” in the public speaking

service.

said.

This 4 session group will begin the

said. “I

him

Avoid doing

“The world revolves around my son, Daniel, and

team.

the speech?

family.

property.

made.

make

River recognized as a Canadian Heritage River in 1996. He has also been a corporate

tion of land deals for a new, larger

more than 507,000

part of a course rather than

in

of Software Solutions, which he defined as a leading edge software

he was

speaking? speeche,s at all costs?

With him

board saw reduced

From 1998 to 2001, he was a member of the Halton Women’s Place board of directors. The non-

OVERCOMING PUBLIC SPEAKING ANXIETY GROUP •

to

million.

the chief technology officer

which saw the Grand

Initiative,

important to spend time with his

the role of

Kingsbury was elected

Labatt Blue Line helps students save By ANDREA

and operSince

museum.

he was recognized for work done at board and committee levels as well as community work. In his second (Photo by Julianna Kerr)

for the preservation

ing.

Halton.

graduated

Award

the museum has had tremendous success with fundrais-

was one of 18

from Conestoga College’s materials management program in 1982. He said the college played a huge part in his

my

to take over direc-

the

the Halton

the

and the Ontario Public School Board Association. He was the recipient of the 1993 Ontario

societies,

spokesman and has been featured in call-in shows for both radio and TV. schedule, busy his Despite Kingsbury said it is incredibly

of

In 1994,

secret to his success? His education.

successful business

was formed

chairman,

faces challenges and

Kingsbury

Foundation. The founda-

Kingsbury has assumed

a Canadian business

them head-on. What’s

Regional

Halton

the

for

ation

away from work. Kingsbury

currently chairman of the

is

tion, planning, fundraising

Award nominee Tim Kingsbury knows, but he cannot seem to stay

the

historical

of architecture in Milton. He was also a member of the Blue Springs

tion

time you're 40 years old? Premier’s

Nassagaweya and Milton

Heritage

Museum by the

Board,

Services

Police

tion.

board

Bv JULIANNA KERR

tackles

projects

hfic been hppn affiliated with such organiorg; has zations as the Halton Regional

focusing on local history and educa-

He

in

Toronto.

whirlwind.

community

in

He

immerse

has also found the time to

college

contribution

will

workings of business.

self to the

program created by the government to acknowledge the important economic and social

provincial awards

make

Company

the

of

recipient

second in a six-part series on Conestoga alwnni who are nominated for the 2002 Premier s Awards, an annual, This

to I

wouldn’t remember

the

phone number,”

of money,”

said Rebelo.

Katie Laurin Rodgers, 21, of mechanical engineering. said

Blue

Labatt

Cunningham

about $30 to $80 a month on long-

Line was created by Labatt Blue and Onlinetel Corp., a next generation telecommunica-

distance calls using other long-dis-

tions

Most

students,

on average, spend

tance providers. It

is

estimated that those

who

use Labatt Blue Line save about

$30 a month, which is coincidently about the same price of a 24

and software services company and wholly owned subsidiary of Eiger Technology. If

you are

visit their

interested in registering,

Web

tblueline.com.

site

at

www.labat-


News

SPOKE, October

Audience becomes the target By CARRIE HOTO

childhood education student, said, “The best thing was when he

The audience became a part of the comedy show in the Sanctuary on

up with a guy.”

Nobody knows what to expect when they go to watch McElwain; if you have ever seen his show Gutter Ball Alley, you will understand. The

Oct. 9.

Comedian Wade McElwain

me

hooked

per-

formed an impromptu set, ranging from targeting random students as

self-proclaimed Canadian celebrity

of his jokes to playing matchmaker. The 30-year-old invit-

writer,

ed two willing students onto the

host of the show.

the

butt

stage after briefly harassing

them

Steve Knill, an electrical engineering student, said his favourite part of

me

act has taken

Ireland,

New

company

Productions, which

CVS

is

called

owned

at

McElwain has

to

Gutter Ball

sell

Alley to a network

in the

United

States one day.

more

receptive.

going

to

work

in the hall.” He has been a comedian for six and a half years.

McElwain “I don’t

is

incredibly upbeat.

believe in negativity,

doesn’t have any place in

won’t

my

way.”

All kidding aside,

McElwain

taught

He

still

knew

that (career path)

was-

face

comedians was, “Do

a.spiring

fulfill

every-

you want you have to work harder than anyone else.” McElwain grew up on a farm and thing

.

.

me how

to

father.

said

he said, and, “to treat people with

would do anything in help someone out with

my power

said.

One

talent,”

he

piece of advice he offered

many

both

been

“My

par-

amazing, to

help.”

Preparing his act has

become

rou-

McElwain. “In the comedy business you are trained to react,” he tine to

said.

“A

lot

of times

Another perk he said

business

bound by

Tune

“I to

have

always supportive and willing

“He

be a classy guy,”

very close to his family.

is

ents

respect and dignity.”

London and

received an honours in history.

He

life.”

anything stand in his path. “I tend to be the kind of person to look for challenges to come

McElwain performs between 150 and 400 shows a year. in

it

let

he was inspired by his

Western Ontario

to

everything you can to .

more of

attended the University of

He added

out.”

an attitude.”

said, “I

Aboriginals

per-

almost every college and

students

n’t

— Page 7

2002

,

comedian’s jokes

during school he was always the “jackass,” continuing, “I was the kid

all

university in Ontario and finds col-

He

Television.

him

has also been to

Las Vegas, Los Angeles and

York.

formed

He

lege

He hopes

By PETR CIHACEK

comedy

across Canada.

“University students have

by

match, Janice Villanueva, an early

His

always on the road.

is

rated

GBA

love

because he

the

out really nice.” the

not to mention

...

McElwain has had

has a production

show was, “When I got to go up on stage,” adding, “He (McElwain) the

The other victim of

animator

honour of having the highesttelevision show on the Comedy Network. McElwain also

in

the audience.

centred

the executive producer, creator,

is

He also headlined Drunktoberfest YukYuks in Kitchener on Oct. 10. McElwain currently lives in Toronto but said he is never home at

of

21

1

just spout.”

to is,

the “1

a nine-to-five regime.”

into

McElwain’s show.

Gutter Ball Alley, on the

Network 1

1

comedy am not

on

Comedy

Thursdays

at

:30 p.m.

barriers

resources and standard of living as other citizens. However, the situa-

Aboriginals on reserves suffer from alarming suicide rates, poverty and unemployment; those living in cities

could be better

but

many

face

problems such as low

self-

off,

esteem.

took away the culture, lan-

(that)

guage and ceremonies," said aboriginal counsellor Lou Henry. "Residential schools were one of the most tragic things you could have ever done to people." Residential sctooIs were operated by various church groups up to the 1970s. Native children were often forcibly removed from their homes

and placed into the schools where they were forbidden to speak their languages and engage in their customs. Many of them were physically

issues, sexual abuse, physical abuse,

mental abuse, loss of identity, loss of culture," Henry said as he

residential

received,

reserve Indians.

those

in

selor at the

Anishnabeg Outreach, a

He started drinking when he was Two years ago, he spent six in a treatment centre to get

help with his anger problems.

Unfair treatment, personal, physi-

and mental abuse, were among

cal

the things that used to

"Look

the treaty negotiations

at

have been signed, sealed, and not delivered," he said. "Is that fair?

do not think

so."

He

like if

said

it is

somebody buys

a car from you but never gives you

money. "They were mistreated, to, they were cheat-

they were lied

"The biggest barrier I see is low self-esteem," he said about his

make hjm

angry.

the

com-

1.000

12.

Kitchener organization that pro-

munity.

maybe

same problems.

vides funding, training, and counselling for the local aboriginal

have,

people there." Nixon said problems such as alcoholism and anger issues are a result of "years and years" of unjust treatment of aboriginals. Henry, 36, who comes from the Six Nations, struggled with the

I

an employment coun-

usually

"There are maybe 30 to 40 jobs on

relations." is

also said people

situations

a reserve and there are

that

Henry

He

for

on-

"nothing to do."

schools

in

among

high suicide rate

the

neon lights flashing away as a major root problem of our should be

listed

main problems and reasons

weeks

or sexually abused.

"They were not taught any life skills and it was part of being institutionalized. They had nothing," said Henry. "Although many people are appreciativ^of the education they

on some reserves are alarming.

"Poverty, drugs and alcohol, anger

the

stems from residential schools

"It

tions

Henry about

ed," said

his ancestors.

"Everything you can think of was all lies. It was a way to deal with the Indian problem."

problems. "They were 'You cannot do it.' If

But Henry said he has been "clean and sober" for nine years and since

you hear something 1,000 times, you start to believe it."

he came out of the treatment centre,

clients'

always

told,

Kelly Nixon, for

seling

who

provides coun-

aboriginal

students

at

make him

those things do not ter" "I

"bit-

anymore.

do not want

to

be angry;

I

was

Conestoga College, said students usually seek her help because of their (Reeling of isolation and their

angry for a long time and it is hard to live that way. Now I guess I am

and health-care problems. "They told me of discriminatory comments that were made," she said about the other issues. "There is no

Henry said Aboriginal Peoples have been here for thousands of years and they will always "be

understanding of the hardships abo-

"The genocide (and) assimilation of aboriginal people never worked," he said. "You cannot get rid of us,

financial

riginal people

Henry too

went through." said

aboriginals

still

face discrimination

on a daily basis

do many other

nationalities of

as

"TTiere is a stereotype that that."

somebody nal

around."

we

he

said.

comes

"Just because

you are aborigi(they think) you use drugs or figures

tice

is

way

WORKSHOP Thursday, October 31 1:30 - 3:00 p.m.

to Henry, the govern-

of redressing past injus-

Location: 3E02

an apology and "throwing

money on

people."

"How is it going to fix up the thousands and thousands of people?" he

want

drink alcohol."

asked.

According to Henry, aboriginals living in cities can enjoy the same

rights just as

my

SUICIDE PREVENTION

are very strong people."

According ment's

people.

with

disappointed."

(Photo by Petr Cihacek)

Aboriginal counsellor Lou Henry stands in front of the Anishnabeg Outreach centre on King Street Kitchener. The centre provides training and counselling for the local Aboriginal community.

"I

it

and my was signed. I want

my

status

kids to have that too."

FREE Information

Session for

College Employees and Students

in


Page 8

— SPOKE, October 21

,

News

2002

Graduate making a difference really hard, Highley is acknowledged. “I can remember thinking ‘I cannot see another body.’” She stressed the importance of having an outlet, someone to talk to about what you see. “It really makes you re-evaluate your life,” she said, adding, “You never take life for granted in this

death

Bv AIMEE WILSON

Many college graduates leave school determined to do their best with high hopes for success. Dana Highley, a 1992 graduate from the ambulance and emergency care program at Conestoga College, wasn't any different. Her determination and drive to achieve her dreams has made her one of Conestoga’s graduates

who

job.”

Her most difficult call so far was when a patient resembled her

mak-

is

mother.

ing a difference.

“I related too

Highley’s hard work and determination paid off with a job as a

paramedic for Perth County

Her

and seeing the daughter cry out for her mom, Highley knew that could have been her. Even though she has seen many

emergency care Grade 12 when a class-

interest in

mate told her about the job of a

knew with my

paramedic. “I sonality type to-five job,” sat

didn’t

I

Highley

unpleasant circumstances, there have been gratifying times as well.

per-

want a -ninesaid.

About eight years ago, Highley was called to a car accident. A

As she

with her legs outstretched on a

mother hadn’t been seriously hurt but due to precautionary reasons the paramedics took her to the hospital. The woman’s little girl was

couch, which doubles as her bed at the base, she said, “I couldn’t stop thinking about

(Photo by Aimee Wilson)

it.”

Like most high school students, Highley was enthusiastic about her

new

career.

When given the chance

paramedic chance. the at she jumped Unfortunately, the feedback she to

meet and

talk with a

received was

negative.

The

para-

medic basically told Highley to save her time and find a new career. “I was so discouraged,” she said of

As

Dana Highley, 31, a paramedic at the Stratford base for Perth County, graduated ambulance and emergency care program at Conestoga College. made

Highley left her dreams behind and decided to fill out an application to become a a result,

police officer.

A

couple of weeks later Highley a bad car accident. One person lay lifeless in the car and the other person was completely

came upon

distraught. Bystanders didn’t have

a clue what to do. “It was chaos,”

Highley said, as she remembered the horrific event. She recalls the change of atmosphere as soon as the paramedics arrived. “This team of paramedics came and the whole atmosphere changed. They

it

orderly and calm.

“It was the best thing that ever happened to me,” she said. “I knew that night this was the job for me.” As a smile appeared on her face she explained how she went straight home and immediately ripped up

the

the experience.

OPP application. “It wasn’t my heart was,” Highley said,

you

think

is

it

been has course paramedic changed to a two-year program. Brent McDonald, a registered nurse at Stratford General Hospital, met Highley in college. He noted she was not only full of energy and lots

of fun but also “spunky” in

school.

in

1992 from the

also unhurt but very scared for her

mom. Highley

Everyone starting a new job is always anxious. Being a rookie and having people’s lives in your hands is really stressful. Highley admitted how anxious she would get when a call would come in. “I would get butterflies if a Code 4 came in,” she said. Code 4 is the

to

comfort the

took

it

their

way

Now

ification

comes

everyone

like they

“That’s where

from treating were her family. get my job satis-

adding, “I never looked back.” After a year of work, Highley applied at both St. Clair College and Conestoga College. “I knew it was really hard getting into

Highley treasures her health and the health of her own two little

challenging.”

any day

Conestoga,” Highley said. Conestoga only took 30 students whereas St. Clair took 100. She was thrilled after being accepted to Conestoga because she knew the college had a good reputation. “It was an extremely hard year,” she said, adding, “There was a tremendous amount of information you had to learn.” Since then the

too early

in

“If

you love it, stay with Dana Highley,

it.”

Conestoga College graduate “That year of school changed

my am

very grateful to the college for the

very pfofpssional and very confident,” McDonald ^id. Highley said it is a constant

opportunity they gave me.”

learning process. “I

life forever,”

Highley

said.

“I

from

graduating

After

-‘She

i,s

my

to

summer

patients.”

Mary’s base. After her two-month term she at

transferred

the

to

St.

the Stratford base

where she currently works.

girls. “I

:

am continual-

and learning in order job better and help my

ly studying

Conestoga, Highley worked for the

do

I

*

faction.”

.

A

paramedic sees many things the average person doesn’t, including death. Dealing with

adding,

know I

that any minute of

could be

‘‘Lifie is;

gone;,’!

Services.

WEIGHT CONTROL to lose

some weight?

Follow Canada's Food Guide and tiy cutting

down

the overall

number of calories essential element in dealing with procrastination

planning. Effective planning

Take breaks and

is

a key

to

seem more manageable. Set a deadline for each in rewards. Work with a friend. Be reasonable and

will

build

with your goals; perfectionism can get procrastinate! Talk to

A Message

is managing your time and achieving goals. Divide larger tasks into

a

in

step. realistic

the way. For further assistance, don't

in

your diet,

particularly those that are high in fat.

Remember to exercise and

weigh yourself regularly and above all give youself a pat on the back for each pound that you lose.

counsellor.

from Student

Semces (Room 2B02)

-.

i

You can read more about Highley the summer 2002 issue of Connections foupd in Alumni in

priority, like

Need

V

ed.”

an assignment

some

I-

For students presently in thie; paramedic program Highley stresses, “If you love it, stay with it,” adding, “You won’t be disappoint-

the semester to deaf with procrastination, or are

procrastination, you first need to recognize what avoidance technique you employ and whether you want to change it. Then you can try helpful approaches.

she said,

tbp short.”;

HEALTH CARE TIP

Procrastination

actually involved in

smaller steps which

little

comfortable with her skill level, anything. for ready she is “Everything is different all the time,” she said, adding, “It’s so

To overcome

An

A

to the hospital.

later,

highest level of emergency.

Some see other aclivities vacuuming your room instead of beginning to read that textbook chapter. An extra ten minutes of TV can eventually become the whole evening Sometimes, students get “stuck" on one part of their project and don’t move on from there. as taking

back

Highley received a card from the mother thanking her for her kindness. Highley said her gratwhile

Avoiding or putting off work which needs to be done can come in many forms. Some students ignore a certain task, hoping it v/if! go away. Some underestimate is

herself

in the

of the ambulance as they made

just procrastinating'?

how much work

upon

little girl

where

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: You may

to that call,”

nessing the death of the patient

at the

Stratford base.

ignited in

much

Highley said sombrely. After wit-

St John Ambulance


News

SPOKE, October

21

,

2002

— Page 9

Students on the prowl at Doon campus

(Photo by Abbi Davies)

Brock Newitt, a computer programmer/analyst student, gets

in

a quick

game

of pool

between classes

at O.T.’s sports bar in the rec centre

on Oct.

9.

(Photo by Halley McPolin)

nap Advertising student Cindy Devries, 19, catches a quick 8. Oct. before class in the Sanctuary on

(Photo by Daniel Roth) (Photo by Sinead McGarry)

The colder weather hasn’t dampened Safi Rezaiy's hotdog by moving onto ness. The vendor has actually sold more hotdogs busi-

the patio area outside the cafeteria.

Brad Ceballo

(left),

with second-year a second-year computer programmer/analyst student, along playing hacky-sac by day fall warm Steinhauser, enjoy a

architecture students Matt

Rogers and Matt

outside of Door 2 on Sept. 10.


News

— SPOKE, October 21, 2002

Page 10

Dedicated to the revival of the peregrine By JEFF MORLEY

DDT inhibits

throughout the world.

peregrine mothers from transferring

Agnew

Judith

Not only ly,

she

is

an active woman.

she busy with her fami-

is

also

is

and

concerned

Agnew

is

a

the

for

of peregrine fledglings

from the top of City Hall for the past two summers. She first heard of the foundation while listening to one of the local Kitchener radio stations.

At the

time

Canadian Peregrine Foundation trying to release the first group of four Peregrine fledglings and was the

was

need of some volunteers. volunteered and quickly fell in

Agnew in love

The mother of two used

to

be a

glider pilot and has always been interested in aviation.

Naturally,

she has always had a “soft spot for all birds.” She added that general-

want

to fly

and revere

anything that can soar. And soar they can. Falcons can dive at

speeds

of

is

and

are

aerial acrobatic

and maneuverability. As

ability

she

320 km/h

for their

talking, she gazes at

some

and remarks abut how

pictures

pretty the falcon’s eyes are.

Agnew soon

realized she wanted be “more involved than falcon watching.” So she became a volunteer site co-ordinator and this past

to

summer became

the

urban peregrine nesting

the project co-ordi-

Once the falcons take flight in late summer the foundation organizes dozens of volunteers to watch the This enables the foundation to

sites

birds.

in Canada including Kitchener, London, Hamilton,

track

Ottawa and Toronto. Peregrine The Canadian Foundation was launched in 1997 by a group of volunteers. Later that

out of danger.

across

CPF

year the

became

officially

the

A day

monitor their need be take them

birds,

progress and

if

falcon watcher will begin their

approximately

40

minutes it once

before the sun rises and end the sun has set.

The day can be

full

incorporated as a national charity

of lengthy aerial shows as the

dedicated to the rehabilitation and

cons play and learn

recovery of the peregrine falcon in

observation

Canada. Currently, the foundation sponsors a foster program, tracks

weeks

the progress of peregrines and edu-

as long as 15 hours.

cates the public throughout the year.

recruits dozens of and Agnew estimates that 2,500 man-hours were spent watching for the falcons last sum-

Agnew’s time

summer

in the

is

spent ensuring the sur-

primarily

vival of the peregrine chicks at City

with the small raptors.

known

when

are

co-ordinator

ly all pilots

a result,

volunteer for the

Kitchener chapter of the organization. She has been directly involved in the release

As

hard.

summer.

Canadian Peregrine Foundation (CPF) and is currently working as project

make them

the mothers are nesting they crush soft eggs. Once DDT was banned many peregrine recovery programs were initiated. Now there

involved with the welfare of peregrine falcon chicks she helped to release this past

necessary calcium to their eggs to

can also keep an eye on the falcons as they learn to fly and take them out of harm’s way. This part of the program is called Project Watch-”Em. city volunteers

Hall.

The program The goal

Release.

called Project

is is

period

to fly.

can

last

fal-

The for

on their yearly migration south. Days can be until the birds start

The foundation

volunteers

mer.

and

Daily logs are also kept noting

until they

the whereabouts of each of the

to feed

house the peregrine chicks

how

and

behaviour.

are ready to take flight. In Kitchener

raptors

a hack box or large birdhouse has

Agnew

been constructed on the roof at City Hall and a video camera has been

of the logs and posts them on the

up home. set

monitor the birds

to

their

foundation

Web

To help with

in their

site.

the tracking of the

raptors as they migrate

The video is relayed to a television

most

writes or supervises

some

birds

are outfitted with a satellite trans-

The Trillium Foundation has

in the cafeteria

where the public can whenever they like. Video is also relayed to the foundation’s Web site. While the video camera offers unique entertainment and insight, it also

mitter.

view the

been generous enough to sponsor the project. which enables the birds to be tracked as they migrate south. Some of the falcons have made it as far as Columbia in one season. The

provides an excellent opportunity to study the behaviour of the birds in

foundation is able to study migratory paths and learn even more about the falcon’s habits. This information

activity of the birds

captivity.

The

nator for the Kitchener chapter of

city

the foundation.

place

She wears a denim foundation jeans and sandals and looks comfortable. She settles her glasses and straightens a bright red curl of hair before explaining what she has

However,

to

may seem

to

be a strange

nurse peregrine falcons.

Agnew

explains that the

is

also posted

Web site. Agnew is on

on the

In addition,

and responds

to peregrine

(Photo by Jeff Morley)

Canadian Peregrine Foundation chapter Kitchener, surveys the Grand River in search of raptors.

Judith

emer-

of the

to Grade 7 children. The foundation brings a peregrine to the school and teaches the students about the falcon. The foundation is

Grade 4

also call

Agnew,

able

to

leave

instructional

books and allows students peregrine. The program

to

adopt a

cultivates

young students

safer

gencies throughout the summer.

interest

city tends

to

Sometimes it is a case of mistaken identity, however it gives Agnew the opportunity to talk to and

Agnew hopes will last a lifetime. Many of the visits are sponsored the

The peregrine falcon was almost wiped out in the 1970s due to the widespread of use

pigeons. Moreover, there are no natural predators in the city. In the hin-

inform the public about raptors and how to identify them. Throughout the rest of the year

terland wolves, owls, bald eagles

Agnew

received.

dichlorodiphenylchlorethane

and even red tail hawks will make a meal of a peregrine falcon. In the

shirt,

devoted

much of her

DDT, an

life to.

insecticide

or

widely used

urban landscape can be than the countryside.

much

The

be warmer than the open country and also provides shelter and a plentiful food source of starlings and

spends her time fundraising and educating. Project Show-’Em is an education program targeted at

A Jobp Check Out: www.workopolisCampus.com

NOW POSTING jobs for •Students

•Grads/Alumni Of Conestoga College! ACCESS CODE is available at Career Services, room 2B04 or call: 748-5220, ext. 3542 Conestoga College

[j

by is

in

that

TDCanadatrust Eriends of Environment program. Agnew

the

pleased with the amount of cor-

porate support the foundation has

She says, “The peregrine falcon and humans have lived together

in

4,000 years and in the last humans have years almost killed the falcons twice.

for

hundred It’s

scary.”

And

there are

new

threats aris-

such as the West Nile Virus, However, Agnew and the foundation will continue their efforts to ensure the peregrine survives. For more information about the foundation or the falcon go to the Web site www.peregrine-foundaing,

888 709t be at Conestoga Mall Oct. 17, 18, and 19 for the day with a peregrine falcon and a barn owl. tion.ca or call toll free

3944.

Agnew

will

1

also


News

Student uses college By VALENTINA RAPO PORT

games

buddies, a

cooking

club, a

club and a computer club.

Leah Lewchuk,

second-year

a

In addition to clubs, the centre

number of

applying her college skills to assist

ing information sessions on topics

kids

community of low-income fami-

of interest as well as referrals and

said.

The

22-year-old

College

student

is

placement

field

Conestoga currently on

the Courtland

at

Community Centre

and Shelley

in

Kitchener.

Located

Courtland

l()64G

at

community centre

the

Ave.,

is

among 70 lownhouse complexes where low-income families live. The centre is a program created hy the House of Friendship’s famiservices division that strives to

ly

support and promote opportunities

low-income families and

for

indi-

viduals living in subsidized hous-

resources.

able for clothes, child care, counselling,

recreation

courses

that

aid

and

facilities

employment

in

advancement. Residents can also obtain free bus tickets, food vouchers and donated food, clothes and household items at the centre.

Community garden

plots are also

Families can plant any-

available.

thing they choose in their plots and

responsible

are

maintaining

for

what they have planted.

Lewchuk

with

helps

who

pre-

ESL program where

chil-

community

Aecording

to

Metzger,

commuimmi-

grant and Canadian families

who

are on either social assistance or

Ontario

Support

Disabilities

Program (ODSP), as well as employed families whose work might be only seasonal.

“The community centre is set up build neighbourhood development and to assist neighbours and

to

residents ty

who

live in the

eommuni-

with their personal growth,” she

said, adding,

“The whole focus of

program is to assist people back workforce and/or support (the families) in emergency situa-

into the

(Photo by Valentina Rapoport)

community centre resource co-ordinator, and Leah Lewchuk, a Conestoga College social services student, stand in front of the Courtland and Shelley Community Centre.

Juanita Metzger

(left),

Lewchuk, who has been working

dren learn to read, write and speak

tions,” she said.

her experience at the centre so far

centre since the beginning of

English. She also helps with the

Metzger, who graduated from University of Waterloo’s social development studies program and

as “unique.”

at the

homework club where

September, said she enjoys the placement because it deals with not

children receive help and incentive

only academic in-class issues, but

to

also one-on-one

also assists with food distribution

her master’s at Wilfrid Laurier

and telephone inquiries from

University in social work, said res-

life issues.

involves (dealing with) differ-

“It

of living,”

aspects

ent

after-school

complete

she said,

dents.

been

“It’s

referring to the centre. “It’s

homework. She

their

resi-

a

all-around

social

is

presently working on obtaining

idents of the

,

living

community

ciative of the services

are appre-

and see the

1

am

learn-

ing in class 1 can apply right away,” she said, adding, “I’ve been able to feel more comfortable because of what I’ve learned (in class and at the centre).”

According

Lewchuk,

to

the

community

for individual families, but also as a

give students enough background

one of four centres in the Kitchener-Waterloo area created by the House of

here.”

place that helps deal with issues

to

within their community.

as group

Friendship, offers a variety of pro-

where residents are asked personally what additional services and programs they would like to see

dent

on-one work with

Canada with her family five years ago from South Vietnam. Thach

fessional organizations.

offered at the centre.

and her husband Ut, who have four children, attend the ESL and com-

for career (experi-

ence) but also for personal growth.”

The

which

centre,

is

grams for both adults and children. Programs offered for adults include: English as a Second Language (ESL) courses, cooking classes and computer classes. Clubs offered for children include a homework club and a preschool club for children whose par-

ESL

ESL

ents attend the

Also

courses.-

Lewchuk

also helps with a door-

to

Juanita

Metzger,

tor,

the courses offered at the centre are often attended and the services

puter courses offered at the community centre. Lainy’s children also attended the pre-school ESL

often utilized.

course

community resource co-ordina-

the

who

Metzger,

offered are after-school clubs for

community

2 including

years, said

has been

at

garten club, a reading club involving Wilfrid Laurier University stu-

tre.

the

homework

dents

who

1

club, junior kinder-

volunteer as reading

Thirty-five adults are registered

in the

ESL course

and nine children

last year.

“They (community centre

the

centre for almost three

20 to 30 families pick up food on Thursdays during the weekly food distribution at the cen-

children ages six to

Lainy Thach, a community resiof two years, arrived in

to-door needs assessment service,

According

centre not only as help

staff)

always help people in the area. When I am looking for a job they help me make a resume,” said Thach, adding, “She (Metzger) is a

good woman who likes to help.” As for Lewchuk, she described

skills

taught in class at the college

work

action

in different settings

such

homes, where the

inter-

is

individuals.

“These are

neat that what

“It’s

atmosphere here,” Lewchuk said. “There are all (types of) needs

good not only

11

use the centre daily,” she

the

the

— Page

2002

,

course.

nity residents consist of both

Financial subsidies are also avail-

school

ing.

community

on

information

lies.

ESL

21

“The aflcr-school programs are generally well attended. There seems to be a common group of

offers a

a

skills in

in the pre.school

social services student, has bpgiin

services includ-

SPOKE, October

more

relaxed, to one-

“You could say

clients in pro-

I

said.

Madeleine Poynter, co-ordinator of the social services program at the college, believes students in the program who experiat

community

well-rounded

centres receive a

important func-

she wrote

an e-mail.

in

Poynter also said centres

students

at

community to work

learn

with diverse populations and help to address

many

different prob-

lem areas because they come

in

contact with individuals of different ages

and cultures. “All of

these factors usually

combine

to

ensure a successful field placement experience for both the students and the organizations,”

she wrote.

have a wide variety of different skills,” she

ence placements

all

tions of a social service worker,”

According to Poynter, out of the 35 second-year students in the program, six are currently attending placements in community centres.

Although Lewchuk is not quite sure where she wants to work after she graduates, she hopes her career will include a combi-

experience by developing competency in the areas of resource

nation of both academic In-class

development, grass roots community organization, group work,

adding,

advocacy and interventions with

and one-on-one social “It’s

settings,

certainly the type

of work for people interested in helping others.”

Tips for acing an interview Bv SINEAD McGARRY

to

for us? 'What skills can

work

you bring

you need extra^cash for Christmas presents, simply go for If

walk through your local mall and you will notice help wanted signs everywhere. More than 10 stores in Conestoga Mall are hiring for the Christmas shopping season. If a

you are searching for a part-time job simply find stores with help wanted signs, fill in an application

and hand

in

The resume

you the

interview and the interview will

land you the job. the

The interview

is

step in the job search

last

process and the most important. There are three points to

remember while preparing interview.

“Know your

for an

skills

from other candidates? What are your strengths and weaknesses? What experiences do you have that relate to this position?"

One-on-one interviews are the most common type of interview. This is where the employer will ask questions and wait for an answer. Panel interviews and group interviews have also

become popular

your resume.

will land

and

What

to this position?

distinguishes you

tools for inter-

viewing.

According to the Gap Web site, group interviews are what the

company

prefers.

The company

plans a meeting between several individuals wanting the position, and then questions them as a gi-oup.

During

type of inter-

this

view

cise

wees promote themselves and

Free, career serx'ices officer.

You

also need to

be prepared, and

research the

company before-

hand. She suggests you have a

each skill that you possess and dress appropristory prepared for

ately.

with business casual dress

usually expected.

The

five

questions an ask during an

basic

employer will interview are:

Why

do you want

it

is

YOU CAN VISIT A NURSE OR MAKE AN APPOINTMENT TO SEE A DOCTOR AT THE DOON HEALTH SERVICES OFFICE (INSIDE DOOR #3)

essential that intervie-

abilities,

and be confident, conand enthusiastic,” said Sara

NEED MORE THAN A BANDAID SOLUTION?

their skills as

much

Closing the interview

is

also

you are interested in the position let the employer know. Prepare some questions to ask at the end of the interview and thank the interviewer for their time and consideration. If you are still nervous, visit

essential. If

career services for

views and resume

We can also

help with:

as possible.

mock

tips.

inter-

allergy injections and immunizations

y

blood pressure monitoring

non-prescription medications

y

community referrals

prescriptions from a Doctor

y

birth control counselling

health resources and information

y

pregnancy testing

first aid

y

a place to rest when you are


:

— SPOKE, October 21

Page 12

News

2002

,

Feng shui deals with well-being says. And through courses she completed in Kitchener taught by a consultant, shui Bunce feng became certified two years ago. As for applying feng shui to her home, the Conestoga College grad-

Bv LAURIE VANDENHOFF “Feng

more

shui,

fun

the

like

way.” That’s exactly what continuing education teacher Lisa Bunce her students. Bunce’s introduction to feng shui offered through course, likes to instil in

uate says

it’s

hard, “especially with

a two-year-old running around.”

program,

But when she moved into her

teaches students the basic art of

house, she says she immediately

con-ed

Conestoga’s

how

feng shui and

own “When

she says.

Feng shway)

divided

to

changed my “I certainly want experience what it

(pronounced

a contin-

venient to use the front door of her

home because

work

is

course.

who has been certified in feng Shown here are several feng shui tools

shui for

points out, feng shui

about the physical

isn’t just

own home and

utes of room;

is

life.

both a design process

image

to

promote positive energy

a house.

in

their life,” she says, adding,

don’t

“Most

know you can apply feng

she has

between them and

male, but the last two semesters the

A

and can be

ural

used to improve good fortune in areas such as career, wealth, relationships and self-knowledge.

“It

exactly

nat-

my

well-being through various ,

makes them think about them-

selves as well as their house,” she i'

iJ .U IJ V

k-S'jdl

person’s ch’i or

shui

“I

exercises during the course.

fcii

i;i

their house.” life

energy,

is

improved by the proper application of feng shui, and is often the incentive for wanting to learn the art. Marilyn Rego, 30, admits that is

to health.”

Bunce helps students achieve

one being

explains. “Their ch’i has to jive

do with

ed in alternative ways of improving

also recognizes that a

to their life

also has to

people are more interest-

“I think

person’s surroundings act as a mirror

it

attrib-

personal well-being.

outline,

and an eastern philosophy. It has ancient Chinese roots that date back nearly 3,000 years.

Feng shui

used

layout.

mouth of the

mary

entry point of energy.

seen

is

and the

ch’i

pri-

Bunce, a former construction

As Bunce

so they can apply feng shui'to their

feng shui

that are

its

as the

stu-

dents through a course-long project

According to the course

two years, teaches an introductory feng shui

of

In feng shui the front door

(Photo by Laurie Vandenhoff)

Lisa Bunce,

simplify the subject, and

homes. But

impossible and entirely too incon-

six-week course. attempts to do

trying to apply prop-

Bunce always has a solution. In one case, a student felt it was almost

especially hard to learn everything

What Bunce

when

er feng shui into their

uous learning experience. But with such a vast array of principles, subjects and beliefs, it’s in a

there are problems students

run into

fung

harder to master. Both students and it’s

Bunce

consists of

romance and fame.

wealth,

hard to explain and even

teachers discover that

a major unit It

the

to

nine areas in a house, including

Then

shui

up according

teaches in the course.

like.”

is

it

Baqua Map. The map is.

really

it

other people to

can be

it

started practising feng

I

shui myself, life,”

to apply

lives.

their

why

she took the course.

students,

was full with 25. Bunce finds most students want to learn more after they finish the class. They may end up taking more courses and applying the

class

principles to their

found I had too much stress in and I wanted to make it less

life

stressful,” she*says.

While most students are women, Bunce says she does usually have about one male. This time around

A ijm

17

That’s

feng

own

She

started

her

able entrance, the side door.

and give them

“I try

real

exam-

not something outlandish,”

ples,

she says. “I want them to see

it’s

and easy. A lot of people get overwhelmed.” It costs $103 and will be eight weeks long starting next semester. Anyone interested should sign up

in

reading

books on it after first learning about it from a television program. “I started taking classes and then I wanted to become certified,” she

at the

continuing education office

Doon campus.

at

Nursing program gives students

.

TEST ANXIETY WORKSHOP

good career By IZABELA ZARZYCKA

P e m

DO you DO THE FOLLOWIN6?

practical nursing

program

at

Conestoga College provides students with the knowledge, skills and experiences needed to start a career. It

Complete your work, are successful on assignments, but your test marks puli you down. Get so nervous that you feel sick to your stomach. Experience panicky sensations and find that your mind goes blank before or during a test.

them

also prepares

for the

world outside the classroom.

m a

start

with the elderly. The students also visit

The

high schools and set up small

clinics

where they take the blood

pressure of their clients.

At the end of their studies, they have a 12- week work placement. Hacking said, “Graduates should be very well equipped to deal with patients,”

During the

first

semester

The program

in

is

a two-year, four-

semester program, which has been

students, “go outside the

walls of

Doon campus.”

modified by increasing the amount of time students spend in a clinical

and medical environment.

Nancy Hacking,

Also, there

SIGN UP FOR A TEST ANXIETY WORKSHOP!

leave

they

after

Conestoga.

chair of health sciences

To register bring a copy of your timetable and sign up STUDENT SERVICES (2802) before Wednesday, October 23'’'^,

make

door “disappear,” tricking energy into entering her more suit-

front

practical

lives.

how Bunce got involved

shui.

engineer, suggested she

on

put

Nancy Hacking,

chair of the

is

a lot

more hands-on

experience and more emphasis

mental

the

health

is

of

patients.

health sciences program, said the

program prepares students to “work in a variety of places,” like a hospital or nursing home.

“Graduates should be very well equipped to

Students are introduced to theory

deal with patients.”

of nursing as well as hands-on

Common hours

will

be selected from submitted student

experience.

They work

Hacking

in a clinical

environment, which allows them to

timetables.

practise the theory they learn in the a.

The

classroom.

This "four session "

For example, is

available beginning

the week of

if

a class

is

taught

about vile science, the next day

October 28'^

students practise

Workshop

During the first semester students, “go outside the walls of Doon campus,” said Hacking,

Facilitator -

Joan Magazine

it

in a lab.

adding that students also H:N6roup W«rkshaps\Tes» Anxiety WorkshopS.doc

visit nurs-

ing homes.

yjT

.y

There they learn about dealing

with

students are taught to deal clients

that

are

mentally

unstable.

For example,

if

a

patient

is

depressed before or after a surgery, students will be taught to help out in

such situations.

Emphasis

is

elderly persons.

now

also

gerontology, which

is

put

on

the study of


News

show

History Television LEACHM AN

By LESLEY

Some

During the mainstream

things in Canadian history

930s

1

racist hate

was

People keeping each have an inter-

Ontario.

in

strongly believed

in

have been conveniently forgotten.

race separate and to

However, in the docudrama History’s Courtroom, many of

racial

Canada’s forgotten injustices arc

to marry Johnson and had moved in with Johnson and his aunt. Jones’ mother was so enraged at

revisited.

premier episode, the issue

In the

marriage was a social crime. Despite all of this, Jones planned

of the Kill Klux Klan’s presence in

her daughter’s

southern Ontario was explored.

called

Courtroom, which on Oct. 9 at 9 p.m. on histo-

History’s aired

of the

ry television, told the story

KKK

terrorizing

an

interracial

couple that had plans to marry. The story was conveyed through interviews of actual witnesses to the incident, opinions of local his-

dramatic

and

torians

re-enact-

ments.

The show opened with Globe and Mail journalist Kirk Makin describing the

named

woman who was liv-

of a

life

Isabel Jones,

ing in Oakville in February

Jones

lived

1

930.

home with

at

mother, but soon met and

named a man who happened to

with

love

Johnson,

her

fell

she

that

hoods the home of Johnson their

in

white

leader of the group knocked

on the door and demanded that if Jones did not accompany him back to her mother’s house, there would be severe consequences. Jones was so

of her

terrified

fiance being hurt that she plied. After she left, the

KKK

members

com-

remaining

planted

their

Ira

ready to harvest,

Pumpkins

are

pumpkin windows

late

or displaying

doorsteps

in

on

Local farmer Kevin Shantz said number of pumpkins this year

frost

in

more of a

by the hundreds in Hamilton. They managed to get an

which was held

reported that the chief of police

appeal,

went down

Ontario Supreme Court.

to the scene

and not

only did he do nothing to stop the Klan; he shook hands with the leader and praised his actions.

the

in

argued that the Klan’s actions were like terrorism and they were acting on their own accord to overthrow the law of the land. The Chief Justice agreed with the Crown and increased the mem-

bers of the black

mem-

community

lead

He

also stated that

This docudrama was a huge eye-

Most Canadians

opener.

The Crown (defending Johnson)

months

ber’s penalty to three

couple had three children.

if

the

in

KKK

This was a significant ruling

in

truth

is,

however, that Canada had most black and

segregation

Canadians were barred from getting certain jobs.

KKK

was active in Also, the other provinces besides Ontario. Manitoba

In

down

in

Klan burned and lO

the

a Catholic church

students perished

expect bigger penalties.

feel that

kind of racism only took place the southern United States. The

this

in

the flames.

The Klan claimed they did

Canadian history. It was the first time that the KKK was condemned for being a “lawless mob.” However, they still had yet to be

because they were defending things white and Protestant.”

let

to

condemned for being racist. Once the three-month sentence

Canada

However, the police still thought KKK did no harm, so they only charged one of the 75 members with wearing a mask after

had passed, the Klan intended to have a celebration in Oakville. However, Oakville refused to allow this and the Klan eventually dwindled from the Canadian side

dark without a lawful excuse. The

of the border.

public.

and asked for the assislawyers from of two

a protest

tance

Toronto.

With the help of the lawyers, they went to the Attorney General

and forced the Oakville police re-evaluate the incident.

that the

charges were

it

“all

No

laid.

Canadian history books seem instances

from

such

pages

its

a

History’s

in

and make sure

story

is

this

to

slide

order to give

more peaceful look. Courtroom aims to

review injustices tory

in

as

Canadian hiswhole

that the

brought forward to the

rich

mature to their true pumpkins were a record size this year because of

pumpkins

to

the

summer

heat.

The

trend fol-

6 years, said watering his fields year helped to make this har-

weighed in at a record-breaking 547 kilograms.

this

vest a success.

Shantzholm farm has eight acres of pumpkin fields and 18 variations of pumpkins, as well as

com

newspapers

year due to the October, allowing

lowed across Canada where in Nova Scotia one pumpkin

a record at

Indian

day,

Meanwhile, Johnson and Jones were still determined to marry and eventually had their wedding at a Six Nation’s United Church. The

this

Shantzholm farm. Shantz, who has been a farmer for 1

next

courts

in

colour. Shantz’s

night.

the

was

The

— Page 13

2002

,

Having nine children of his own, Shantz realizes the expense

orange colour

Halloween

together

21

for pickin’

prefect for preparing a traditional

and

with the charge that they rallied

the police to intervene.

Furious with the police,

The

farm offers a free com maze for children to walk through.

pie,

displeased

.so

were friends with Johnson called

rags.

of entertaining the family. So the

are

was

continued their actions, they could

75 members of

pumpkin may have

pumpkins

received a fine of $50.

KKK

The

jail.

later,

influenced farmers’ crops this year. Despite a dry summer,

great

member

marriages.”

KKK

the

Pumpkins prime The

mem-

community who

crosses tied with gasoline soaked

days

lit them, and told Johnson if he came near Jones again, he would be punished.

TOMS

this, several

bers of the black

marched to and Jones, carrying with them

KKK. A few

of the

assistance

the

crosses on Johnson’s front lawn,

be

of

all

reveals racism

(Today historians believe that the police chief may have actually been a member of the KKK.) The press also went on to applaud the Klan’s motives by saying it was a “good thing to deter interracial

for

in

black.

By JANINE

actions

During

SPOKE, October

If you’re looking to take your family to a farm, Shantzholm pumpkin farm is located on Bleams Road, just outside of

Kitchener.

and gourds.

Ridin’ along (Hnoto oy

janme loms)

lhantzholm Farm supplies great pumpkins for Halloween.

Groundskeeper Cory Mather takes a spin outside the E-Wing on a mower from the maintenance shed on Oct. 8.

CLASSIFIED

CLASSIFIED

fost)ens% “Ultimate The Lord Jesus Christ is the difference. Learn about

Him

Bible Study by correspondence.

Please send

and address

to:

1

Bible Study,

238 Main

St.

ON LOR IZO e-mail:bible @ zurch.on.ca our website: www.zurch.on.ca

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at the

CSI

requires an

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assistant to provide support with generating and producing promotional ideas for events, etc during the academic year.

experience/education in marketing or advertising

would be valuable as well as a creative side that would provide new and innovative ideas for reaching our audience.

Drop

Sheffield,

Sign up today. IT'S

The Vice-President of Communications

Some

name

Zion United Refonned Church,

Class Rings

Communications Assistant Required

Questions”

Conestoga College

off a

resume

at the

CSI

October 2 1

office:

Judy Dusick or fax it to 748-6727. Resumes will be received until October 0.2002. This is a part-time paid position and Attention:

22'"^ 6e 25'"^

1:00 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Foyer Inside Door #4

1

will continue until April of 2003.

Keep your memories on hand

for a lifetime.


— SPOKE, October 21

Page 14

,

Entertainment

2002

Horoscope ^

fashion has vintage flare

Fall

Bv CARLA

Week of October 21-27

SANDHAM

Libra

winter fashions. A collage of browns, oranges and purples has filled store racks as this

new colour

fall’s

apgv

Happy

lihru

Birthday

A new season has fallen, bringing with it a new collection of fall and If

palette.

"The colours are very neutral this season,” said Sophia Gurrell, manager at Le Chateau in Fairview

September 24 October 22

& Scorpio

you plan on going out for your make sure you have some-

-

People respect your advice more someone needs

birthday

than you realize. If

one responsible looking out for you. Don't do anything too daring. Luckiest day: October 21.

advice

when

make

giving

sure

you are sincere

it.

Luckiest day: October 22.

Park Mall. Judi Shekter, a fashion adviser

Scorpio

Aries

from Humber College in Toronto, said deep reds and strong blue-

March 21

.1

October 23

April 18

-

greys are also hot colours this season. She added passionate pur-

You

complex blue-greens and burgundies combined with

ples,

rich

dark and classic hues are winter’s

fall

will

have to seek the advice

of a close friend to resolve a problem. You'll confuse yourself

and

Must-have items, said Shekter, boots, belts, hobo bags and

are

Health office administration student Candice Beselaere, 19, sorts through her clothes, assessing what she has before heading to

Gurrell agreed high boots are a

commodity this fall as well as chunky heeled shoes and

the mall to update her wardrobe for

stilettos,

and

fall

enced by the media. Wear what makes you comfortable and

fashions could

be grouped into three categories; vintage,

the

and the

tribal

The

look

she

appropriately

said,

The “Britney look”

She added

and low-rise jeans are also popular styles for fall. Dirty denim also complements

flares

the tribal

look,

dress

great place to

has the

Britney Spears look.

Mall, said anything in dirty denim

which combines

is

now

passe

and has been replaced by a warmer and fuzzier look on the runways in Paris. From hats, boots and collars to shawls, coats and vests, fur is one of the most dominant textures. Black, glamour and European folklore are also

shoes or boots.

situa-

“Winners is a shop and Wal-Mart

new

to

an

article

from your grandmother’s

Luckiest day: October 23.

zine, also highlights fall

hair and makeup trends. It states simple hair colours, such as

ter

trends appearing

can be com-

son. Braids, in conjunction with

als.

style jackets.

in popularity as well as touchable

However, being in style and keeping up with the latest trends can be costly and difficult for many

hair.

The career look

sports high-waist

and striped shirts with such as French cuffs, for a

pants, vests details

more feminine look. “Not all styles are right

for every-

one,” said Shekter, but added indi-

viduals should style they

make

choose

sure whatever

suits their

body

type.

Also, she said, “Don’t be influ-

As

college students. Shekter said she

recognizes this and offers a few

statement.

style, but out

who want

to

be

of debt.

With such

grand array and prints this

a

colours, styles

go through your closet and assess what you already have.” Next, update your wardrobe with “First,

Luckiest day: October 27.

,

May

,1

OF HER

MEMORIES CAN BE GREAT, BUT WHEN THEY*R£ NOT,.. THE BEAT GOES ON. UHLOM YOUR MEMORIES.

mmma toi'

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December 22

June 21

IMSI&E

so. S.

-

January 19

" f

to try

A time for celebration

offered the chance

something new

in

work or

After

-

coming. will

be

accom-

plished.

Luckiest day: October 26.

Cancer June 22

|

is

much hard work you

able to enjoy what you've

Only good things can come of this, so go for it. Luckiest day: October 25. school.

Aquarius

V-

'n,

January 20 February 18

July 22

of

Pay close attention to your gut Your instincts are working overtime to keep you out of

if

Consult a close friend for advice you feel trapped or like everyone

is

against you. Their views will

trouble.

help

feelings.

you out of your crisis. Luckiest day: October 25.

Luckiest day: October 22.

fall

Pisces July 23

-

February 20 March 20

August 22

interest.

staying out of the feud.

situation.

will

SIJiGgft

gBait MtOesatUSJ

-

Something new will capture your A change of pace could be what you need to improve a dull

between close friends start to get you down. You'll be much happier by conflict

Luckiest day: October 21

Luckiest day: October 26.

Virgo Daniel. R4tk is xi.third-year

August 23 September 23 Several conflicts with friends and

NOW

YOU NEVER KNEW WHY THIS ^NG REMINI^

Play BiofB

Capricorn

Gemini .

tastes.

MEREDITH BROOKS

373

them know you are capamaking your own choices. Luckiest day: October 24.

ble of

and winter, Gurrell said there is something to suit everyone’s

iiqitch USES CD OUTLET I

Someone is going to be getting on your case about work and relationships. Let

A

im

a

Don't spend frivolously right now.

or family

UNXIL

make

for

earth tones and

in

November 22 December 21

20

decision as to what you really need.

the fall vintage look, are growing

makeup, cool pastels, plum purples are painting faces this fall and smokey eyes are also making a

tips for students

May

are going to have to look

You might be magaand win-

Flare, Canada’s fashion

on the catwalk and plemented with the

of bomber-

Sagittarius

closet or

attic.

browns, oranges, ethnic prints and embroidery in suede-like materi-

rise

you've learned from the recent past will help in the near future.

closely at your finances and

by

Derick Chetty, fashion editor for Flare magazine, much of the vintage garb can be lifted directly

golden blond, chocolate brown and caramel, are hot dyes this sea-

all

-

down lateWhat

are ahead.

latest styles for less.”

And, according

tions,

any denim, aged denim. Melissa Martin, a manager at Jean Machine at Fairview Park really hot right now.

to

different

for

such as school, job interviews and clubs. And, she added this fall’s fashion faux pas is the

corduroys, chunky, knit

sweaters with flared sleeves, peasant blouses and denim. But not just

is

belts, hats,

Lastly, she said,

She advises, however,

vintage

accessories, such as scarves, bags,

happy.”

career look.

includes

April 20

You fall’s

you've been feeling better days

winter.

suede runners. Gurrell said

If ly,

Taurus

(Photo by Carla Sandham)

hats.

the

you

Luckiest day: October 21.

tones.

hot

if

overanalyze a situation.

and sensual

romantic

-

November 21

family are making you feel like an outcast.

If

everyone

is

angry,

joidnaUsm student vcho h&f kt0ied pues ct^^^

0^0

be '

r“-

thankful you're being avoided.

Luckiest day: October 25.

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Sports

SPOKE, October

21

— Page 15

2002

,

h/ILB playoff

CSI plans bus

is

to Buffalo for football

excitement back with new blood

By

MA RC HULET

Baseball fever

Gone from

is

and well.

alive

the playoffs are ihc

postseason stallions of times past:

New

York Yankees and the Arizona Diamondbacks. Other high salary teams - such as the Boston Red Sox, Los Angeles Dodgers and Seattle Mariners the

media saying

Last year’s world champions, the Diamondbacks, were bounced in

the

the first round of the playoffs by

free agent after the

Louis Cardinals.

the St.

The Cardinals were

this

year’s

Buck and star pitcher Darryl Kile. The four teams that made it to the

staff.

two championship

series

have had

was an

was always able

expected them to finish ahead of the

offs started.

Chicago

were round of the playoffs. However, the Angels shocked the stalwart Yankees and the Twins knocked off the Oakland Athletics, despite their 103 wins in the regupayroll,

the

but written off in

first

season.

lar

The Angels did more than simply dispatch the former world champi-

They

ons.

battered

off-season and no one

Sox

White

or

the

But with the Indians starting a new youth movement and the White Sox pitching self-destructing, they could have control of the American League

Cleveland Indians.

set a post-

it

four

teams

that

made

two championship

to the

series have

had

their fair

share of struggles

in

the

did not handle the A’s

managed

to

dispatch the upstart team with a

Oakland boasts starters (Tim Hudson, Mark Mulder and Barry Zilo) in the American League but the Twins and their feisty hitters weren’t intimidated by the trio. The San Francisco Giants showed they can play together as a team by dispatching the Atlanta solid

the

team

best

effort.

top

three

Braves - another playoff regular.

as a proven workhorse.

Chuck

from the Cleveland Indians fill

the void but he

Cardinal

Woody

They

Finley to help

39 years

old.

including

pitchers,

Garrett

Morris,

is

the

with only Matt

acquired veteran

Stephenson and

Williams, have suffered a

rash of serious injuries over the past

few

seasons.

Injuries

minor

to

ins

left

team scrambling for viable filland overpaying for veteran play-

Jamey Wright, in trades. The best news for baseball, and

ers, like

fans alike,

playoffs.

that

is

FOX

This

were feeling Disney, owner of the Angels, has

been trying to sell the team for a few years now. But with the recent success, news around baseball is suggesting Disney may have changed its mind. At the very least, the price

no doubt risen. The Giants made headlines

is

all

earlier

season after a dugout tussle

between

their

two best

hitters

a bus for the trip.

on Nov.

NFL

3, is a

season

-

Barry Bonds and Jeff Kent. Despite the animosity between the two players, Bonds has since spoken out via

when

something out of the

to see

Most students cannot afford to go to a football game on their own. Bus trips like these offer

ordinary.

You may

new year

the

in

Maple Leafs

with another Sabres

Basketball fans are not

A

either.

trip to

Toronto

been

set.

you won’t get anywhere 1

*Fairview Mall

*Conestoga Mall

and they want be competitive.

Let’s play ball!

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out

Prices for. these trips have not yet

the October classic

W

left

March 26, when the Raptors will take on the Philadelphia 76er.s.

they want is fun and exciting baseball by passionate baseball players. They want new faces in to

Feb. 7

planned

is

to see.

A

Ftm Pof) and Pfz».

game on

against the Vancouver Canucks.

not what they

October J23rd, Z00j|

t

package deal

*Downtown Kitchener

dollar dynasty

first

The.se

visit Buffalo.

tickets are offered in a

10% STUDENT DISCOUNT

IT

5;OCl|Kn|-

The

What

more teams

see the

to

in action.

on Jan. 23, when the Toronto

trip is

Coudi potatoes? Fraucli

^ Wednesday

your cup of be offering two

will also

find cheaper prices, but better value

9

football isn’t

CSI

STARS MEN’S SHOP

channel changers. is

NFL

CLASSIFIED

of the

at

a.m. on Nov. 3.

Buffalo Sabres

.

of the Yankees

be leaving from Door 5

trips

baseball players were

The multi-million

and cost $80. The bus

office,

will

to .see the

offering students a

its

Tickets arc available through the

CSI

chance

The CSI enjoys

NFL,

the CSI.

tea, the

“These (bus trips) are so much fun. A small group of people go out and have a great time,’’ said Jody Andruszkiewcz, CSI events programmer, about his previous experiences on similar trips.

the

it’s

price.

some-

it’s

about the opportunities offered by

be played

go on strike. The fans have spoken through

their

good

kinda cool!” said Andruszkiewcz

will

live.

chance

thing different, and

If

The game, which

more

the

in the latter part

threatening to

want

tag has

this

If you have wanted to sec an NFL game, but just didn’t know how, then here is your chance. The CSI is offering a trip to Conestoga students to go and see the Buffalo Bills take on the New England Patriots in Buffalo. CSI has bought 48 tickets and chartered

has reported

impressive considering the rage fans

average of .376. They also averaged 14 hits per game.

The Twins

him,

students that chance at a

“Students like them,

an increase of 19 per cent in the number of people watching the

past few years.

season record with a team batting

quite so easily but they

later

the

the Yankees’

aging pitching staff and

Moms

left

league pitching prospects have

Central for a few years.

The

to pitch into the late

Without

compete.

when the playThe Anaheim Angels,

The Twins were almost eliminated in this past

who

innings-eater,

innings and give his team a chance

considered fodder

all

weak-

ened an already precarious pitching Kile

DOYLE

K.

a

with the deaths of broadcaster Jack

to

Minnesota, with the 27th highest

is

Series.

also further

it

Cardinals were

5th highest payroll, and

who

Cardinals, but

past few years.

1

World

By JAMES

crucial for

feel-good team after having to deal

their fair share of struggles in the

with the

it’s

The midseason death of Kile delivered an emotional blow to the

even make the playoffs. Both American League teams that dueled it out in the American League championship series were failed to

that

the Giants to re-sign Kent,

trip

Miyevdwnr vw -JSl


Page 16

Sports

— SPOKE, October 21, 2002

NFL season By NICK

HORTON

all,

now McNair and George

right

are healthy and the team

Now full

NFL

that the

swing,

it’s

season

is

into

time to review a few

ing.

Titan linebacker Keith Bulluck

summed up

such a mess

smacked my and went in

a

it’s

laughable.

The Jacksonville Jaguars deserve hand for getting off to a good

on the

the Tennessee season

Web

site

theinsiders.com.

someone came our house and knocked our “I feel as if

our

little

brother on

the

girlfriend

my

into kid,

floor,

on the ass

refrigerator,” he

said.

an indication of the team heading

The Houston Texans have already accornplished what they wanted

in the right direction.

this season, to beat rival the

Their 3-1 record

start.

is

definitely

The Jaguars proved themselves with a win over Philadelphia in

week Mark

five,

even with Fred Taylor,

Jimmy Smith

Brunell, and

playing their best football.

not

With Taylor healthy, this small market team is definitely on the rise.

A

disappointing team after

five

Tennessee

the

is

Tennessee has

the

week

Titans.

third

worst

defence in the league right now.

behind Buffalo and the lowly New York Jets. It seems a Super

Just

Bowl and two good enough ful

13-3 seasons were

for the

once success-

McNair and Eddie George

have taken their beatings over the past few seasons and don’t seem to be playing with the warrior mental-

we once knew. If these two marquee players were injured, it would make no difference. After

ity

is

Emmitt Smith. Eans must realize this isn’t the Emmitt Smith of the mid-90s.

is

This is a much older Emmitt Smith, with less support around him. In the mid-90s. Smith played with Troy Aikman and Michael Irvin, who have since retired. Now Smith has to play with a young mistake-prone quarterback (Quincy Morgan) and a consis-

have to leave. Minnesota can’t have its two best players fighting olf and on the field. The chemistry

tently injured offensive line.

Cowboys

in their inaugural game. Since then, the Texans are 0-3.

On the bright side, wide receiver Corey Bradford is having a breakthrough season and is quickly adapting to quarterback David Carr’s style of play.

Bradford has great hands, tremendous speed, and his blocking downfield is improving every week. Carr doesn’t get much protection from his front line, but is gaining respect and confidence from his teammates. The Texans are definitely a team to watch in the

NFL

a

sti-

in the last

and week six is about to start, Cowboys are 2-3 in the NFC

which

is

good

for last place.

obviously the franchise player. the

of the Minnesota

future

and

isn't there,

until the

The Rams came

season

expecting

pened.

then outwork them.

One, injuries are killing the

recently his neck.

matching up.

aren’t

No

Kurt Warner’s latbroken right pinkie that is expected to keep him out for seven to nine weeks. Marshall Faulk seems to have various injuries at any given time, most Injuries to starters such as Pro

Bowl

Orlando Pace, Policy, and cornerbacks Aeneas Williams and Dexter McCleon, have also taken

the respect isn’t there. Since

Moss

tackle

left

linebacker

Tommy

into this

run

over

teams.

They expected to be quicker and outsmart their opponents rather

Now

their

numbers on offence are declining and they can’t stand up and win low-scoring, physical games in the fourth quarter. Lastly, the fifth reason St.

Louis

Rams

domino effect Rams’ defence is the

offence.

why

the

games is on defence. The

are losing

If the

built

around the

offence isn’t pro-

ducing, the defence has to stay on the field longer.

to to

of football the

Secondly, the offensive line isn’t

what it used to be. The injury Pace has forced Grant Williams

to

They can no longer rush the quarterback and try to cause turnovers. The Rams’ defence is accustomed to playing with the lead and not in the hole. The style

their toll.

St.

Louis

Rams

take the left tackle spot opposite

play only exploits the injuries

rookie John

and problems the team is havEach part of the team is leaning on the other for support and not one can handle the pres-

St.

Williams

Clair.

has poor footwork while is

matter what either one says

offence.

est injury is a

against Philadelphia in

1993.

Both Torry Holt and Isaac Bruce seem to have lost that burst of speed they showed many times last year. This is causing teams to be more physical at the line of scrimmage knowing they can cover them downfield adequately. Finesse, mentality and lack of patience all make up the fourth reason.

Bowl

game

is

declining speed of the receivers.

winning record. No fan could ever have predicted the St. Louis Rams starting out the NFL season 0-5. There are five rational reasons why this hap-

Rams

yard rushing seasons, an NFL record, 37 career games with two or more touchdowns, 74 career 100-yard games, 149 rushing touchdowns, also an NFL record and a career high 237-yard rush-

problem

solved the Vikings will not post a

years, but his surroundings have changed drastically. Here are a few interesting stats 33-year old Smith has accumulated since he was drafted 17th overall in the 1990 draft: Three Super rings, 11 consecutive 1,000-

is

He

Vikings for better or worse. This being said, Culpepper is going to

few

can say they are surprised. Daunte Culpepper and Randy Moss just

all

here,

East,

two

that the regular season is

it

ana-

son.

the

not to say Smith has not

pre-sea-

such that

were praising

Now

is

The Minnesota Vikings have disappointed this year, but not many

fling defence, lysts

This

lost a step or

ing

near future.

The Dallas Cowboys have

team.

Steve

Dallas

signed to a huge contract, he

Fans are quick to pick apart the Cowboys running game, particularly

and disappointments of the first five weeks. The easiest team to start ripping apart would be the St. Louis Rams, but that’s just too easy. The team is surprises

is still los-

of surprises

full

among

les in the

The

St. Clair

the worst starting tack-

NFL.

third reason

would be

the

ing.

sure.

Condors disappointed with referee at soccer By VANESSA LAYE

game

of the current

players due to penalties and anoth-

game and are suspended from playing in the next league game. At the end of the first half.

second half Late in the Conestoga received their second red card, when Joaquim Machado was thrown out because of a late

two due to injuries, Conestoga’s men’s soccer team gave a valiant

Condor goalie Ivica Abramovic was seriously hurt and removed

tackle.

Mohawk

from the field after being tackled by an opponent. According to assistant coach Paul McQuade, Abramovic won’t be able to walk for a couple days, after being kneed in the side of

Despite being without two key er

against

effort

the

Mountaineers on Oct. 8. “This wasn’t a (soccer) game. It was a rugby game,” said Geoff Johnstone, head coach of the Condors. According to Johnstone, the referee did not fulfill his duties on the field, due to the fact that every time

Conestoga players moved they were kicked or illegally tackled.

“We

get kicked about the field

and they In the

call nothing,”

he

middle of the

first

half

Joaquim Machado was kicked to the ground by a Mohawk player. Teammate Roberto Rivas went to talk to the opponent about the situation, and while talking they bumped chests. Rivas was red carded and thrown out of the

game

for something that should

have been a warning or at the most, a yellow (caution) card.

When a player receives a red card they are automatically kicked out

battled hard to the end, but

didn’t

just

McQuade

work out

for

us,”

said.

Although Conestoga

lost 4-1

to

the leg, creating a painful charley

Mohawks, assistant coach Duane Shadd says they can still make it to provincials if they find a way to score in their upcoming

horse.

games.

The Mohawks scored their second goal of the game during this tackle, to lead the game 2-1. Condor Bojan Djokovic responded, scoring a goal for

said.

“They it

off a penalty kick.

He

Conestoga

obtained the

shot off a hand-ball by a

Mohawk

player.

“The team is a unit,” said McQuade. “You half to work harder when you are down men.” Marcos Bordadagus replaced Abramovic in net; this was the first game of the season for him. Within minutes Bordadagus was also taken out

by an overly aggres-

Mohawk

player, but stayed in

sive

net despite his injury.

the

“We

can

hit crossbars,

we

posts, but

we

can

Shadd said. Condor Shannon Machado ranked Ontario

fifth

hit

can’t find the net,”

in

scoring

Colleges

in

is

the

Athletic

Association, with 6 goals in nine games. Condor Chris Gomez isn’t far

behind

in ninth,

with 5 goals in

eight games.

6,

During the weekend of Oct. 5 and Conestoga lost 3-1 to St. Clair

College,

with Shannon

Machado

scoring the lone goal. It was also a close game between Conestoga and Lambton College, but in the end Lambton was victo-

rious with a score of

1

-0.

It’s

outta there

Second-year woodworking student Josh Whitton gets a hit during an intramural softball game on Oct. 10. Whitten’s team won the

game

14-11.


Digital Edition - October 21, 2002