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Taking a

A

trip to

South Korea

The

learns about

and

window could be

thing of the past.

new

the

It’s

diversity.

ban underway?

local drive-thru

deemed a

Halfway around the world one teacher culture

drive-thru

Combos

at

deal at the theatre

Famous

Tuesday, October

2002

,

may come

Players

complete with your choice

of

stiff

34th Year

drink.

— No. 20

Bus mix-up leaves teams without ride By TORI SUTTON

pointed.

was our

It

we had

the year and

An error booking buses left two Conestoga varsity sports teams without a ride last month. The weekend of Sept. 21 and 22, buses failed to pick up the men’s hockey and rugby teams. Rugby team members were able to drive their

own

vehicles to the

at this

civil

Conestoga proctor with

Students

can

disabilities

assured that they have all the same opportunities as other sturest

thanks

dents

registered in the disabilities office.

“Students need to be registered

i

is

filled

by

ally

“Students need to be

a paid position, usu-

proctor

community or

a

member

of the

faculty.

Students with disabilities work one-on-one with this person who assists them with their needs.

registered

meet

during tests or exams. They are present as a tool to scribe a

test,

take notes or simply be present

if

•impaired

student

a

who

is

with

hearing

may need someone

to

then

will

Judy Hart, test

administrator

we can

to

exam

which

F

is

that runs

when

the

closes, a proctor can stay beliind as a

monitor so they

may

match

students up with one proctor, so a student has

we

all

if

their test dates set

can look ahead and schedule

other hand,

writing a test or

to discuss

to

potential

if

On

the

a student has a test

tomoiTow we can't guarantee who they will be matched up with. Our job is to give them the best service

were unable

Because a proctor does not tutor a student, ority to

it

isn't necessarily a pri-

match

specific needs.

Last-minute plans

to

provide the

team with alternate transportation fell through, and Rickwood said it would have been unreasonable to ask his players to drive their

own

vehicles to the game. “I’ve got guys that might get cut from the team the next day. How am I supposed to ask them to drive all the way to Windsor?"

who do

not have classes and are

willing to w'ork after hours.

Last year Conestoga had 23 proctors working to keep up with the high

demand.

Anyone as

interested in assisting

a proctor can

time

at

in

the

apply

disability

Room 2A109

at

any

services

or can

contact testing administrator Judy Hart at ext. 3232 for more information.

Rickwood said. "Our relationship with

schools

St. Clair

will certainly not be the same." he

hard for us to be taken seriously when we can't get a bus for our team." Jay Shewfelt.

generally occu-

A

loop

said. “It

makes us seem

hard to explain the issues incidences create). All summer, we work hard to recruit then it looks like a sham.” “It’s

tant

St.

Clair's assis-

hockey coach and senior

hockey convener for the Ontario Colleges Athletic Association (OCAA). said St. Clair had advertised the exhibition game on the radio and in the newspaper and ended up turning away between

400 and 500 fans game. “It's

less

time to prove them-

selves.”

Rickwood

After the missed bus,

was

afraid he

“Two

didn’t

would lose mem-

show up

to the next

had to call them and apologize to convince them to come back.” The buses were booked through and purchasing athletics the departments at the college, however Elmira Bus Line claims it

practice,” he said. “I

never received the school’s order.

game.

can anticipate coming across. It is important to note that students at Conestoga College cannot

office

possible."

to get to the

said. "It's

is

Rickwood

bers of the team.

another had

Incidences like this strain the

position

players

to travelling first class,”

night before to stay with friends,

college's relationship with other

The

new

are used to the Junior

them one

The purpose of the meetings is simply to give an overview of what is expected from them and what types of circumstances they

pied by people outside the college including retired faculty or faculty

one proctor consistently.

visually

description

Hart, test administrator.

impaired may need assistance relating what is written on the front board. If a student needs extra time is

began meetings

proctor other students.

take lecture notes, just as a student

who

the disability services

and will then meet with us to determine their needs," says Judy "W'e try as best

the student needs extra time.

For example,

and

week

proctors.

with us to determine

to be

severe arthritis or

exams.

the job

their needs.”

confused with a tutor, a proctor is geared more towards the physically disabled as an aide

Not

more a tool the student can utilize to achieve their goals, which is usually in completing tests and

hard to get

“It’s

who

mix-up caused team than just a missed game. One player had headed down to Windsor the for the

reached in time to let them know the bus had not shown up. Also, parents of players had already

proctor can be thought of as

office

ofTercd by proctors.

A

A

not always run smooth-

ly at the college.

In addition, Rickwood said exhibition games are crucial to rookie players trying out for the team. “By missing a game, it gives

started the drive to St. Clair not

Last

assistance

the

to

complete the test. This service is offered exclusively to those students who have been

difficult

“It was very distressing. We’ve Greg said worked hard,” Rickwood, the men’s hockey coach. “It was our first game of

realizing their sons

By HALLE Y McPOLIN

is

gets around that ath-

(these

decided to drive his own vehicle to Windsor. The players could not be

assisting college students

players

missed out on their first pre-season exhibition game against St. Clair College in Windsor.

while

tests

letics are

like a joke.

more problems

engineering students Liz Chilton and Rachel Burrows take land elevation measurements for a surveying project outside Corridor D on Oct. 4. Chilton and Burrows are two of the only nine females in the second year of the program that has 50 students.

Second-year

when word

Rickwood,

to

new

the college.

;

Take a look

According recruiting

and used

the year.” As well, the bus

(Photo by Valentina Rapoport)

game of

a lot of par-

ents here from out of town.”

match against Seneca College, later being reimbursed for gas by

However, the hockey team

first

the night of the

an unfortunate situation,"

No

follow-up phone calls or faxes were sent or received to confirm the bus order.

was

"It

a simple mistake." said

Marlene Ford. Conestoga’s athletics co-ordinator. She refused to comment further on the incident. However, the college may be paying for the simple mistake. Since Conestoga had to cancel the

hockey game with

the school

may

for

some of

the

hockey game.

"We with

S:.

Clair,

be stuck pa\ing

St. Clair's fees to

host

currently are in discussion

St.

Clair regarding ice times

and referee fees," Ford said. Howe\er, since the game was during the exhibition season, the school will not have to pay a missed game fine like in the regular

season.

Since Conestoga has received their ISO certification, the procedure for booking buses and dealing with vendors has been finetuned.

Certain guidelines must be met and maintained for vendors in

games here, any other school would not have

order to continue providing the college with their services, said Stephen Case, manager' of materi-

as large of a crowd."

al services.

Shewfelt said.

“We

get

a large

turnout for hockey

"Our guys were

pretty

disap-

Continued on Page 2


.

— SPOKE, October

Page 2

Speed

15,

News

2002

large factor in

campus accidents

By STACEY MCCARTHY

How

lot

Conestoga Coilege

at

do you drive to your in the morning? Did

fast

parking

Bus mix-up not first • Continued from page

you know the college speed limit is 15km/h? There have been three accidents

If

‘^aid

1

any vendor provides unsatis-

their coach. Since

team more than once. by the purchasing department show two buses did not show up last winter. He is also concerned about the workload the staff in athletics takes upon themselves. He suggests budget problems have left competent employees scrambling because of their heavy

factory service three times within a

lem for

reported

six-month period, the college no longer deals with the company.

Files

hour apart, and another was reported on Oct. “We haven’t had anyone injured,”

system,” said Case.”

at Doon campus this year. Two were on Sept. 13, a half an

“It’s

1

If

accidents. Hunter said those that

which then company. At press time, the lack of a rugby bus on Sept. 22 was reported, but no tracks the strikes against the

do

occur are usually caused by drivers

speeding through the

parked vehicles. other things

lots

and

hitting

“Many people have

on

mind, and

their

unfortunately they are not necessarily concentrating

When

on

their driving.”

asked about the

installa-

(Photo by Stacey McCarthy)

Most accidents on Doon campus are caused by drivers speeding lots and hitting parked cars.

through parking

a

deterrent

security

office.

“Even

if

it’s

a

minor accident, we (security services) should be advised. Then drivers can take their vehicles if they’re drivable, and they usually are, to a collision closest

is

reporting centre.”

The

the Waterloo Regional

Police Centre at 200

Maple

Rd.,

with

ings must go through the purchas-

is

ing department to ensure the trip

department forwards the sports schedule and bus requests for the

“They buy some of our equipment at Play It Again Sports,” he said. “What happens when someone gets hurt because the school is too cheap to spend an extra $20 on

upcoming year

a concussion-proof helmet?”

covered under the college’s

is

liabili-

other drivers involved. If necessary

here,

especially in the parking

can also provide students with a copy of the inci-

lots.”

sends out the requests to multiple bus companies, who in turn fax

dent report for insurance reasons.

because they are

important for students to contact security about an accident,

job.

campus

accidents are advised to visit the

students simply slow

bus on the 21st was on file. According to Case, all bus book-

dents get the required information of

Doon

maintenance keep cameras

Continuous would be required to in good working order. Those involved in any on-campus

and insurance companies typically be called from

there as well.”

Exterior cameras, are very expensive.”

if

workload, leading to incidences like the bus booking mix-up.

ty insurance. Usually, the athletics

would

as

prevented

there, police file a

Hunter

security responds to

all

on-

accidents and ensures stu-

said, they

It’s

even

if

the

damage

is

minor, so

it

can be determined whether traffic signage or traffic control played a role in the accident.

He

said part of

the continuing job of security serv“to try and keep the

near Sportsworld.

ices

“That’s typical protocol for an accident where the vehicles are still

as safe as

is,

we

campus

“Sometimes students get

.

.

.

My

advice

a hurry

take your time

com-

on campus. Hunter said the students involved are

generally

“We usually

very

track

compliant.

them down

if it

turns out to be a student and cau-

They would be

subject

to discipline if they persist.”

Yoii don't

to the purchasing

department in the summer. The purchasing department then

back

their quotes for the services.

The school then chooses

the best

price and books whatever buses are

needed.

limit.”

services gets a

plaint about speeding

tion them.

can.”

However, most incidents can be

is to

and obey our speed

If security

in

late for class or their

his

kept

record of the hockey team’s missing

down. “The main factor is speed with most of our accidents. People are used to driving 50 km/h on city streets or faster, and frankly that is much too fast to be driving

report

Hunter said, “It's not looking at. we’re something

of cameras

From

drivable.

speeding

tion

show up or is late,

incident to purchasing,

many

there aren’t usually

a bus does not

the athletics department reports the

A1 Hunter, head of security said, “and that’s an important thing.”

While

a three strikes and you’re out

he has been

coaching at Conestoga, late and inadequate buses have been a prob-

A confirmation

by the college

to

fax

is

sent

complete the

is

not clear whether the pur-

chasing department received the request

well, Rickwood is not satisfied some of the equipment his team

provided with by the school

However, Tony Martin, director athletics and recreation at Conestoga, said the hockey team has proper equipment that should pose no safety risks. “They do receive new equipment and concussion-proof helmets,” Martin said. “This year they’ve received new gloves and vouchers of

for six sticks per player.

process. It

As

for

the

two buses

or

whether it was overlooked. Missing buses are not the only concern for the men’s hockey team

have to be an expert to win, |ust pick 3-6 outcomes, iPs that

easjr.

We proWe do

vide them with everything. very well for our athletes.

“Every college has problems, but don’t just have a hockey team. We’re here for the benefit of every

we

single student at this school.”

Play today at year lottery retailer.

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News

SPOKE, October

2002

15,

— Page 3

Nursing grad nominated for award This

lODE

lence, as well as the

in a six-part Conestoga alumni who

the first

is

series on

Award

Butler

are

nominated for the 2002 Awards, an annual provincial awards program created by the government to acknowledge the important economic and social

Care Nursing from George Brown

Premier’s

College.

graduates make to Ontario. Award winners will be announced Feb. 24, 2003 in

award.

cess,

said she

wasn’t

She had

always shocked

is

gets nominated

serious about nursing.”

“The biggest hurdle while at colwas working two or three parttime Jobs while studying. It was exhausting,” she said. “I wanted to lege

incredible people out there

what they do. acknowledged in the midst

stay involved with

So

to be

ing,

the thought that guardian angels are

of

all

watching over

humbling.’’

something comrorting all

of

us.

at

For the sick and premature babies The Hospital for Sick Children

in

Toronto, one of the guardian

angels watching over them

is

Prince said she owes

Prince.

of former graduate The Conestoga College’s nursing program has found her niche in life ancf their families

-

It is

because of her

tireless

work

was nominated for a prestigious Premier’s Award, which will be awarded in February 2003. nominated by was Prince Conestoga College in the Recent Graduate Category. Nominees having graduated from an Ontario college of applied arts and technology within the last five years - must show promising career success and have contributed to society and their

into the nurse she

is

no stranger

of

recognition for her work. She was honoured with a

number way

Conestoga

College’s Dr. Stanley

F.

Leavine

Memorial Award for Excellence in Nursing and the James W. Church Award for her academic excel-

Sunbeam

Region,

Waterloo

Ministry.

Prince essential

said

volunteering

need

in

an

is

has learned a lot while being a volit

was an easy choice

unteer.

important.

once she had done some careful

too

research.

loved and need to be cared

people

think

“I

who

it’s

to

do

There are need to be

many people who

our responsibility as

for. It’s

human kind

“My

to

experience

do

who

Hospice of Waterloo Region has been with a

university

at the differences,”

and

she said.

that,”

volunteering

I

Prince

the

at

eyes

there’s

recognition that they think:

skills for the first

ing with her classmates.

their

in

person ing

time and interact-

ognizing that the person.

going

little

How many

to take

comes

in rec-

person

times are

is

a

we

blood from that baby?

pain from coming to that child, because each one has numerous invasive procedures that have to be

can come to Cohestoga knowing that the reputation is there and that

goofing up while learning intricate

“I think the dignity

anything else.” Prince said preserving dignity is one of her main goals. “There are so many people asking for money in Toronto that I find even if you give them a smile and

who

ates as excellent nurses. Students

some of her fondest memories of the college came from

she cares for with the utmost dignity as well.

How many times is he going to get poked? How are we going to prevent

of children

look

have great instructors.”

care unit at Toronto’s Flospital for Sick Children.

are dying of cancer. They’ve inspired me more lot

Prince said

Recent nursing graduate Julie Prince has been nominated for a Premier’s Award. She currently works in the neonatal intensive

it.

attended Conestoga and people

attended

(Photo by Marc Hulet)

society and she

Somebody’s got

they’ll

through school. received She

numerous

Residential Centre and Oasis Street

said. “I really wanted the hands-on what that’s and experience Conestoga had to offer. “I had heard a lot about the strong reputation of the nursing program and 1 looked into that. They put out good nurses and institutions and hospitals look at Conestoga gradu-

of awards while working her

at

choose Conestoga as the place to pursue her dreams and aspirations,

looked

to receiving

support

organizations, such as the Hospice

today.

is

to

life

continued to volunteer

“I talked to different

own community.

Prince

my

in

myself and study.” Despite the challenges. Prince

to

ous academic excellence and selfless volunteer work, that Prince

my volunteermy family, too.

and abilities she learned at Conestoga College. She said her instructors also helped mould her

Prince said

Sick Kids, as well as her previ-

church and

tionships

her

dreams.”

can.

at

much of

my

That was the hardest part for me. I had to sacrifice some of the rela-

very, very

“They prepared me very well in terms of classroom and practical skills. They really challenged us to be professional and to go after our

any way she

-

is

it

professional success to the skills

Julie

helping babies in dire situations

those people,

not

herself

in

is

-

which was supporting

that are excellent at

There

for

to Juggle school along

with numerous other activities

for an

an incredible feeling to be

many

games

fun and

all

the least of

“It’s

MARC HULET

we were

Prince.

acknowledged recognized and when you've worked hard. It’s also incredibly humbling. There are

Toronto.

By

but It

when she

had a great class and we lot. We had a lot of fun

laughed a

Prince, despite her previous suc-

college

contribution

“We

Joan

in Perinatal Intensive

me

-

that

T’m

a

somebody’s acknowledg-

as

more than

just a

home-

done,”

she said. “This

have experiences these All helped Prince become the best nurse that she can be. She treats each critically ill baby

little

the privi-

lege of being at the beginning of that little

person’s

life.”

well as caring for the babies. Prince said it is essential to care for

As

their families as well.

important for her to show the parents that she cares about their baby and that she is doing everything she can to make

She said

less person.’”

a

is

human being and we have

sure the

possible. “If they see me do that with care and with love and with tenderness then they are going to feel better. They’re going to feel like their baby is safe when they go home at the end of the day.” For Prince there is no doubt she has found her calling in life.

“I

is

as comfortable as

many

parts of

love.

It

work with

and

to

wee

ones.”

With

that in

who are

leaders If

you

financial

are a first-year student in

accounting,

microeco-

nomics. nursing theory, psycholomodern physics gy or concepts in and would like to improve your grades,

learning

support

peer

College

new

are

this year.

to

They

helpful

to

are provid-

It

is

also

strategies test

your-

selves.

learning

skills

Joy Tomasevic, overall grades increase an average of five

adviser

to 10

per cent.

Students interested in the peer support learning groups may attend as many sessions as they feel necessary.

well.

Tomasevic said responsibilities of a PSLG leader are to “contact faculty.

introduce the concepts to the

work

closely with the faculty

through material covered each week.” The group leaders are not there to lecture, but to share what they have learned with students about how to

compare notes, develop among one another and to

done

Conestoga

meet other students,

According

and

regarding material, and lead groups

grades.

their

selected leaders are

have previously taken

course

the

by PSLG from peer

groups

ed to improve student’s understanding of the course material and

improve

The

who

seniors

class,

groups are for you. Peer support learning

(PSLG)

tutoring.

led

is

recruited

ing a guardian angel over their children.

study the course

and how

to get a

on what they learn

better grasp

in

class.

Each

leader gives review ses-

sions

when

necessary.

The groups

will

meet once a week

THE MAC VOISIN SCHOLARSHIP

honour Mac Voism.^a Kit^ener business leader This scholarship has been established to Meat Shop cham o - -ic ses. and entrepreneur, who founded the

M&M

Award Criteria:

students register^ m the fipt year is awarded annually to three CoUege. The award wdl be gtven to Conestoga at three-y"axtusiness%rogram 3^a^ permanent resident and who; student who is either a Canadian arizen or 2002 dire«ly from their first year of studies in Septeinber

The Mac Voisin Scholarship

Has entered Admimstrauon Ac^unong, Management one of tlie following programs; Business Planmng or Computer Programmer Financial Management, Studies, Marketing, M^tenals '

• . •

Analyst subjects; Has achieved an overall average of 80% in Grade 12 years of high school; two past the during leadership Has demonstrated tlie commumty. Has demonstrated volunteerism either in high school or

m

Value of Award;

The value of the award is $500.00 to each of the three Guidelines for Submission of Application; • Complete the application form (See reverse) •

hour for the entire semester. The scheduling of the meetings will be based on students’ schedules and

.

availability of the majority of stu-

.

for an

and announce the date and place of the next group session.

recipients

uthat demonstrate leadership and Provide your own letter outUning your activities your volunteer woih Provide a transcript of your High School marks dc^umciuauon to Janeen Hoover, Submit your appUcarion and all supporting

Associate Registrar, As^raids/Financial Aid, SCSB,

dents. Leaders will visit each class

Deadline: • Thursday, October 3 1, 2002

little

mind, the families of

Scholarships

.

the tiny

the babies confined to the neonatal intensive care unit can relax know-

A’wards, Bursaries

Each session

Bv AIMEE WILSON

encomlife that

bly. It’s

Peer support groups help students

It

my

challenges me incredian area where I’m learning constantly. It gives me the opportunity to work with families, to work with a great team I

it’s

baby

have absolutely.

passes

Doon Campus.

,

.

is

watching


THAT'LL BE $85.50 ANDYOURj

Smoking: it’s on the way out

FIRSTBORN...

but that Cigarette smoking has been a part of society for centuries,

does not In

its

mean

form of

the

it

will last forever.

was only smoked by the upper class in were made of the sweepings off the cigar factory and were consumed by the poor.

early days, tobacco

cigars. Cigarettes

from a Over the years it has evolved into a socially acceptable habit and throughout the the number of people who smoke has only grown floor

20th century.

Enter the millennium; smoking has developed a stigma because of

and risks. because of government influences and concerns over public of smokers. safety, the laws are changing and they are not in favour have made governments municipal years, of couple During the, last side effects

its

Now

it

establishtheir responsibility to rid their regions of smoke-filled

ments.

Waterloo Region was the

In fact,

made

it

bingo

halls.

smoke

illegal to

first to

approve a bylaw that bowling alleys and

in bars, restaurants,

For years, these places had been considered havens for smokers. across the Region had to 1, 2000 many establishments

But on Jan.

smoking patrons to light-up outside. dismay of many business owners, however, there were sevexemptions to these laws. Private clubs, such as legions, and

force their loyal

To eral

THE FUTURE OF SMOKING?

the

workplaces were not required to follow the new regulations. For two years, life went on this way and it seemed the public was accepting the changes.

couple of weeks ago when council decided to toughen the bylaw by removing the exemptions. banned from all pubIf the law eventually passes, smoking will be

That was

lic

until a

Conscription not right Being a Canadian

venues.

This type of bylaw is possible since it has been successfully implemented in places such as Ottawa and Guelph. But, what will all of these restrictions do to the future of smokers? Ontario mean more It would seem these sweeping changes across headaches for people who simply want to enjoy a cigarette, like they

haps

probably have for many years. But as more laws are passed, the trend of kicking the habit will catch on and smoking will eventually become a thing of the past.

crawl.

The

effects can even be seen in our

own

school community where

smoke-free boundaries have been created. Painted on the ground, outside

all

where people cannot smoke.

my

ment, but there

only

citizen per-

is

something about

tion bill into United States

Congress

that

makes

my

make one wonder.

For the sake of the argument, say Bush does press on in his campaign

place to com-

and the U.S. becomes actively

the reintroduction of a conscrip-

involved in an Iraqi conflict. Will ,

the current

skin

amount of troops

H.R. 3598, a

Congress

in

bill

to

introduced to

Although Smith may hope the

Representative Nick Smith, sug-

tion, leaving

confirmed American casualties

males between the

from the United Nations and other world powers, could a wide scale

58,202

officials will forget the

should resort to forced conscrip-

the fighting in

Considering the lack of support

public and his fellow government

once again the U.S.

accommodate

Afghanistan as well as Iraq?

immigration to other countries.

2001 by Republican

in

assault

on Iraq be completed suc-

Those caught smoking within the boundaries, like with the Region’s smoking bylaw, will face monetary penalties. If creating smoking boundaries wasn’t bad enough, the government continues to raise the price on cigarettes in hopes that those

ages of 18 and 22 no choice but to

Vietnam, the odds of that happen-

cessfully with the

spend up to one year

ing are slim.

ly enrolled?

who

and his supporters have erased the Vietnam War from their memories.

bill

The violent opposition of many American citizens against the draft at that time is more than mere

Congress,

can’t afford

it

will quit.

Bring down the cost

in health

care and decreasing the

amount of

people dying form lung cancer and other smoke-related diseases

is

on the governments agenda. It seems that these changes are only foreshadowing the future one where smoking is only a legend and is seen for what it really is,

also

But for now, smokers

ment and society

in basic mili-

Although the response

tary training.

3598 thus

For some reason. Rep. Smith

common

is

ation to worsen, as

will

have

govern-

to deal with the pain the

dishing out and they can only expect their situ-

more laws

are passed

and tougher penalties are

imposed.

many

to the

government and

been

H.R.

paltry, the

Due

to the lack of support in it

somewhere

languishes on a desk in the

Subcommittee

make me, -

illegal

like

Although the tle

still

enough

cuirently has

current-

the U.S.

enroll if traditional advertising

speeches I

to

lit-

chance of being passed, the

cam-

to

fail

succeed?

neighbours to the south would

jump

into a con-

some

resistance. If

anything

is clear, it’s

Bush’s war machine

move and

it

is

that

on the

does not look

like his

recent push by President George

administration plans on letting

W. Bush

run out of gas anytime soon.

for an attack

go

don’t think the youth of our

scription situation without

many, think twice.

bill

numbers would

about encouraging more citizens to

wholeheartedly

on Military Personnel. lines in the bill are

How

paigns and propaganda-filled

However, the proposed guide-

of today’s youth will react

same way their ancestors did through enormous anti-war protests, and more seriously, lies the

far has

to

has not been swept off the

table.

knowledge. Although

decades have passed, chances are

a deadly habit.

in the

U.S. military be enough to stretch

gests that

of Conestoga’s main entrances,

are red lines that clearly designate

it’s

not

on Iraq can

it

Spoke Letters are

welcome

is

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College

editor. Letters

letters to

should be signed and include the

and telephone number

the

Advertising Manager: Laurie-Ann Vandenhoff

name

of the writer. Writers will

Circulation Manager: Lisa

be

Hiller

Photo Editors: Stacey McCarthy, Daniel Roth, and Janine Toms

contacted for verification.

Graham and Vanessa Laye Spoke Online Editors: Marc Hulet and Production Managers:

Editor; Julianna Kerr

Spoke welcomes

Julie

Tori

Sutton

Faculty Adviser: Christina Jonas

No unsigned

letters will be published. be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any tetter

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca Web site: www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

Letters should

for publication.

Address correspondence to: The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

N2G 4M4

Dr.,

May by a payment from Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) in exchange for the inserThe views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers in Spoke are not endorsed by the CSI unless their advertisements contain the CSI logo. Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a MS Word file Spoke

is

mainly funded from September to

tion of advertising in the paper.

would be

helpful. Letters

must not contain any

libellous statements.


News

SPOKE, October

2002

15,

— Page 5

Students encouraged to work locally By SINEAD McGARRY

enced professionals or new graduates. All the companies represented were accepting resumes for co-op,

The theme of HRNET’s 2002 “Go high-tech and

Career Fair was

“The career

Members

HRNET,

of

Communitech group

human

resource

is

to give stu-

dents the opportunity to learn about

consisting of

the advantages of staying local and city of

what the

professionals,

Waterloo has to

offer,” said career fair co-ordinator

at

Dopko. The high-tech company Sybase

on Oct.

the University of Waterloo

Julie

than nine different compa-

More

fair

a

hosted the on-campus career fair

2.

and part-time positions.

full-time,

stay local.”

is

nies representing various high-tech

dedicated to providing customers

Technology fair,

and partners with software and service that will enable them to

including Mitra, Sybase, Northern

gain advantage in the field of e-

and DSP Factory. Recruitment activities and information pertained to a wide variety of areas, such as: engineering, math, computer science, technical

business

training, quality assurance, techni-

tion developer

cal support, technical writing, tech-

were some of the co-op opportuni-

industries

the

in

Triangle were presenting at the

infrastructure and inteSybase was recruiting students for more than 50 co-op posi-

Digital,

grating.

tions available every term.

Software development, applicaand Web marketer

nology, and marketing.

ties

available in addition to full-

“There are so many excellent job

time positions in technical writing

opportunities available to students

and sales representation. One of the most popular companies represented at the fair was NCR

We

locally.

want

to

keep

all

interested

ented students

the talin

high-tech business in Waterloo,

the

we

Canada, a leading design, developand marketing company. ing, Recently named one of the Top 100

don’t want to lose such talent,” said

Charlene

Hofstetter,

human

a

companies

resource specialist for Sybase.

The

fair

was open

interested

NCR’s

to all students

whether they were experi-

careers,

Red

facturing

2003 Kitchener

professional firefighters’ calendar.

There have been calendars produced it first

five firefighter

in Kitchener debuted in 1991 with a

Each has offered a unique view of calendar firefighting and next year’s is

women

to say,

three start

of being involved in these types changevents, it says the world is ing.”

Times indeed

are changing.

That year’s calendar raised $50,000 for local children’s charities and sold close to 7,500 copies. Money raised from this year s sales will go to four local children’s charities; Citizens Concerned with Crime against Children; K-W and 3 area Big Sisters; Ontario Track (disabled) Ski association and Central Ontario Developmental

version of the calendar wide criticism from the

it

has two

occupying the months of

faced

labeled

media. A local newspaper which a “beefcake” calendar it resulted in sales of the calendar soaring.

July and October.

Waterloo

information

further

more then 500 local students seeking employment with companies

HRNET’s

offering jobs in their desired fields.

www.hmet.com.

comes back

The 1991

“beefcake” calendar.

no exception because

went on

in bringing together

For

of

Web

last

visit

site

at

to Kitchener

professional firefighters calendar

in fifth

“When women

high-tech career fair

was successful

ana-

number to have.” The 29-year-old mother of

and software developers.

HRNET’s

manu-

in

12 firefighters, supports and has the definicharities six local cover? tion of a hero on the back

since

lysts,

Firefighter Tory Jones said, “In the past there has only been one woman the calendar, so two is a great

What has

the

for in Canada,

engineers, quality

includod

Bv JASON WWDP LET ON

is

work

hot calendar

Two womon

The answer

to

representatives were recruit-

ing for hardware engineers,

pursuing high-tech

in

.

(Photo by Sinead McGarry)

HRNET’s 2002 Career Fair attracted more than 500 local students to the University Wednesday. The high-tech career fair featured more than nine companies.

Riding Program. Two local memorials, the Fire Waterloo Fighters’ memorial and the Regional Children’s Memorial, will

from proceeds. The month of September

also benefit

will

hon-

our the

of those firefighters

lives

who perished trying to save others in

the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. The picture for September features an officer in full dress

“We talize

are in

uniform saluting.

no way trying

on the Sept.

1 1

calendar chairperson

to capi-

tragedy,” said

Tim

Forsyth.

honour the 343 firefighters that were killed.” father Jones, whose husband and

“We want

to

said, are both in the fire department, firefighters 1 Sept. 1 , “Because of

and

all

workers within emergency

the services have been thrown into responsibila have we and limelight

ity to

our community and to our-

selves to be conscious of who we are and the service we provide.” Copies of the 2003 calendar can be purchased in front of either Wal-

Mart or Sears in Fairview Park Mall on any Friday or Saturday from the until right October of end Christmas. Calendars are also available at any of the six Kitchener fire departments.

asked if he had ever thought of being in the calendar Forsyth simply said, “Fm the staof the calendar (because he

When

ples

holds

it all

together).”

A Jobp Check Out: www.workopolisCampus.com

NOW POSTING jobs for • Students

•Grads/ Alumni

Of Conestoga ACCESS CODE is

College!

available at Career Services,

room 2B04

or call: 748-5220, ext. 3542 Conestoga (Photo by Jason Middleton)

V Jones, 29, a Kitchener •

nightshirt Oct. 3.

ar's

Jones

firefighter, is

one

of

pumps some

two

Kitchener firefighters’ calendar.

women

iron during

included

in

t

is

College

^


News Drive-thru ban a no-go for Conestoga students Avenue West won

B y MICHELLE TAYLOR

existing application for a drivethru decided under the old law, not

its

Drive-thrus are not the problem. According to Tom Hewson, a first-year business administration and materials management student at Conestoga College, idling cars at drive-thru establishments cause no more pollution then regular

driving habits. “What’s the difference between that (idling at drivethrus)

On

and a stop sign?” he Oct.

Hewson,

1,

said.

other

Conestoga College students and fast-food employees were asked their opinions on the recent bylaw passed by a 35-5 vote by the City of Toronto. The new bylaw bans all types of drive-thrus within 30 metres of residential areas.

the

one.

how he would feel hometown of Guelph banned

if his

asked

Hewson,

drive-thrus,

said

19,

take a look at McDonald’s at lunch time. The (drive-thru) is pretty

much

as

busy as

it

is

inside.”

Brittany Arnold, a supervisor for Harvey’s on King Street East in

Kitchener, said the ban will drive “With business. away McDonald’s, most of them close

up

and leave the drive-

at night

thru said.

An

running,”

19-year-old

the

“This will hurt business.” employee working with

Hamdi

also place regulations on drive-

Brittany agreed with her.

thrus already in existence.

Mohamud,

According to an article by John Barber in The Globe and Mail, the bylaw was prompted by a dispute over a proposed McDonald’s restaurant renovation on St. Clair

will disappoint customers.

Avenue West in Toronto. Nearby residents protested the proposed drive-thru because they believe drive-thrus cause pollution (because of idling cars), encourage excess

traffic,

are too loud,

smell bad, the signs are too bright, and the buildings are ugly.

it

definitely be a pain. “Just

would

will

It

new

When

19,

believes the ban

“A

lot

“It’s

constant

mostly

time.”

22,

St.

Clair

program analyst student. council city said O’Brien shouldn’t ban drive-thrus because

rants near residential areas in her

(drive-thrus)

Kerry Gillespie wrote, on Oct. 3

on

If noise is an issue a system should be developed for an umbrella or shelter, said Darby O’Brien, a second-year computer

be entrepreneurs in the area. “Unless they get incentives, they will not build in those areas. This will affect businesses directly and therefore how businesses sup-

there

B y KATE

Campus Living Centres has been providing student housing for more than 13 years and

and says the company

Conestoga Residence and Conference Centre and 12 other on-campus facilities.

include training resident advisers, overseeing the budget, advertis-

According Centre’s

h

e

We e k

in class.

You

will

learn

• •

who

Viola,

co-ordinater, said she has

for purposes of

the

biggest responsibilities in

site,

“planning, designing, financing,

the building and that along with

constructing and managing stu-

general

conference

and

housing

facilities.”

Campus

Living Centres

student housing

more than 13 years.

Thousands of students these 12

campus

live

at

facilities at col-

unjustified. “I think (the

are to keep traffic moving,” said O’Brien. “What are they going to do, park on the

drive-thrus

Conestoga,

as

leges

Campus

Living staff,

Centres

who not only

get the benefit of working for the company, but also staff rates

when visiting other cities the Campus Living Centres

where oper-

ate.

Assistant

general

working for Campus Living Centres are numerous. She said all the staff work together and focus on trying to get everything done together as a group.

“No one works on

The company keeps parents of mind as well. A pro gram called “Rez Test Drive allows parents and students to visit the residence over the sum for any period of time, so

mer

they can get to

Campus is “full

<?

Web

Sarah

months.

residences

affiliated

hotels during the

Centres

summer

This allows for the corporation

company and what her everyday

to

would be while she was working there. She said the training really gave her “an understanding of what we were getting into.” Even though Viola has only worked for Campus Living

school

responsibilities

and

all

manager

Campus Living

given a one-week general training session that taught her about the

the lectures. stay involved Visit the instructor during office hours. Instructors like to see students who want to help themselves. Ask friends, members of your study group, classmates. A classmate that explains something to you learns just as much as you do. The best way to know how to do something is to teach it to another. Go to tutorials if available. Check with Peer Services, 2B02, for scheduled tutorials. Find a tutor. Go to Peer Services, 2B02, and ask for an appointment. All students need help at some point, be sure to get the help you need.

Also,

become

hired, Viola

to

...

work

Viola,

assistant general

with

site.

Living Centres

towards.”

was

Once she was

the college

of opportunity

always a goal

hired in June

2001, applied for a job over the Internet on the Campus Living Centre’s hospitality

know

and the living environment they will be housing in.

towards.”

who was

a hierarchy,”

manager

Conestoga of Viola, Sarah Conference and Residence Centre, said she chose to work for Campus Living Centres because “it’s full of opportunity,” and there is always “a goal to work

road?”

Viola said the

responsibilities,

benefits of

has been providing for

John manager Kobylnik, she oversees the whole building. However, aside from all these

employs many

is

also the resident

life

and Sheridan.

ban) would cause more of a bottleneck. My impression is that

is

a corporation

O’Brien believes the complaint that drive-thrus cause traffic

in

ing and accounting.

port the community.”

jams

very

of her responsibilities

students in

USE THE RESOURCES YOU HAVE AVAILABLE Ask questions

Web

was established

Living

Some

such Algonquin, Durham, Fanshawe

wait until just before a test. New material builds on previous sections, so anything you don't understand now will make future material more difficult to understand.

Campus

to

is

“fast-moving.”

Viola said.

GET HELP AS SOON AS YOU NEED IT. Don 't

t

the

includes

Viola,

f

company

Centres for a little over a year, she has already had a few promotions

VANDEVEN

D.

may

GETTING ASSISTANCE

O

Living Centres

the work and

like

dent

pollution.”

there are

in the winter because you don’t have to get out of your car.”

McDonald’s

dences are noisy anyway. “There’s no reason not to have one in a residential area,” he said. “There is usually a highway near them anyway causing noise and

from

are easy,” said Faric, “especially

the

residential area, but he said resi-

few McDonald’s restau-

hometown. “They

homewould be a

in his “It

of

they

ience. You want to grab food on the go and go home or wherever.” Fletcher believes the ban makes sense somewhat because of the

she said.

is

if

pain,” he said. “It’s just conven-

dinner and lunch

who explained how

Faric,

Montreal, quite a

(traffic),” at

would care

banned drive-thrus town of Brantford.

tions student, doesn’t see a problem with drive-thrus. “It’s not that it’s

Campus

Fletcher, a police founda-

tions student,

of people don’t want to get out of their cars in winter,” she said. Barbara Fade, a police founda-

Star,

The Toronto

In an article in

Don

the right to have

Employees

increase

This

revenue when

its

is finished.

conversion

to

a

hotel

directly benefits graduated alumni

because they receive special

discounts in

when

they are staying

any Campus Living Centres

hotel.

ASKING QUESTIONS •

Don't be afraid to ask questions. Any question is better than no A good question will allow your helper to quickly identify the parts you don't understand.

question.

YOU CONTROL THE HELP YOU GET •

Helpers should be coaches, not They should encourage you, give you hints as you need them. They should not actually do the work you need to do. They are there to help you figure out how to learn for crutches.

yourself. •

When you work

with your tutor, have a specific list of questions prepared in advance. Be prepared (Photo by Halley MePolin)

for the session. •

Do not allow yourself

to

become dependent on

cannot take the exams for you.

the tutor,

The

tutor

Flag day in the Sanctuary Michael Fellows, better known as the “Flag Guy” to students, makes a sale during his visit to the Sanctuary on Oct. 3.


News

Co-op placements

SPOKE, October

— Page 7

2002

15,

offer

students the ride of a lifetime By SINEAD McGARRY

neering, wanted to be placed in a

environment

fast-paced

The co-op

takes

office

great

pride in placing students in the

career fields of their choice.

their

job placement, not at another typical

desk Job.

“Co-op gives students

Conestoga

for

the oppor-

drawing.

way

thought this was a great

1

employer mechanical Machining skills and for

the

your

was

interpretation

access

to

abilities.

drawing

also important,”

College currently co-op component into more than 18 programs. “Cooperative education allows stu-

skilled, motivated students in their

fields,

dents the ability to work

workplace,” said Sara Free, a co-op

career path

employment

“Working at Wonderland convinced me that I would really enjoy the career path that I’ve cho-

integrates

the

before

field

in their

graduating,”

Andrew Cywink,

said

.said

chosen vocation. Employers benefit from having

dents to test a variety of career

mechanical engineering technology student.

“From

this,

decide what type of work they

wish

to

be involved

their

in

officer.

a

students arc able to

in,

as well as

“Who

wouldn’t want to

work

an amusement was so much fun.”

park,

at

it

deciding whether or not their chosen program is actually of inter-

credit

course career to the start of

The most popular theme park in Canada, Wonderland has more than

the

rides.

for the season.

are

required to

successfully complete a mandatory

first

work

term. all

courses and achieve academic standards in order to qualify. Paramount Canada’s Wonderland hires students based on their technical ability and knowledge. “During my interview I was prerequisite

certain

I

pro-

Conestoga College are

at

growing. The imple-

mentation of new degree programs including the Electrical

Engineering Technology program are helping Conestoga’s co-op pro-

grams be recognized. Fairmont Flotels, Stantec Consulting, Mitra Imaging and the City of Kitchener are Just a few of the employers who hire Conestoga co-op students. For further information on co-op placements and Job opportunities, visit a

co-op adviser or any

who

required to correctly assemble a lap

member

are extremely interested in engi-

bar restraint ratchet according to a

office.

Both Cywink and Moore,

to find areas

in

continually

Co-op students

Students are required to pass

“Who

me

and others that 1 needimprove,” said Cywink.

grams

development prior

and 65

was good

Conestoga College student

tenance technicians.

want to work at an amusement park, it was so much fun,” said Moore. Their placements began in April and will be ending in two weeks when the park closes

down

Wonderland gave me experi-

ed to

prerequisite

attractions

narrowing their to one choice.

before

ence, and helped

Derek Moore,

Cywink and fellow classmate Derek Moore are completing their co-op placement at Paramount Canada’s Wonderland as ride main-

wouldn’t

sen.

for stu-

The co-operative education

est."

200

Cywink. Co-op is an excellent way

tunity to gain real-world Job expe-

rience

career

the

at

staff

(Photo by Janine Toms)

Students board a bus outside Conestoga College on Oct. 10. A new express bus route to Fairview Park Mall has been added twice a day,

Monday

to Friday.

Express bus service to Fairview Park Mall added

services

By JANINE TOMS

was a demand by CSI programmer Jody

realized there

students for an express route.

From

If you can’t arrive in style you might as well reach your destina-

the Sanctuary

tion with time to spare. On Sept. 3, Grand River Transit introduced a new express bus service. The express route is the only

Supporting Canadian talent I

“Who's that guy on stage? I've never heard of him before.” your question. Well If you sit in the Sanctuary, you'll find out the answer to talent in the form of Canadian supports dutifully Inc. Students Every year, Conestoga live noontime entertainment. v. entertainers we bring in The reasons why we do this are many, hut mostly because the to perform for you are good at what they do. . perform in front of^ a They have refined their acts to a point where they feel ready to it's also about having percrowd. Although it's not about simply being ready to perform, •

.

.

.

formed in the

Many

past.

of the performers

we bring in do

television

^ shows as well as their stand-up

t' act.

Others perform on the road aU year. The fact is that they work hard at what they do. their And what we can do as a student body is support them. We need to come out to professionals. are entertainers these that remember Ishows in the Sanctuary. We need to who take pride They are not multi-million dollar entertainers, but they are entertainers in

what they

do.

By showing up and supporting these

-u + entertainers, you're showing that your student .

doUars have been spent wisely. entertainers started Beyond that is -something more. Many of the big name Canadian nooners. doing put playing the college circuit entertainment. You can go The Canaciian college scene is a .great one for live, noontime there is something going on at all to any college. Camphs. bh' any dey’df the' week and times in the student lounge. they are how lucky 4.v. The student scene is just a great one. Many students don't realize talent. of pool great to have the opportunity to support such a circuit. It s a Even big name Canadian entertainers and performers still do the college planet. the on people coolest the arguably with involved great way for them to stay it s And students. Conestoga will have a gi^eat run of entertainment this year for Canadian promoting with Canadian. We recognize what a great idea it is to get involved we have promoted entertainment. We know that every day we have live entertainment, in Canadian thing big next the seen even have jsomething worthwhile. And we may entertainment. * to do that is What the student body has to realize is the same thing. And the only way a good haveto ready park yourself on those leather couches in the Sanctuary and get ,

.

.

,

I

'

time.

And

the best paif

is

that

when you hear someone ask who

that

^ guy on stage

might know. -

Jody Andruszkiewicz CSI events

I

— CSI advertisement —

programmer

is,

you

bus that travels directly from Conestoga College to Fairview Park Mall with no stops in between.

The

ride takes 15 minutes, leaving

Fairview Park Mall in the morning and departing Conestoga College in the

afternoon.

make any

The run does

stops,

which

is

not

quicker

events

Andruszkiewicz said students have the option to use the express bus instead of driving to school.

said.

Andruszkiewicz said there is not enough parking for everyone at the college, a problem most students are aware of. Carol Werner, a second-year genbusiness student and an express bus rider, enjoys the bene-

then the usual 30 minutes it would take to get there by the number 10

eral

bus route. The route will continue its service, coinciding with the

fits

Harold Neidenback, senior scheduler,

Transit

is

said

to

tran-

Grand River

always trying to improve

service for students.

20

of a direct route and said it’s quicker and not as crowded as the conventional route.

school year.

sit

“The

bus provides an alternative source of transportation, alleviating the congestion of the regular running buses and the parking issues,” he

He

said nearly

25 students take the express

bus everyday. This means there will be less overcrowding for students taking this, or any other bus route.

Grand River Transit collaborated Conestoga college's the

“It’s faster.

at 3: 15

p.m.

bus stop

on time and

is

Monday

to Friday.

The

located at Conestoga s

main building in front of Door 3. For more information on bus routes in the K-W and Cambridge area

Grand River Transit

call

Students Incorporated

7555.

and

arrive

The express bus runs twice a day leaving Fair\’iew Park mall at 7:58 a.m. and departs from the college

with

(CSI)

I

there’s less people,” said Werner.

at

585-


Co-operative learning programs a success for Conestoga College Bv BLAKE GALL

systems; environmental engineering applications; post-graduate;

Conestoga College is making mark in the workplace with 18 co-operative learning programs

mechanical engineering technology: design and analysis; mechanitechnology: engineering cal

currently running at the school. Violet Boutilier, co-op adviser

robotics and automation;

wood-

working technology; and

electri-

its

employee

and

Conestoga,

is

cal engineering technology

for

liaison

excited to see such

is still

Wage

in the programs.

growth

In the early ’90s there were just

programs

co-op

three

at

Conestoga. Over the years many new programs were launched giving students

D VandeVen)

(Photo by Kate

write their Smart Serve test on Oct. 1 All Resident advisers Debbie Brock and Jason Arnold residence and the CSI put on Campus Living Centres employees are certified, but the Conestoga the program for resident advisers as well. .

resident advisers to

All

be Smart Serve By KATE For the

D.

time

first

at

Conestoga

Residence and Conference Centre, resident advisers have been trained in

Smart Serve. It

was decided

this training

was

essential because resident advisers

deal with intoxicated people on a daily basis.

So

together,

CSI and residence made

on Oct.

1,

the deci-

sion to educate these advisers on how to deal with alcohol-related

problems.

According to the Smart Serve Web

Smart Serve helps trainers “develop proactive approaches to preventing alcohol-related problems, recognize signs of intoxication site.

and implement intervention

strate-

gies for aggressive customers.”

Jody Andruszkiewicz, CSI events programmer, thinks that Smart Serve is “a real comprehensive program.” He said the most important aspect taught in this program is for

fields to explore.

“Co-op alternates periods of classroom study with periods of employment,”

Work

said.

Boutilier

terms are as long as four

months

which the student

in

is

paid for their placement. “Co-op provides career-related work experience, application of ,

certified

classroom learning to the workplace, evaluation and assessment

rates for these

programs

range from $8 to $15 an hour, which lightens the stress of tuition

and supplies. graduation, co-op stu-

“Upon

dents typically experience high rates of employment and a higher starting salary,” said Boutilier.

of

graduate

a

Allen,

Jeff

mechanical engineering technology; robotics and automation, is living proof of the success of co-

op programs. graduated from Allen, 27, Conestoga in August and currently works at D&D Automation in Stratford. first two co-op Cambridge, Allen D&D Automation

After doing his

problems before they become a

Resident adviser Debbie Brock thinks having Smart Serve is “a

of career choices, contracts for graduate employinent and income

terms

problem.”

good

who

while students complete their

wants to get into hotel restaurant and management, is pleased with the

program,” Boutilier said. With approximately 700 stu-

decided to try for a change of pace for his third

opportunity to receive the training.

dents currently enrolled in co-op, Conestoga is making its mark in a

advisers to be able to “spot potential

VANDEVEN

more employment

which

pending approval.

assistant

Sarah Viola,

general

manager of Conestoga Residence said and Conference Centre, although it is mandatory for all Campus Living Centre employees to have Smart Serve, the number of underage drinkers and the double cohort are other major reasons

was decided

it

She

Brock,

asset to have.”

said

it

gives

them

“better solu-

on how to say no.” Anita Larkin, another resident

tions

adviser, said she too is pleased to

have the training and thinks Smart Serve will help with jobs in the fumre. However, Larkin stated she

why

to train the resident

advisers.

administration:

accounting, marketing and mate-

human management; management; post-

rials

graduate; chef training; and food

Resident advisers must receive an 80 per cent in order to acquire their

and beverage management.

assess situations and the seriousness

certificate.

ly

Future training programs such as

program teaches a including

CPR and Bacchus are being

looked into by residence and CSI. These programs will further educate

number, of aspects during the two-

hour course

first aid,

checking

resident advisers as to

identification, cutting off intoxicated

knowing the limit of drinks one’s body size and liability.

persons,

with students

to

intoxicated.

who

how

to deal

have become

“I ’got a taste of

new

Information technology current-

has one program running for

what different companies had

D&D in December of last year but continued working there part-time while finishing school. Allen says co-op often offers “part-time

work

The majority of the co-op programs exist in the School of Engineering Technology. They Architecture: construction engi-

engi-

tal;

computer engineering tech-

nology; electronics engineering technology;

telecommunications

after

co-op to

stu-

dents because you can get a sample of

be

are;

civil-

opportunities

terms.”

He recommends

computer programmer/analyst.

neering technology;

supervisor

styles of

he said. With more than 100 employees at ATS and only about 40 at D&D,

ic

what your career

will really

like.

Each co-op program has specifacademic criteria that changes

for each placement.

Upon completion of

neering technology; environmen-

Bookstore has

and

sizes

Allen realized that he prefers smaller companies. He completed his placement at

are:

Business

drinks.

training

placement.

They

resources

situation.

in

to offer,”

Viola said that with this training, the resident advisers will be able to identify students requiring help more quickly, they will be able to catch signs of distress and be able to

The

ATS

wide range of businesses. There are six business programs that include co-op placement.

expected the training to incorporate more, such as learning how to make

of that

at

gram

the

pro-

students receive a co-op

endorsed diploma which should impress potential employers.

By REBECCA LEARN There’s a new face to greet you when you enter the bookstore. Mary Andraza is the new super-

CLASSIFIEDS

visor at the Conestoga retailer.

Andraza

is

also the supervisor

STARS MEN’S SHOP

bookstore staff at Guelph, Waterloo and Stratford. "I'm just getting my feet wet,” she said, adding, “I still have a lot for

You may

find cheaper prices, but

now

is

it

easier to start

DISCOUNT

than at the beginning of the

year

because rush

startup

*Fairview Mall

“September over.” However,

the

is

*Downtown Kitchener

she said she was here at the begin-

*Conestoga Mall

ning of the year to pack books, talk to students

better value

10% STUDENT

to learn.”

Andraza said

you won’t get

anywhere!

and get a

feel for

the job.

Andraza said busy again

at

it

will start to get

the

end of October

Booking

when the book requests start to come in for the winter semester. The books will be ordered in early

for part-time job that is not

the usual

trail...

STAMPEDE CORRAL

November. “It’s

going to be a

fairly

is

smooth

transition,” she said of taking over

(Photo by Izabela Zarzycka)

Mary Andraza is the new supervisor of the bookstore at Conestoga She started her new position earlier this month.

from the previous manager. Andraza said her predecessor has gone on to become manager

eyes open for

of campus

clothing items students might be

administration just

down the hall. As far as making any changes, she simply stated, “We keep our

College.

new products and

interested in.”

One

item of interest

may be

the

Jostens rings, which are available

day at the bookstore, Jostens will be on campus giving a 10 per cent discount from Oct. every

They will be of Door 4.

21-23. side

set

up out-

looking for servers and security people for part-time weekend work. Fun people & atmosphere.

Apply in-person

at

248

Stirling Ave. S.

Kitchener On.

N2G 4L2


News

SPOKE, October

2002

15,

— Page 9

Students speak out on war By VALENTINA RAP OPORT Will military action -against Iraq

we

the question

is

with today as U.S. government

become

cials

offi-

increasingly support-

knows

come

that

second-year general

a

business student at the college.

plan,” said first-year social services

Although she agrees .something must be done to help the Iraqi peo-

student

only

make

war would

piTsed

action

Bush’s request to use force against

since the Iraqi people are already

Iiaq.

struggling to survive, due to poverty.

UN

weapon

who

inspectors,

month, are presently waiting

this

new “tougher”

a

resolution

locations

UN

setbacks to

to

“On

month Saddam Hussein’s adviser Gen. Amir Al Sadi

special

agreed to

oil

and election

is

or

anyone

John

under Iraq

else.”

unrestricted searches

professor

but denied access to the presidential

Waterloo,

former politics professor

the University of Waterloo

palaces.

should

According

politics

to politics teacher at

any excuse, how-

freedom amongst the Iraqi people is one of the U.S.’s main arguments for wanting to overthrow Saddam and his government. Dale argues this motive is false because of the U.S. involvement in world conflicts, where U.S. officials have supported governments that have exiled people with opposing views. Dale referred to Afghanistan where a new government was set up by

not benefit from aggressive policies

ever flimsy, because an all-out war

U.S. officials to replace a Taliban-

and would be “buried with

would be hard to American public).”

run regime, adding, “The

speech to

In his

Sept.

1

search resolu-

must accept

look for any excuse to use forceful

UN

Bush made

2,

“mess” with other nations, adding, “The U.S. is under no threat by Iraq or anyone else.” Kersell, who retired from teaching in 1996, is convinced Bush will

it

members on clear that the

would

palaces

presidential

new

included in the

Iraq

be

tion

stating

new

inspection regulations or face

that

action against Iraq.

“Bush won’t be happy

war.

Saddam

In response,

would

will try to look for

their sick

dreams, arrogance and greed.”

So how do Canadians war against Iraq? According

feel

about

(to

“He

the

science department

at the university

for research purposes, Kersell said

to a poll

if

war

a

if

Saddam

was assassinated by the CIA. In addition to deciding whether or not to support a war against Iraq, many people 'also question U.S.

dents were asked their opinions.

more

did not take place in Iraq he

wouldn’t be surprised

new gov-

ernment represents the minority of the people. Have we improved the lives of people? No we haven’t.” Dale worries Saddam is now

associated with the political

Still

conducted by CNN and USA Today last month, 57 per cent of Canadians are in favour of backing a UN-sanctioned war, while 38 per cent oppose it. Here at Conestoga College, stu-

justify

he

until

gets his way,” he said, adding,

told televi-

sion reporters that Americans

political

not

likely to attack since

Bush has

made his intentions to disarm Saddam and his government public. He compared Saddam to a cornered rat.

“Anyone who

adding, “If they have nothing to

(Saddam and his government) then there shouldn’t be any

hide

limits for an inspection.”

against

Iraq

is

to

Ken Reid, also a management

terrorists.

Elmasry, an engineer-

Canadian Islamic Congress, Bush for his plan to attack Iraq in a column he wrote in the Kitchener Record on Oct. 4. Elmasry wrote, “Have they (the Bush administration) realized that if all countries developing weapons of mass destruction were to be invaded, who would be left to do the

has cornered a rat

invading?”

had the same arguing that North Korea

criticism,

posed a higher threat when

he’s

(Saddam) a big enough

it

came

Saddam).”

Matt Loschmann a second-year computer-engineering student, believes

feeling

“Since the U.S. of the world Sept.

after

Bush

“Other countries have a non-willingness to use biggest threat.

them (weapons),” he Craig

Jacobs,

a

said.

second-year

materials management student at the college, is convinced that

Saddam

nuclear

produces

most

is

the

superpower

can do whatever

it

he fully supports

1

plans

his

stop

to

However, Luke Hooper, also a second-year computer-engineering student, disagreed and

blamed U.S.

of hatred between Middle Eastern countries and the U.S. “U.S. meddling with internal are

feelings

for

thing,

the

the

terrorism.

mass

is

1

and

trol is

Iraq

it

is

all.

wants,” he said also stating that

weapons.” According to Golley, of the countries developing weapons of destruction,

safe

important thing of

affairs is the

that are developing these

threat

then he has the right to (overthrow

mass production of weapons, adding, “I have no idea why the U.S. doesn’t go after other powers to the

agreed

student,

with Jacobs, adding, “If Bush feels

policies

Prof. Kersell also

first-year materi-

als

the

the college Michael Dale, lack of

that

Bush adminis-

to the

criticized

University

the

argues

According

weapons and should be slopped. “Saddam’s got to be controlled and his weapons seized,” he said,

tration the only motives for taking

ing professor at the University of Waterloo and national president of

at

of

at

last

resort.

Mohamed

E. Kersell,

nations

all

.said, adding that Saddam might use his weapons against any

have,” he

of harbouring

referring to retaliation by Iraq.

John E. Kersell, former

they

keep peace worldwide. Bush has accused Iraq not only of mass producing chemical, biological and possibly nuclear weapons, but also

the upside people will get the

said,

everything

with

military action

no threat by

intervention within

can also cause problems,” she

palaces.

Last

included

“The U.S.

the college,

help that they need but intervention

eight presidential

Bush’s plan for military

if

Iraq.

including

Iraq

in

Saddam Hussein’s

at

believes there are both benefits and

for

that

would allow unrestricted access all

of general business

he wouldn’t be sur-

.said

they get quite vicious and

out

neighbouring countries as a

Golley.

vote interests.

Jessica Evans, also in .second-year

are

scheduled to go to Iraq by the end of

Dean

Golley

things worse for^them

Bareirolo believes

ple,

of U.S. President George W.

ive

motives behind wanting to over-

throw Saddam. “He’s the man (Bush) with the

Barcirolo,

are faced

war

a needless

“It’s

ensure our safety?

This

would

cause more suffering,” said Nancy

reason

retaliating,”

“Any country

why

countries

he said, *dding,

living

under U.S. con-

a threat.”

Regardless of opposing opinions,

most students agreed whether

it

is

that

some-

military force,

or simply keeping a watchful eye on Iraq, must be done. “There needs to be a global pause to stop and look around,” said Golley, adding, “maybe that

inspections,

(possibility)

is

for idealists

like

myself only.”

Making ends meet By ABBI DAVIES

President’s Choice Financial for one, that have savings accounts

For many students, along with the end of September came their bills first set of phone bills, cable more, many For bills. hydro and

available that have an interest rate

the realization that as well

came

independence when

gaining

as

high as four per cent. The downfall of these accounts, however, is that you may have to wait upwards of 24 hours before you can withdraw of transfer funds

as

out of the account, although, this out of their parents delay may well work out to your of_ also get the joy advantage. If you have to wait a funds. limited full day to get your hands on the In order to get all of these bills cash, you have that much longer does life social paid on time, your

moved homes they

they

With a

not have to suffer.

little

determination and discipline you

can actually enjoy

all

of the bene-

of living on your own and possibly even put some money fits

away

students say that eating the biggest drain on their

is

bank accounts. Eating lunch the cafeteria may seem cheap

in at

you spend only $4 every day that you are at school, that adds up to a whopping $320 first

but,

if

every single semester. Some students say that iest to

it

is

eas-

money

if

that they

and buy growill need to pay ceries ahead of time. That way bills

they

know

right

er

away how much

spending money they will have for the week. Others have a set amount of

those Parasuco’s after all. Credit cards seem to be a

pendent teenager. Although great for building credit, charge cards can lead to a debt that

looming

month

rolls

around.

There

are

also

in

the

(Photo by Aimee Wilson)

too big to

not-too-distant

credit cards at home advise many stuplace, in a safe dents. Only take one out when you

Leave your

know what you

some

banks.

are going to

buy

and you are sure you will have the money to pay it oil. Some people even go so far as to

with

it

put their credit cards in a plastic, the zip-lock bag and put the bag in

The reasoning is the same behind the higher-interest bank accounts, if you have to wait you for the card to thaw out before

spend each month on ment and clothes and once this limit has been reached the fun stops until the next

is

climb out of. Who of us really needs that with the prospective of having to pay off student loans

as that

entertain-

to

com-

downfall for the newly inde-

freezer.

that they allow

to reconsid-

whether or not you really need

themselves

money

about your purchase and

much more time

Practice

much can use it, you will have that puryour reconsider to time more chase.

makes

perfect

using a first-year paramedics students, practise andice Yuill (left) and Lesley Ann (right), both lies on the stretcher. program, in the also is who Nootl. ScherZslde Door 5 on Oct. 4, ten Van

future?

monitor their spending

they set aside the

that

mon

for a rainy day.

Many out

to think

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,

News Alcohol and movies don’t mix, patrons say

Page 10

— SPOKE, October

Bv CARLA

2002

15,

He

Sherbin.

Famous

recently

Players

announced it is thinking about serving beer and wine in some of its movie auditoriums.

Andrew Sherbin, manager of Famous at affairs

corporate

Players, said they currently have four licensed lounges in theatres

across

Canada and

added,

would

of alcohol

V e

C

r

Coliseum,

Spoke

Paramount,

Burwell

visited

Kitchener

training,

asked

would be licensed and designated as legal drinking age and above. And alcohol would not be

goers

and movie-

how

they

about the wet so-called

felt

permitted in the auditorium once a

theatre

movie has

Most agreed

"We would trolled

create

regulations

all

a very

con-

environment and will ensure regarding alcohol

Jousting

started.

A maximum

number of drinks

also be implemented,

would

which

Sherbin said would most likely be

adding

atres.

think

I

it

will

it

promote

underage drinksaid

Stephanie of Burwell, Kitchener “There’s good things and bad things about it, don’t I but think beer and popcorn mix,” said Paul Berry, of Grimsby. “I think it will destroy the family

there,

you go

beers.

It’s

to

is

not a good idea,

they would probably not

indulge in a beer at the theatre. “I think it’s a stupid idea. And

to

have

fit.

The atmos-

phere won’t be as relaxing and

more

will be

Vince if

bars

not needed here and

doesn’t seem to

idea.

would be candidates for a “wet" theatre,

date was underage and I wanted a drink, we would have to watch the movie in separate the-

atmosphere.” Maria Weiss, a Wilfred Laurier student said, “I wouldn’t drink

SilverCity

screen in the the-

atre

and

Collosus

staff

to

Sherbin said, one

y

t

i

lounges.

risk.

would implement this carefully and responsibly,” he said. addition

open

licensed

We

In

at

of the currently

Berry

my

ing.”

not looking

are

they have had no problems at any

our guests, employees or our theatres at

theatres, such as

remain

designated areas for those guests of legal drinking age.” He added

not permit the

put

1

“We

Serve,

“We

to

Sherbin said branded

will

consumption in our theatres. Alcohol would be regulated to

sale

only

“It

SMART

concession

i

Sherbin, unchanged.” said

are researching

options.

guests will be able to

and certification prothrough grams such as

as part of their

S

Famous

proper training

expanding

that

all

He added

purchase drinks by using a specially designated “wet” ticket. As for the family experience,

would receive

Players’ employees

minors nor would we ever

the possibility of

two.

consumption are enforced,” said

SANDHAM

like a sports event.”

Kitchener of might not be the greatest

Jonker,

agreed. “It

Sometimes people get drinkbecome loud and could dis-

thing.

ing and

turb people around them.

might

I

have a drink at a movie, but only I can bring my own,” he said.

if

“It doesn’t seem right, but I haven’t really thought about it,” of Jonker, Catherine said

Kitchener. “They would have to limit it and I don’t think be available at

PG

it

should

or

children’s

movies.”

Andrew

Murphy,

Mount “It

said,

of

Forest

might a

attract

younger crowd because the old timers probably

won’t like

it.

will have to

They

separate the theatre to avoid conflict

with minors, which may be But, I would probably

costly.

and watch a movie and have a beer.”

chill out

Men needed as much medieval times women in the field of

in

(

as

By PETR CIHACEK

early childhood education

heavy armour, risk fight practices and spend time working on medieval

They sweat injury in their free

in

Children benefit

garb and weapons. if

They are Bryniau Tywynnog, a group of local enthusiasts who have devoted their lives to “playing” in medieval times. “All our money, all our free time goes into this,” said the group’s herald Dan Blair. “Most of us have jobs

Early childhood education has always been considered a femaledominated profession. There is a common misconception that

pay to keep playing.” Blair and around 40 other members of Bryniau Tywynnog meet every Thursday at Kitchener’s St.

males generally don’t enter the field unless they are prepared to

Jude’s school to practise medieval

Their weapons include

swords, maces and pole arms and are mostly

The

made of rattan. (Photo by Petr Cihacek)

fighters are usually dressed in

medieval garb and are required to wear pieces of armour such as hel-

mets and knee and elbow protection.

Tim Ireland

(left) is

about to attack Brian Dorion

during their prac-

Jude’s school gymnasium in Kitchener. Ireland, 40 others practise medieval times fighting once about Dorion, and

tice fight at St.

“It

wicked injuries.” That is the reason why beginners have to practise for at least one

month before they can

fight in tour-

naments such as the Pennsic War.

The Pennsic War is the largest event Bryniau Tywynnog engages in.

It

takes place every August in

Pennsylvania,

where

more than

0.000 members of medieval recreation groups gather to fight over a

goods

trade.

a huge event,” said Blair. “It

“It is is

know

an excuse to have a party.” are also medieval-style

There

activities in Ontario.

“We have a bunch of new events coming up,” said Blair. “It is a busy season coming.”

One

is

the

Kingdom

Arts and Sciences Fair that will take 19

Oct.

in

Burford near

Brantford. Blair said the fair presents “just

1

stretch of land.

The event

takes over

two weeks and includes archery competitions, bridge battles and a

woods

“We

"That one you really have

but

we know

is

to see to

a gathering for

all

the people

interested in this,” he said.

are from) North

come from

in

Dan

Blair,

Leader o f Bryniau Tywynnog

“(They

America and some

overseas.”

Other features of the event include craft workshops and medieval-

in

that

time

sucked.”

The head of the group Brian Dorion said he would be interested in visiting any era of medieval Europe but would not like to stay

my microwave, my refrigerator and my cable TV,” he said.

According to Blair, the society is most popular in North America. “In the States and most of Ontario, there is a branch in any major city,” he said. “We have around 100,000 members around Bryniau Tywynnog is a part of the Kingdom of Ealdormere that occu-

their lives to recreating the glory of

times,

Bryniau Tywynnog

members prefer the

of

com-

of today.

“We

offer in the learning stages of a

“Most parand teachers understand that it is healthier for children to have a more balanced environment and that there ought to be at least one man around the place,” said

child’s development.

really like to play about the

Middle Ages,” said

Blair.

“But

we

“Men

in

ECE need

be

to

particularly confident in

themselves and be

most of Ontario. The group was founded approximately 14 years ago. The name Bryniau Tywynnog is Welsh and means Sand Hills, which was one of the former names for Kitchener.

pies

,

ECE student co-ordinator Birdena

ECE

and lasted only one semester,” he said “When I went to Conestoga

Hamilton-Armitage,

student co-ordinator, could-

more. She believes that children need positive male and female role models. “I think they n’t agree

the

still it

didn’t

me a bit and it was great!” There are currently 240 students enrolled in the two-year ECE program at the college, six of them

bother

being males. On average, two year. per graduate males Hamilton-Armitage has learned -

that,

“Men

in

ECE

need

to

be par-

ticularly confident in themselves

and be socially mature.” found himself facing

Sommer.

Birdena Hamilton-Armitage,

boats to writing poetry.

fort

lot to

tion called the Society for Creative

about everything” from building

medieval

females and males have a

at

“I felt very self-conscious

seven years later, I was only guy in the class, but

socially mature.”

Territories.

program

Seneca College, and found himself to be the only male in the

Waterloo campus, has and continues to prove that misconception wrong. Sommer insists that both

Bryniau Tywynnog is a local branch of an international organiza-

Anachronism. The society was founded in 1965 in California and comprises 17 kingdoms that are spread throughout the world from South Africa to the Northwest

ECE

an

entered

class.

there.

the planet.”

Although they have dedicated

not just about fighting. “It is

that living

that time sucked.”

believe,” said the group’s “surgeon”

Gary Snyder about the woods battle. "Thousands of men come charging from the woods from either side and whenever they meet they fight.” But Snyder said the Pennsic War

really like to play

about the Middle Ages,

battle.

living

“I like

of the events

place

that

than 20 years of experience, he admits that there was a point when he felt alienated as a male entering a widely dubbed female profession. Eresh out of high school, he

be ostracized for their decision. Mark Sommer, 50, an ECE worker at Conestoga College,

ents

a week.

depends on how many bruises you want to get and what you want to cover up,” said Blair, adding that even full armour does not always protect fighters from “some really

they have male and female role models By DIANA O’NEILL

just to

fighting.

more from the experience

Sommer similar

while attending Ryerson. “Male students were more often

issues

out to prove something that had nothing to do with learning to be a really good caregiver and teacher,” he said.

Research has indicated that

chil-

need quality programs staffed by well-respected, wellpaid and well-trained individudren

Sommer

als.

out whether

suggests finding

ECE

is

fascinating

self-fulfilling before enter-

and

(children and their families) can

the field. “To hell with whether or not a guy is ‘supposed’ to do this kind of work,

benefit from the experiences of

whether

men and women working

money

colle-

and cooperatively together,” .is why we need both men and women in ECE.” Sommer, an Ohio native, received his ECE diploma from Conestoga College in 1981, as well as earning a bachelor of applied arts, ECE degree, from

ing

the

you love

gially

“If

she said. “This

don’t, then drop

Ryerson Polytechnic University in 1994. Although Sommer has more

it,

or

the

Sommer

said.

status

is there,”

then do

it;

if

you

it.”

Sommer offers this advice to both men and women in the field or in an

ECE

program:

“The

doesn’t need people

who

profession don’t find

every child intriguing and worth every effort and consideration,” he said, adding,

the work.”

“And who don’t love


News

SPOKE, October

K-W Humane

Volunteers important to ^ MICHELLE TAYLOR

— Page

2002

15,

11

Society Volunteers must

fill

out an appli-

cation with any skills they have,

A

age and

sad pair of eyes stares at you

The

to be taken

Humane

North Waterloo located

250

at

Kitchener,

all

wagging is

look-

“The

trick

come

in,”

Innocente said.

to get the schedule

is

we

going, but

should be line.”

Another program the humane

and

tails

one way

that

to

society has

Huffy rabbits with lloppy ears.

Volunteering

“We

170 new (volunteers)

to

new home. They include

cute dogs with

entation will be in December.

have want

Dr.,

home

approximately 92 animals, ing for a

volunteering. This year’s next ori-

and

Society

Riverbend

currently

is

availability. All applicants

must attend an orientation before

home. Kitchener- Waterloo

begging

started five

to help

animal fostering.

is

It

months ago. “We have

homes

now,”

ease the transition for animals that

four

have been abandoned or are The variety of animats at the

Innocente said. To become an ani-

lost.

K-W

foster

mal foster you have

right

to

humane society benefit from the many volunteers who help bath,

application explaining

feed and walk them.

staying,

are

essential.

do an

invaluable

service,” she said. “It’s very tough for the staff to (spend time with the

animals)

when

there are

They do

feed.

the

40 dogs things

little

to

we

can’t get to.”

(Photo by Michelle Taylor)

^

According to Innocente, who has worked at the shelter for 12 years, to become a volunteer you must be at least 14 years old and have no

This five-year-old black and tan doberman female North Waterloo

home

from a

Humane

named Jenny

She doesn't get along

Society.

up

is

K-W and and would benefit most

adoption at the

for

with other animals

having babies

free of other pets.

commitment per month (one hour per week or two hours every other week),

They

are

requirements such as the special

dependability and patience are

public

events guru and the animal educa-

that’s

tor. As a special events guru, you would be responsible for co-ordi-

responsible

nating special events such as the annual dog walk and adoptathons. You must be an outgoing person

feeding them. play therapist requires four hours per month as well, dependability and high energy. You work directly with the animals. “These people spend individual time with

ic talents are.

required.

turn

really

anybody

away,”

for

specific

If

Some

jobs

call

and be comfortable interacting with groups of people. An animal educator would be responsible for preparing proper

required. for

cleaning

mals,

all

is

cages and

their

just cuddle

them and

and the humane socie-

such as bylaws, euthanasia oc rou must be care. You and proper pet care,

ty itself

one

to

1

most valu-

According to an article in The Record by Dave Pink, the $1 -mil-

Time required

work

lion project will allow prospective

in the out-

maintaining the gardens, leash free dog parks and bird feeders of the K-W humane society. This job is perfect for someone who wants to help the animals but can’t work with them hands on. Time required is one to two hours

with them

owners to view dogs

in their enclosures in a skylight atrium, the shelter size will be doubled and cats will be kept behind glass. Innocente said the shelter will be able to hold at least 25 dogs for

per week.

is

In

2003 the humane society

spent on

the shelter.

0 hours per week.

Habitat helpers

is

going to require more volunteers, Innocente said. “The volunteer pro-

to vw get very depressed.’’

icu They mey tend

the dogs’

going to be more important

now because of the money

letting the

doors

what they need, said Innocente. “It’s very tough on the animals to stay in a cage all day.

because that

know

program,

able traits and skills.

You would be bathing the ani-

ty is renovating, so the volunteers

also contribute to the adop-

tion assistance

A

information regarding topics about the animals

you’re interested in becoming a

pet pal, a four hour

Innocente said.

adoption and have room for 25 strays. They are kept in the stray area for at least 72 hours. After they are healthy, they are put

that, if

up

-I

t

4.1

1

They both agreed they planning to go back to Graham

are for

sell

to

make

for every artist

“If

artwork and

his or her

a profit.

an even bigger compliment when someone wants to, “stick it on (them) for the rest of (their)

He

He one.

Tammy Webber chose

my

select a

enjoys doing. In fact. Graham started out by doing personal designs about two years ago, and opened his own business about three

months ago. Drawing something from scratch, instead of copying another design is what takes talent. "Just because you're a tattooist.

mean you're an artist, he Graham added the majority ot people who come in. “want some-

doesn’t said.

\

somesomething

thing that's a unique piece,

thing

that’s

custom,

that’s

drawn

for them."

He

stressed

some thought into what they want, they will be more

that if they put

1

said reactions

from peo-

than

satisfied

if

they

is

not the only one

s

alize

made

she said, but nobody will

She ever have an identical tattoo. peothis idea because a lot ot likes

ple

who

set a tattoo

w ant

it

to be

personal and individual. Nobod> wants the same thing as a hundred other people, she said.

This personal touch is one reason Tammy Webber, of Bingeman s Inc. in Kitchener,

chose Graham

Her

"excellent

a great impression."

For both of them, this was their tattoo. Webber said she s first

never do the same piece He 11 alter it a bit. oi peison-

it.

tattoo.

work, prices w'ere good and he was very friendly." Webber added. "He

he’ll

tw'ice.

her

Graham because he had

mother. Christine Graham, who out helps with the business, pointed one unique aspect ot her son s shop is

lor

butterflies.

boyfriend. Paul Young, of ConCast Pipe in Guelph, said he chose

w ho

Graham

custom work.

because she loves business

randomly

sample piece.

Graham prefers

this tattoo

s

"always been fascinated by them. She chose her buttertlN tattoo, because she

"fell in loie

terrified.

1

two had a good expeWorld Domination Ink. Webber explained Graham "made sure we were \ery comfortable Overall, the

sat

in

the chair,

and Young added. "He was ven

first

But as soon as looked so good on

They

set a boost of confidence.

CLASSIFIED

replied, “It’s never a dull day.

do see a

You

of things (such as

lot

abuse), but the (animals) that do go feel a lot better.”

ic is

which

“r#aQllv cool rrvnl to see." “really

Since there

is

no formal training

tattooing.

for

Graham

“You learn from the person who’s done it before you." However, he said it’s w'orthwhile to check things out on your own. He s always reading books and maga-

said,

zines and looking for information

on the Internet. He added it’s especially important

to

accurate

get

information

concerning health issues. Graham speaks to dermatologists, pharmaand the regional health cists.

department

to

ensure he’s offering

and healthy service. Brenda Miller, of the Waterloo

a safe

Redonal Community Health Lnit. said she likes Graham's setup. His "procedures and protocol are well put together." she said.

CLASSIFIED

Milton’s

Restaurant

Now

Stars

Men’s Shop

hiring

paiT-time wait

2979 King

rience at

we even

was

m>

got

staff.

with the

colours."

before

said.

"When

was done, it me. The only thing you think aboyt going to is what your next one’s the w ay change tattoos be." He said people think about themselves.

it

(Photo by Brandi Stevenson)

was also stressful. He said there is more freedom with tattooing. It s not so rushed, and it’s more selling something he

result was."

ple are his favourite part ot the job, especially if it’s their first tattoo.

said he

artwork,” he said.

budget restrictions are

Graham

enjoyed doing it, and worked on some exciting projects, but added it

is

said

in the print

industry for seven years.

Custom work

He

what the end

Drive in Kitchener. Graham was originally a graphic designer,

were up to me,” Young said, my whole body covered.

have

scared to get the tattoo, Webber added, "1 was also excited to see

owner of life.” said Will Graham, World Domination Ink, a tattoo and piercing parlour on Kingsway

and worked

it

“I’d

holding him back. Although she admitted she w'as

It’s

require someone more experience.”

According to Innocente, a police check is required because you are taking an animal into your home and the shelter has to be sure, for one thing, that you’re not interested in selling them. “We are not there to keep an eye on (the animals) all the time,” Innocente said. Innocente also pointed out that having volunteer work on your resume will help future job searches. “We have a lot of volunteers who want to be vets,” she said. When asked what it’s like to work at the K-W shelter, Innocente

available

another tattoo in the future.

The ultimate goal

little

custom designs

patient.”

R y BRANDI STEVENSON

with a

home make you

for adoption.

Kitchener tattoo parlour offers is

we would

animal

gram has just been revamped in the last year.” The K-W humane socie-

comfortable working with groups.

not too difficult,”

is

Innocente said. “With an injured

Canine companions share time with the dogs. They walk and train the dogs to learn basic commands.

No specif“We don’t

allergies to the animals.

if your pets are vaccinated, you have access to a vehicle and whether or not you rent. If you rent, a signed letter from your landlord permitting the animal(s) into your home is required. According to Innocente, it can be stressful on the animal if they have to be returned shortly after being taken home. To be a foster, experience is preferred but not necessary. “A mother if

ordinator for the society, said that

volunteers

out an

you have

other pets, where the animal will be

Kathy Innocente, volunteer co-

"(Volunteers)

fill

if

St. E..

Kitchener On the comer of King St. and Fairway Rd.

Now

hiring for

Christmas. Please fax your resume to

(519) 744-5273


1

— SPOKE, October

Page 12

Teaching ESL By LISA HILLER you needed to make money fast pay a debt, if you wanted to

If

to

make

a lot of

money

within a rela-

tively short period of time, or if

just

wanted

you

away and have

to get

to teach

the world

English?

Denise Sanvido did, as have hundreds, if not thousands of others. Some have wonderful memories,

some

not so wonderful, but you

couldn’t find a

more challenging

in

English classes

at the

through

organizations

hundreds of agencies, or companies that contract Canadians and other indi-

finish

Although many

some

don’t.

people get jobs,

Some

sometimes discrepancies in contracts, and some countries don’t pay a lot and don’t pay for flights or accommodations. Luckily though,

You

just have to

find them.

many

do.

do research and

Most would probably

argue that despite problems, teaching overseas is a good experience.

explore another country, “I will not be coming back to Canada,”

teachers

South Korea was Ewing’s choice because at the tirne, “it was the best place to make money.”

school later in the

start

they go

a bit earlier, but

Ewing’s process was similar

through the summer, according to Sanvido. Summer holidays exist in

two-week breaks here and

and answered a questionnaire. She did not need a TESOL certificate, although she took the course and got one anyway, and has a bachelor of fine arts degree from the University of Guelph. The agency found Ewing a job and a work visa and the Korean

there, as

well as other national holidays.

was

Sanvido experience.

“It

about

nervous

teaching, since she’d had

was

no prior learning

a

experience,” she said. “They didn’t

many

I had to make and flash cards to

supplies;

my own games

consulate stamped her passport.

get by.”

she ever goes. again, Sanvido would bring the necessary supplies If

she uses to teach Grade

1

students

school in Guelph.

(Photo by Lisa

of mouth was the main reason she

things

decided to look further into teach-

can teach, and I wanted a career,” Sanvido said. After teaching in Korea for a year, Sanvido enjoyed the experience SO much that she went back,

have to be a native English speaker and a college or university grad-

much

asked for. ' Jobs are supposed to be guaran-

She talked extensively with a who had taught in Japan. Having two Japanese exchange stu-

friend

dents live with her family helped her decide as well.

She found a placement agency on

“One of

the

important

most

learned in Korea

is

that

to try

this

time to a

compares

it

I

as

larger city she

in size to her

hometown

To teach

most countries, you

uate. In

some cases

tificate

is

a

required,

TESOL and

in

cerrare

some teaching experience

cases,

teed

of Guelph.

in

if

is

those stipulations are met.

In only a couple of countries.

ed teachers. The only requirement was that the teacher had a mini-

accommodations were better, and there was much more to do when she wasn’t teach-

South Korea and Saudi Arabia,

mum

ing.

for

was hard to get used to the language and food the first time Sanvido was in Korea. “You didn’t know what anyone was saying, and your diet had to completely

according to federal law.

the Internet that advertised

it

which

degree,

three-year

need-

Sanvido had, a four-year degree in psychology from the University of Guelph.

She had to fax her birth certifi-. and her transcripts or degree as proof that she had them. Sanvido said some agencjes

cate,

There,

her

It

university degrees are necessary

foreigners

One

teach

to

there

and an agency called Teach and Travel abroad uses

many

cases, this

is

it,

is

that,

in

an opportunity

someone

else’s

change.”

to see the world, at

on the floor at restaurants and didn’t do much else as there was really not much else to do in such a small village. She had lived on the fourth floor

expense.

which basically covered that she would be teaching children English in South Korea approximately 30-40 hours a week. Pay was to be determined later. But Sanvido said she made an average

of a small apartment building with

about any company or contract,

were bugs, mildew, second-rate,” was everything Sanvido said. “There was basically just a kitchen table, a bed and a

want to, and you may not be treated the way you want to be because of cultural differences, Sanvido

of $1 .400 a month in the one-and-

plastic dresser bureau.”

said. In other

required her to have a Teaching

English as a second language over-

(TESOL) certificate. The next step was to sign

seas

a con-

tract

She

1

ate

Who

wouldn’t want to do

“There

she does realize that her certificate

may come in handy someday, as many more jobs now require them.

Korea.”

Since being in Korea for three Ewing said she is learning patience and tolerance. “I am learning about our language, and alternative forms of communica-

With a 14-hour time difference and it literally being on the other side of the world, she’s right. By the end of her time in Korea,

was

The shower,

there.

a sunken floor with

She signed the contract, obtained her working visa, and was off to Korea on a paid flight the day after finishing her exams and complet-

a tiled wall and the squat toilet

ing her degree.

teaching more the

“1

never thought of going to

Korea."

she said.

“Ed

originally

thought Japan, but there were more jobs in Korea.”

Sanvido had applied to teach overseas in October and November and found herself in a small village. next to an army base in South Korea in December 1996. It is called Umsa-ri, where most, if not all Sanvido’s students were from families in the army, navy or

were especially hard

to get

used

There are hundreds, if not thousands of jobs out there. But people should be careful and be informed

You may not be

tion.”

couldn’t hold a conversation.

sentences.

two years

*'

Sanvido said she enjoyed the first

time she

went, and she enjoyed the living the second time she went, from

January to August 1998. There were pool halls

and

Korea have shaped who I’ve become,” she said. “It’s the fact that I put myself in a place foreign to me, and made it work.” Sanvido said it was strange coming back to Canada in between

living

where you

someone to turn

HEIP SOMEONE

words, be prepared.

tract,”

With no previous teaching experience, Sanvido was thrust into teaching students of

round-trip flight to a destination as

air force.

all

ages, but

mostly children aged seven to 12.

well as the accommodations.

“Teaching overseas

is

a chance

to be involved in another culture

and

expand your knowledge

to

of the world beyond the narrow

own home,”

of your

confines

Ewing said. “And it’s way to make money.”

a great

at

a

to.

YOU

CAMAOWK OiAOeres ASSCKSAnOH

i

you need

life,

Call the

Canadian

cmoi

dietiiton

KNOV/. CAtl l-SOO-BANTING

ASSOCIATION canaoiemne DtASeTE

W

www.diotoetes.ca

Now, with her educa-

Korea four months second time she was there to take a one-year bachelor of education degree at Brock University), and teaching experience, Sanvido would choose to

said.

and Sanvido found she could save about 35 per cent of what she made. Today, with a TESOL certificate, many companies will pay for a

five-year-

olds can put together English

Diabetes Association.*’

CLASSIFIED

earlier the

work

The money she was making paid

said she loves her job

ment she sees when

‘When diabetes enters your

tion, (she left

karaoke bars. There was much more to do for fun on her off time because the city was bigger. There was more of everything, Sanvido

for her living easily,

Ewing

and the sense of accomplish-

I’ve spent

in

She would be more fickle about things if she went again. “I was naive the first time, it was an adventure.”

to.

years,

Sanvido had learned the basics of the language by what people said and did. She had learned enough to take the bus and taxi and make purchases in Korean, but she

I

a-half years she

certifi-

that?

said Sanvido.

2 apartments.

TESOL

helped much, other than giving her some confidence in her ability to teach. However,

was a pretty awesome experience; most people will never get to go to

“I think the

of the biggest selling points,

said the

hasn’t

cate

She taught

Korea.

Ewing

Hiller)

Denise Sanvido, a 28-year-old Guelph schoolteacher, brought

some interesting souvenirs back from South ESL in that country for more than a year.

at St. Patrick’s

I

to

Sanvido’s. She submitted a resume

Sanvido would say so. Like most things people get involved in, word

ing overseas.

at

she said emphatically.

Students

have

be staying

2003. She could be anywhere after that, hopefully heading off to

taught.

people aren’t

told the truth, there are

will

her current school until February

them before Sanvido

to

She

three years.

her regular

day than students in Canada, and

viduals who speakers and try to get them jobs.

The Lanark, Ont. native has been Chang-won city for

teaching in

The desks were set up the same way and the students behaved similarly,” she said. Of course, the

talked

her fourth year teaching

is in

time.

schools.

if their

did.

happily married

Guelph. Twenty-seven-year-old Rachel Ewing is in South Korea right now, teaching and having a great

she taught three to four classes. “There wasn’t much difference in

school, especially

now

in

of the day took

part

last

is

at the time,

home, Korea

first-graders at St. Patrick school

Sanvido to Hogwan, a one-room schoolhouse for 12 students where

students were better at

English

and

of her contract.

Sanvido and others are teaching or have taught English as a second language to people all over the world. They become involved

native

Sanvido

elementary

job or a better adventure.

are

didn’t feel like

school she was assigned to as part

The

because Canada,

trips

Each morning, she was driven to a school, a different one most days, to teach preschoolers. Then she taught two or three 50-minute

an adventure, would you say yes to

moving halfway around

News foreign country an adventur^

2002

15,

college or university

overseas.

would also make sure holidays were written into my con“I

“There weren’t more than a couple days off to she said.

travel.”

But she did get to travel, and kept a journal of everywhere she went and took 25 rolls of pictures to remember her time there. Despite some of the hardships and unfamiliarity, Sanvido said, “It

Communications Assistant Required The "Vice-President of Communications

at the

assistant to provide support with generating

CSI

requires an

and producing

promotional ideas for events, etc during the academic year.

Some

experience/education in marketing or advertising would be

valuable as well as a creative side that would provide

new and

innovative ideas for reaching our audience.

Drop

off a

resume

at the

CSI

Attention: Judy Dusick or fax

Resumes

will

This

is

be received

until

it

office:

to 748-6727.

October

10,

a part-time paid position and

will continue until April of 2003.

2002.


— News ^Actors face long. hard struggle to succeed SPOKE, October

By LESLEY LEACHMAN

Some

things

get

into,

first

start-

to

when you’re

especially

tion

Entertainment.

“You

acting can be a very

demanding business

taught by professional people and require hours of hard work.

easy as

aren’t as

And

they look.

live in the school,”

put so

all

my

in the field,”

she

“For example, one of

my

script.

many hours it’s .so

work

professors’

something you can just get up and what people don’t realize is

says.

that there are different styles

worked

do. But

much

all

fun

week.

...

1

vocal coaches, David Smukler, has

of act-

movies

in

like

1

my own

in at the studio,

you’re practically there

looks like

The first film he created was entiThe Chase. It was about three

Hurricane

tled

ing and

many

different approaches

and the Boomtown Saints. They

minutes long and

to

says

Beryl

give you great advice and you learn

white.

it,”

Bain,

a

20,

University of York theatre student. “It’s

you have

not a simple task;

a

he an emotional athlete.”

And

to

accomplish

this,

it

takes a

behalf.

“You have in

the

go beyond what’s you have to make

to

script;

how

to

learn

how

what they’re feeling,” continues Bain. “The actor has to feel it and if the actor doesn’t feel it, it’s not going to be believable.” Bain is originally from Waterloo and is now training to be a performing artist at the acting conservatory program at the University of York in Toronto. She is currently a second-year student and it took a lot of effort and talent to get to where she is

(development),

this training,

know what’s going

to

you graduate),” she say around 85 per cent

(after

says. “I’d

of actor performers are unem-

love speaking,

things

words,

And once you’ve completed your

I

love

I

and love being on stage,” I

York theatre student

says.

“You can build a career overtime,

you don’t you can say, ‘Oh

a very big deal. If

not like

but essentially you’re just an actor

shows up for auditions,” Bain says. “Your career is basically based on other people’s decisions.

be other jobs,”’ she

“You need

that

to get into the pro-

gram.”

And once you do

get

in,

the

It’s

classes aren’t something the stu-

dents can take

They

lightly.

that I’d

besides

words,

ence.

undergraduate degree.

it’s

“I’ve never thought in life,

this. I

my whole

be doing anything else I

love speaking,

I

love

love creating things and

I

day, for an hour, for a minute,” says Lynch. “It’s an enlightening experi-

year course that will give you an

are

But despite this risk, Bain won’t ever give up her dream.

It’s

exciting.”

Lynch, a University of Guelph honours English student, found a love for drama at an early age.

Over the formed in

years.

Lynch has

Little

per-

several theatrical pro-

ductions such as Into the

and

chancy.”

on

building) after a long night of rehearsal

thing in the world.” Like Bain, Ben Lynch, 20, has also developed a passion for the stage. “It’s a weird, wicked art, where you become somebody else for a

love creating

Beryl Bain,

to audi-

tion again to get into the second-

well, there will

main

Oct. 3.

most euphoric feeling I’ve ever experienced. It’s my most favourite

panel of people that you’ve never seen before.”

get in,

Vari Hall (York’s

the

“I

“It’s

(Photo by Lesley Leachman)

York University student Beryl Bain pauses to take a breather at

love being on stage,” she says. “It’s

ployed.”

racking procedure; you had to perform two monologues in front of a

first-year

“The type of film we used wasn’t light, so we had to do all our filming in broad daylight,” he explains. “And one day we wanted to film, but it wasn’t very light out, so we had to change everything around and do it again on a different day.” Also, Lynch did all the film processing by hand, instead of sending it away to a developer, and he

not a consistent career and

a very nerve-

course, you have

some

discovered

very responsive to

1

"The audition was

Lynch

emotions.” all

I

But, as with any first-time experi-

ence,

obstacles that he had to overcome.

is

1

their first

and acting,” says Bain. “It prepares your body, your mind and your

necessarily

and about 70 people auditioned and only 6 people got in,” says Bain.

Most people on

film wouldn’t try risky things, but

movement

you are not guaranteed a job when you go out into the field. “It’s a very demanding profession, which takes a lot of determination, and for what? You don’t

a general audition to get

weird shots that

inten.se,

don’t like to be held back.”

But even with

into the first-year acting course

some

“The program is about training ... you learn confidence and poise, as well as things like

happen is

has

tried out.

acting

today.

“There

develop themselves as

well.

voice

to feel

involves them (the actors) run-

in a comedic, almost cartoonish style chase scene,” says Lynch. “It also

just

portray a character; they to

and

black

in

ning around downtown Guelph

yourself

You

(your character) a real person.

have

“It

in the

program are taught more than

of hard work on the actor’s

lot

lot.”

Furthermore, the students

to

Blinc

entitled

that wanted to make movies and have my own team, he says. I got a couple of my friends together and told them what wanted to do. Then we created some ideas and wrote a bit of a

“But it

company

decided

I

Bain. “It’s such a crazy time, you

ing out.

“Acting looks easy,

laughs

Page 13

2002

15,

Woods

Shop of Horrors

at

Lynch found

During rehearsals for these plays.

be quite

hard ... but you just suck it up. You never feel ready, and you’re totally stressed, but you’ll find everything comes together a few days before (opening night),” explains Lynch. “But

found

you can’t ignore the stress; it’s just something you have to tolerIn addition to theatre. Lynch performed in his first film role in the movie Boys and Girls by Energy

god of film don’t thwart me now!’” With one film under his belt. Lynch hopes to create at least two more short films per year. “In the next few films, I want to

Productions.

exploit the talents of actors

“It’s really

have

to

“Film

is

theatre.

It

was

interesting,

but

“You’re

recently launched his

dollars

your hands,” he

And

go past the

want

to get the

you’re

who are And I

limits.

most intense

shots that you can possibly get,” Lynch says. “Then I want to build

up a repertoire and then ask for

some

grant

money (from

ernment) and do a year

Lynch has

own

in

willing to also

it

on the sixth take, you have to maintain the same about of energy as your first take. It takes a whole lot of dedication and focus.” this.

situa-

middle of a dark-

says. “It was scary. there praying, ‘Dear

“If you’re

to

in the

worth of work

could be very frustrating,” he says.

addition

be quite a tense

room with hundreds of

from

intensely different

this to

tion.

ate.”

In

Centennial C.V.I.

his life to

hectic.

I

hope

the gov-

real film.

my company

Every

will con-

tinue to grow.”

produc-

CSI revamps pub nights a nd hop es for better turnout _

The funk and disco-themed pub on Oct. 3

place.

had a less than expected turnout. Due to lack of advertising and the

success of Survivor,

Sanctuary had less than

its

The

lot

it

is

of times

a

in

it

fun at

different

(events)

is

...

a

cut and

dry.”

Although the CSI encountered a few problems with the students Bash, Biz after the

Andruszkiewicz biggest problem-

said, is

“The

they (students)

up after themselves.” He added, “They need to exercise

can't pick

better

)

common

sense.

It's

not cool

smash a window or tip garbage cans." However, he said the broken window by the cafeteria was

to

an “isolated event."

more

harder to keep

is

it

stations sell-

(Photo by Aimee Wilson)

Conestoga students (left to right) Jeff Schmidt, Catia Lopes, and Beverly Psenak and Jonathan Van Veen attended the funk Sanctuary. the disco themed-pub night on Oct. 3 in students

week everything has been revised.” During the Biz Bash and toga

doing routine checks at the

party the lineups to get drinks were

During the evening nine law and security

administration

were doors entering the school, the Sanctuary doors and throughout All nine workers were the pub. equipped with walkie-talkies. Two police officers were also on duty in the Sanctuary Melissa Henley,

LASA

student,

said.

long.

Some

students

more beer. The

said they waited in line tor

than 45 minutes to get a

CSI eliminated

this

problem by

second-year

adding a third beer cart near the exit doors of the Sanctuary. Now. they have the main bar and two

“Since

beer stations.

.

a

incredibly

last

is

for the sweltering conditions

the Sanctuary, Andruszkiewicz

said, “Part

and the Biz Bash little

“Reality

As

Incorporated (CSI), said, “Part of the reason for the themed nights is to get away from Top 40.” He

because

a rock and hard don’t want to oversell.”

fact is with

of

problem stems we’ve never had

this

from

the fact that

this

wild success before."

He

trying to put

some

added the CSI

is

fans in to ease

some of the

*-t

(CBSA). Tickets will only be sold at the door Also, on Oct. 17 there will be a

you are selling most students prime, before they come,” he said.

packed crowd. Jody Andruszkiewicz, events programmer for Conestoga Students

the toga party

I

track of the people

regular

much

I

ing alcohol

the

to.

added, “People had so

Cftirl^knf Association ir'i A CCGl Student Business and D

stuck between

night in the Sanctuary

recent

J.

Andruszkiewicz said, “It’s a total Catch-22, we do some great beer sales but, at the same time I’m

By CARRIE HOTO

sizzling

humidity.

to students for trip bus Oktoberfest at Queensmount. Buses will leave from residence at 8 and 9 p.m. Tickets are SIO and can be purchased at the CSI office in the Sanctuary.

CLASSIFIED “Ultimate Questions The Lord Jesus Christ is the difference. Learn

Lisa Lefier. a first-year accountwas celebrating her

about

ing student, 19th

birthday

at

Sanctuary.

the

“Actually, almost every song

ognize which said, adding.

is

“I

I

rec-

pretty cool," she

didn’t

think

The next pub in the

night

Sanctuarx’ and

is

is

is

dence. Please send

name and

address to: Bible Study, Zion

I

would." The only thing the CSI could improve on, she said, would

be their numbers. “There lot of people here."

Him

Bible Study by correspon-

not a

on Oct. 31

United Reformed Church,

1238 Main

ON LOR

St. Sheffield.

IZO

e-mail:bible@zurch.on.ca

our website: www.zurch.on.ca

a joint event

between the CSI and Computers

Sign up today. IT’S

FREE!


Page 14

Entertainment

— SPOKE, October 15, 2002

Horoscope

m

Happy

Libra

Birthday Libra

September 24 October 22

Expect many wonderful things from the people around you. Something special from a family member might surprise you. Save any extra money you might receive, something you really want might

become

-

Everything will seem as though falling into place this week.

it's

Enjoy the good times while they last, a surprise could catch you off guard next week. Luckiest day: October 16.

Scorpio October 23

Aries March

21

-

Events taking place

in

your

-

life

cannot be avoided. Any relationships you have with family or a

Someone unpleasant is going to be making things tough for you. The best way to get rid of them is

Luckiest day: October 20.

Sagittarius May

-

November 22 December 21

20

you are considering doing something different with your money make sure you look at the If

source of

wouldn't associate with could say or do something to surprise you.

look

at

them.

Luckiest day: October 16.

M

Capricorn December 22

Gemini 21

-

January 19

June 21

-

have to make a tough decision this week. Make sure both sides of the problem are weighed carefully before you

You

way you

This could change the

income could also be starting. Luckiest day: October 14.

May

are going to

Unusual dreams could be preventing you from a good night's sleep. Make sure you listen to your intuition; it could help you out of a jam. Luckiest day: October 14.

after

the

release

sial

various conditions of

substance abuse and

and lighting on fire. The film was shot over a threeyear period with a hand-held cam-

mental

illness.”

Luckiest day: October 18.

including Hannah, have

turned

the lawsuit in early

society so driven

entitled to a bigger percentage of

what the video has grossed so far. The four men who made the movie

copies?

Is

shows

like Survivor

and

are

The filmmakers claim

the fight-

all

recent graduates of film pro-

grams

the

at

University

University

of

Los

of

ing and violence only shows the

California,

true reality of

what the homeless go through everyday. Rufus Hannah is one of the men

Angeles

men have

Southern California. They got their

to

featured in the video.

He

is

shown

head into a wall and riding a shopping cart down a steep hill. San Diego police did not agree that these were normal hardships homeless men faced and went ahead and charged the four produc-

ramming

his

ers of the movie.

do

movie,

reality entertainment thanks to

many

300,000 copies to people ks far away as Europe at a cost of $20.

to

home-

the

in

October and think they should be

Jackass?

makers allegedly paid the homeless men who perform the stunts and even had them sign a consent form. But many homeless charities feel the movie is cruel and exploits the homeless men performing the

men shown

They began

on

said to a local tel-

then has the video sold so

Why

was being sold through the on their Web site. The video that was released in the summer has already sold more than

the

Hannah

around and are suing the four producers over the profits of the film.

for the Homeless

Internet

of Las Vegas and the film-

enticed,”

less

U.S. National Coalition

era and

The movie was made on

were investigating a on the film where one of the bums broke his ankle and an ambulance was called. “We were never forced to do anything, but we were fight

Ironically, several of the

Donald Whitehead,

television

streets

he allegedly offered

Hannah and another homeless man, Donald Brennan, $25,000 each to

evision station.

into steel doors, pulling their

their hair

after

tice,

Authorities

“These men are being forced to do things under

fighting each other, running headfirst

Donald Whitehead,

refuse to co-operate with police.

men

video that shows homeless

ill-

from the U.S. National Coalition for the Homeless.

of their

stunts.

choose.

McPherson, who faces the same

and

University

of

idea after seeing violent fights

between men

living

on the

streets

Will there be a Bumfights

Not

likely,

Two?

but this film shows just

how far filmmakers will go when shooting a reality-based movie. What would be a good film is one based on this ordeal and why 300,000 people bought copies of Bumfights.

Aquarius V

Cancer -

faces a charge of obstruction of jus-

said

ness,”

three-month investigation by

“The men are being forced

June 22

charges as his three friends, also

substance abuse and mental

teeth out with pliers

Someone who you normally

A new

things under various conditions of

video Bumfights; A Cause For Concern. They also have a Web site that features clips of the controver-

loved one could be intensifying.

April 20

after a

police

you agree with them. Luckiest day: October 18.

to think

Taurus

homeless men to fight Zachary Bubeck, 24, Daniel J. Tanner, 21, Micheal J. Slyman, 21, and Ryan McPherson were charged

on camera.

November 21

April 18

Bv JASON NOE Eour young men from Las Vegas were charged on Sept. 26 with conspiracy to solicit and assault with deadly force after allegedly paying

available later on.

long-term effects.

Filmmakers charged with staging fights between homeless to sell videos

Week of October 15-20

!?

January 20 February 18

^

it

July 22

You are in-store for a good week. Family and friends are going to be a big part of your life this week. Good times will be coming from

Confusion about finances may make you upset. You can avoid any problems by making sure you don't spend your money frivolously. Luckiest day: October 20.

everyone.

LETS TALK ABOUT

»

Pisces

Luckiest day: October 17.

February 20 March 20

Leo 1

1

July 23

-

August 22

Don't spend any

have

to.

An

money you

don't

unexpected surprise

may be

seeking your one of their probyour sugar-coat Don't lems. answers, tell them what you think.

People

advice to

settle

Luckiest day: October 17.

could leave you scrambling for funds.

Luckiest day: October 17.

Make

1

Virgo

^

August 23 September 23

you what you have sure

stay focused to

Daniel Roth

T

COULD START EVERY SENTENCE YOU NEVER KNEW THAT MEMORIES CAN BE GREAT, BUT WHEN THEY'RE NOT... THE BEAT GOES ON. UNLOAD YOUR MEMORIES.

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Sports

SPOKE, October

15,

2002

— Page 15

Condors look towards playoffs By NICK HORTON

Johnstone added he expected the

wanting to play harder, they

game

out the better players.

looking

is

really, really well,”

at the

room

soccer resulting in a l-O win over George Brown College Oct. “We capitalized on our chance,

one goal decides a game ... we did it as a team, not just one player,”

game

passing

George Brown catch up with.

never was able to

game

The

the

the

“We have guys everywhere, (all over Ontario) our whole team is balanced ... Some guys go into games

“We we had.

playing

Johnstone,

can’t

DOYLE

K.

The Toronto Raptors

are

fin-

ished lurking in Waterloo.

The ing to

NBA

camp

at

team

RIM

Park from Oct.

now

increasing with the

fessed.

He acknowledges that

going,

even

come back

drive

in

to visit

Association's

Johnstone said.

The Condors next home game Fanshawe Falcons.

alternates

Ashleigh

regular

not

in

and

one

ol

eight

men, two

woman,

of the annual tournament since

women's team

winners were Georgian. Humber and Boreal colleges placing first,

ond and third respectively. lumber College took the men V)id w itli a two-day score ot 6 5

« 1

World Championships,

year

the

at

will

Murray should

step into the

power-forward position. His big Davis

frame

will take pressure off

down

low, letting him bang with

the big boys.

At point guard, the Raps will go again. Williams Alvin with Williams is also coming off surgery, but

is

a strong player

who

should be back in form.

If

his

won

since

1

1

s

Pete. is finally

own

Carter went

in

down

com-

NBA.

the

last sea-

son, the Raptors looked to him to pick up the slack. And he found Peterson is gaining his touch. confidence in his 3-point shooting ability, which is an area the Raps

dribble, proving he

is

a legitimate

scoring threat.

The

JunkYard

Dog,

Jerome

made

a draft-day trade to

Lindsey Hunter. Hunter is a who knows what it takes to win and should help lead the team into the playoffs. Hunter gives Wilkens another option off the bench, and could play pointguard with Alvin Williams moving over to shooting guard. The Raptors are a middle of the pack team right now, and their playoff positioning will depend on the knee of Vince

player

Carter.

Williams will be back for another season in Toronto. His energy off the bench is always needed.

If he is healthy for the whole season, and dominates a game the way he can, the Raps may be able

Williams goes to the glass hard,

to

and his hustle

is

Wilkens will more than likely keep Williams on the bench to

make a run deep However,

incredible.

if

integrate Carter into the offence, it

will be a long year in Toronto.

you could save

someone’s

life...

Would you help? In just

tournament,

one

hour, you could save as

many as

four lives.

blood every 56 daysot ever/ day.

As a blood donor, you're eligible to give blood every minute yet someone in Canada needs

985.

Please help by giving blood.

Lacey teceivt^-^

Invitational held

Peterborough on Sept. 6 was won by Niagara's men’s team and

For clinic information, call: 1.888-871-7201 CANADIA N BLOOD SERVICES

1

in

Georgian's women's team.

The Durham Golf

Invitational

Lakeridge Links on Sept. 24 produced a men s team win for at

Humber and another victory for Georgian's women. Humber. Durham and Georgian colleges proved to be superior this year, placing at all ot the

tournaments.

in the East.

the Raptors can’t re-

one hour of your time

Conestoga also participated in two other golf tournaments during their month-long season. Fleming's Sanford Sir

Kawartha Golf

De Rooy.

997. This year's

which shouldn’t hurt the

6’ 7”

Conestoga's Tyler Smith placed 5th. but as a team the college has

Assistant coach Tony Martin is proud of De Rooy's etlort and tor the courage it took to play tor this year's team. Women's golf has been a part

1

this

into

1

Falls.

five

again

and

will be looking for help. Peterson can also drive or shoot off the

flies high.

The Raptors lost back-up point guard Chris Childs in the off-season, but

When

(Internet photo)

at a torrid

bring in

AD

Morris Peterson

1

2 by Niagara

game, and go with the and Raptor

to excite his club

Mo

ing

were Jim Currie ol Humber with 46 and for the women. Kim a Ferguson of Georgian with a 59.

The event was hosted Irom

start the

pace, only distribute the ball to

Vince,

Davis

role

last

by Niagara with 625 and Durham with 636. Individual winners this year

annual

through played competing in all season, proving his the team. Williams

need to score

will not

load anymore for the

centre

first

key to Raptors’ success Williams

Vince Carter

the

Last

The team consisted

Jamie Scott takes a free kick for the Conestoga Condors in the half of a soccer game against George Brown College on Oct. 1

points, followed

golf championship.

players,

(Photo by Nick Horton)

is

16 at 4:30 p.m. against the

Oct.

a close

to

Legends Course

it,

it,”

that

Davis will be helped immensely by the acquisition of Lamond Murray in the off-season. The

the Ontario College

Athletic

Niagara

coaching

team season

at

Oct.

knowledge

which should mean he already be in game shape.

Conestoga's golf team put forth another valiant effort this year

at

the

Antonio

the

off

By LAURIE VANDENHOFF

30- to

And

Raptors because they are in the smaller East. Davis is also coming

the Raptors.

including

has been

Davis will more than likely step

stronger than ever. The key to Carter’s success will

College

life

shot or his above the rim

his back.

Vince Carter is coming off of a shortened season after having knee surgery, but hopes to be back

Sept.

and

it,

has emerged over the past couple of season as the leader of the Raptors. Emotionally and physically, TDavis has put this team on

year,

comes

still

fans everywhere.

Also gone from last year are Keon Clark and Chris Childs. These absences should not, how-

Golf

past

him.

82 games

into

hamper

that

the

dedication to

his back.

ever,

in

keep have

jump

Raptors.

the

from a disc problem

players

the

is

it

to

Carter wilLnot have to carry the

core of his team back, including superstar Vince Carter, Antonio Davis, Alvin Williams and Morris Peterson. Wilkins will miss bigsuffering

him

“A big chunk of my watching

it

JYD

offensive

is

love

injuries all year,

upcoming

man Hakeem Olajuwon who

1

highlight reel dunks from Carter.

is

season approaching.

Coach Lenny Wilkens has

...

he has a healthy knee to explode off of, fans may be in for more

I

Although practices were

6.

closed to the public, excitement

that

be to get back into the swing of Carter is a player the offence. who can dominate with his quick heroics.

held their train-

do

players

Carter, Davis, Williams By JAMES

a

year,” Johnstone con-

taken up by this sport, playing

Machado commented on

The score should have

I

more every

played for him

balance.

team’s experience.

said

in the

with experience comes suecess and

score of the

didn’t convert on chances

been

of Oct.

other sports team,

throughout the match.

6-0,”

ties as

Fanshawe Falcons.

As with any

dommen’s team showed

inance the

two

west division, two points behind

that

at all rellect the

did not

vegetate,

second place

As

at the col-

Johnstone Jokes he was only when he started coaching. “Other people at 55 go home and

loose.”

sit in

years of coaching

college level.

at the

lege,

They

1

sociology professor here eight

7.

Conestoga played a hard tack-

coaches

need

little

three losses, and

scored the game’s only goal. ling, fast-paced

is

The Condors have four wins,

who

Machado,

“We

improvement.

for

to prove,” he said.

Johnstone’s 3

more structure on defence, sometimes our defending is a little

a

I

Shannon

skillful

soccer, Johnstone admits there

tight controlled

something

come

They have

experience set him apart from other

he said.

Although the team played

The team played

first

half,

playoffs this year.

said

be close, but after the

he thought they were going to win by several goals. “We played

The Conestoga men’s outdoor soccer team led by veteran coach

Geoff Johnstone

to

toasts.

Blood.

It's

in

you

to give.


Page 16

SPOKE, October

15,

2002

Oktoberfest ist wunderbar! Join 2,000 other students as they enjoy the spirit of Gemuetlichkeit at

Queensmount Arena

over 500 tickets already

now

sold!!!

at the CSI Office or at oktoberfest. ca for Conestogaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest event

$10

tickets are

on

sale

Doors open at 8:30pm

Rememher

to bring proper ID

You must be 19+

to attend this event

Buses from residence are available


Digital Edition - October 15, 2002