Page 7

-News

— Page 7

SPOKE, September 23, 2002

Night school booming Best kept secret at college, says Con-Ed director By LAURIE VANDENHOFF

number of Over

The hands on

the clock arc about

nine and

reach

to

Doon

And

campus.

the wall

it’s

Welcome

not.

actually

for everybody,” said Stewart.

Numbers can only be expected

The

faint

of

ebrating

are

sound of music

logue

travels

beginning of their

courses and programs to entice

new “I

year with a

toga

hours,

new

Stewart, the director of continuing at Conestoga College. “The concentration is often on the full-time day programming.” But with more than 20,000 part-

education

time students and only 5,000 time students,

more people do not

“We

probably

\ea-vo

fx*\\-i\vT-vc

and the cafeterias close at 4 p.m., it does not mean the day is done. But as Stewart pointed out, sometimes you cannot tell if it’s 7 a.m. or 5 p.m. because of all the students

in

school

the

get

for sup-

ignited

different

in

it’s

from people who call in and propose an idea. Then it’s up to Stewart and his colleagues to decide if they want However,

Stewart said in a recent interview. ».Vvc-

community

to give the course a chance.

the best kept secret at the college,” A.

if you don’t, no one is going to read it.” But with courses being removed there is always room for improvement. That’s why the college

ways,” said Stewart. Usually

full-

notice the action

is

the

port and ideas.

the school generates at night.

"Continuing education

like

stuff in the Sears catalogue,”

looks to the

hard to believe

it’s

much

consider this

Stewart said, “because

Dave

said

students.

Sears catalogue, you have to put

of activity that occurs during

evening

the

published.

This year the college added, 52

Meanwhile, steps away, there are others just getting their fall semester under way. A lot of people do not realize the level

is

Students are cel-

halls.

the

new courses and programs that added each time a new cata-

party.

school

to

grow, especially with the number

careers.

uing education.

through the

semester

1

world of contin-

to the

fall

showing nearly 2,000 registrations. “With more than 1,000 courses, there has to be something in there

not your average twcntysomethings first

part-time

in

steadily with last year’s

it

reads 9 p.m. and the.se students are

preparing for their

lot.

number

programs has grown

courses and

at the

while

appears to be a normal day,

The clock on

of students enrolling

students liave

already filled the classrooms

cars in the parking

the last 10 years, the

and the

if it’s

not doing well,

w\\\ t>e removedl. According to Stewart,

it

one out of

every 10 courses is cancelled. Usually it is because the course or

program did not generate enough interest and not enough people registered.

The

college requires a mini-

(Photo by Laurie Vandenhoff)

almost as full at night as it is during the The parking lot at day. With 22,000 part-time students attending the college throughout the year, sometimes it’s hard to tefi what time of day it is because of all the traffic. 10 days or less of the start date, they be no shortage in the various promum of 12 students per class. may not receive a confirmation letter grams you can complete. But with courses like advanced until after the first class begins. While many of this semester’s prolog cabin building and personal For more details check this grams have already begun, there are training specialist or programs

Conestoga College’s Doon campus

childhood education administration and register practical nurse upgrading there should

like

early

still

plenty of courses that begin in

October or November. However, if students register with

as

one of

year

first

1 1

in

is

making her

or not, paying fees at the college level is a reality. But instead of bemoaning the fact that you have to pay fees,

Like

females entering

woodworking

at

resident intends to prove that sex

when

it

comes

and hammers. Connors discovered her in

to

is

interest

Grade 9. She continued studying woodworking, becoming one of

(Photo by Blake Gall)

in

the only females to complete all the

available classes.

a clockmaker,

computer person,

I

can't

sit

down,” she adds.

While building sets at Theatre in Hamilton for Jesus Christ Superstar, Connors realized cabinet-making was her specific Aquarius

field

of choice.

So will being a female make the program more difficult? Connors quickly replies, “No!” She says that the males in her class have been very accepting of her. There are occasional comments like. “Are you sure you know what you are doing?” or “Wow, there

s

a girl in

here,” but overall the ridiculing

“Not

of Connors, 19, Crystal Hamilton, is one of 11 females enrolled in first-year woodworking at Conestoga College.

is,

that bad.”

Mark Brahmer, program

what

certain fees are

all

.

r

.

is

co-ordi-

best of

But

The

its abilities.

is just a fraction of what the fee pays for. biggest and most valuable aspect of the association fee

staffing

lege and across Ontario.

definitely

inspired her career choice. “I’m not

a

better to understand

.

tak-

ing a mandatory technology course

Connors says her family

it's

course there are other fees you pay on t an important fee because it pays for your education. Of students should pay most attention to is the Conestoga statement you receive every May and June, but the fee that Students Inc. Association Fee. value and students should know what it pays tor. This fee, $85 for the 2002-03 academic year, has incredible student association. It pays for five full-time staff Primarily, the association fee pays for the operations of the programmer and front desk events assistant, executive manager, salaries - president, general by CS the vice-presidents and the part-time staff employed It also pays for the honourariums of It s the staff ot an CSI. like organization not-for-profit even a work, Any organization needs staff to make it always stnvits constituents. In this case, the CSI is ser% e better grow to and function it to allows that oraanization e its students to the sei^ to CSI the of mandate the it is ing to grow so that it can better service its students. In fact, Tuition

saws

woodworking when she was

The daughter of

B-wing of Doon campus.

it

about.

Conestoga College. As a female in a male-dominated program the 19-year-old Hamilton not an issue

in the

Fees are important

By BLAKE GALL Crystal Connors

semester’s catalogue available at the continuing education wicket

CSI advertisement

Going against the grain mark

is

nator, says the program has never had such a high percentage of

females enrolled. In past years, 10 per cent was the standard, but this year

it

is

slightly higher.

Connors intends

to

two-year program but

complete the is undecided

whether or not she will continue with the technology courses and co-op placement. She encourages other females

woodworking *to purcareer. “If it's what you

interested in

sue the

Conestoga Students

its

student

it.

college students

would not have a

^

..^ to the administration of Conestoga College .

u

at the

co

i

-

u issue ^ on such -

fomm

secondary’ education.

Of course,

the exciting part of the association fee

entertainment during the day.

It

mean

there

is

not value in

it

is

the events

is

it

pays

for. It

J r pays for the Pond Party and the li\e

CSI handbook amongst other things. most important fee a student will ever pay. Yes.

helps pay for the

Behind tuition, that association fee

.

.

it

is

,

is

well

but that a student will not participate in all aspecLs the fee covers,

does

the

not

have to be.

body

pays for student representation

to air their concerns and have their voice heard. Alliance. I found the expenence invaluable. Aside from Student As a former executive member of the College Student Alliance is a highly respected organization College the understand to came I my personal experiences. only did I speak on behalf of my students. I S{»ke within Ontario. When I spoke, politicians listened because not associations that were not a part of the College student those that learned also I on behalf of all college students. didn't know many of the issue surrounding postStudent Alliance had more difficulties dealing with politicians or

without

end," she says.

“I

it

rights and responsibilities. as tuition financial aid, classroom standards and student Alliance, an organization that represents all Ontano Provincially, the CSI is a member of the College Student This lobbying is important for students because issues. same the on government college students to the Ontario

below the provincial average. Sometimes

simply reply.

that .

Inc. represents

enjoy then just go through with it and everything will work out in the

Ask Connors if she is confident in her own abilities and she will

is

for the students

who pay

S85. but

it.

-

Jody Andruszkiewicz events programmer/co-ordinator

CSI

it

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