Page 1

1

CSI introduces new paid position

Sushi bar review delivers raw facts

Recent Conestoga graduate accepts the challenge.

Waterloo restaurant a welcome

is

alternative for your

ECE

holds awards banquet Conestoga college students honoured welcome back party.

next dining

experience.

— No.

34th Year

Monday, September 23 2002

at

17

Applied arts dean bids farewell to

Conestoga

By LISA HILLER Pat St. John, Conestoga’s current

vice-president of corporate training

and public

relations, is leaving the

college after five years of service,

having accepted a job as president

and CEO of Shad International. But deciding to accept the job was a tough decision. “Conestoga College is amazing,”

John

St.

said.

“And John

(college president)

is

Tibbits

a wonderful

mentor.” St.

(Photo by Carrie Hoto)

Bronwen Davis

Anderson, 19, and Ashley Pearson, 19, show pub night held in the Sanctuary on Sept. 12.

to right), 19, Kari

(left

togas at Conestoga’s

first

off their

More

than

400 toga-clad students

packed into the sweltering sanctuary

for

Students

Conestoga

a

Jody Andruszkiewicz, programmer/events co-ordinator, said the full house was beyond his “wildest

430 people

He

just

“When

added,

appeared,

it

was

great.”

Approximately 50 per cent of the students in

attendance showed up

striped, checkered, floral,

in

Hawaiian

and traditional white togas. Andruszkiewicz said, “The best part about a toga party is that people always

remember

it,

hand.”

because

where else are you going

to see

full of energy dancing under laughing and simply

The room was with

Incorporated themed event.

expectations.”

500 people wallcing around in bed sheets?” He added, “The words college and toga party go hand-in-

students

strobe lights,

having a great time. Carly Shepherd, a

first-year

keting student, said, “It

mar-

was awe-

some.” She added the reason she didn’t wear a toga was because, “It’s on my bed at home. I decided to sleep in

it

rather than

wear

it.”

two Walk Safe students were in attendance to walk students back to residence. “This is the first one (pub night) well,

to

check

it

But according to Andrea Leis, whose son attended a Shad Valley

Brunswick in 1999, Shad is much more than a think tank for talented minds.

“You got a sense

“The program exercises that aren’t used or

government sponsors. St. John possesses all of these. “It was quite an honour” St. John said of being chosen from many applicants. “I took a look at what they wanted and saw that my background really fits with Shad,” he

University

adding he believes his vast

and diversity in employment what Shad was looking for. St. John starts his new job on

skills

that there

was a

well-rounded group,” Leis said. She noted that some students were strong in artistic areas as opposed to, strong in math and science.

included private sector experience, experience in the education system, marketing experience, and an understanding of working with

said,

New

session at the University of

skills

exposed

school,” she said. Leis’s son, David,

in

now

in 'the

computer science program

month in New in a good way.

“We had

high

at the

Waterloo, said his Brunswick was busy of seminars and lec-

lots

on the

tures, as well as field trips

weekends.” Leis said

it

gave him a taste of life was going to be

what university like.

His

mom would definitely recom-

fit

dent of the organization.

Sept. 30.

because of

of his top priorities will be to get the message out about Shad to

“The quality and range of people who spoke to the students was amazing.” Leis said. “There were

There were no problems with dents.

stu-

“Our students are incredibly Andruszkiewicz

well-behaved,”

night

had

Job qualifications cited by Shad

interests.

in about 10 years to have this turnout,” said Jon Olinski, presi-

he attended because of the unique theme and said, “I heard there was going to be a lot of peoI

as a candidate last spring.

years.

.

police foundations students checking IDs and working at the door.

said.

ple there so

they could submit his

if

Current president and CEO is Jack Pal, who has been with Shad for 1

There were nine law and securiadministration (LASA) and

Lance Reid, a second-year computer programming analyst smdent, said

the college

He came to know about Shad when an executive search firm name

ty

As

at

asked him

CSI toga party wraps students in fun By CA.R»IE HOTO

John has thoroughly enjoyed

work

his

However, most Canadian students' fees are subsidized by sponsors. Students can apply in January and should know if they’ve been accepted by May. Campuses are usually chosen in terms of distance from an individual’s hometown so he or she can learn about a different place. Students are also grouped according to personality and common

Other CSI events include

Monday

Tuesday movies and Thursday pub football,

night nights.

All events are held in the Sanctuary.

out.”

One

more students. Shad is a partnership, begun

in

focuses on leadership, innovation

done

and entrepreneurship. According to St. John, the focal point of what the organization does is the one-month Shad Valley pro-

said.

that hosts students at 10 uni-

campuses in Canada and Great Britain. There students work on projects important to Canada versity

up with ideas to help

and come solve problems

in

that,

touch

participants

with

other

each

and

exchange ideas through the Internet and the Shad .Alumni Association, St. John said.

The Shad experience

isn’t

all

Look out below! free dive onto Jeff Stemmier, 21, 'sstin Falconer, 21, a management studies student, got to take a 9. Jr defeating the management studies student at a sumo wrestling event on Sept.

The

fit

"It

a

modem

was not

situation." she

but so

typical,

fun."

Leis and her son heard about Shad through other parents, guidance counsellors at school, and

Shad

representatives, however. St.

John wants

to

make

sure every stu-

dent at ever)' high school

about to

knows

it.

include

program campuses in

to increase the

more

Canada and Great Britain and increase the annual number of participants

from 475

to

900 over

the

next four years.

“Shad gets thousands of applicaN early, we want to ha\ e more

tions

host

campuses

to

accommodate

these students." he said.

"We

compe-

for

national

ha\e to sohe the

fact

that

there are students that don't hear

awards. SI. 700

to

Valley projects are sub-

fall

titions.

to

“Men were salsa and a Greek play was

different.

dancing,

compete

and fun Canada's

trips

Wonderland, as well as

And Shad

offer.

According to St. John, current Shad president Jack Pal is working on getting a campus in Quebec. St. John said Shad needs new strategies to become better known.

work. There are pub to excursions

mitted

has to

Leis noted the closing talent show

was

He wants

in this country.

have a chance to do a work term with one of Shad's sponsoring companies. Students are encouraged to stayAfter

all it

amazing and unique kids and the program really blew open what they could do.” there

in 1980,

Shad Valley program

the

really

between the governments, universities and business industry in Canada. It is an organization meant to challenge high achievers in Grades 11 and 12 and

Waterloo

gram

(Photo by Aimee Wilson)

mend

program costs between and S2.250 per student.

about us." he said. “E\er) student should know about Shad."


News

— SPOKE, September 23, 2002

Page 2

CBS A class

reps

gain experience By ANDREA

SMITH

R.

time you put up posters, raise a of money,

you

If

like to get involved, learn

responsibility and

work

in a friend-

fun atmosphere than you should

ly,

think about

becoming

a class repre-

sentative

for

the

Conestoga

Business Student Association.

Becoming

a class representative

for the association

CBSA,

means

known

as the

organizing

and

working for biz bashes, reporting issues your class section needs addressed to the CBSA and relying issues the CBSA has to your class section. You need to be a business or information technology student

at the biz

chocolates and

sell

bashes you will earn a

points. At the end of the year, whoever has earned the most points will win a Last year first prize was a prize. 27-inch colour television. Other

amount of

certain

perks include free pizza once a

month

rep meetings and a

at class

end of the ..year can be put on your resume if you attend more than 75 per cent of certificate at the that

the rep meetings.

“Anyone can come out and ticipate

the

in

school issues.”

ricular events, fundraising, creating

class rep. First,

a business student yearbook, put-

teacher and

together a semi

ting

formal and

organizing an awards banquet

at

end of the year are also some

the

duties. "I

became a

wanted

class rep because

to get involved,” said

I

form.

rep

becoming a enrich the whole

will

out

a

volunteer visit

the

Room 1D14-D

and

in

an executive and third

talk to

the Web site at www.cbsa.on.ca and send an e-mail.

Some

for

think

on

voting

By TORI SUTTON Conestoga employees are being

school

encouraged

to sharpen their pencils

and nominate

next year and attending rep appre-

leagues for the annual

ciation nights.

Recognition Awards. The awards are given out to up to 10 full-time employees of the college, and are divided into customer

"We want the students to stand that we are here for said

Adam

underthem," president of

Duce,

to

have a fun

service,

their outstanding col-

all

first-year journalism students,

Doon campus.

acknowledge those who

to

meets every other

Thursday at 4:30 p.m. The first meeting was held on Sept. 12. “Thursdays have always been a convenient time to meet in the past,” said Duce. “But we will plan a better time if needed.

We

don’t

want the CBSA to interfere with work and have students skip school.”

There are many perks to look forward to if you become a class representative. For example, every

deserving,” said Croft. In order for the selection committo make informed decisions,

tee

employees should be as thorough possible

as

when

filling

out the

Nomination forms were attached

year the program has been running,

spirit categories.

in the fields they

above what is expected of them in their positions. “Employees should put some thought into who around them is tions

nomination form. Croft said. Although this is only the third

some experience

CBSA

gram

and team

innovation, student

are interested in.”

Employee

community involvement,

atmosphere and give the students

The

the

employee recognition awards

issues, electing the executive for

CBSA. “We want

Christina Bramburger,

enjoy the

have made significant contribu-

responsibilities of a class

include

(left), Connie Coggan and warm weather on Sept. 14 at

Jason Smith

College seeking nominations

school experience.”

rep

Soakin’ up the September sun

visit

Linda

should be more than just classes class

fill

Second, you can

CBSA office

grammer/analyst program. “School

I

par-

said

There are three ways to become a you can talk to your

Varga, 31, of the computer pro-

and homework.

meetings,”

Duce. “But only reps can vote on

be a voting class representative. Putting up posters of extra-cur-

to

lot

work

to

a

memo

life

sent to

all

full-time

employees and can be submitted until

Sept.

27.

Extra nomination

fornis are available

from the human

resources department. “Certainly

it

is

our goal to have

employees aware of the awards to nominate worthy colleagues,” said Debra Croft, director of human resources at Conestoga. “We want to recognize those who have gone above and beyond.”

The

college established the pro-

the

number of award winners

seems to be rising - only three employees received the awards the first year, while five were acknowledged

in

2001.

Winners awards

will

at the

receive

their

Guild Reception in

November, a gathering to hand out employee awards. Along with the Employee Recognition Awards, awards are given out to long-serving employees and those who are retiring.

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News

SPOKE, September

23,

2002

— Page 3

.0J

New CSI

position

opens up event possibilities By JULIANNA KERR

planning between their studies,

Andruszkiewicz said he has had

Conestoga Students

new

years of student leadership, and

Inc. created

that “I

why he got the job. know students,” he said.

May.

and no one could be happier than

a

position last

I'ull-tinie

guy who fills those shoes. Andruszkiewicz is the organization’s events program-

His involvement has included

the

four years with the recreation pro-

.lody

He

mer.

is

gram

fresh out of the jour-

nalism program

CSI

friends in the

and volunteers.

new

his

athletic is

council,

paid to party for a living,” he said.

developed a

“The more serious description

ning.

is

co-ordinate the planning and

work

the behind-the-scenes

I

to

to

fall

Doon used elected

students

Andruszkiewicz

that presented

to party for

I

a

ming.

living.”

A.ndruszhieMficT.y

events organizer

disappointed -witVi line quality of events at Conestoga.

“Having “It’s

“So

said.

work

with school,” he of events got put by

lots

the wayside.

Or

they were

down-

who

loaded onto one ended up doing really poorly student

Andruszkiewicz was executive vice-president of the CSI last

He

programmer

posi-

November or December. Current CSI president

tion

came about

last

Jon Olinski and Andruszkiewicz had been comparing Conestoga’s student union to those of other

in plac*e

to

provide them with

the opportunities to have a

time.

And he

The events programmer works with the vice-president of student activities. Jay Mielke. “It’s

always

schools.

“Every other student union has this full-time staff position,” he

ideas guy.

“So last year. I suggested we create one and we all thought it was a great idea." said.

Olinski said the events programmer position was a long time in

coming. really

needed someone

solely responsible for that area,”

he said. “We're looking at running a lot more events this year and we have a much fuller calendar than

we have had Olinski

said

having

position ensures that

all

this

paid

events on

the calendar will actually occur.

team

a

said.

effort,”

“Jay’s the

We bounce ideas off each other. We’re working for the same thing - making sure students have a great time.” For Andruszkiewicz, it doesn’t get

much

better than this.

“There are days I cannot believe I get paid to do this,” he said. “This is the most amazing job I could ever have right out of college.’

He

said he’ll be around for a long

time to

come, and he's always up

encourage students to come I encourage

out to every' event and

them to come talk is always open."

to

me.

My

SiaKOrSIME

WHEN YOU

/mmmm

He

By IZABELA ZARZYCKA

said he will try financial help

The Ontario Student Assistance is not satisfying some stu-

Program

him

as

is

designed so students from lowerincome families can still get post-

secondary educations. The

OSAP

site for

Web

states that this pro-

“promote equality of opportunity for post-secondary

gram

will

same way he

is

will write a

not

is

who OSAP.

not the only student

with

satisfied

Fehmida Malik, a

third-year busi-

ness-accounting student, also had some complaints about the program. She found that the forms to fill

out were too lengthy and

some

were confusing.

parts

Fast year

education.”

treats

door

0? HEART AN0STT«)K1

FOUNDATX>N

She wishes there was a knowledgeable person that you could go to SO he or she could look at the

OSAP overpaid her and OSAP has

year she said that

first

year she applied for

OSAP she

handed in the form to be checked and the lady that took the form told her that it was fine. But she received the form back because it was filled with mistakes. Julie Cleaves, 20, a second-year student in general business, found some parts of the form lengthy. She

believes that

OSAP should help out

year general business student who did not want his last name used, disagrees

this

However, nothing has changed on her form from last

a wide range of people and also

with this statement.

year.

levels.

However, Matt, a

He found

first

OSAP

that

is

underpaid

her.

should minimize the requirement

not fair to

students and that there is no evidence of equality. Matt applied for all

OSAP,

many

just like

students at

Conestoga College, thinking that the government would help him with his studies. Well he was wrong. He said that the amount that he was offered from OSAP “was a slap in the face.”

His family does not have enough to put Matt through college

TW nag ii save International Student Identity Access Student Class

I

OSAP

and

gave him a measly Save

I

He decided not to take that money and try somehow to pay for school and residence out of his own

$200.

OSAP

pocket.

Airfares’" for

35% on economy class

point-to-point tickets

with VIA Rail

Save

25% on Greyhound

point-to-point tickets

did not cover his

any other expenses, he adding that he “saved up for

Canada and

around the world

money

said,

college

gone.”

going

all

He

and now it is all does not know what he is

my

life

do next

to

looked

year.

owns

Save on

attractions, hostels,

and much more

at

I

Plus your ISIC features the ISIConnect

phone card

service, including discounted

long distance, voicemail, email, online safe,

and an emergency help

line.

and income and

a business

that

Matt.

He wishes

that

OSAP

would look more at the student s income and not mostly at the parents'.

He

for their

said lots of students pay

own

education with some

help from their parents. Matt suggested that the assistance program

tfvuubiAr»>of

buying candy.

form and catch mistakes. In the

Matt

OSAP,

OSAP

letter.

dents at Conestoga College.

The program, known

the

if

said she has to

students

is unfair:

again next year and

to

«w •

WEAKNESS

system

not the family's income, according

Stfi imoKdlalf medHral auroUoo

SEE1HEM.

OSAP

OSAP

a

gum and candy on Sept. 13. Gayler mean lots of students

stock the shelves everyday since longer lineups at the store

Matt’s father

Students won’t have to cram event

lECOGIIZEM

Upping the candy quota clerk, restocks the

tuition or

for a chat. “I

in the past.”

good

isn’t alone.

Andruszkiewicz

“We

staff

is

be the guy

said the idea to create the

full-time events

full-time

Andruszkiewicz said he loves being able to spend time with students. He wants them to see that student life is fun, and he wants to

in

class.”

year.

this

ensures that the going to get done, that events are going to be put on, and that students are going to get the best bang for their buck,” he said.

member

hard to balance a

really

full-time job

person who’s

that

going to be there from the time the event starts until the time it finishes. And you need that person there before and after.” Since all students have to pay fees, Andruszkiewicz said he wants to make sure they are not

(of

CSI

(Photo by Julie Graham)

Tannis Gayler, a bookstore

“You need

get paid

Jody

really

is

accountable for events program-

some problems.

that

is

it

important to have one person be

said

“The fun description

my job)

got a love

I

Andruszkiewicz said

to

com-

often required a full-time

“And

for this.”

Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI). These were not paid positions, but mitment.

taste for events plan-

ence,” he said. at

last

really got that

all

of our events.”

Planning of events

was

it

“As executive vice-president I hands-on experi-

all

for

but

year with the CSI that he really

get

I

staff

In his first years at

Conestoga, he worked with the

Job has two descriptions.

“The fun description

program co-

a

ed scheduling and overseeing

office.

Andruszkiewicz said

As

ordinator, his duties there includ-

among

thrilled to take his place

as a student at the University

of Waterloo.

Doon. and

at

is

should

visit the

house and see the

style of living of the family.

University

Shops Plaza

170 University Ave. West 886-OAOO

University of Guelph University Centre

763-1660

Card

(ISIC)

<fNT SrUOfNT

:


Page 4

Commentary

— SPOKE, September 23, 2002

HAVE

Patients should

have

TOLb you

I

LATELY HOW MUCH I LOVE you?

right to die

pain-free The

recent study to

come

out of the University of Toronto that sug-

amounts of nar-

gests doctors could provide patients with unrestricted

cotics or sedatives to relieve pain, even if these drugs help to bring

death,

is

many

causing concent on

Peter Singer, director of the Joint Centre on Bioethics at the

says the goal

make

to

is

on

fronts.

U

of T,

sure no person dies in pain.

Critics believe this could be a step towards euthanasia

-

the bringing

about of a gentle death for a person suffering from a painful, incurable disease, also a criminal offence in Canada.

But there

is

a difference

between relieving pain and encouraging

death.

The proposed

ideas indicate that doctors

and show they have the intent

must keep records of doses

to relieve suffering, not

encourage death,

with the drugs they prescribe.

Doctors should be able to ease the suffering of dying patients under the assumption that they are doing it'for palliative reasons.

The guidelines suggest pre-emptive dosing to prevent pain and sufis not euthanasia, but palliative care - helping to reduce pain and

fering

suffering as a result of a terminal disease or illness.

Singer says doctors have under-treated pain in the past for fear of

being prosecuted for euthanasia, but the 22,000

who

die in

Canada

each year should be able to die pain-free, according to Singer.

As long

as a doctor’s intent

is

palliative care

and good records of

doses are kept, they should be unafraid to treat pain properly.

Who

TV

Is

taking over our lives?

wouldn’t want to die pain-free? In

some

cases, drugs might be used as a preventative in anticipation

of pain, as well as giving continuous intravenous injections until a

from an

patient dies

illness, called

terminal sedation.

There are several advantages to letting doctors relieve the dying of pain. Patients may be able to enjoy their last moments because of the pain relief medicine, and the pain family and friends feel might be eased as a result of their loved one’s decreased suffering. However, disadvantages include euthanasia, when an intended or

unintended death occurs.

If

such a death were to occur, the family

Margaret Somerville, director of the McGill Centre for Medicine, Law in Montreal, criticizes having the emphasis of the

Ethics and

report on a physician’s intent.

There

There

is

is

no way

some

to

prove a physician’s

clarification

needed if it is

When

is

even considered that

easing

at

some

point?

And how can anyone

really

know

for sure what someone intended

Also, pain specialists need to be used in situations requiring them.

Somerville cited a recent study that showed 60 per cent of cancer specialists failed an

And there

exam on pain management. who are knowledgeable about how

are specialists

There must be a way for pain

way being misconstrued

to

life.

producers are showing us exactly

to

and no

TV

TV.

all It

doesn’t interest

how

make

be eased in dying patients without

possible

tance.

nating

is it

actors pretending to be buddies

on

Beats me, but I’m absolutely,

100 per cent sucked

TV evil? No, probably not.

Is

it

for ourselves? Is full

it

fdling our heads

of nonsense and cutting off

communication? And

is it

feeding

that

we’ve begun

life

to see as truths?

it

reaches out to millions

this

giant world of ours

It

teaches us about the fasci-

cultures

world.

of the

It

gives us insight into lost civilizations

and new technologies.

us on guided tours of

It

takes

some of

the

most interesting and intriguing places in the world. In 1969,

in.

us distorted slices of fictional

as euthanasia.

over

It

every day, crossing time and dis-

someone who adores her friends as much as I do can suddenly blow them off to watch that

a great tool. At least

is

could be.

it

even

it

also crams our evenings

And

with the

ever-increasing popularity

of the

full

of fictional drivel.

less.

mostly aware that the

real

life

scenes have often been manipulat-

ed beyond recognition, still

think

I

we

what we’re

start to believe in

seeing.

The other day classes

the

in

we watched

one of

my

a film about

impact of media.

It

seems

like we’re catching a

sometimes

moment some person on the

private, and spontaneous in the life

TV

took us to the moon.

But

to see! No more And even though we’re

what they want us

has turned

mush and blown my

don’t like TV.

Is

Wow!

thing is, we all know how heavily these sho'ws are edited. The

The

is

social skills into oblivion? I like to it

Real people, real situations,

real reactions. Unscripted.

Julianna Kerr Opinion

did this happen and what

this alien creature that

call

told

that everything we’re seeing is real

want-

giving us a chance to stop thinking to

life comfortable for terminally-ill patients without quickening death.

that

How

TV?

do?

if I

Survivor.

me. Honestly. So

intent.

in this study.

me

ed to pop by his place on Thursday and I told him I couldn’t go. Why couldn’t I go? My husband and I had to stay home to watch

I

pain considered euthanasia,

to

A good

friend asked

my mind

could sue.

Toms. Suddenly we’re being

I’m so embaiTassed.

of

screen. But as the film in

class said,

“Nothing

is

my

shown by

accident.” There’s nothing sponta-

neous or private about film being

show phenomenon, TV has taken us along on a whole new kind

edited simply to

hook (and keep)

viewers. But

we keep coming

of adventure.

back for more.

reality

We’ve become

Maybe.

spies.

its

Peeping

Spoke Letters are

welcome

is

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College

letters to

the

Advertising Manager: Laurie-Ann Vandenhoff

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be

editor. Letters

Circulation Manager: Lisa

Hiller

Photo Editors: Stacey McCarthy, Daniel Roth, and Janine Toms

contacted for verification.

Graham and Vanessa Laye Spoke Online Editors: Marc Hulet and Production Managers:

Editor; Julianna Kerr

spoke welcomes

Julie

Tori Sutton

Faculty Adviser: Christina Jonas

No unsigned

letters will be published. be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke ©conestogac.on.ca Web site: www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

Letters should

,

for publication.

Address correspondence to: The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

N2G 4M4

Dr.,

May by a payment from Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) in exchange for the inserThe views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers in Spoke are not endorsed by the CSI unless their advertisements contain the CSI logo. Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a MS Word file would be helpful. Letters must not contain any libellous statements. Spoke

is

mainly funded from September to

tion of advertising in the paper.

A


News

SPOKE, September

23,

2002

— Page 5

students recognized at banquet By DIANA O’NEILL

A chance of rain did not spoil the sunny atmosphere at the early childhood education awards banquet. Clouds kept their distance on Sept. I, as Faculty welcomed back students and handed out awards of I

recognition.

easy

not

“It’s

ECE

(Conestoga)

to

get

into

these days,” said

Birdena Hamillon-Armitage, student

co-ordinator

of

ECE.

“Returning students need to be Gathered in the appropriate setting of a playground,

commended.”

firstand second-year students were invited to enjoy an hour-long event, including awards ceremonies and cake. On hand to help HamiltonArmitage distribute the awards was Bill Jeffrey, dean of healthscience/community services, and

Suzanne Burns, chair of the child studies program advisory committee. The first honour handed out was the Donna McKenna award. With an amount of $500, the award is given to a third-semester student. Lois Abel was the recipient. According to HamiltonArmitage, not- only was Abel “required to have characteristics

and qualities needed of an early childhood educator” to be considered eligible, she also had to have

A

an

her field placement, as

in

well as a

B average

in

other cours-

es.

Murphy, a fourth-semester was the winner of the ECE Award of Excellence. Worth $300, the award recipient was chosen by faculty. Hamilton-Armitage Janet

student,

described

Murphy

as a student

strong academically

field

in

who

is

place-

ment as well as having great interperskills. “(Murphy) has a positive attitude and has demonstrated commitment to the ECE profession.” The ECE Advocacy Award, an impromptu one of sorts, was given to Bill Jeffrey. Hamilton-Armitage caught Jeffrey off guard as she awarded him chocolate-covered aspirins for the “headaches along the way, to show what he thought was important.” HamiltonArmitage credits Jeffrey with helping to get the curriculum lab open sonal

time for the fall of 2002. Approximately 50 to 60 students and faculty winded down from the event by mingling and enjoying the snacks and beverages provided, including cakes that were ceremoniously cut by the award winners. in

(Photo by Diana O’Neill) Lois Abel, winner of the

awards were

part of a

Donna Mckenna Award,

cuts into a cake at the

welcome-back party held Sept.

Maintenance staff kept extra busy on campus this year

11 at

Conestoga College’s maintenance crew continues to help the college and its newest addition look and function at its best.

TIPS FOR ACADEMIC SUCCESS

KEEP UP. It's more manageable to do a little every day on reading and assignments than to try to catch up on a week's worth of work on a Sunday afternoon.

“We

try

behind

to

the

look after what’s said Barry

wall,”

added to replace the pay display system for daily parking.

“We

try to get the areas

we

ing lots using

as well as the

lifts

cleaning and general repair of

total

continuously

used

classrooms

throughout the school year.

who

is in

charge of the

maintenance, said chal-

school’s

lenges for his department increase as

the

college’s

population and

campuses. “I give credit to

our

staff.

They

work very hard and take pride in the work that they do,” Milner said. and staff from Martin’s Building Maintenance Services, 12

This past summer the crew worked with contractors to get the new E-Wing ready for September by putting in the furniture, cork

rial

boards for postings, direction signs

engineering and groundskeeping were hired for extra help during the

and balancing the air-conditioning and heating systems in the buildOutside work included laying

ing.

sod. hydro seeding, putting

up no

parking signs and painting parking

staff

students,

who worked

summer. to Milner, the contract

with Martin's Building Maintenance Services has been adjusted to

area

hydro seeding. Besides cleaning from floor to ceiling, general repairs and getting

rated

new wing ready

year, the

for the school

maintenance crew worked

on many other projects. One of these was the reconfiguration of level 1C where corridors and classrooms were opened and totally reconstructed. Parking lot 1 1 was also expanded and a pay gate was

SET REASONABLE STUDY GOALS. is

According

wing since the contractors are still This finishing up minor details. includes laying more sod and addi-

the

Are you a morning person? A night person? Can you study during your lunch hour and still be productive in the afternoon? Do you need to find time after work? Setting aside a quiet, separate place in your home that will be your study place and always studying there Is an effective strategy.

t

in the areas

include staffing for the

tional

STUDY WHEN YOU ARE AT YOUR BEST.

of general maintenance, planning,

on the asphalt. According to Milner, there is still some work to be done in the new

lines

Transfer your notes or summarize Organize and rewrite your notes, make a chart, diagram or flashcards. Discuss or teach what you are learning to another person. Anytime you can interact with or think about the information in a new way you increase understanding and retention. information.

Painting, flooring and other reno-

In addition to the college’s janito-

square footage grows.

ENGAGE IN ACTIVE LEARNING.

vations were also completed at the

Guelph and Waterloo Conestoga

surface.”

Milner,

nor-

dents are here,” said Milner, referring to checking lights in the park-

resources department at the college. “The plumbing in a wall is

on the

Reviewing class notes as soon

as possible after class increases understanding and retentior

mally can’t get to while the stu-

Milner, manager of the physical

just as important as the paint

banquet. The

Doon Daycare’s playground.

REVIEW CLASS NOTES. By VALENTINA RAPOPORT

ECE awards

is

After studying your effectivenesj

reduced. Take breaks often. The average attention span of an adui approximately 30 minutes. Find your optimum attention span and

study accordingly.

new wing.

Other plans include hiring four additional individuals for positions in the

of

security,

tradesperson.

receiving carrier and clerk.

As Conestoga continues to be in Ontario by the number 1

key performance indicators (KPIs), Milner gives credit to the hard

work of

individuals

“Many

at

the college.

of the great reviews

we

have received as a college in facilities go right back to the quality of individuals within the department."

he said referring to the physical resources

employees.

and

maintenance

SKILLS THAT YOU NEED FOR LEARNING

same

you managing have already developed time, setting priorities, asking questions, and knowing yourself. These are the

skills

by juggling multiple responsibilities:

are the

skills

desire to

that

make

learners successful.

them and the formula

Add motivation and

for success is complete.


Page 6

News

— SPOKE, September 23, 2002

Kids safe at day care By JULIE

GRAHAM

was found dead was abducted in

After several high-profile child

the

day

after she

home A 27-year-old man

in California.

front of her

of

supervisors

the

has been charged in that case.

who

United States, children’s safety and security has been forced into the

Many of the suspected abductors have been neighbours, parents or

does not.

spotlight.

close

At the Doon Childcare Centre, a tight system of securky is in place.

Amber

Violet

Nemec,

a supervisor at the

centre, said they have never experi-

enced a problem. “We are a busy centre here so often

when someone comes

front doors we’ll stop

away and

in the

them

right

‘Can I help you,’ or ‘Who are you looking for.’ And we often get mistaken for the registrar’s office almost constantly,” say,

Nemec. “The staff is pretty good at knowing who belongs here said

six-year-old

main

suspect

in

Smart’s

a hospital in Salt

Lake City due

to

a brain injury.

Five-year-old Samantha Runnion

T’S

in

belongs

She also said there

a system in

may

or

up

children

pick the

not

is

who may

place regarding

know

and who

in the centre

after

school.

“When

students get enrolled in

our program, age, a list of

we have, in a packwho we may release

children to. Obviously mom and dad or whatever the case may the

be, but

we

them

also ask

to list

potential people that could possibly

1996.

Once

a child has been reported

missing, law enforcement officials the case meets the criteria

decide

if

for an

Amber

Alert. Usually, this

whether or not the

criteria includes

that

abduction remains unconscious in

Amber Hagerman who

was kidnapped and murdered

as her parents desperately continue

The

the

result,

was put into greater use in several states. Used under the Emergency Alert System, the program is now under consideration for use in Canada and was created in Dallas and named after

tem sounds, a good idea

plead their case to the media.

a

Alert system

and who doesn’t.” In the U.S. and Canada this past summer, there were several child abduction cases, including the abduction and murder of Danielle Van Dam in San Diego. David Westerfield, who lived two doors down from the Van Dam family, was convicted and sentenced to death after her body was found along a roadside. In Utah, Elizabeth Smart remains missing to

As

student

are

teachers, the children get to

abduction cases in Canada and the

friends.

many

college students around and

suspected abductor area and

if

is

still

the

in

come

to pick

them

say to parents

And what I even though

up.

that

is

these people are on the

would not child

let orie

list,

we

of them take the

without authorization from

the parent.

“When

the police have informa-

that

person comes,

we ask

Nemec. “We

tion about the abductor’s appear-

for photo I.D.,” said

ance or whereabouts. Radio and

would never, ever let anyone come and take a child without photo I.D.

television stations are then notified

and an alert is displayed on electronic highway signs. In the future, alerts

may

be broadcast over

cell-

phones and beepers.

Nemec

in

said the

parent

Amber Alert

beneficial. “I think

it’s

to

have something like

because you hear

more and more about these abductions happening everyday,” she said. at

the centre range in

age from four months to 10 years. Nemec said since there are a lot of

first.”

Nemec

sys-

place,

Children

it happened that somebody showed up that wasn’t supposed to ... we would get in touch with the

If

also said

dren have,

in

some of the

their

chil-

court

files,

orders against certain people

who

cannot pick them up. She said that if

a situation was to arise

at the

(Photo by Lesley Leachman)

cen-

where someone who was not allowed to pick up the child, showed up at the centre, the staff would immediately call security

Serving up a hot lunch

tre

Sandra Hawco, a Pizza Pizza employee, makes lunch at the new cafeteria on Sept. 13. The new cafeteria is located on the

first

floor of the E-wing.

services at the college.

ALMOST

HERE!!

VISIT

Over 150

SERVICES, Room 2B04:

Employers -

-Employer Guidebook - Career Fair information

One

Locatio

~ Bus schedule ~ Resume/Cover

PA

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2002 10:00 Visit

a.in. to

3:30 p.m.

Doon Campus - Career

(Rm 2B04) Guelph Campus - Main

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Waterloo Campus - Student Services Office »^a^ partners4emplnyment ca for Career Fair information and updates! ,

1


-News

— Page 7

SPOKE, September 23, 2002

Night school booming Best kept secret at college, says Con-Ed director By LAURIE VANDENHOFF

number of Over

The hands on

the clock arc about

nine and

reach

to

Doon

And

campus.

the wall

it’s

Welcome

not.

actually

for everybody,” said Stewart.

Numbers can only be expected

The

faint

of

ebrating

are

sound of music

logue

travels

beginning of their

courses and programs to entice

new “I

year with a

toga

hours,

new

Stewart, the director of continuing at Conestoga College. “The concentration is often on the full-time day programming.” But with more than 20,000 part-

education

time students and only 5,000 time students,

more people do not

“We

probably

\ea-vo

fx*\\-i\vT-vc

and the cafeterias close at 4 p.m., it does not mean the day is done. But as Stewart pointed out, sometimes you cannot tell if it’s 7 a.m. or 5 p.m. because of all the students

in

school

the

get

for sup-

ignited

different

in

it’s

from people who call in and propose an idea. Then it’s up to Stewart and his colleagues to decide if they want However,

Stewart said in a recent interview. ».Vvc-

community

to give the course a chance.

the best kept secret at the college,” A.

if you don’t, no one is going to read it.” But with courses being removed there is always room for improvement. That’s why the college

ways,” said Stewart. Usually

full-

notice the action

is

the

port and ideas.

the school generates at night.

"Continuing education

like

stuff in the Sears catalogue,”

looks to the

hard to believe

it’s

much

consider this

Stewart said, “because

Dave

said

students.

Sears catalogue, you have to put

of activity that occurs during

evening

the

published.

This year the college added, 52

Meanwhile, steps away, there are others just getting their fall semester under way. A lot of people do not realize the level

is

Students are cel-

halls.

the

new courses and programs that added each time a new cata-

party.

school

to

grow, especially with the number

careers.

uing education.

through the

semester

1

world of contin-

to the

fall

showing nearly 2,000 registrations. “With more than 1,000 courses, there has to be something in there

not your average twcntysomethings first

part-time

in

steadily with last year’s

it

reads 9 p.m. and the.se students are

preparing for their

lot.

number

programs has grown

courses and

at the

while

appears to be a normal day,

The clock on

of students enrolling

students liave

already filled the classrooms

cars in the parking

the last 10 years, the

and the

if it’s

not doing well,

w\\\ t>e removedl. According to Stewart,

it

one out of

every 10 courses is cancelled. Usually it is because the course or

program did not generate enough interest and not enough people registered.

The

college requires a mini-

(Photo by Laurie Vandenhoff)

almost as full at night as it is during the The parking lot at day. With 22,000 part-time students attending the college throughout the year, sometimes it’s hard to tefi what time of day it is because of all the traffic. 10 days or less of the start date, they be no shortage in the various promum of 12 students per class. may not receive a confirmation letter grams you can complete. But with courses like advanced until after the first class begins. While many of this semester’s prolog cabin building and personal For more details check this grams have already begun, there are training specialist or programs

Conestoga College’s Doon campus

childhood education administration and register practical nurse upgrading there should

like

early

still

plenty of courses that begin in

October or November. However, if students register with

as

one of

year

first

1 1

in

is

making her

or not, paying fees at the college level is a reality. But instead of bemoaning the fact that you have to pay fees,

Like

females entering

woodworking

at

resident intends to prove that sex

when

it

comes

and hammers. Connors discovered her in

to

is

interest

Grade 9. She continued studying woodworking, becoming one of

(Photo by Blake Gall)

in

the only females to complete all the

available classes.

a clockmaker,

computer person,

I

can't

sit

down,” she adds.

While building sets at Theatre in Hamilton for Jesus Christ Superstar, Connors realized cabinet-making was her specific Aquarius

field

of choice.

So will being a female make the program more difficult? Connors quickly replies, “No!” She says that the males in her class have been very accepting of her. There are occasional comments like. “Are you sure you know what you are doing?” or “Wow, there

s

a girl in

here,” but overall the ridiculing

“Not

of Connors, 19, Crystal Hamilton, is one of 11 females enrolled in first-year woodworking at Conestoga College.

is,

that bad.”

Mark Brahmer, program

what

certain fees are

all

.

r

.

is

co-ordi-

best of

But

The

its abilities.

is just a fraction of what the fee pays for. biggest and most valuable aspect of the association fee

staffing

lege and across Ontario.

definitely

inspired her career choice. “I’m not

a

better to understand

.

tak-

ing a mandatory technology course

Connors says her family

it's

course there are other fees you pay on t an important fee because it pays for your education. Of students should pay most attention to is the Conestoga statement you receive every May and June, but the fee that Students Inc. Association Fee. value and students should know what it pays tor. This fee, $85 for the 2002-03 academic year, has incredible student association. It pays for five full-time staff Primarily, the association fee pays for the operations of the programmer and front desk events assistant, executive manager, salaries - president, general by CS the vice-presidents and the part-time staff employed It also pays for the honourariums of It s the staff ot an CSI. like organization not-for-profit even a work, Any organization needs staff to make it always stnvits constituents. In this case, the CSI is ser% e better grow to and function it to allows that oraanization e its students to the sei^ to CSI the of mandate the it is ing to grow so that it can better service its students. In fact, Tuition

saws

woodworking when she was

The daughter of

B-wing of Doon campus.

it

about.

Conestoga College. As a female in a male-dominated program the 19-year-old Hamilton not an issue

in the

Fees are important

By BLAKE GALL Crystal Connors

semester’s catalogue available at the continuing education wicket

CSI advertisement

Going against the grain mark

is

nator, says the program has never had such a high percentage of

females enrolled. In past years, 10 per cent was the standard, but this year

it

is

slightly higher.

Connors intends

to

two-year program but

complete the is undecided

whether or not she will continue with the technology courses and co-op placement. She encourages other females

woodworking *to purcareer. “If it's what you

interested in

sue the

Conestoga Students

its

student

it.

college students

would not have a

^

..^ to the administration of Conestoga College .

u

at the

co

i

-

u issue ^ on such -

fomm

secondary’ education.

Of course,

the exciting part of the association fee

entertainment during the day.

It

mean

there

is

not value in

it

is

the events

is

it

pays

for. It

J r pays for the Pond Party and the li\e

CSI handbook amongst other things. most important fee a student will ever pay. Yes.

helps pay for the

Behind tuition, that association fee

.

.

it

is

,

is

well

but that a student will not participate in all aspecLs the fee covers,

does

the

not

have to be.

body

pays for student representation

to air their concerns and have their voice heard. Alliance. I found the expenence invaluable. Aside from Student As a former executive member of the College Student Alliance is a highly respected organization College the understand to came I my personal experiences. only did I speak on behalf of my students. I S{»ke within Ontario. When I spoke, politicians listened because not associations that were not a part of the College student those that learned also I on behalf of all college students. didn't know many of the issue surrounding postStudent Alliance had more difficulties dealing with politicians or

without

end," she says.

“I

it

rights and responsibilities. as tuition financial aid, classroom standards and student Alliance, an organization that represents all Ontano Provincially, the CSI is a member of the College Student This lobbying is important for students because issues. same the on government college students to the Ontario

below the provincial average. Sometimes

simply reply.

that .

Inc. represents

enjoy then just go through with it and everything will work out in the

Ask Connors if she is confident in her own abilities and she will

is

for the students

who pay

S85. but

it.

-

Jody Andruszkiewicz events programmer/co-ordinator

CSI

it


News

— SPOKE, September 23, 2002

Page 8

Workopolis works with you Bv SINEAD

letters.

MCGARRY

when

when you thought Conestoga

Just

Canada’s

of thousands of job postings for students and graduates. This extremely

popular search engine allows students and alumni the opportunity to

250,000 seekers,

to

hear from you. Conestoga College

200 other Canadian coland universities are registered on the site, which was implemented on Sept. 9.

(Photo by Sinead McGarry)

as well as

leges

The

Web

list

site

of benefits for using

this

endless for students.

is

Monica Himmelman, alumni career services officer sets up an information booth for Workopolis at Conestoga College. Each job seeker has the ability to create and save their individual

where they can keep a record of their personal resumes and cover folder

aimed

site are

particularly at

students and alumni. After paying a

search engine but so do surrounding companies. Employers have the

certain grads

group e-mail job seekers and inform them of upcoming events and info sessions.

individual school sites.

database

is

the

and students by exclutheir offerings on

posting

sively

Prior to Workopolis, students and alumni of Conestoga would have to search for jobs through the career services binders for postings. “With

no online access

to students there

was very limited exposure site

sim-

WWW. workopolis

onto

log

ply

fee

opportunity to specifically target

also available to

of registered students. To access the job posting

have

employers

small

employers who are recruiting at the campus, with contact information

registered

waiting

All jobs that are posted on the

Web

became easier for employers. Not only do students benefit from this

A

This free of charge service cur-

has

sonal computer.

ability to

conduct job searches based on their individual interests and criteria. rently

posted in their field

Workopolis Campus also has jobs

largest job site, offering a resource

employment

is.

posted that are available on campus, as well as surrounding areas. Hiring individuals for jobs just

searching needs. is

a job

for their specific skills or criteria.

College couldn’t get any better Workopolis Campus has arrived to help you with your entire job

Workopolis Campus

code (JOBS4U) and then begin your search. The workopolis Web site can be accessed from any computer in the school or on your per-

alerts are also avail-

Career

able where students are informed

Campus.com. Click on the New Job Here icon. Register Seekers Complete the online registration form, enter your school’s access

for

employers,” said Sara Free, the career services officer. “Now job seeking

much more

is

convenient

and accessible for students beeause they can search 24 hours a day, seven days a week,” she said.

Extensive training for resident advisers By AIMEE WILSON fortable,” she said, adding, at advisers Residence and Residence Conestoga Conference Centre are receiving

additional from the

training staff

here

Services College.

year Student

this

at

Conestoga

at

a book management

Jonathan Veitch, a first-year business administration materials the sun while reading from his Essentials of Business Communication book on Sept. 12.

to receive first

aid,

CPR

certificates.

This will be organized by the

abuse,

shock,

culture

RAs

will receive at least 12 hours of

additional training. stressful

a

“It’s

job,”

said

Sarah Viola, assistant general

manager

at

Conestoga

“We want

dence.

to

make

resi-

sure

In preparation for this important role, the

RAs

also attended

five-day training seminar at

a

>

Meet new people?

Centennial residence organized

biscuss issues related to being in a new country?

by

Tremblay

Jeff

and

Jack

Fletcher, directors of residence life.

These workshops provided

information on communication,

team building, report writing,

This group will run once a

week beginning the week of October

how

to

handle aggressive

stu-

dents and skits of possible situa-

748-5220 ext. 3487

advisers

are

the safety of the students, pro-

gram events with

the

Social

a leadership role,” said Viola.

submitted Residence

were Conestoga

applications to

last

year for a

resi-

dent adviser position for 200203. After sorting through the

resumes and giving a brief information session, the chosen applicants attended an extensive interview process by a panel

consisting

of Viola, Gregory,

Fletcher and two current RAs.

Residence advisers pay the

amount

for their

room

full

but are

paid biweekly for their duties

around residence. Requirements for a resident adviser position are a C plus average or above and preferably a second-year student who has lived in residence. Qualified first-year students are also wel-

comed.

“We ative

look for people with creideas

events,”

said

Deb Brock,

20, a

for

Viola. to

may -be

lenge.”

the first contact

Gregory took part

“RAs when a

ing the

new

If

in facilitat-

training along with

other Student Services \\CS7WOLl\COMMON^STU_SERV\efoup WorkshopsVWULTICULTURAL SUPPORT SROUP.doc

Residence

required to interact and ensure

Services counsellor, said,

Student

student has a problem.”

Keith Martin

“There

be more (training)

resident adviser, “It’s a lot of fun, if you’re up for the chal-

Gregory,

Carol

Croup Facilitator:

Viola,

to

According

tions.

Please sign up for the group in Student Services (Room 2B02) before October 4^.

According

Thirty-five

August of this year, the RAs attended workshops on drug and In

they are prepared for anything.”

Share information about your own culture? Learn more about Canadian culture?

er.

everyone abides by the residence rules and regulations and attend workshops. “It’s hard to be a peer and have

ation centre. In total, the

> > >

very useful,” said

it is

ment, sexual assault and nutriThere are also plans for the

had an introduction to Student Services and a tour of the recre-

WOULO YOU LIKE TO:

“I think

Holly Beitz, 20, resident advis-

Orientation Staff (SOS), ensure

alcohol

MULTICULTURAL SUPPORT CROUP

ter.”

possible suicide, sexual harass-

CSI. studies student, enjoys

“The

the bet-

next year.”

and Smart Serve

in

it,

Throughout September and October the seven resident advisers (RAs) will be attending workshops on identifying the warning signs of depression and

RAs

Take a look

we can make

will probably

tion.

(Photo by Janine Toms)

easier

way

staff.

“I

make them (RAs and students) feel com-

hope

it’s

a

to

you would

like

more

infor-

mation on becoming a resident Conestoga the adviser call Conference and Residence Centre, at 895-2272 or e-mail rsconestoga@sympatico.ca.


!

News

SPOKE, September

Old department has new By HALLEY MCPOLIN needs department may have a new name, hut the service remains the same. The department, which will now

The

l(p

special

known

as disability services, will

who

continue to assist those students

qualify as special need. In order to register with the

department students

must present documentation that proves they are eligible, such as records of a disability and a record to

been provided with

verify they have

such services waiting

of the calls that

and

says

tutoring,”

name

who

ice

we

“Special needs

seemed

to imply anything

you

need.”

average intelligence.

Marion Mainland

the co-ordi-

is

nator of disability

and

services

says there has been a

lot

of confu-

sion about the nature of the depart-

ment sons

“One of

in the past.

we moved from

the rea-

special needs

term implies special privileges and that’s not what our the

that

.students want. They don’t want anything special; they just want they need to keep an even playing field with alt the non-dis-

The number of

students regis-

tered as being special peeds has

grown from 277 in 1998 to 537 in 2002, making up almost 10 per cent of the student population at

Conestoga College.

The primary reason change

for the

any more

to eliminate

is

name

accepted

the deaf, can

for

“The them to

college.

the

into

be

for

been accepted, so on their application form there can be no reference to it because they’re accepted based solely on their marks. They

name change

Besides the

within

the department there has been one

serx’ices

other significant adjustment to the

Conestoga was the

among

Provincial

the

on

now

Disability

last

Special

called

Issues,

to

eollege

the

end

of a four-year research endeavour

Needs

called the Learning Opportunities

College on change the

Project and with

Advisory College Conestoga Committee last March where the motion was passed. Mainland agrees that there can be some hesitancy among students

the province,

just anyone.

"We

have to respect the fact that who have had support in the past and have been called ‘disabled’ get out of high school and they’re tired of it - they don’t want they

be seen any want to blend in and start fresh,” says Mainland, who sees many students each year with disabilities that are not registered. “They have differently;

almost $3 mil-

which involved

project,

-to refer to themselves as disabled, but says there is also a certain amount of credibility they gain by knowing the service isn’t open to

it

The purpose of

lion in funding.

department name. The recommendation was submitted to the

to

May saw

service. This past

College

students

abled students.”

‘1

that gets accepted.”

co-ordinator of disability

Issues,

above

However, chances MORLEY

other colleges and universities in

was

to test

new

serv-

ices for students with learning dis-

and educate faculty on what the term means so it can be

abilities

detected earlier. a result of the lost funding positions within the depart-

As some

ment have been transferred back and past pre-admission work and free assessments for students, which included work into faculty,

within

department’s special-

the

ized literacy lab, will

be charged a

now have

While summer

is

ebbing into

fall,

with the West Nile virus. However,

do advise residents of

the experts

Peel Region, west of Toronto, to take

done within

all

community and before students

“We

w'ere enrolled.

(current Conestoga students) and

never

assures

will,”

“this lab is

Mainland,

In a Sept.

3 press release, the Peel

1

infected

two

“The

said,

lent containing

DEET (N, N-diethyl-

meta-toluamide).

“Cooler temperatures

slow

will

down mosquito

McKeown

However,

and

public to remain cautious the necessai

7

to take

steps to prevent the

virus.

This warning

came

at

a time

when

a Peel Region hospital patient died

from the vims Sept.

confirmed patient's

Nile

that

16.

the

Officials

unidentified

cause of death was West

\'in.is

a day

Dr.

Peel

David McKeown,

R egion Medical Officer

Peel Region officials

recommend

fall,

says all

Dr.

been over

the age of 60.

takes

approximately

three to 15 days to cause

symptoms headaches,

such as fever, muscle aches and occasionally skin rash. In the most severe cases frontal

encephalitis,

The vims tends

a swelling or inflam-

David

McKeown

can occur.

The Peel Region Web site says that \ims was once centralized in

the

West Asia,

“Africa, Eastern Europe,

and the Middle East.” Howe\er, in 1999 the vims w^as found in New^

York

City.

Now

the

\

ims has spread

north into Ontario, as

it

follows the

migratory path of birds.

to affect the elder-

and those people with a weakened

immune

level of service

it.

Nile virus

residents affected have

virus

services at.Conestoga

change in name the same who need

to students

mation of the brain or spinal cord.

system. In Ontario those

CLASSIFIED

STARS MEN’S People should also eliminate any

may exist on by emptying such things as wheelbanows, tires, pails and barrels. The Peel Region Web site says that the bird-bome \ims is spread by mosquitoes exclusively and can be passed on to horses, cats and dogs. The vims is rare in humans and

their

those

property

that

However,

later.

the

disability

CLASSIFIED

activity.”

standing water that did ask the

Most people infected with the vims will not show any symptoms. To these people the vims is harm-

bird.

ly

be provided

The

to Toronto.

will

slow down mosquito

of human illness remains low. Cooler temperatures, especially at

activity.”

City and died soon after he returned

less.

risk

night,

York

Mosquitoes spread the disease while they feed on a host, such as a

residents in the area.

McKeown

David

in

wearing light coloured clothing and using mosquito repel-

Both Mississauga patients are male and are over 65 years of age. Dr.

New

College, says despite the

West

decrease visiting

Marion Mainland, co-ordinator of

will

a free service.”

man had been

quitoes,

(Photo by Halley MePolin)

never charge

which to prevent the West Nile vims. They include avoiding areas with high populations of mosin

precautions.

Region Chief Medical Officer confirmed reports that the virus had

to

fee.

This work was the

of ‘contracting the virus

ways

so are the chances of being infected

the

the

all

Protect yourself against By JEFF

name

compete with every other student

Marion Mainland,

Committee

are of normal or

— Page 9

identify a disability before they’ve

Most students with learning abilities

they

2002

want to do it on my own.’ Then what we see is around midterms a lot of them come in.” Mainland encourages .students to register as soon as possible with the department so that preparations, such as books on tape or decide,

province can’t ask

provide.”

have English as a second language. dis-

have

so

made. The process of registering occurs once the student has been

a few.

or those students

learners,”

that

past

the

interpreters

“slow

considered

those

toms,

strategies in

imply ‘anything you need, come to this office’ so by changing the name we make it clear what servto

with no other anxiety symp-

iety

is

get regarding

some good done well

Mainland. “Special needs seemed

who would not qualify who experience test anx-

are those

work

dial

ment completed. A disability could include hearing or vision impairments, physical or psychiatric problems and Students

we

aren’t responsible for at

such as mature students, reme-

all,

have such an assess-

learning disabilities to

we

things

or be on a

in the past,

to

list

misunderstandings about what the department provides and for whom, by plainly defining the office name. “By calling it disability services we cut down on some

23,

resident

do catch it rai'ch die. 999 one other Ontario

in

1

did die.

The 75-year-old

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— SPOKE, September

Page 10

23,

News

2002

Smokers agree with new By BRANDI STEVENSON

gested with people, making ficult to get in

Smokers and non-smokers agree new no-smoking policy at the school is a good idea. In a random survey conducted at that the

the

Doon campus,

faculty

students

were asked how they

felt

dif-

ing.

Second-year civil engineering and environmental student Dale

new rules. many people were

Pike agrees with the

and

about the designated no-smoking entrances around the school.

it

and out of the build-

“Last year too

appreciate

who

don’t really want to smell the

doesn’t ground.

smoke again when

smoke.” However, he does predict that rain will be a problem, since the overhangs attached to the door-

it a lot as a non-smoker, and especially as a smoker that's quit because it’s tempting to want

to

ways

over

all

it’s

in

your

paint

the

think

just

“I

make

these

on

ugly

the

lines

the school® look crappy,” he

said.

understand not smoking in

“I

guard,

ty

like

I

are designated no-smoking.

John Kroetsch, a campus securi-

place

the

and

the

in

policy went

front of the doors, they just

overboard, especially in this area,”

on the ground specifying the no-smoking areas is

entrances. It was cansing havoc even get-

hopes

there

new

ting into the

everyone

e n 0 u g h

Robson, who was smoking by woodworking building, said he will obey the rules, especially because he cannot afford to pay a

security guards outside enforcing

building,

will

room

fine if he doesn’t.

the

he

ue to com-

The red

paint

to the school, as well as the

rules.

The policy was adopted

because

smoking

in

front of the

years.

The

doors

m

smoking

policy,

smoking closer

when

build-

because

there

is

less

Leah Walter, a

first-year

civil

engineering student, and ex-smoksaid she

er,

welcomes

the policy. “I

as

the

is

for to

smoke

else-

He

also

thinks

where. a

computer program-

long

people

building

the

h6 added.

policy.

Kroetsch, non-

smoker,

that

policy

the will

last,

because Kroetsch

whole

“the

Head

said that smokers “should have the

world’s

does not have a problem with the

same freedom we do.” Although most people support

smoke-

ming the_

to

people

the weather gets colder.

First-year

Walter

garbage around.

Pike

can picture

front of the

school

always con-

but

Head

woodwork-

Pike added that the designated

were

as

contin-

ply with the

in

the

she

said

entrances improve the look of

in

past

_

^

ing.

been a

problem

f

Walter

'

while

entrances has

r'

said.

ing

main

agrees with

face.”

analysis student Chris

regulation.

“There’s

plenty

of

space to smoke out here,” he said while

smoking outside of Door 4. He added that the no-smoking areas are “good for non-smokers

new

not everyone

going free,”

and

pleased.

this

just

Jeremy Robson, a second-year foundations student and smoker for about six years, said he

another step

the

policy,

is

police

is

in

that

Robson

direction.

Apprenticesearch.com could work for you By ABBI DAVIES

and what wage rate and working conditions to expect once fully

Apprenticesearch.com helps take

qualified.

the headache out of searching for

an apprenticeship placement. in April 2001, Established apprentice search is an invaluable

Also,

the

outlines

site

skills,

and values that are commost workers in each par-

interests

mon

to

ticular trade.

Niagara, not only provides a place

For each trade a short six to seven-word quiz entitled “Is this job for you” is provided that poses questions such as “Can you work at heights?” and “Do you enjoy working with your hands?” The quizzes are designed to help give you a better idea of whether or

for businesses to post openings for

not you are right for the job.

tool

students

for

considering a

career in a skilled trade as well as for

students

for

an

which serves

the

searching

apprenticeship placement.

The Web

site,

Waterloo Region as well as Peel, Halton,

Dufferin,

Hamilton and

apprentices (look under leads on

If

you

jobs) but also provides a place for

a

students to post their profile.

answers

This

site gets

more than 20,000

and helped to make over confirmed matches. Apprentice search offers detailed information on skilled trades ranging from general machining and automotive service technician to

same or

For each trade available on the site,

information

is

provided as to

to

the

quiz questions,

of other jobs that require the

list

5

hairdresser and fruit grower.

you would enjoy based on your

apprentice search also provides a

hits daily 1

trade

find that

specific

similar types of skills, val-

ues and interests. (Photo by Jason Middleton)

Apprentice search has a section

Tying on the stretch

called “helpful programs”

which programs and seminars, some free of charge, which are available to you in your area and are of inter-

Cynthia Woroch, 46, demonstrates the dandasana yoga position to her students at the recreation centre on Sept. 14. Woroch, who teaches iyengar yoga that uses props such as ties, says the ciass is aiways open to newcomers, in yoga you perform many stretches that increase fiexibiiity over time, and you do these stretches and movements in a reiaxed atmosphere. Ciasses take piace on Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. You can sign up for this ciass by reg-

lists

est to those in skilled trades.

On

what exactly the job entails as well as what training and education is required, what types of employers

news

hire people in that particular trade

to tradespeople.

the site there articles

is

also a spot for

regarding

current

istering at the front

The bookstore: more than By REBECCA LEARN

the pants' are $20.

Law and

Prues said he shops

crave.

goes

student Joel

at the

mainly for convenience. to

in the

bookstore

He

said he

bookstore on occasion

browse and admitted the sweat-

clothes, magazines, school supplies

shirts

and even candy

However, for now he said he has just bought a backpack, magazines, highlighters and some candy. Prues said he is glad he bought the backpack because he has used it a lot. They range in price depending on the style, but are all around $40.

after

shopping for

books. Katie Morel, 19, said she bought drafting supplies for her construction

program.

sweatshirt and like

She also bought a pants,

“because

I

them.” The sweatshirts range

from approximately $30

to $50.

and

appeal to him.

Some

just

of the recreation centre.

books

administration

security

The bookstore doesn’t just have what you need, they have what you Conestoga students are buying

desk

trends and issues that are pertinent

students, such as business

student

Andrews and management

CLASSIFIED

“Ultimate Questions”

Chris studies

student Rebecca Moser, have found supplies they needed for their class-

CLASSIFIED

Canadian Forces

Army

Reserve

The Lord Jesus Christ is the difference. Learn about

es at the bookstore.

Moser tor this

said she bought a calcula-

which was required. She said was something mandatory but

she also goes in the bookstore simply to look around.

Employment with

a challenge

and adventure. Full-time

summer employment

throughout the year.

n’t

bought any

Andrews

yet.

also bought a calculator

for his classes.

Please send

name and

address

to:

Bible Study, Zion United

Reformed Church, 1238 Main

St.

Sheffield,

ON LOR

She said when she goes there she likes to look at the clothes, but has-

Him

Bible Study by correspondence.

IZO

e-mail;bible@zurch.on.ca

For more information Call 624-4393

our

Web

site:

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Sign up today. IT’S

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News

SPOKE, September

nmetable woes hopefully a thing of the past By VANESSA LAYE

some

for

intends to

is

.some-

new

Olinski,

had no teacher on the teijeher

was

siek,”

first

he

dence

one

Some rooms

build

students were

that didn’t exist,

(photo by Vanessa Laye)

CSI President Jon Olinski looks over timetable revisions Sept. Many students have come to him with scheduling problems

12.

time

three

weeks

in

at least

advance or have them

gaps have been moved closer together, Olinski admits that sometimes

posted on the school’s

those gaps can’t be avoided.

the

Web

still

already

into elTect next

which

come

dents

at the

out so

late.

He

fall.

also added handing timetables

out so late to

makes

set

it

hard for stu-

up work schedules, timetables

are

been an issue for years, but I think it’s time to deal with it,” he

especially

said.

John Tibbits, president of the college, said it’s hard to give out

"It’s

Other schools

in

Ontario send out

if

their

subject to change.

was

have

to

accommodate

is

new the

full-time employees,

biggest

hiring

the

school has had in 15 years.

There are some good things about the timetables too,”

“We

said Olinski.

one of the only colleges to end most of our classes by 4:30 p.m.,

are

compared

to 6 p.m. at other

was with

company Daeon

to

but

noise,”

noise

the

inevitable so residents "dealt as best as they could.”

it

He added

that other than noise,

had no other com-

really

plaints during the construction.

Waiting

and

lists

double

the

cohort were the biggest factors that contributed to the decision to build

two additions. first

summer

according

additions,

the

He

Kobyinik.

said that

always had to wait to get into the

residence, this addition took the

cohort they figured the waiting

room

because a new mechanical had

to

be

built, air ventilation

had

to

be installed and elevators had to be

would

and with the double at

least

double

Altogether,

153

added, allowing 306 to

move

in in the last year.

these

difficulties

were

hired to build the additions,

company with

parent

approximately one year to build, in September 2001.

Living Centre, which

ending

However,

this

completion did

not finish the endless hours of

ham-

mering, drilling and thumping that residents had to endure for

more

Conestoga

this

is

to

it's

Guy

project

complicated

then

buildings.”

BECAUSE ANYTHING CAN HAPPEN, ANYONE CAN WIN.

^ .

1

Foley,

manager of Daeon, building the additions “was no

the

that easy. Play today at your lottery retailer.

*

a

part of since

Lo'w-flying blimp

3-6 outcomes,

is

Campus

is what the and Residence

Conference Centre 1993. According

more

than a year.

the

Game-ivinning field goal attempt

just pick

the

rooms were new students

taken care of, the addition took

schools.”

in

years to come.

Daeon, the company which was

in.

After

residence

list

down

Kobyinik said that during

You don't have to be an expert to win,

to

students

of 2000 and according to John Kobyinik, general manager of the

put

Tibbits also added that the college

College Council meeting on Sept. 9, along with the question of why Conestoga’s timetables

up

the college

part-time teachers.

hired 32

problems

when

hiring in July, along with the

fact that they

site.

Olinski said that the idea of putting timetables online has

timetables

bech recommended and may come

Olinski brought these

up a contract with the

Construction was slowed timetables to their students

students’

to

longest.

had one- or two-hour time gaps

between classes. Although some

set

part of the addition in the

said,

while others

marked a

students

Construction began on the

wasn’t explained to the stusent to class-

the

winter of 2000, the resi-

construction

day.

dents.”

that has

all

with

issues

they

In the

to

for

era

come.

aeeounting elass had their timetable revised four times, while another

it

years ago, the Conestoga

began a project

just not fair.”

“The

inconvenience to students

little

Residence and Conference Centre

Olinski

"You shouldn’t be handing out

“but

with

time though, residents "always had

draft timetables,” said Olinski. “It’s

elass

to

Two

fix.

Aceording

campus come and go

Changes

Conestoga

College students, but this thing CSI President Jon

— Page 11

By KATE DANIELLE VANDEVEN

Timetable problem.s seem to be a

coneern

2002

23,

mil

IIJC

UIIL prolino.ca

other


News

— SPOKE, September 23, 2002

Page 12

Breast of Canada calendar unveiled By STACEY MCCARTHY

tion decided against endorsing the

calendar, claiming

The Breast of Canada 2003 calin Guelph on Sept. 12 amid continuing controversy stirred by last year’s calenendar was unveiled

dar.

Without the foundation’s seal of

would snicker and walk away

were reluctant to sell the calendar. Richards ended up giving away

disgust.

piece by others, the 2002 calendar

profit

naked

women aged

1

of

breasts

However,

"The purpose of the calendar was to draw attention to breast health and (breast cancer) prevention,” said Sue Richards, who pioneered the idea for the calendar.

"I

feel

an emphasis to find a

cheerfully

replied.

“That’s business.” there’s

money

to

it.

than

just cal-

providing

threefold:

calendar herself for $70,000, ended up with losses totalling around

$50,000.

She said

it

was

difficult to

mar-

ket the calendar without the sup-

of the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation. The foundaport

Annual

By JASON MIDDLETON

and Richards

added

has

breast cancer survivor.

Richards remains optimistic of this year’s success.

Her

efforts to

pre-sell the calendar this year

have

already been rewarding.

Richards admitted she was nervous about the 2003 calendar in light of last year’s negative

Richards said about the growing popularity of the calendar. “I’m

responses.

getting personal stories, offers to

“But the reaction was from a few, not the majority.

people

who

love

It’s art it

-

there are

and people

who

“Something’s happening here,”

put up posters, and advice on different It’s

ways

to sell the calendars.

amazing.”

(Photo by Stacey McCarthy)

Sue Richards,

Canada

creator of the Breast of

House

outside the Pagani

in

calendar, sits

Guelph before unveiling the 2003

calendar to the press.

education

$43,000 that will be used to help enhance wireless communication education within the school.

golf.

Classic,

The

Conestoga College’s

golf tournament,

annual

tournament,

raised

which

took place at Heron Point in Ancaster on .\ug. 20, honoured Jim Balsillie and Mike Lazaridis of Waterloo’s Research in Motion, the company

makes Blackberry portable

e-

“It

was a sit-down dinner instead

of a buffet because said

respect,”

it’s

all

about

Simmons.

“It

reflects the college.”

Of the 136

golfers, about a

dozen

When

were Conestoga alumni.

mail devices.

they

and Lazaridis were cholist of prominent local business people who have helped promote this area. After the honourees are chosen

Monica Himmelman, an alumni

Balsillie

sen from a

area of the

school that will

money Simmons,

receive the

Ron

is

decided on.

who was

in

charge of the corporate side of the

tournament, said, “The object

make

We

and male breast and a

another distributor as well.

$175 went to a charitable donation, $10 towards the prize table, and $215 towards the day of golf. Elizabeth Witmer, deputy premier of Ontario, was present at the dinner, which followed the day of

the

smaller photographs with borders,

golf

for wireless

that

2003 calen-

tournament college raises funds

at

The

to the

smaller calendar,

a cheaper price tag ($19.95)

again financed the 2002

a

pictures of both a

on prevention.”

who

include

However, she said the response this year has been sensational.

cure, but there’s an under-emphasis

Richards,

Some changes dar

education, awareness and funds.”

Ninety per cent of last year’s retailers have requested the calendar

that there’s

“The important thing is that it got It’s good to get emotion and reaction. In that way the calendar was incredibly successful.”

more

The purpose of the

endar was

in

people talking.

regard to the lack of

in

she

“But

8 to 40.

it. Some found it offensive... and challenging to look at. I would have a hundred people come up and thank me profusely and one

hate

approval, retailers and distributors

many of them.

the

was too con-

troversial.

Labeled as pornography by some and hailed as an artistic masterfeatured

it

a

try to

That

is

is

to

high profile tournament.

make

why

it

a prestige thing.”

prizes at the tourna-

ment ranged from new vehicles donated by Forbes Motors to a 19inch television, which could be

won at the putting contest. The tournament attracted 136 golfers who each had to pay $400 in order to play. From that fee

got

to

the

putting

contest

service officer and volunteer at the event, gave the grads a golf shirt, a

pen and a copy of Connections magazine. Himmelman was one of approximately 12 volunteers who helped the day run smoothly.

The tournament also included a game called Beat the Professor,

(Photo by Carla Sandham)

Walk Safe volunteers (from Kingscote are

If

By CARLA SANDHAM

they received a sleeve of golf

Walk

lot

of people (when they

ended up giving us yellow

balls,”

lost)

their ugly or

Simmons

said.

CLASSIFIED

Conestoga College.

at

Safe, a service initiated

security services,

people

balls.

“A

walk safe

who

is

escort and patrol col-

great for the students involved,

and the college

in its

percep-

tion of safety.”

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED Volunteer with a child at their school and help improve their self-esteem and confidence. 1-3 hours a week commitment. Call 744-7645 X317

the college

by

a team of 14

grounds Monday through Thursday from 6:45 to 10:45 p.m. “It's a win-win situation,” said A1 Hunter, head of college security. staff

Hunter said the demand for Walk

Escorts

maglite radio,

activities held at the col-

lege and the increase of students

commuting

to residence.

Walk Safe recognizes the changes and is willing to take that extra step in

home

flexible as well

Safe co-ordinator and second-year

parties held at

police foundations student, said the

which end

after

mid-

making sure students

are

equipped a

(flashlight),

first-aid

kit

with

a

portable

and either a

6.

services.

Other Walk Safe responsibilities

two

jacket.

patrols in

“They are highly visible,” said who compared their presence on campus to that of the comforting feeling one would feel seeing a police officer on King Street Hunter,

late at night.

at the college,, is

escorted to her car

by Walk Safe volunteers four nights a week and said the service is

excellent. “I feel a lot safer

they have

and

I

am

so glad

to

lege.

out

lights,

smashed windows or

general maintenance issues.

good preventative

a

Kingscote.

He added they also look for anyone who may be having car troubles or in need of help and will offer their assistance.

“Eeel

free

to

whether

it's

for

uals to their cars, but as far as res-

However, Jesse Kingscote, Walk

Door

1

and Door

5.

for

break and enters in cars,” said

Escort stations are strategically at

directed

look for anything suspicious or dangerous. This may include burnt

she said.

it,”

three

and outside of the colWhile on patrol, volunteers

“It's

Jan Hawes, a Harveys' employee

situated

safely.

-move to However, escorts can be pre-arranged by contacting security 5 station will soon

involve

For example, escorts will not only walk individget

Door Door

reflective vest or brightly coloured

Safe has grown this year due to

more CSI

accommodate

night.

lege

“It's

Hours are

idence. to

Students, staff and visitors can

they lost they had to donate

their ball to a bucket, but if they

won

all

Oliveira,

Walk Safe team picks up pace

where the player had to beat or match the shot that Ron Simmons shot.

Sandra

Stephanie Pogue, Jason Storey and Jesse second-year police foundations students. They’re trying to keep the campus safe. left)

escort

or

Kingscote.

ask

anything

“We

for

help,

directions, else,”

an said

are there to help.”


News

walk back

*A

SPOKE, September

23,

2002

— Page 13

history

in

By IAN ROSS The Doon Heritage Crossroads had a fun and educational show dogs barking, musicians and sawdust flying on

with

playing

Sept. 15.

People gathered

Huron

10

at

Rd., Kitchener to visit the historical

where

site

was volunteer

it

recognition day.

Doon Heritage Crossroads like

a small

world stuck

early 20lh century.

is

the

a year-

is

It

in

round place to visit where people can take a step back in time to see exactly how people lived. The Crossroads has people working there year-round doing different activities and giving the

(Photo by Ian Ross)

Len Hilderley

sheep for inspection at the Doon Heritage Crossroads sheep dog demonstrations on Sept. 15. Hilderley has been using and training sheep dogs for 20 of Heidelberg, flips a

years.

public a history lesson.

The

heritage site has a large area

of land that houses

many

build-

including a blacksmith, butcher shop, post office, sawmill ings

and railway Special

station.

presentations

such as sheep dog demonstrations and musical entertainment were held during the afternoon.

The owner of

the three sheep

dogs gave advice on how to maintain and train the animals. Len Hilderley owns a farm in Heidelberg where he has been using and training sheep dogs for 20 years. The dog trainer has three dogs that he keeps on his farm named Shep, 3, Twist, 9, and Kate, 12. ^Hilderley

showed spectators how

the dogs round sheep into a pen and demonstrated different commands verbally and with a whis-

(Photo by. Ian Ross)

Kyle Faust, 21

tle.

how

to manipulate metal.

in

how

to

at the University of Waterloo,

makes a

months.

Seminars and workshops are available where the willing can learn

a student

lamp holder at the Doon Heritage Crossroads blacksmith building on Sept. 15. He has been perfecting his craft over the past five

At the blacksmith participants learned

,

Kyle Faust, 21,

become blacksmiths

an eight-month program.

the hobby.

He

a University

is

of Waterloo student

who

took up

has been working

on lamp holders and has been working in the blacksmith program for five months.

Adult students better their education at Stratford

“Wheh diabetes enters your life, you need someone to turn to. Coll

campus

By JA SON NOE

The Job Connect program also offered at the college.

is

It is

Conestoga College’s Stratford campus is small in comparison to the three other campuses, but it

funded by the Ministry of Education and Training and helps young people find employ-

serves a vital purpose within the

ment. youth

community.

The campus building

consists of a single

next

the

to

Stratford

rents the property

from the hospital. The campus used to be

known

for

its

Doon campus

several years

campus has more than 400 students with some

ago.

Currently

living

in

the

skills

they jobs.

real

this

by

job without having to train the

Another program offered school

is

at the

the general educational

development pre-test for adult high school equivalency.

to older students

The LBS Literacy program

gives students a chance to further their abilities in

English as well as the academic

upgrading program, which focuses on English and math skills.

CALL 1-800-BANTING CANADIAN

ASSOCIATION

DIABETES ASSOCIATION

CANADIENNE

DU DIABETE

Students write this test to qualify employment or receive a high

course to prepare students for the test every four months. “Every

wanting to attain a better educa-

SOMEONE YOU KNOW.

for

offers several pro-

grams catering

HELP

person.

school equivalency certificate. The college has a 10-week

attached to the school.

tion.

find

residence

small

the

The college

gaining to

Carol Seto, dietitian

unemployed

Employers benefit from

nursing

program with several graduates being hired by the hospital. However, the course moved to the

in

require

assists

finding a qualified person for the

General Hospital.

The college

It

the Canadian Diabetes Association.”

is completely full,” course explains campus administrator Linda McLeod. “The popularity of the course has increased with a maximum of 40 students.” The test itself is eight hours spread over two days, a Friday evening and a Saturday morning.

“BITCH” MEREDITH BROOKS

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1

1

Entertainment

— SPOKE, September 23, 2002

Page 14

HOROSCOPE Week of September

suggestions but follow your gut feelings also.

23-29

Luckiest day; September 23.

Happy Birthday

Libra: September 23 October 22 A powerful person is going to have a great influence on you. Things will work out for the better if you are on his or her good

Libra!

side.

Luckiest day: September 23.

Financially things are going to be getting better for you. You will continue to be surprised at the new things hap-

pening

in

your

March 21

Aries:

iT

A

-

April

income

maintain

will

balance

a

between school, work and play. But be advised to do equal amounts of each.

19

A

between close friends or family will have you battle

Luckiest day: September 29.

_

drained. If possible try to take a

December 2

Luckiest day; September 29.

If

outlook on Taurus; April 20

yCy A

-

May

20

new approach to an make your life a A new way of thinking

idea will easier.

will increase

your chances of suc-

you maintain a positive

opportunities will be presented to

you;

good so pick your

are

all

The Doo Wops, John Catucci (left) and David Mesiano kept students in stitches and rocked Sanctuary on Sept. 10. They have been performing together for almost four years.

the

great rewards will

life,

coming your way. Lots of

be

(Photo by Carrie Hoto)

November 22

Sagittarius: -

neutral ground.

little

-

2

steady

you

help

life.

October 23

Scorpio:

|||^ November

favourite.

Luckiest day: September 25.

Doo Wops stop by Conestoga on their way to world domination

cess.

Luckiest day: September 25.

Capricorn: -

May

Gemini;

JJl

you don’t keep better records of your finances you may

students

a fiery dis-

find funds going in every direction.

forming

-

position

going to be making

is

The

trouble for you.

handle the situation

best to

is

way

to

If

Make

you track every penny.

sure

Luckiest day: September 27.

confuse Aquarius; January 20

the individual.

Luckiest day: September 23.

Jvir February

A younger person will

^

Cancer: June 22 - July 22 it feels as though you have been climbing an If

uphill battle,

know

the

end

The challenges you have overcome will be beneficial later near.

is

charge.

Luckiest day: September 28.

February

Pisces:

A Recent events

August 22

may

tionship

leave

you feeling like a bit of an The best way for you to feel better is to forget about what happened and start over. Luckiest day: September 27.

outcast.

August Virgo: September 22

HhP

Someone

with

23 a

-

great

deal of knowledge will be advising

you on an

Head

issue.

-

19

March 20

Luckiest day: September 28. -

be

giving you trouble. The best way to deal with this problem is to make sure he or she knows you’re in

on.

Leo: July 23

-

18

to his or her

hysterics

while per-

singing/comedy show in the Sanctuary on Sept. 10. John Catucci, 29, and David Mesiano, 23, started The Doo their

Wops

almost four years ago. The two met through a mutual friend at York University while Catucci was directing a play that Mesiano was cast in. “We found out we had a common interest in singing and comedy, so we decided to put the two together,” said Catucci. The Doo Wops won the 2001 Just for Laughs Home Grown competi-

problem with a

rela-

headache. You will have to decision and stick to

a

end the

to

it

make

Mike Bullard show. appeared on Star times, as well as

TV

They have numerous

The Sean Cullen

Show on CBC and have performed

conflict.

Luckiest day; September 24.

Los Angeles,

in

Calif. Catucci said,

I

usually find history to be bor-

To me

it

is

nothing more than a

bunch of dates linked together with

supplied by

is

come upon the This immediately made

that

-

the

world!” Catucci continued, “Or

at

least southern Ontario.”

The duos name means Doo,

as in

However, when I began reading Canadian author Sandra Birdsell’s latest

book. The Russlander,

my

views on history changed. Set in Russia in 1910 on a wealthy

Mennonite

estate, Birdsell tells the

world completely changed was enough to keep me turning the

chapter of the book deals

pages, desperately wanting to find

find

out

why

tragedy took place.

The

dull facts.

first

once again when the German army invades her village. How Katya comes to terms with having her

this

to

with Katya’s

life

on the

estate six

years prior to the bloodshed. She

unaware of the her country is in. Her

out what happens next.

Despite the tragedies that Katya I didn’t find the novel to

lives a sheltered life,

endures,

danger that

be

family has a bright future in front of

them. Their father has

come

into

at all

depressing.

To me, this

the part that really

novel

interesting

made

is

that

The Russlander

wrote

girl

named Katya

wealth and has begun to build his

Birdsell

(short for Katherine)

and her fami-

own

based on the experiences of her grandparents. Instead of just a bunch of facts, you get the emotional aspect of the events and you

story of a

young

ly’s struggle

munism and

anarchism,

which

eventually take hold of the country.

What

really

book was tled,

the

drew me into this opening page enti-

“Notice of November 15, It lists the names of 11 peo-

1917.”

comwant had been dis-

ple killed at an estate, with a plete account of

farmstead.

Katya’s days are filled with hap-

with the rise of com-

piness and delight, until the Tzar (the

Russian leader) and his family

are

murdered. Then

communism when the

takes over and that’s

chaos begins.

Her house

is

plun-

dered by anarchists and her family is

tom apart. The young

Late

girl’s

life

changes

Show

with

realize

exactly

how much

Russian people had I

would

the

to endure.

recommend

The

Russlander to anyone who enjoys reading stories about hardship and strength.

majoring

in political science.

John

Catucci,

The Doo Wops

Now,

he focuses on acting and performing. He has appeared in numerous commercials and an ABC movie of the week, called Kiss My Act, which starred Camryn Manheim, from ABC’s The Practice. Mesiano currently attends York University and is majoring in psychology. After university he plans to act, perform and sing. The Doo Wops have travelled to North Bay, Montreal, Vancouver and L.A. They have also performed for students at

Craig Killborn.”

University

of

Brock University, York Toronto,

University, Centennial College and

Seneca College. This was the year The

Doo Wops

first

played college

gigs-

impressed was buy The Doo Wops CD

Greenwood enough

to

for $ 1 5 after the show.

Krista

Cowan, a second-year planning student, said,

“They were completely hilarious.” The Doo Wops found Conestoga to be, “Really open and receptive to what we do,” said Catucci. Mesiano added their main goal was to, “Give people what they want, which is a ha ha.”

two, and Wops, as in the slang term

me want

goes well we’re going to be on The Late “If all

financial

years.

incident.

tened.”

on The Late Late Show with Craig Killborn,” which airs on CBS.

Mesiano added, “After

covered there, which

stu-

“They (The Doo Wops) kept me laughing the whole time.” He added, “This is the most attentive I’ve seen the crowd here and for once people shut up and lisdent, said,

“If all goes well we’re going to be

Daniel Roth is a third-year journalism student who has studied astrology and a variety of clairvoyant subjects for four

the first person to

ing.

a second-year broadcasting

Their prize included a performance on the Open Mike with

Russlander gives new view on history By LESLEY LEACHMAN

Only standing room was left after the show started. Jeff GreenwoodT'

tion.

going to be giving you a

is

in

Catucci attended York University

for Italians.

The Doo Wops kept Conestoga

June

21

21

Someone with

By CARRIE HOTO

December 22

January 19

The duo performs approximately 75 to 100 shows a year. Their next stop in

was headlining Comedywood

Toronto for a week.

You can be added to The Doo Wops’ mailing list by e-mailing doo the at them They also wops@hotmail.com. have a Web site, which is currently doo the construction, under wops.com.


Entertainment

touch of Japan

TV

By DANIEL ROTH

If there is .seating

be Seoul Sole Korean and Japanese Restaurant in Waterloo

mom

the best

is

and pop restaurant of the

sushi world.

aeeommodate your food

to

The

I'amily.

not highly priced and

is

it’s

not intended to be a fast food estab-

lishment. a

is

One cannot

truly appreciate sushi

he or she knows more about

— ”Su” mean-

word “sumeshi”

the

its

came from

Sushi actually

history.

meaning word was short-

ing vinegar and “meshi” rice.

Over time

ened

to just sushi.

the

Centuries ago,

in

Japan, sushi was

claimed the origins of sushi

came from

the areas of southeast

Asia. Fish w'as layered in a contain-

between

and

rice

salt

then weight-

ed with a stone. After a few weeks the stone was

Months

the fish.

and

to eat.

the fermented

later,

were considered ready

rice

It is still

some

eaten in

areas

like this today.

The delicacy has evolved considerably since then to the raw fish with

cooked

now.

rice eaten

only fermented product you'll find at Seoul Sole is the sake In fact, the

(sah-key) or rice wine. There are three things

when going

observe

The walk If

first

is

to

you should

any sushi

bar.

when you

the smell

in.

the restaurant smells fishy turn

around and run. Sushi

a subtle

htis

smell, and should smell like fish.

Next, look restaurant

A

at the clientele.

means inventory

is

busy

rotated

quickly and you’ll be eating fresher

product as a

Third

is

result.

the overall presentation of

the food.

Seoul Sole passes flying colours.

The

three with

all

restaurant has

almost no smell other than the aroma of the

warm

dishes served such as

the teriyaki meals.

Also not

try to get there early as it’s

overly

and given a a full colour

is

combos you

with different

well as a brief description allow

you

know

to

exactly what you’re

ordering.

A

available.

When

menu

takeout

menus

the lunch

also

is

and din-

combined Seoul

are

Sole has a large variety of fresh dishes you can choose from. tured on the plastic placemats on the table.

The

servers are quick to help you

with any questions you might have regarding any of the dishes. Individually

packaged wooden at

the table, although domestic utensils

are available by request. this

futomaki

review

the

California

was ordered,

lunch

as

large

and

up

fills

it

The server was quick first

part of the meal, a

simple to make and

to

bring the

miso soup,

is

served with

Miso is a fermented paste made from soy beans that is available in a variety of spiciness.

The soup was mild and had a unique taste with a subtle but defi-

stick as

top

the

you would

other

the

on your

middle finger or your ring finger.

finger to

lop

The thick

to

bleach wood.

Two

were served meal. They were also consistency but were

Although the restaurant was busy were brought to the table

circles

large

include:

wasabi,

with

ginger and

soy

sauce.

enhance the (Wasabi is the

the wasabi to

used instead of real wasabi. a vegetable. Wasabi is rare and more ish is

expensive than the

fish it's

flavour-

is

provided for you to to cleanse

your

When

in

rice

flavour than

noodles,

the

passing a platter of food,

your friend pick what they want from it. Don’t pass the food to them with your chopsticks, and it’s considered bad manners to wave your chopsticks aimlessly over the food. Also, don't point

at

Soy sauce

is

the fish, not the rice.

So dip

the

vertically into

your food, especially

Don't hesitate to eat sushi with

sta-

your hands, it's not considered ill mannered. Soups and other liquid dishes should be sipped from the bowl.

Name:

quite filling.

The

meal came with

teriyaki all

the

same

warm

with a

cooked and is

hot.

The

&

Owner/Manager: Richard

J.

Ro. Location: 170 University Ave. W. Waterloo. Unit #20.

Phone: (519) 884-6053.

Type

teriyaki dish

using beef or

available

also

Seoul Sole Korean

Japanese Restaurant.

side dishes but

flavourful heap of

marinated teriyaki chicken. The sauce was sweet and enjoy-

Fish

high in protein and low in

is

fat. It's

also easy for your

digest,

especially

food patients

who

just

body

Often

raw.

Japanese hospitals fish

is

to in

the first

came

off a

liquid diet will eat.

of

restaurant,

business: dine in

Family

or takeout,

LLBO.

Don't pick up a dish of food with your chopsticks still in your hand.

American

The smoke taste

women have

Sushi

is

The leaner

cardiac

low

in

100 calories per

roughly

100 grams.

prevent heart arrest.

In

comparison 100 grams of steak contains around 500 calories.

is

also

better

memory and quicker

opment of brain

Fish

attacks is

high

and in

devel-

cells. is

the

most con-

centrated source of fatty acids in

humans, a lack of omega-3 could contribute

to

depression.

omega-3 fatty acids. Some patients taking omega-3 supplements found their arthritis improved and they

can impact y our behaviour, mental functions and mood. .A steady diet

suffered from less joint pain and

of

moming

calories.

easier for the cells

it

send messages.

Since the brain

could

fish contains

your

lessen

The omega-3 acid DH.A

Japanese women.

your sense of

very

to

chance of developing Alzheimer's disease. Researchers think the brain latched onto the DHA and helps build membranes around the

the brain in children, resulting in

in a sushi bar.

of eating sushi

omega-3 acids called

credited

breast cancer of

smoke

The health benefits

the

credited for simulation growth in

Eating fish on a regular basis

and smell.

is

three times the reported

will kill

don't

One of

DHA

to

Rest them on your plate before you pick anything else up.

Dinner 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. Competition: Mr. Sushi.

nerve making

the rice.

sushi into the sauce rice side up.

bot-

is

people with

your chopsticks. Chopsticks should never be put

palate.

provided to flavour

Quick Facts

on the plate are

portions

small because the meal as a whole

Including a 15 per cent gratuity.

dressing,

And

ing.

between dishes

buds never got

taste

cooked

subtle

let

come

Overall, Seoul Sole Korean and Japanese Restaurant, in Waterloo, offers a welcome change of food in this land of meat and potatoes, and is highly recommended.

The meal also came with: a small garden salad with vinaigrette

California rolls.

some condiments to enhance the common three The flavour.

site.

Hours: Monday to Saturday; Lunch: 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Art would best describe the presentation of the food. Everything

By DANIEL ROTH

sake

licensed under

promptly.

was almost too

The

two lunch meals and a large came to $29.89, which is a good deal for what you got. The meals were enjoyable and filling. The restaurant was clean, the service was wonderful and the presentation of the food was exquithe

Even though the restaurant is busy we were never rushed. Good customer service is obviously important to management.

in

more

often

Waterloo, presents the

salmon.

heavy

the meals

dishes

The

meal.

able with the chicken being well

like pure alcohol.

Sushi

surprisingly

cucumber.

tastes

with this

it

is

strong

It

grab

is

texture

rolls

wrapped

sitting

by small cups as sake is intended to be drank one shot at a time. If you have never tasted sake

to

lettuce

rice,

almost

The rice wine, which is served comes in a vile accompanied

hot,

enough

cucumber and

avocado,

complement the flavour. The futomaki is a large roll containing: rice, cooked egg, simmered gourd, fish flakes and

accompany

make sure you’re down when you do. It’s

with: crab, (normally imita-

bored.

the meal.

before

invented in California and are

ly

made

and heavy. Even without being dipped into the wasabi (a spicy condiment) they did not have a fishy taste. Dipping them into soy sauce added just enough salt to

sip.

to

stick

tionary.

the

with fresh crisp vegetables. The

almost entertaining to watch after

The

stick

the food.

tom

move

items touched.

The California futomaki lunch was wonderful. The California rolls were actual-

every

The ginger

and your pointer

No two

place.

bean sprouts and asparagus. The condiments included wasabi, pickled ginger and a small dish for your soy sauce. The salad was light and made

nate taste. All the side dishes had a unique flavour which added to the entire

eat

Use your thumb

The platter the meals came on was large and everything had its

in

green condiment on the plate used to spice fish.) Sometimes horserad-

Rest

pretty to eat.

seaweed. Six bite-size rolls are carefully prepared and placed on the platter.

Sake was ordered

in

wonderful dishes available at Seoul Sole.

some. Overall it has a thin consistency and was quite enjoyable. The oity miso separated from the water-based broth quickly and was

flavour of the sushi.

stick either

many

of the

tion) shrimp, trout,

Use

hold a pen.

one

nite flavour. The soup doesn’t compare to any domestic cuisine and it may be a touch salty for

How to use Hold

California futomaki lunch, just

Japanese restaurant

cooked asparagus and bean sprouts had a wonderful soy flavour. The rice noodles were clear and were flavourless, which was welcome as everything else had such a domi-

Sushi bar etiquette

chopsticks

Anita Kwan, 22, a server at Seoul Sole Korean and

is

almost every meal.

was so colourful

quickly.

(Photo by Daniel Roth)

well as the chicken teriyaki lunch.

a traditional Japanese dish that

replaced and only a light cover sat on

fish

The lunch menu sheet

For

fish.

er

Waterloo

in

available you'll

seated

chopsticks are waiting for you

created as a method of preserving

It's

— Page 15

Additional types of sushi are pic-

restaurants in the area.

until

2002

menu.

ner

welcome alternapredominately Germanic

Seoul Sole tive to the

23,

can order. Pictures of the meals as

designed

restaurant

a

It's

quickly

SPOKE, September

fish

can help regulate

fluidity.

stiffness.

American women ha\e

three-

times the reported breast cancer of Japanese women. The high amount of fish and soy

may be

Alterations in the brains fluidity

in the

responsible.

Japanese diet

Health benefits were researched by Daniel Roth with infonnation including: Web sites from

www.kayuga.com http//masasushi.hypennart.net.

and


@

Page 16

By JAMES

DOYLE

K.

their

Montreal Expos first game on April

They

are

The

that they are close to being a play-

age and 19

1969.

off contender. Just as they start to

is

when

win, major league baseball slows

8,

NL

is

first

for

in the

in the

average

home

runs (37) and seventh in Runs Batted In (RBI)

But why should anyone

Expos

name

in hits (188), third in

(.336), fifth in

as cloudy as

for the

Guerrero

majors.

is

He

players.

tracks. On Aug. 12, 1994, Major League baseball players went on strike, thus ending the season. At that time, the Montreal Expos were six games up on the Atlanta Braves for first place in the Their National League East. record was 74 wins and 40 losses, good enough for the best record in

uses

all

Japanese sensation

Toma Ohka

has been a pleasant surprise for Montreal this season, with a 13-7 record and a 3.18

his athletic

ERA.

Javier

Vazquez has been disappointing

guide his team to victory.

this year, but will

be under less pressure to lead the staff with the addition of Colon. Montreal was given a shot at life when owners and players agreed

is

another young, excit-

tons of talent. Vidro currently sits third in hits (175) and ninth in average (.310).

ing

He

player with

would not take

that contraction

dynamic defensive player with solid hands. Vidro is one of

place in the next four years, but

second baseman, and proved it by being voted as a starter in this year’s all-star game.

the club has not been

is

a

baseballs

This year’s addition of the Expos, playing under the dark skies of contraction, are 72-76, before games being played on

building

tools and leadership qualities to

baseman,

the big leagues.

also

the

Jose Vidro, the Expos second

.

are

Colon also leads team in complete games with four and shutouts, with one.

100 ). Offensive numbers this high, combined with one of the best arms in the league, make Guerrero one of baseballs most exciting

that every time they start to put a promising or winning team on the field, they are stopped in their

a rookie of the year contender.

average (ERA).

(

care?

The problem

a

himself as the best player

tracted for at least four years, the is

making

rightfielder, is

Wilkerson

runs,

themselves a strong pitching staff. Ace Bartolo Colon, who was acquired through a trade with the Cleveland Indians earlier this season, has been nothing short of Colon has an 8-3 amazing. record, and a 2.74 earned run

Vladimir Guerrero, the Expos

Major League Baseball has been Expos all season long, and although the iTew collective bargaining agreement has said that no teams can be con-

home

The Expos

them down.

last.

trying to contract the

future in Montreal

on the senior With a .274 batting aver-

for himself

circuit.

are starting to

played

waiting to see

they will play their

name

The young and exciting show signs

Sept. 14.

Expos

now

Expos

but over for the

All

ever.

Sports

— SPOKE, September 23, 2002

Rookie Wilkerson

Expos owner for the

best

found, and they are

Brad quickly making a

Baseball.

centrefielder is

still

being

League

Major This means

by

operated

An

need more.

still

that

the

other 29 teams are supporting a

team

that doesn’t get 10,000 peo-

The finances of basecannot allow these 29 teams to spend money on their competition. Thus, Montreal desperately ple a game. ball

needs someone to step up to the plate and buy this group of young and exciting players. The problem, then, is what if someone does buy the Expos? Would this new owner keep the Expos in Montreal? The answer to this is more than likely “No.”

Montreal needs a new stadium. Olympic Stadium is old, ugly and If the city of falling apart. Montreal and the provincial government cannot get a new ballpark in Montreal, the Expos are as

good

Max underwent

Last year,

surgery to implant

new

a

kind of pacemaker, one with technological advancements unavailable just 5 years ago.

Every time you give to the Heart and Stroke Foundation,

you fund research that leads to medical breakthroughs, like

the one that saved Max’s

life.

as gone.

Unfortunately,

no

will

this

Now

doubt be one of the Expos’ final seasons. Should someone create a miracle in Montreal, and save the Expos, please, show yourself soon. If not, and you plan to purchase this group of future champions, please, keep them together. The foundation has been laid for a winner, and with a little bit of extra money, this current group in Montreal may just wear a World

he can spend more time

with his grandfather. Please give to the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

HEART

AND STROKE FOUNDATION

Series ring.

GROUPS AND WORKSHOP SCHEDULE 2002

Fall,

**REGISTER IN STUDENT SERVICES (Room 2B02

GROUP

#OF

RRGIl^rER

SESSIONS

BEFORE

6

October 4'**

Multicultural Support

Group October

4

Public Speaking

23'^**

Ext. 3360)

START DATE

FACIUITATOK.

Week of October

Keith Martin

7 Week of October

Shawna Bernard

28

Anxiety Test Anxiety

October

4

Group

Joan Magazine

Week of October

23^**

(Photo by Nick Horton)

28

Zhen Zhen Suicide Prevention

October 29™

1

October

31*'

Barb Kraler

(left)

goes up

to take

a shot against Zhou Xiao

in

the

recreation centre Sept. 13.

Session

On

Virtual Mature Student

No

Joy Tomasevic

September 17

Ongoing

Line

throughout Semester

Community

varsity basketball

By NICK HORTON

enough players

clearly

if

you go

into the recreation centre at any

——— —

A

' j

THE FOLLOWING LEARNING AND STUDY SKILLS WORKSHOPS WILL BE OFFERED ONCE A SEMESTER AND OPEN TO ALL STUDENTS.

#OF

WORKSHOP

SESSIONS

REGISTER BEFORE

^

START DATE V-

^

Sept 19 or Oct 9 @*12:30-1:30

Joy Tomasevic

Textbook Reading

1

Sept 23

Sept 26

@

Joy Tomasevic

Note Taking

1

Octl

Oct 3

Multiple Choice

1

Oct 8

Oct 10

1

Nov 19

Nov 21

11:30-12:30

Joy Tomasevic

Joy Tomasevic

11:30-12:30

when you are free. timetables of the majority of registrants. The more times you are free, the more likely it is that we can accommodate you. Once a time and place have been us if you prefer.

Some workshops have established times and rooms. Check when you register

.

into Student Services

2B02 or

call ext. 3360.

mCroup

well varsi-

programs were doing and found

The survey looked

many

at participa-

spectators were

games.

into

Workshops\2002 Wottahops\20O2 Werkshop Seheiule fatUoc

The survey sports

and how

coming out also took

how

well

teams

fared

consideration

Conestoga

copy of your timetable, highlighted Every attempt is made to accommodate the

For information about Winter 2003 Workshops, drop

how

a basketball team was just not fea-

to

Joy Tomasevic

for a group, please leave a

we wilt contact you or you can check in with

a major survey on

tion in practices, tryouts,

@

12:30-1:30

established,

or volleyball pro-

sible.

@

12:30-1:30

with times

var-

gram since the 1993/1994 season. At that time, the college conducted ty,

given time there are always people playing basketball,” he said.

Marlene Ford, the ordinator

sity basketball

Sept 17 or Oct 7

When signing up

at

question this year, and might be

Conestoga has not offered a

1

Preparing For Finals

team

out of the

is

for awhile.

Time Management

Test Taking

basketball

varsity

Conestoga College

athletics co-

sports,

varsity

for

acknowledged the

but

situation,

much they can do about it. “People come to Conestoga because it is number also said there

is

not

1

...

coming here

students are

education

rather

then

for an

play

to

sports, the interest is not there.”

Ford also explained the situation is in. “If we were to offer a varsity basketball program we would have to cut back on She said intramural programs.” the college

that funding for varsity sports problem, but the college has

is

a

still

add three varsity two years - golf,

against other colleges.

been able

result of the survey

sports in the last

being

badminton, and rugby. Wayne Dietz, a second-year

The end was the varsity basketball and volleyball programs cut.

The survey may have been corthough some students attending Conestoga seem to think the

to

management

studies student

and

“A

rect,

avid basketball player, said,

opposite.

of students want to play post-secondary basketball and if a school

“I think

enough

Conestoga would have to form a

participation

basketball

team,”

said

Nick

Faulkner, a second-year computer

programming

student.

“There are

can’t

offer

that,

they

lot

won’t go

why questioned Conestoga College can offer sports like girls’ softball, but not basket there.”

He

ball. “It is quite

odd,” Dietz saic\^

Digital Edition - September 23, 2002  
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