Page 1

Pond Party draws a crowd Nearly 3,000 students attend

Spoke

Conestoga’s Pond Party during orientation week.

NEWS Monday, September

According

The college community can breathe a sigh of

finally

relief.

Thanks to a new smoking task force, smoking will no longer be tolerated

the

at

college's

main

entrances.

Students

and

staff

returning

from summer holidays may have noticed new signs and red boundaries painted on sidewalks outside the college's doors.

Barry Milner, manager of physical resources at the college and chair of the task force, said the idea for the committee began

when

college administration and security became concerned about

growing number of people smoking near entrances. "People were ignoring the old requests," he said. "We were just trying to take low-key a the

approach.

Now

it's

a

little

more

high-profile." A.V the eT\<i of the spring semester,

Milner was approached by administration about chairing a new committee that would look into the

smoking at the college. with Conestoga Together

issue of

to the task force, the

at various locations.

Just ask

pamphlet is also being made available, providing further

be handed out in the first couple of months while students and

become accustomed

,to

A1 Hunter, supervisor of securiConestoga said with the old practices, smokers agreed ty services at

move when

was no

asked, but there

However, hopefully change with

lasting effect.

will

new rules. "If we fail

the

to get

compliance

obviously

we'll have to resort to issuing tickets to the

then

However, Milner and Hunter agreed that issuing tickets was not the goal of the task force.

"We

are serious about enforc-

"But hopefully

ing," said Milner.

we'll never

In

have

order to ensure a smooth

be con-

transition,

was

rainy days and winter months.

It

ty

means anyone seen by securismoking within the marked

boundaries

will

face

conse-

quences. Students face monetary fines,

visitors

will be

asked to

shelters will

campuses smokers away from the

structed at the various to direct

main entrances, especially during Milner said the college

located.

The problem

those entrances.

"We're moving.

Fines for students start at $25.

days those fines will reach a

rise to

maximum

not paid after 15 days.

10

$35 and of $50

if

campus is that

is

the

no jurisdiction on

college has

face disciplinary action.

they are not paid within

wait-

General

Stratford

the

Hospital where that

leave and administrative staff will

If

is

ing for eonfirmation of support

from

I

believe this

is

work

in progress," said Milner.

"It will

be maybe one, two, three

a

do you play the drums, guikeyboard and sing alt at once?

McRorie

who

Tait,

forms as the McRorie One

per-

Man

Live.

years before

we

fulfill

committee wanted

arrived at

Conestoga College in a sequinned tank top and black Spandex shorts, was a new addition

Pond Party. The Pond Party is an event held by the CSI every year to give students a chance to get to know more to the

people, while enjoying free pleasure,

games and entertainment.

Tait played a

wide selection of music including; The Tragically Hip, Eminem, Michael Jackson, AC/DC and Led Zeppelin to

Tom

Stompin'

Connors. Tait said, interesting by providing an assortment," of different styles. "I

keep

it

Tait was enthralled," said Jody Andruszkiewicz, the programmer/events coordinator for the CSI. "totally

So how does Tait become man band? The secret lies

a onein the

four sensors in each shoe that con-

to."

union locals and related staff, a smoking task force began. After reviewing previous policies and methods, a new system created.

How

The audience watching

offenders," he said.

Students Incorporated, administration,

the

new methods.

this

what the

to see done."

trol

snare and symbol

the bass,

drums. Tait can change the sensors to whatever he wants through synthesizer modules. On his chest he

wears four more synthesizers, which create "tom tom sounds." He also has a keyboard on his left and right side, which generate bass and rhythm sounds and with the microphone he can generate the sound of a guitar through his voice. Tait has been involved with music since the age of eight, when he began playing the drums. He was involved with various bands over the years, but the bands never stayed together so Tait decided to start his

own

band. "Rather than

using machines,

He added he

used myself."

I

has no aspirations of

being picked up by a record company. "It's not going to happen." Tait will only play live music,

which his

is

why he

decided to leave

management company. He

said

that there is an artificial reality

of

what people are supposed to be, which he refers to as the "airbrush culture."

He

said this refers to the

music business, because a singers

now

forming Tait

lip

lot

of

sync instead of per-

live.

has

spent

more

than

$100,000 trying to get his One Man Live up and running and has spent $70,000 on lighting and sound equipment.

He (Photo by Jason Middleton)

^ ^services

Framing success

Monica Himmelman displays a diploma frame. The frames were part of fundraising efforts that took place at commencement June 19 and 20. See Page 7 for story. Alu.

officer

Live band

The Hornepayne, Ont. man, who

The education stage also means large number of fines may not

to

1

By CARRIE HOTO

details.

staff

18

entrances students tar,

A

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; No.

34 th Year

One Man

initial stages of the system are about education. Students can find information about enforcement and fines on notices posted

a

Saving your funny money

Conestoga College, Kitchener

help clear air

9

Canadian comic James Cunningham puts a funny twist on financial advice.

ENTERTAINMENT

Smoke-free zones By LAURIE VANDENHOFF

NEWS

10

2002

16,

Career Fair coming Sept. 25 The countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest career fair will be arriving at RIM Park.

north

resides

currently

Hornepayne. of

which

Sault

Thunder Bay. He

St.

is

in

located

Marie

and

travels all over

Canada, through the United States and for two months in the winter he performs in the Cayman Islands.

(Photo by Aimee Wilson)

The McRorie One Man Live stole College Pond Party on Sept. 5. He

also does exhibitions and fairs

the

at the

Conestoga

Rogers

Television

show

Both

and

during the spring and summer. His next stop after Conestoga College

Belair Direct set up booths to hand

was

Cuts had draws for fanny packs, travel wallets and coupons for ISIC photos; and Blockbuster offered

Belleville.

Tail's

CD

is

entitled Live

Music

Head-to-Toe, Version 1.0 and can be purchased later in the year on

Web

out information.

free

As

well. Travel

Reward memberships

who have

to stu-

a valid student

mcrorieone-

dents

manlive.ca for a cost of $10. The

card.

CD

You could also sign up for numerous clubs and programs

his personal

is strictly

site,

original music.

In addition to the

one man band

,

CSI added another new attracPond Party called the Trampoline Thing, which involved being harnessed and jumping on a the

tion to the

giant trampoline.

The

free pleasure continued with

hot dogs and pop. not to mention

beer

at

the

minimal price of $2.

The CSI handed out calendars and student planners.

around the college. "To be honest

it's

(the

Pond

we throw." Andruszkiewicz. He added

Party) the coolest event

said

there's nothing better than a gor-

geous day with free food, entertainment and lots of free pleasure. The event, which cost approximateh' $4,000. was attended by 50 per cent of the student body.


News

New

end

orientation plan helps

first-day jitters success workshops. "It lit everything up for you," said Robert McLeod, 20, a first-year

A new

standardized orientation

management

model was put into affect this year at all Conestoga campuses to help

lege.

first-year students with the registra-

little

to

school, and having the

model.

chance to meet the faculty "made me feel comfortable," he added. For Phase 2, the students were

orientation ses-

given the student procedures guide

and orientation process. The day began with Phase

the four-phase orientation

of

1

sion began around 8:30 a.m. in the recreation centre where the stu-

to

dents were introduced to>4aculty,

procedures.

given a pep

and a chance

talk,

to

policies,

rights

and

much

so

"There's

(in the proce-

dures guide)," said Gregory, adding, "They'll have it and know they have

gave you an idea of what was

member

student's

important information

happening," said Melissa Brown, 19, a first-year nursing student. The students then followed a

inform them of program

expectations,

ask questions. "It

who

student,

studies

nervous coming to col-

McLeod took a year off before

coming

tion

A two-hour general

a

felt

access to the information."

For Phase

of

3,

first-year students

classroom where

be given a 45-minute presentation about the services available at

they were given their schedules and booklists and had the opportunity to

Conestoga College. The presentation will be given in a Strategies for

their faculty to a

meet

their faculty

and senior

will

stu-

Student Success class or incorporated into another class.

dents in their program.

Carol Gregory, a counsellor, along with Jon Olinski, president of CSL and Jan Stroh, Job Connect, presented the overview of the new

Kara Speedie, a

standardized orientation model,

all

program orientations had student,

to include items

orientation

the

Kar a Speedie, 19, a first-year nursing student, felt she received a lot of

ness

make first-year students feel welcomed and informed and "give

good information but the two-hour Speedie orientation was too long.

to information,"

also said an organized tour of the

those uncomfortable seats was too long. .we didn't really get a chance to meet people (outside of their

school would have been helpful.

model

to the

academic co-ordina-

tion committee.

The goal was

them equal access

to

said Gregory, adding, "Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s peo-

Brian Gray, 19, a first-year busi-

ple here to help them."

felt

was too lengthy

as well. "Sitting in

VAN ESSA LAYE

Conestoga College council held their first monthly meeting on Sept. 9 to discuss the many issues and concerns on campus. One of their main concerns was if the students

had a

blast during this year's orien-

tation week.

"were keen, they were up for it, and they were pumped." But there was one phrase that stuck out in Harris's mind; it was

something that a student said which he thought epitomized the entire event:

"Now

we

know

why

Conestoga is number 1." However, the fun and games

John Tibbits, president of the college, said he was pleased with the positive feedback he received from

weren't the only things the council was impressed with - there were

students and faculty regarding the

first-year students

and information given throughout the welcoming week.

mation desk with routine questions, but the decline at information

With an 89 per cent turnout of

meant the use of Student Services went up. "The students have listened to what was told to them (by faculty)

activities

students at the events, Fred Harris, executive director of student serv-

and

ices

registrar, said the students

some

practical results too. Usually

COUNSELLOR'S CORNER:

swamp

the infor-

part of a

on the

new

checklist.

organized by the CSI

at

Doon,

Phase 4 is an introduction to the Learning Resource Centre. Overall, Gregory felt the day went really well. "It's a wonderful she said.

Waterloo and Guelph campuses.

first step,"

The afternoon was

positive tone."

left for the stu-

"I

hope

it

set a

dents to tour the school, find their lockers and classes, buy their

If you would like to offer feedback about the new standardized

program)."

books, student ID cards and park-

orientation, call Student Services at

The day

ing passes and sign up for student

748-5220.

.

also

offered

a

lunch

College Council pleased with this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bv

As

checklist. first-year nursing student, looks over the registration

of where and who they can go to for support, help and or information," Harris said.

Students will continue to gather knowledge about services at the college through a four-phase pro-

gram

the college

implemented

this

program offers a welcoming to the school along with knowledge of services, meeting program faculty and learning how to use the Learning Resource year. This

Centre.

Although the council was pleased with the start-up of the year,

some

said that

could be made. Tibbits discussed

new school

improvements the

idea

of

expanding the Pond Party into a

fall

semester kickoff

bigger event, along with the option of serving vegetarian foods to suit different students needs. There was also the issue of students starting in January and what kind of welcoming they would or

Tibbits added that Conestoga's enrollment growth is bigger than Wilfrid Laurier University's this year.

With the double cohort coming Conestoga

into effect, Harris said

6,000 to 7,000

should receive upon arrival to make them feel like a part of the college. Another big issue at the meeting

might be looking

was the 1 2 per cent increase in registration, which includes co-op and

of students, Tibbits said the college still needs a bigger presence of stu-

Business,

dents from the Guelph area, as they make up only seven per cent of the

international

students.

technology, applied arts and health sciences enrollment increased 12 to

Even though

said

there

are

this

seems

like a lot

student body.

"The area we draw the least from is Guelph," said Tibbits. "We could have a campus this big

15 per cent.

Harris

at

students next year.

currently

5,737 students enrolled at the college, which may drop 2 or 2 fi per

in

Guelph.

cent by November.

Loneliness

you are here from out of town; some are living away from home for the^ what you are doing first time. What a change! There's no one to report to about and when. Curfew - what's a curfew? There is also no one to ask, "How was your day?" "What time would you like to have dinner?" and to say "I love you."

Many

of

The excitement sickness

-

of

new freedom and

may be tempered by homeand community. Slowly, you'll get to know

opportunity

missing your family, friends

roommates and other peers. Perhaps you'll get involved in intramural activities at the Recreation Centre and clubs and events through the student government. Read Spoke, your school newspaper, to familiarize yourself with happenings on campus.

some

of

your classmates,

faculty,

You can meet with a counsellor in Student Services to talk about adjusting to your environment and to do some problem solving about getting involved in your college and your new community.

A Message

from Student Services

(Room 2B02)

A ictoria Cafik, 20,

eneral business

place

enjoys the

homework

In

the sun

warm weather

while working

outside Door 5 at the

^

on^r

Doon Campus.

VÂŤ.V!


News

SPOKE, September

16,

2002

— Page 3

L

Opinions vary on pot issue By HALLEY McPOLIN To

discover their needs to decide where they should go from there

legalize or not to legalize.

That is the question that has been on the lips of many sinee

argument on by Senate committee

5

members

marijuana should

that

not only be decriminalized, but legally attainable by those as

young as 16. The argument has created several

eonllieting

from the general public, but there's no doubt that everyone has an opinion. For some, the idea of less tax dollars going into the neverending "war" on marijuana is enough to want change, while

who

others

reactions

few.

depressant, you wouldn't see a

be

Amy's

feel

it

luture of kids that

Amy,

is, in

ful

worker who volunteers at a local group home for children between the ages of 6 and 2 years of age, says she can't see any negative side effects to legalizing a drug 1

that

is

already too easily attain-

able.

"They're going to smoke it anyway,” Amy, who refused to give her last name, said of marijuana. ”TIa\s way il can be somewhat controlled or monitored. Quality can be managed, potency can be managed. One can know how much to take at one time." The receiving home where

Amy

works

a short-term care

is

be poten-

her opinion, no more harm-

smoking

than

a cigarette.

"Because the kid who's 17 and charged goes into an opened or closed custody youth centre, generally speaking, and starts getting into that lifestyle. They then turn 18 and by committing

smoker go rob a corner store... we’re

lot

pot-smoker

go

rob

a

corner

store. ..we're too lazy!"

Peggy, who did not want to use her real name, smokes marijuana control

to

the

effects

of

MS

which include tremors, fatigue, and speech impairment. At one point she lost the ability to form sentences for two weeks. "I knew in my head what I wanted

to

came out down and backwards. ..it

say but everything

upside

was

“You wouldn’t see a pot-

to

a 22-year-old direct care

may

the

in

destroying their futures by

tially

our best interest to stay consistent with our drug laws. That, of course, brings up the

intoxicating effects and proven health risks.

lies

participating in an activity that

in

ever-popular argument against cigarettes and alcohol, both of which have addictive qualities,

concern

Hulet

sclerosis,

whether it's foster care, a treatment centre or therapy to name a

-

believe pot to be a

dangerous gateway drug

multiple

"A

of people get angry (on alcohol,) it's such a depressant. Marijuana isn't a

the controversial

Sept.

from

fers

agrees.

FREAK SHOW by Marc

really strenuous."

Peggy, whose tremors were evident even as she spoke, said the only medication available to her at the time was steroids. She began

too lazy!”

use marijuana regularly for her

to

Medicinal marijuana user

symptoms

1991; the pot, she

in

says, allows her to live a

the

same crime they land

in jail

for five years." In Amy's opinion the strong laws against marijuana not only cost taxpayers needlessly, but

also create a greater strain on our youth that could be avoided with simple knowledge. ..knowledge that is often denied as a result of a persistent taboo.

The most recent argument for marijuana has been directed towards the intoxicating effects versus that of alcohol.

"From everything I've heard it's less damaging on the body physically," says Amy, who admits she's no expert. "People who are stoned tend to know it

more and They are

are

more

also

less

in

control.

aggressive,

and self-destructive as

volatile

more norShe does not have a prescription for it however - she says she would prefer not to mal, pain-free

life.

have the attention fighting

would

bring.

It

battle to obtain

to get

it

has been less of a it

through reliable

underground sources. Peggy believes there may be an added benefit to legalizing the drug; "The government can make

some money

off it,

maybe

get rid of

If

pu’re reading

this,

the deficit."

Although the controversy surmarijuana rounding whether should be legalized, decriminalized or remain as it is continues, most will agree that there is no easy answer.

Nor

is

yDta’re-¥eacling

there a resolution in

sight. "I

my

STUDENTS

(legalization on going to happen in lifetime," says Peggy, "and I

don't

marijuana)

think is

Exercise and healthy eating

WANTED GREAT PAY 4

important for college students

EASY WORK!

receives

troubled

facility

that

youth

order to assess them and

in

By JEFF MORLEY

the

they're drunk." Peggy, a 38-year-old

who

suf-

ing the four food groups a student

Students do have a choice.

make

plan on living a lot of years."

when

We

can guarantee a nutritious and balanced meal anytime of the day.

The

countless choices daily, but

most important choices may be

our nutritional ones. According to registered dietician and professional home economist,

dietician

also

recommends

walking or riding a bicycle to school. College life can be particularly sedentary due to the hours in front of a computer screen or just "Exercise

Bonnie Lacroix, good nutrition is to "choose your time well and to choose your food well." This may

sitting

seem

your mind as well. Exercise also serves as a good study break by

like

an impossible task with

uncompromisingly hectic student schedules and stubborn budgets. However, Lacroix could be con-

doctorate

in

food safety herself.

The University of Guelph graduate and research assistant believes eating properly

making

is

that

a question

of

certain lifestyle choices.

having breakfast. She stresses the importance of a good breakfast, likening it to a road trip. Before you go you Firstly,

she

suggests

lecture.

is

Another

stimulates

life.

lifestyle important your week. Make

egg.

By simply

follow-

Lacroix recommends eating

smaller portions

at

meals while eat-

ing "a wide variety of foods."

Students

should

foods that are low

also in fat,

choose such as

fruits

vitamins and nutrients.

decisions you can

on when you are particularly busy. Moreover, on those busiest evenings plan to make something quick and easy,

lifestyle

list

can save time

to avoid

impulse buy-

later

such as a frozen dinner.

On

other

more relaxed devote more time to cooking a good

nights that are little

This

may be

there are) lots of ferent things."

particularly

ways of eating

dif-

Books expensive? Need groceries and spare cash?

tinues by saying that this

prepare food ahead of time. This

a grocery

to plan

daunting for some, but remember that "food is really exciting (and

maybe one

basis.

ing that tends to be expensive and

is

good

having a bread or cereal, a milk or yogurt and

you ensure the necessary intake of nutrients and vitamins on a daily

Lacroix says college is full of "new experiences, new adventures" and by making informed

choice

dinner.

juice,

you

Moreover,

etables are a great source of energy,

it

a

friift

diet diverse

interesting.

sures of everyday

stimulate your body,

during the day you have to get a

!

it

relieving stress and easing the pres-

it

put fuel in the car. In order to "go" nutritional start. Lacroix sug-

make

and vegetables. Lacroix conmay be challenging for students because "mother isn't saying eat your vegetables." However, fruits and veg-

very important" and not only does

sidered an expert considering she

has gone back to school to earn her

a

in

By keeping your also

make

the best

choices for you. But she says to "work hard

above all and enjoy." For more information contact Joy Hancock in the school Health Office in Room 2B06. Students can also look for more nutritional information on the Internet at www.dietician.ca or can look at Canadian Health Guide the www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hppb/nutriat tion/pube/foodguide/index.html.

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Page 4

SPOKE, September

-

Commentary

2002

16,

Defining

remembrance The

anniversary

first

revisiting

On

always a significant one.

It is

reliving

and

time. what we saw and experienced for the first' the horrifying feelings we faced it meant conjuring up 1 1 when we fell And, it was the bitter knowledge of realizing always be in possibly will and was next morning

Sept.

last year.

is

,

asleep Sept. 10. the

remembrance of

terror.

citizens took time to As America’s neighbour, Canada and its firefighters, police offiremember on Sept. 11, recognizing the people, of us, unknowing of what it cers and many others who died. Many

would have

be

felt like to

Flight 93 that morning, attacks truly touched us

all.

New

in

City, at the Pentagon, or

York

compelled

to

For most of

us,

felt

where we would not remember the

pause and it

attacks.

is

on

reflect, for the

hard to imagine a year

Whether bombarded by

why, the imagery has headlines or simply trying to understand our memories. We into burned been unavoidable and is forever or the year after bring, year next will what but this year,

CNN

remembered that?

For students

at

Conestoga College, Sept.

easily the

is

1 1

most hor-

and terrifying event of their lifetime thus it was the Kennedy For most of their parents and grandparents, were two major and that Harbor Pearl af assassination or the events parents and However, generations. their of moments far.

rific

defining

now

grandparents

televishare in the shock that was witnessed on

sion.

As

2002 dawned,

Sept. 11,

it

hurt

remembering the

initial

shock and

fly into the Trade worry of last year after watching planes deliberately dead, CNN’s presumed initially were thousands Towers. Tens of the plain mystery of and ending, never were headlines breaking news had happened in the first place, baffled us all.

why

it

attacks. can be easy to forget the days following the would ones loved their that hopeful Forget how many people remained perhaps but horror, of day jusf'one not was 1 1 return home. Their Sept. months of despair that have not lessened in 365 days. and There is little comfort in knowing there may be future attacks colours, indicating that America now lives under a warning system of everything in northe risk level of potential terrorist attacks. Almost

However,

mal-day

it

life

seems

to

be relate back to 9/11, and

100 per cent safe traveling by

feel

it

remains

difficult to

venturing into the United

air or

States.

World leaders have assured us of

their efforts to eliminate terrorism

play an and enhance safety developments. Canada has sought to forces armed our and changes made have airports Our role. important

have fought

in Afghanistan.

dents and families,

it

However, as citizens of Canada, as

a difference in our post-Sept.

all to

who

lost their lives.

When

it is

all

too easy to

sit

back and feel sorry

much worse than anyone else’s, we rights we have been given and the free-

and think our day

should always remember the

is

live with.

remember our good fortune of living in our on freecountry. Even when Sept. 1 1 was a horrible attack important rebuilding is taking place. And remembering is an

And, we should beautiful

dom,

world.

it

for ourselves

dom we

1 1

we could ever make

makes a difference to simply pause and reflect. It helps recognize the moments of silence and pay respect to those

However, us

difficult to believe

may seem

stu-

the

try to

part of that rebuilding.

Legalizing pot bad idea 16-year-old to toke up legally whenever he or she wants as a good thing. Kids (and adults) have enough trouble getting their lives in order without having to do it through a haze of foggy thoughts.

A

Senate committee recently recommended that marijuana be legalized.

Marc

appears the senators have been smoking a little too much 'wacky tabaccy' themselves. Legalizing marijuana would present our society with even more problems than It

we

are already facing with

smok-

ing and alcohol.

We're currently trying to curtail smoking by slowly eliminating it

from public forums. And taxes on cigarettes have recently shot up.

we now

allow people to smoke pot after 79 years of deeming it illegal and taboo?

Why

should

Admittedly there have been a few good things to come from the

am

hemp to we have made

for the use of

all

of February 2002, the Toronto Star reported 750 people

As

in

Canada had been granted

es include those suffering from AIDS, cancer and multiple sclero.sis.

Those diseases all have nasty symptoms and side-effects. Using marijuana who are dying passion.

and other products. The use of marijuana as a medicinal supplement is a little

battle

me

understand

to swallow, but

how

it

can help

I

to

ease someone's pain.

per-

mission to possess up to 30 days' worth of pot. People allowed to use marijuana for medical purpos-

help ease the dent in the tree population over the years to meet demands for paper

harder for

And if the legal drinking age is 19 and you have to be 18 to pur-

Opinion

to ease the pain

marijuana plant. I

Hulet

My

is

of those

an act of com-

allow 16-year-olds to toke up, as

was suggested

recently by the If 16-year-olds

Senate committee? are not responsible

enough

to

age of 16, then why should they be allowed to smoke

drink

at the

pot?

Advocates of legalized marijuana say pot isn't nearly as bad as drinking alcohol or smoking tobacco, which in most cases

be

true, but

it

may

wasn't by accident

was banned. heard someone defending pot recently. They said all it does is

that pot

dad died from multiple

scle-

rosis last year after a long, painful -

why would we

chase smokes,

he never used pot to ease him go

I

make you

relaxed, laugh or eat.

his suffering. After seeing

There's a lot

through that I can't, in good conscience, say it would be wrong to smoke pot in such a situation. However, I can't see allowing a

but even

if

more

to

it

than that

there wasn't

-

don't

-

we

have enough lethargic, immature, out-of-shape people even without legalizing pot?

Spoke Conestoga College published and produced weekly by the journalism students of and Broadcast student Print Journalism former of memory the This edition of Spoke is dedicated to Mike Metzger. is

Letters are

Spoke welcomes

welcome

letters to

the

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be contacted for verification.

editor. Letters

Production Managers:

Advertising Manager: Laurie-Ann Vandenhoff

Vanessa Laye Hulet and Marc Editors: Spoke Online

Circulation Manager: Lisa Hiller Photo Editors: Stacey McCarthy, Daniel Roth,

and Janine Toms

for publication.

N2G 4M4

Dr.,

Julie

Tori Sutton

Faculty Adviser: Christina Jonas

4M4. Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke ©conestogac.on.ca Web site: www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

letters will be published. be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter

No unsigned

Letters should

Address correspondence to: The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont,

Graham and

Editor; Julianna Kerr

Inc. (CSI) in exchange for the insermainly funded from September to May by a payment from Conestoga Students not necessarily reflect the views or do newspaper this in expressed opinions and tion of advertising in the paper. The views their advertisements contain t|£ unless CSI the Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers in Spoke are not endorsed by beyond the amount paid for the CSI logo. Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising contain any libellous statements. Letters to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and must not

Spoke

is

sp^p


'

News

SPOKE, September

16,

2002

— Page 5

Advertising program uses fresh learning techniques By BRANDI STEVENSON Conestoga's

gram

offers

new

community.

advertising pro-

more lhan

just applied

learning.

Deborah Reyner,

a former mar-

new program,

plans to employ

experiential learning.

Reyner

siiid that

doing a cas6 study or an assign-

make them

ment. "we're going to touch

it,

taste

it,

see

it,

For example,

feel

she said.

it,"

Reyner plans

to

bring in different scented candles

evoke her students'

to class to try to

senses and thoughts. "Experiential

going

make

to

is

what's

this particular pro-

gram unique in Ontario," she said. Another unique aspect of this program will be the students involvement in the school. As part of their mark, advertising students

helping

be

will

Reyner

events.

out

CSI

with

said, "We're

going

be very involved with the college

to

in a positive

This

way."

she said.

title,"

TV

advertising because he sees

radio

or

sorships, or event planning.

the arts and

most important element to integratmarketing communications is making sure that all of these communication methods are "co-ordi-

creative side of advertising.

thinking up

So

to the cus-

When

and theothem the creative aspects of advertising and hands-on learning. dents' the basic concepts

a creative genius, said they are a really

ple,"

will teach

who fondly called Romer

good team.

he applied, McIntosh knew

was a new program. He was proud of himself when he got accepted. "I felt really good kneeing I was accepted out of 500 peo-

taught mar-

more than 10 years, will be teaching her stu-

Romer

both students said they are

that this

keting at the school for

ries.

far,

ions are key elements.

Reyner and Joe

who

he said.

On (Photo by Brandi Stevenson)

Joe Romer, an advertising teacher, and Deborah Reyner, advertising co-ordinator, are shown standing in the new office. A classroom was converted to office space to accommodate faculty.

Nursing program

the

other

hand,

bit

of pressure on

you've got to set

come

you because out strong and

an example for the next classes."

By IZABELA ZARZYCKA The

program

nursing

KEEP UP. It's more manageable to do a little every day on reading and assignments than to try to catch up on a week's worth of work on a Sunday afternoon.

at

College has gone through some major changes this •

year. It is

now

a degree program with a

practical nursing

component.

TViis

REVIEW CLASS NOTES. Reviewing^class notes as soon as possible after class Increases understanding and retention.

four-year program is associated with McMaster University and is

based on the university's course out-

The new program allows stuwork in small groups as

line.

dents to

well as in a clinical environment. is no longer

The diploma program offered at the college.

practical nursing

The degree and program

offers better

er curriculum.

There

and also hardwill be "new

ENGAGE IN ACTIVE LEARNING. Transfer your notes or summarize information. Organize and rewrite your notes, make a chart, diagram or flashcards. Discuss or teach what you are learning to another person. Anytime you can interact with or think about the information in a new way you increase understanding and retention.

expectations" for the degree pro-

gram, said Ruth Heard, a nursing teacher,

which means

that students

be required to work harder to

will

earn the marks.

Heard also said

be

that there will

rules regarding uniforms

new

and

Uniforms will only be allowed in clinical environments and lab coats will not be worn in lab coats.

labs.

Along with

The

nOw

part

moved

into the

"The classroom environment wonderful," said Heard. "really

SET REASONABLE STUDY GOALS. is

of the building.

is

Are you a morning person? A night person? Can you study during your lunch hour and still be productive in the afternoon? Do you need to find time after work? Setting aside a quiet, separate place in your home that will be your study place and always studying there is an effective strategy.

in the

location of the nursing faculty. faculty has

STUDY WHEN YOU ARE AT YOUR BEST.

the changes to the pro-

gram, there has been a change

The

is

faculty

happy" about the move.

is

After studying your effectiveness reduced. Take breaks often. The average attention span of an adult approximately 30 minutes. Find your optimum attention span and

study accordingly.

"We have our own computers and phones,"

said

Ardelle

Darling,

teacher in the nursing program,

a

"we

are ecstatic."

Darling compared the

new

side to

by saying "before there was one big room and four phones for all the old

of us."

The move

gives

students better

access to the teachers

and faculty

have their own pods and more space to visit with students.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED I

Volunteer with a child at their school and help improve their self-esteem and confidence.

^1-3 .

hours a week commitment. .•

Call

744-7645 X317

SKILLS THAT YOU NEED FOR LEARNING

same

you have already developed by juggling multiple responsibilities: managing time, setting priorities, asking questions, and knowing yourself. These

are the

skills

desire to

that

skills

learners successful. Add motivation the formula for success is complete.

make

them and

are the

Van

Dommelen was unaware that this was a new program. "There’s a little

TIPS FOR ACADEMIC SUCCESS

undergoes changes

Conestoga

like

enjoying the program. They added that participating and voicing opin-

Right now, the program has two

Reyner,

"I

ideas," she said,

"stuff that's catchy, stuff that people

tomers," Reyner said.

Romer.

new

will really get into."

nated and consistent to send out a more powerful, more efficient and

full-time teachers,

to

every-

Van Dommelen has always liked was attracted to the

The

ed

message

it

day and likes logos and layouts. He heard Conestoga has "amazing teachers and good technology," so he decided to come here.

advertisements, direct mail, spon-

effective

two of the 33

McIntosh said he was attracted

will focus

promotions,

19, are

students enrolled in the program.

is

Reyner,

This involvement will generate interest within the school and the

Jared McIntosh, 20, and Beth Van

Dommelen,

every aspect of communicating to customers. It could be

more

learning

that

on integrated marketing communications.

sales

experiential learn-

beyond applied. Instead of

ing goes Just

very sexy

The program

keting teacher and co-ordinator of this

Reyner thinks

even the title of advertising will grab attention. "It's an interesting,

and


— SPOKE, September

Page 6

16,

News

2002

centre bustling with activity

Rec

improvements to O.T.s though. Martin would like to add two sofas

By DANIEL ROTH

and a

com-

are

The major renovations

plete and both Kenneth E. Hunter Recreation Centre and the newly opened Over Time Sports Bar have

never been No one

busier.

would

happier than Tony

is

and the recreation centre.

"Everyone's enjoying the facility more than they ever did before," "It’s

the

He estimates between 500 and 700 people come through the rec

Time Sports Bar

(O.T.s).

also excited about

new programs and

some sports

introduced including Thai Chi and

been added to the fitness centre and Martin is pleased to announce a new competitive sport. "We've have

trainers

introduced rugby sport," he said.

a

as

varsity

Other perks for the varsity teams this year have been provided by a major sponsor. "Molsons have helped us out by giving us a sports varsity player,"

bag for every

he

said.

for a

and

new gym

desperately needed,"

is also a priority.

(Photo by Daniel Roth)

bar are (left to right) At the newly renovated rec centre and sports of development for director Martin, Tony greeter, Knight, Kandace

are minimal have a vehicle," he said.

Doug

centre,

and the recreation

athletics

and former

athletics officer

Perkins.

Moving O.T.s

to the vacant cor-

was move. The extra space and welcoming atmosphere has drawn significantly more patrons. Martin describes the change as dramatic.

ridor in the heart of the centre

a smart

"For the

first

time ever we've

the patrons.

"We're offering a larger variety of food, and a special barbecue price for

all staff

and students," he

said.

If a class or organization wishes to use the rec centre to host a party or event the staff will prepare the

event.

made a profit," he said. The profit may not be

large, but

a profit just the same according to Martin. He credits the success to a new approach of serving

it is

"We would do

all

the

work

for

them, get the barbecues, order the pizzas or whatever," he said. There is still room for small

O.T.s

is

"Molsons has

started to help

us out with promotions to get the students in residence involved on a regular basis," he said. to make the "We want it to

Martin doesn't want rec centre into a bar.

be an activity centre, a place where you go as a student and activity is around. Not a pub."

Martin said

an alternative

it's

place to socialize. "It's not noisy, it's a different diversion than the Sanctuary," he said. Activities are going on in the rec

centre everyday. ity

And

getting activ-

information for the centre has

never been easier. A hotline has been implemented

make it easier for the students or members to find out what is going on in the rec centre. The hotline number is 748-3565 or ext.. 3565

to

school. if

"Activities don't

yoga.

Personal

is

gymnasium

away from

Some

is

which

to try

dents to use the centre in their time

centre in a day.

Martin

some funding

centre.

He is working with Conestoga Residence to encourage the stu-

tenfold."

of the

working

rec

he said, adding new seating around

now. student activity has increased

of the most recent additions to the centre include televisions installed in the fitness centre and a large screen TV in Over

the

to

"I'm diligently

floor,

a very busy centre

always looking to make

is

improvements get

far

he said.

be just fine.

Martin

Martin, director of development for athletics

chair.

anyone wants to donate them they would be honoured in some way or another," he said, and added the old ones from the Sanctuary "If

style.

they

a great place to relax and

accommodating hours. It is open from 1 1 a.m. through 1 1 p.m. Monday to Friday, and from 11 a.m. until close on weekends. The

from within the schools phone

centre closes at different times on

everyday," he said.

the weekend depending on what activities are going on at the

Students can get up-to-date information by going to the rec centre link on Conestoga's home page at

has

school.

Martin wants to give the students what they want to see. "We're trying to encourage them and we want encouragement from them," he said, adding anyone is welcome to drop off suggestions at the bar. He is trying to organize theme nights similar to those in the Sanctuary, but with a different

Martin

is

also proud of the

site for the rec centre. "It's

Sandra Hawco Pizza Hut

(left)

new

tion as to

week

what

is

going on

the

in

Lunch

is

current information regarding varsity sports. Martin says there is no better source to find out

going on.

NEED MORE THAN A BANDAID SOLUTION?

By DIANA O’NEILL

served with the sub stand in teria,

The cafeteria that opened in the new E-wing is ready to start servall

those hungry Conestoga stu-

dents.

In an area slightly smaller

ing

than Dooners,

it

currently consists

of a Pizza Pizza, with a Mr. Sub

coming soon. John Kast, food service

director,

new developis ment and hopes the word will excited with the

spread about the

facility.

Its

loca-

1E04 and 1E05 in the new wing makes it susceptible to people Little do they just passing by. know that a set of descending stairs, just to the left of the main entrance, will lead them to a fresh spin on eating. The Pizza Pizza outlet is up and tion at

running, operating

p.m.

Monday

the Mr.

10 a.m. to 2

to Friday.

However,

Sub's opening has been

held back due to millwork not

being completed.

By now

students

are

familiar

its

the main cafe-

know new wing

but will be glad to

relocation to the

enable

to offer a fuller

it

that

will

menu.

you CAN VISIT A NURSE OR MAKE AN APPOINTMENT TO SEE A DOCTOR AT THE DOON HEALTH SERVICES OFFICE (INSIDE DOOR #3)

Slated to open Sept. 16, the outlet will be serving coffee

We can also help with:

and limited

breakfast items, as well as

more

go alongside a tasty sandwich, such as soups and salads. Another bonus of the move includes the capacity to

make

y

non-prescription medications

y

community referrals

y

prescriptions from a Doctor

y

birth control counselling

y

health resources and inf ormation

y

pregnoncy testing

y

first aid

the

buns on location. "That will definitely be a key feature of the relocation," adds Kast. Amy Hanje, an employee of Mr. Sub,

is

predicting that the larger

setup will "bring

The 23-year-old increased

more

business."

is

hoping that the

menu of

breakfast items,

baked goods, added to their regular subs will draw more of a crowd. Their newly extended hours of 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday to Thursday, and closing at 2 p.m. on Fridays, is also sure to encourage students to check out the as well as

new

setup.

blood pressure monitoring

y

allergy injections and immunizations

choices to

that

in the rec centre, as well as

at the

cafeteria.

Web

updated

www.conestogac.on.ca/rec_centre. The Web site has all the informa-

(Photo by Diana O’Neill)

and Roberta Drimmie cook up a storm

net-

work.

what

is


News

SPOKb, September

2002— Page

16,

7

Students taste freedom By KATE

D.

VANDEVEN

games

other in

points, arc just

This

year

Conestoga

the

at

Residenee and Conl'erenee Centre, 533 students have moved in, 400 of whieh are llrst-year students, ready for a life of

freedom and independ-

enee. is

not only a time for stu-

dents to experience

life

with no

parents, but also a time for parents

experience the loss of their child

to the real world.

everyday

in

Along

with

these

Campbell,

Martha Johnstone, a manager at on average, 200 parents call in the first couple of weeks of school. Some of their worries include payments, roommates, long distance and drinking. These are not Just concerns of the

social orientation

help students

activities,

as lloor meet-

but

parents though, but also of the stuIn order to

dents.

make

the transi-

in,

a schedule."

to

do

is

his

dent events and of course, parties,

diffi-

own

my

own

laundry, his

gro-

experience for both the parents and

up

provides

many accommodations and activimake their stay at Conestoga

ties to

a pleasant one. Activities such as bus trips, allage events and floor events all create a social environment for stu-

dents

to

some

fun.

make

friends

and have

Barbecues, all-age bar

and zone challenges, which are floors competing against each trips

.

in the

are

common

all

But

first-years dislikes,

all

listed as top

this year,

first-year

20, states, there

residence first-years

him is Just "the becoming the man

fun."

want

taking a

is

a "bigger

empha-

on zone challenges this year," and "less emphasis on alcohol." With same age roommates and all-age events, Johnstone says that

of "independence" from his

I

is

sis

parents and living in residence for step

residence

new spin on alcohol-related events. As resident adviser Debbie Brock,

have

broadcasting student Colin Burwell, 18, of Whitby says that these tasks are "nothing out the ordinary" for him. He explains that while living at home he had a

first

advantages of

living in residence.

morning.

As most

lot

the

in

morning.

parents doing

having

cery shopping and getting himself

residence

and waking up

sleep, diet

also not enjoying having

myself instead of

He

having

is

The likes of residence are the same with all first-years. Meeting new people, independence, resi-

is

tion into residence a less stressful

students,

"absolute freedom," but

difficulty adjusting to the lack of

culty adjusting to "looking out for

it."

Aaron Foster, 18, of Windsor, happy with, as he puts it,

is

he loves having the "freedom

of no parents," but

to

motivator."

Likewise, first-year aviation stu-

Louis, 19, of Kapuskasing, says

that

my own

dent,

First-year marketing student John St.

having difficulty adjusting

is

share a room.

arc available

Johnstone says that she finds the first-years have difficulty "being on

own and having

is

Other areas of difficulty include, lack of sleep, diet and having to

to all first-year students.

their

Christa

of Brantford,

19,

"having to be

eommittec whieh

move

administra-

student

looking forward to the independence and "being out on her own."

24-hour availability of resident

ings,

business

management

tion

residence.

accommodations such

the residenee, says that

the

First-year

the activi-

workers, same age roommates and a

This

to

order to win zone

some of

included

ties that arc life in

in

into

is

looking to provide

with

(Photo by Kate D. VandeVen)

"non-alcoholic

First-year marketing student

one

just

to be."

Conestoga College’s alumni servhad a successful fund-raiser at commencement cersummer's this Film, disposable cameras, flowers and diploma frames were all sold at the four convocation services that took place June 19 and

20

The sales of the fund-raiser have yet to be totalled, but Himmelman says total sales of the flowers

GROUP

1

#or

^

RICGIS 1

jpisi

Ext. 3360)

ER

SESSIONS

reached $1,200. Diploma frames were also popu-

Multicultural Support

commencement. The frames, which were available wood, polished brass, or in mahogany finishes, were snapped

Public Speaking

up by graduates wanting

2002

**REGISTER IN STUDENT SERVICES (Room 2B02

October

6

Week of October

4'“

Keith Martin

7

Group

lar at

emony.

groceries,

GROUPS AND WORKSHOP SCHEDULE

commencement

ices

away

Louis puts

jobs he’s responsible for as an independent col-

of the

Fall,

By JASON MIDDLETON

St.

lege student.

Alumni association doubles sales at

John

October 13^

4

Shawna Bernard

Week of October 28

Anxiety

Test Anxiety

Joan Magazine

Week of October

October 23'^*'

4

Group

to display

28

their diplomas. .

"We

doubled the sales of film

sold out of the disposable eras,"

said

and

cam-

Monica Himmelman,

the alumni services

officer.

Proceeds from the fund-raising given back to the college through awards, equipment, and

Suicide Prevention

are

TBA

1

Session

bursaries.

Virtual

Barb Kraler

In October

Exact date to be

On

Mature Student

announced September 17

Ongoing

Line

Joy Tomasevic

throughout

Community

Semester

FREAK SHOW by Marc

Hulet

i

1

i

i

,

BE THE FOLLOWING LEARNING AND STUDY SKILLS WORKSHOPS WILL STUDENTS. ALL TO OFFERED ONCE A SEMESTER AND OPEN ^

1

mmmi

1

BEFORE

SESSIONS Time Management

1

fTARTDATE FAdLTTATOR Sept 19 or Oct 9

Sept 17 or Oct 7

Joy Tomasevic

12:30-1:30

Textbook Reading

1

Sept 26

Sept 23

@

Joy Tomasevic

11:30-12:30

Note Taking

1

Oct

1

1

'

Multiple Choice

1

Oct 3 1

Oct 10

Oct 8

Joy Tomasevic

@

2:30-1 ;30

Joy Tomasevic

@

11:30-12:30

Test Taking

Preparing For Finals

1

Nov

Nov

19

21

Joy Tomasevic

@

12:30-1:30 1

J

'

highlighted up for a group, please leave a copy of your timetahle, the accommodate to made with times when you are free. Every attempt is free, the more are you times more The registrants. of timetables of the majority you. Once a time and place have been it is that we can accommodate

When

signing

likely

-

established,

we

will contact

you or you can check

in

with us

if

you prefer.

when you Some workshops have established times and rooms. Check

1

1

For information about Hinter 2003 W orkshops, drop call ext. 3360. ff.

register.

into Student Ser\-ices

CrtupW»rtil>9pV 2 mW»ftakops\2

m

2B02 or

workshop ScheiulefatUee


Page 8 — SPOKE, September

16,

News

2002

c

for career student prepares College aDolving the while applying 1

r

access-centre in Kitchener. fair After attending a job

benefited his career. "Our class would learn a theory, practise it in the labs, and

in

employment Toronto, Grace found reserve in native a at north up

apply

ity

Wi:

isolated duties required within the community of 17,000. And with no doctor, Grace had to consult

fields.

Git

phone. doctors or phannacists by toothache, I d "If someone had a

taste

would perform

all

medical

"Clinical rotation prepared me receiving a for the workforce by

on-site

had the

in opportunity to use his education throughjobs a variety of nursing his first out Ontario. He obtained Ont. nursing position in Muskoka, to a care private at-home providing

stroke

victim.

He

order to treat

He

year-and-a-half in

for

.

R y PETR CIHACEK

facilitator.

(improve) their

Under-employed single mothers are being provided with opportunity to not only

a great

improve

lives. their social status, but their

Focus For Change, a program at the that started on Sept. 9 Conestoga College Cambridge campus, will give them the skills necessary to make a brighter future children. for themselves and their "The main objective is to make a said better life for these women,"

SaST DI.NETTRS

.

"They're life

looking

to

the

and they do market that

self-exploration,

through information exploration, action planning and decision taking."

The

12- week

women who

are

.

Cambridge. One of them, Lynne from Jones, said her expectation

Dianne Murphy, the program group

program is for on social assis-

tance through Ontario Works. "The majority of them are single moms," said Murphy. They can be

anywhere from 19 and up. Currently, there are 16 students program in the in

enrolled

program

is

to

get

a "game

plan."

"The main thing

is

to

know where

be I'm going and what I'm going to program) "(This said. she doing," will help a lot. I'm sure."

out

The 33-year-old single mother seemed to be excited about the protalking to people

gram. "I've been who have been in it and I ve heard nothing but good about it, just wonderful."

Deep Cheap

1^

made

^

Skills

Double Frame & Futon

$279

For the past 13 years. Skills

Canada has been providing Ontario with the opportunity to

students

off their talents.

Canada,

Skills

a

non-profit

organization of educators, trainers,

employers and government >

cials, is

offi-

responsible for co-ordinat-

four-day

long

annual Skills Technological Competition, in which Conestoga students .have been successful in past years, as well as many other

Metal Frame and 8" Futon

The competition gives students from across Ontario a forum to

$219

an opportunity to test their skills against industry standards in areas ranging from carpentry and precision machining to culinary

showcase

arts

their talents as well as

and hairstyling.

Last year the event attracted more than 700 competitors from across the

NEW

LOCATION: 120 King St. South

(Across from Waterloo

next September as the progra. ^ runs just once a year there. The Doon campus doesn't offer such a

program "wouldn't

at

all.

make

Murphy

said

the program there. "We try to be available to the get groups so the areas

usually

more

it

sense" to launch

we

tar-

offer are

accessible," said she,

adding that on the Waterloo campus the program is ongoing.

trades

Town Square) Tel. 519.725.

province’s

key

province.

"Ontario's highly skilled,

well-educated workforce

is

one of

competitive

Dianne

said

advantages,"

Hardwood Frame

20% OFF LAMPS

from

'

would like to enrol in the progranr wait ti in Cambridge will have to

our

events throughout the year.

Starting

who

women

Unfortunately,

in skilled

Bv ABBI DAVIES

ing the Ontario

Computer Desks

the region."

Canada encourages

careers

V

*589

complet-

"And day care and transportation is through given (financial) support

1

$599 5-Piece Set starting from

after

to enter the pro-

Ontario students to consider

show

[

this

the Recreation and Leisure Services program at the Doon campus and she plans to work

month she entered

Hawaii

no cost

is

"The cost is covered through the and Ministry of Training, Colleges Murphy. explained Universities,"

great progress since

Focus For Change:

te to test

quite exciting, actually.

it's

gram.

"They go and shadow someone who works in that field," said

and 9" Premium

Dinettes

there

better.

left

out,

Students appreciate the fact that

path they wish to follow, a twoweek "reality check" takes place.

Sleep

^

r~

it

courses such as personal management and employment strategies. Then, when they decide what career

SALE ENDS SEPTEMBER 29 Shop on-line @ eastwestfutons.com ''

Murphy. "They have a chance

ing the program. During the first 10 weeks of the 12- week program, students take

Student Deals

to research the

how to network

in a resort in

PUTOflB IJJB5T DESKS BEDS DUVETS I.AMPS •

how

market, careers and

Kerr has

the

"Whatever walks through you have to deal with.

door,

Cambridge who took Focus For Change last September, said that it time" really changed her life "big

she

medical

Grace realizes that no matter what the situation, you have to be

oraise onlv one to praise Jones is not the only a 33Kerr, Therese program. the from one year-old mother of

as she learned

different

said.

^ ^ O moms new

Conestoga College.

Change course helps

he

prepared.

in at Kuntz Electroplating Occupational nurse Shane Grace, at program nursing of the practical Kitchener, is a 1999 graduate

it."

his

Attawapiskat has given him an pracucc, ms practice. of his advanced scope ot

continued the two con-

Focus

feels

(Photo by Janine Toms)

many

of

areas,"

based have to assess the situation in on the guidelines 1 had available

three-month :hree-month position for

to real-life situations."

an assortment of health-related

leagues,

m

Kitchener. After graduation, Grace

it

Con

The college gave him handson employment experience in

Attawapiskat, Ont. colGrace, with as few as six

health occupational nurse in the Electroplating Kuntz centre at

more

At Conestoga College Grace used that have a wide range of skills

patients

skills

Are students getting the in their they need to be successful graduate College Conestoga field? education Shane Grace feels his workforce. the for prepared him practiGrace graduated from the Conestoga at cal nursing program is an College in 1999. Today he

of his edu-

cation.

maintain secutive summers, while overflow of work part-time ing care at a community

JANINE TOMS

skills

Cunningham, minister of training, colleges and universities, in an Ontario government press release. Other Skills Canada events comfor ing up are the Skills Work Women conference in Toronto on Oct. 8, as well as cardboard boat

which will be taking place on Oct. 24 in both London and Nepean, Ont.

races,

teams In the cardboard boat race, to of competitors are challenged will design their own boats, which other then be put to the test against

more competitors

in several differ-

and ent areas such as fastest boat most the boat that can carry the weight.

which Presently, Skills Canada,

moved to

a

new Kitchener location on

630 Riverbend Dr., Suite 102 parAug. 1, is searching for past ^tario the of ticipants at

Com®

Technological Skills as they are looking to

m^e

archive of past competitors.

ion

an


News

SPOKE, Se ptember

Conestoga computers, labs undergo By ANDREA

R.

S MITH SMITH

at at

you think you were busy this summer, imagine having to upgrade more than a thousand computers and If

new computer labs. Between the months of June and August, Conestoga College Computer vServices personnel install

upgraded

1,325

computers with Windows XP on all campuses including Stratford and Waterloo.

XP has

"Windows ity

and

Windows

more

reliabil-

compatibility

(than

1998),"

said

Richard

Gibson, chief information officer

Conestoga.

students,"

puter labs which will be open to stu-

Room

1

put

hall, in

Room B2 I

1

,

from the CPA program. year they should

the

Gib.son.

new

it

is

Windows

current.

1

want

CSI office will open at about same time with 25 stations.

in the

"I dc-i't

really

know how

XP

to see

my

find

e-mail."

Along with

the upgrade there has

been a new version of student "I is

"The computers are a benefit to me this year because they are much faster," said Sean McCafferty, 22,

services at Conestoga College in

Room 2B04

Dust oft those resumes and begin fine-tuning them because the 2002 Career Fair is coming to a town near you. ^

The country's

largest career fair

will be arriving at

Sept. 25,

RIM

from 10 a.m.

and book a personal appointment for assistance for all

think the layout of

its

best

Gibbings,

feature,"

19,

from

The Career Fair is a giant informaopportunity to

panies without having to travel to

each

Don’t forget to

first visit

career

individual

outlet.”

Krista Lonergan,

The

nies registered for the fair, though the number continues to grow.

letter

writing,

To make the older labs look a little 350 desks were replaced and

better,

student

"This

is

2002

mice were set as a standard. "There is also a plan to put telephones in the halls of 2A200 and 2A300 in late September," said Gibson. This way someone can optical

call for

help if they need assistance with their computer."

With the upgrade came new software such as AutoCAD 2002, Mechanical desktop. Architectural desktop. Simply Accounting 9, Accpac for Windows Version 4.2 and more. There is also a new version of QuarkXPress, new scanners and printers.

Kjhg Kacia Kress

Hulet iTi

Sara

ehu let

hotm g com

wmjosrw(5r '

REW>^WG 'EM

SI0KI6HTI

/

an ideal time to perfect

resume before the career fair. I know how important a resume is and career services always has the answers to my questions," said Krista Lonergan from the career development practitional program. "The career fair is a great way to network with companies without having to travel to each individual Lonergan. Visit the Workopolis Web site or

your job hunting needs before attending.

Take

advantage of Career Services' free of charge info ses-

career services for further informa-

on which companies are going be represented at RIM Park.

tion to

CAREER FAIR VISIT

Over 1 50 Employers

t AREER

SERVICES, Room 2B04

a single location

^Employer Guidebook

Where?

~ Career Fair information ~ Bus schedule

RIM PA

~ Resume/Cover Ekter assistance

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2002 10:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Visit

Doon Campus - Career

Waterloo Campus or

— Page 9

outlet," said

2002 in

i.

resume

my

fair is a great network with com-

Nicole

Conestoga's career services provides assistance on

way

employers the inform students and

Career Fair does not require the companies involved to have positions available, although many do. Currently there are 150 compa-

literature.

builders and interviewing tips.

to

said

LASA.

6,

face-lift

FREAK SHOW by Marc

“The career

tion session that gives

grads about their company.

Free,

and

Windows XP

officer, also

cover

Park on

to 3 p.m.

sions, tip sheets

e-

which includes calendars.

mail,

copyright 2

M cGARRY

use

upgraded computers,"* said Kayla Hickey, 19, from the nursing program. "1 found it hard to

Career Fair coming Sept. 25 By SINEAD

to

the

college paid about $200,000.

"With the five per cent increase of Conestoga's population this year, we felt that we had to respond

think install

rewritable burners."

people get value," said Gibson. Most ol the funding came from student technology fees that they pay every year in their tuition. The

is

"1

next

labs.

installed

because

another computer lab that will open in one week with 30 stations. A lab the

in the

We

B20.

Across the

.said

There wiM be consultations in the future with program co-ordinators to decide what programs should be

dents to use in their free time. The first 45-station lab was finished two weeks ago; it is located in

programming needs of

to the

Within the next three to four years, Conestoga will also have eight com-

1

-

Student Ser\ ices

www^partiie r s 4emp oyment ca l

.

(Rm 2B04) Guelph Campus - Main

Services

for Career Fair information

Office

and updates!

I.


Page 10

— SPOKE, September

16,

News

2002

Pond party a success

i

!

!

s

(Photo by Aimee Wilson)

and hear and .ea.ured en.er.alnmen. year InCudea .he usual ho. dogs, pop Parry on Sep,. 5. MraCions Ms PonO year's ,0. a«s„ded Mean, 3 000 people .V AfO Thing. Sramalk and Gladia.or JousOng. McRorle one Man L,;;, The Trampoline J"

*

'

_

1*

>*k

Including

11/

Cassandra Smith, at the

Pond

19, (left)

and Amy Ruston,

19, both first-year electronics students, try the Gladiator Jousting

Party.

(Photo by Vanessa Laye)

Broadcasting student Fergus Lowrey (left) shows off his drumming skills by playing off of McRorie One Man Live at the Pond Party. McRoire Tait has been a drummer for 1 5 years and rocked the party with a variety of music.

(Photo by Aimee Wilson) Ivan Petracic,19, a first- year telecommunications student, got a great view of the Pond Party while trying out The Trampoline Thing.


News

SPOKE, September

16,

2002

— Page 11

(Photo by Julie Graham)

Judy Dusick, general manager the students during the

Pond

of

Conestoga Students

Inc.,

hands out calenders

for

Party.

m

r

mm

f

¥

(Photo by Carrie Hoto)

Tarra Longmire

pare to battle

it

both first-year

(left) and Kevin Murphy, out at the Gladiator Jousting event.

paramedic students, pre V

(Photo by Vanessa Laye) (Photo by Carrie Hoto)

The felt

event provided a safe vray for friends to

about each other.

let

each other know how they

really

leisure student,

Teddy Mahy, a second-year recreation and during the Pond tion of goodies which he picked up

Party.

shows

off his collec-


Page 12

News

— SPOKE, September 16, 2002

Conestoga College creating safe haven from harassment By JULIANNA KERR

many cases, an make a comment

Croft said that in individual might

Harassment exists in many forms and finds a home in many places,

human

but Conestoga's

department

resources

doing everything

is

in

power to control it. Debra Croft, director of human

its

resources, said

all

campus have had rights

policies,

training in

human

including dealing

She said Conestoga College has

a.

detailed policy regarding the pro-

based

human

rights,

the

Ontario

on

which

is

Human

Rights Code. The policy outlines a to providing a working and learning environment that

commitment is

free

of

discrimination

it could have on someone These instances are often isolated and do not continue once that individual realizes the impact of

effect

their words.

is

become

situations

and the comments

serious

and how

uncomfortable,"

she said.

"And

you would appreciate them not making those comments again." that

Croft said that

is

a really impor-

piece of advice.

most

people,

"For most

do

conflicts

get

which harassment comes into play. It is much more likely to manifest itself in the form of offensive comments about

If individuals are uncomfortable with the idea of confronting the person, Croft said they could go to her for help. "After we talk about

a person's gender, race or sexual

it,

they sometimes feel more com-

orientation.

fortable going

According to Conestoga's policy, harassment refers to inappropriate remarks, gestures, jokes and innuendoes. It- also includes unwanted questions about an indi-

that person," she said.

vidual's private

life.

"If they tried

explain to the other what happened

resolved at that level." Often that person has not meant to offend anyone.

cally a situation in

have many options. it on their own and that didn't seem to be successful, they could come to me," Croft said. "What I would do is sit down with both parties. It's a chance for them to be face to face and for one to still

"What we encourage individuals to do is tell that person - directly if possible - that the comment was hurtful, that they think it was inappropriate and that it made them feel

always a challenge. A personality between two students who simply don't get along is not typiconflict

If harassment continues after a conversation or note, individuals

don't stop that Croft gets involved.

tant

Croft said defining harassment

when

is

It

more

and

harassment.

a joke without realizing the

tell

else.

employees on

with harassment.

tection of

or

other details.

back and talking

to write

why

a brief note explaining

or joke

feel."

and respond to concerns. harassment continues even

situation If

after such a meeting, the individual could make a formal written complaint. Croft said the parties involved would then meet with her

again. If there

an brought tion,

was

still

investigator in.

very rare that

is

It

no resolu-

would be

instances of harassment go this

far.

"Most people will respond positively if you tell them how it made you feel," she said.

The

best

situation

way

is

words and

to avoid this

kind of

think about

to

your

actions.

"Put yourself in the position of the other person

Another option would be

comment

to

made them

it

This kind of meeting gives each person an opportunity to discuss the

was

the

offensive.

Individuals should also keep a written record of what was said and any

and think about you'd like to be treated," Croft said. "Think about the comments

(Photo by Julianna Kerr)

how

you make and if you think someone might find them offensive, don't

human resources Debra

Director of

as employee records,

Conestoga College continues to spark high interest amongst international students.

This

new school year

will host

from up

the the college

more than 200

students

25 different countries including China, Japan and Korea, who make up the majority of this to

year's students.

"We have been working (in different countries) for a number of years and Conestoga has a

name,"

ognized international written test such as the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a Test Written in English (TWE), or

said

good

Conestoga's International Education director Larry Rechsteiner. Students whose first language isn't English must first take a rec-

International

Language

(lELTS). The students arrive

at

English

Testing

take an in-house test the

dents enroll in business or infor-

mation technology programs. Chantal Qian, 22, from Beijing, China arrived in Canada during

System

may

also

This

college

when they

college,

which

is

administered by the English language studies personnel. The tests determine how many semesters,

(between 1-4), of the English Language Studies Program (ESL) course the student will take before proceeding with the post-secondary studies of their choice.

According to Rechsteiner, 75 to 80 per cent of international stu-

new school year will

the

host more

than 200 students from

up the last

to

25

countries...

week of August

to begin

her

studies this semester at Conestoga. Qian took the inhouse test and is presently taking the ESL course at the college. She

plans to study advertising after her

ESL

studies.

and

training

rights issues here

ees on campus are trained

make them."

International students continue to flood By VALENTINA RAPOPORT

hiring,

human

also deals with

Croft looks after such details

in

human

and development. She on campus. All employ-

rights issues.

Conestoga

"The way teachers are (at Conestoga) makes students feel comfortable," said Qian, who learned about the college through a friend. She isn't quite sure which area of advertising she is interested in but does plan to study at the college for four years.

International students may request to live in residence or with

Canadian families, referred

them

informs

about

college

resources. "It's a one-on-one support system," said Melissa Turner, the col-

Peer Services co-ordinator. Turner said the peer host program has been successful in the past because it helps both students learn about other cultures and improve lege's

their

communication

skills.

to as

This semester the college will

homestay. The college also provides the students with a student host (a student volunteer) who

have up to 25 peer hosts and according to Turner more volun-

spends one day a week with the international

helps

the

The host

student.

student

learn

about

Canadian culture as well as shows around the college and

them

teers are always welcome. Students may fill out an applica-

Room 2B02

tion in

to

book an

interview or log into the Student Services link at the Conestoga Web site.

Bookstore line-ups less hectic this year: Conestoga students By REBECCA LEA RN The bookstore earned an A-plus for

its

She admitted that faster restocking would have been betterbecause

from the ceiling made

some books she wanted weren't on

find his five books.

efficiency during the chaotic

weeks of school. According to many Conestoga students they were in and out quickly and had no trouble finding what they were looking for. Accounting student Lea Prentice bought six books and said, "The cashiers were efficient and the books I wanted were all in one

“The ^shiers were

effi-

and the books wanted were all in one cient

www.dofasco.ca

Our product is steel. Our strength . . .

is

people.

Our home is Hamilton.

but she found "the system of waiting in line outside rather than waiting at the register" less tedious.

easy to

it

first

week

expected," he said. He does think another checkout would help with the lines, but he found all his

I

aisle.”

Lea

books without effort. "Actually it was easy,

it's the paying part that hurts," replied industri-

al electrician student Jeff Phipps, adding, "They give you a list of

Prentice,

accounting student

books you need, everything there."

Prentice said she only waited in line five minutes,

signs hanging

that's

aisle."

DOFASCO

said the

was busy, but the

"It

first

Visit us at:

Sampson

is

right

-

Paige Graver, a paramedic stuthe shelves yet.

Overall, though,

dent

she said she had no problems finding what she wanted.

said

Civil

engineer

student

Mike

wh Sii.-

had nl

utes in line

looking

for.

to

buy 15 books,

’"ad to

wait 10 min-

and found

all

she was


News

SPOKE, September

students at Conestoga are

them."

Record companies people download

that

Everyone heard of the big Napster lawsuit but while all that was going on other programs such as Kazaa emerged and now have a a program designed for exchange files over the You can download Internet. music, movies, games, programs

out and buy the album in stores they like

if

it.

At www.kazaa.com they propeer claim that Kazaa is the "No. to peer application for downloading, playing and sharing files with In the millions of other users." past week alone over two million 1

the No.1

peer to peer application for

downloading, playing

people have downloaded Kazaa

from the Internet bringing the total number of people having downloaded the program to more than

files...

and just about anything that a computer can run. The thing that everyone likes about Kazaa is you can do all the downloading you

1

(Photo by Ian Hoss)

Brandon Thompson. 20,

sits in his

room on Sept. 6

free.

Many Conestoga

happy

the music

pay fees or percentages for each song or album they download. Online surveys have proven though that after downloading an album users are more likely to go

is

want for

all

to

users to

and sharing

aren't

they like for free. The big corporations want users

stronghold on the market.

is

I

1

using the newest Internet downloading program known as Kazaa.

Kazaa

— Page 13

Thompson. "I listen to new bands think it's use Kazaa so when promote help to way that in good

By IAN ROSS

Kazaa

2002

‘down’ with Kazaa

jOlusic lovers Many

16,

be the solution to a student's limited budget since it has yet to introduce fees. "I use

Kazaa seems

students don't

have a lot of money to spend on movies and CDs, especially after paying tuition and buying books.

Kazaa

to

to

download

and

rare

live

to

view a music video he downloaded from Kazaa.

songs that you just can't find stores," said

at

CD

Brandon Thompson,

20, a Conestoga College student. Thompson also said he uses Kazaa

to

download music videos,

live

concerts and computer games. "If you can buy the CD in the store

you shouldn't download

it,"

added

15 million people.

There is always going to be a debate about whether or not music should be free but until there are laws restricting downloads students and everyone else will be getting

all

the

media they

like

without paying a cent.

Computers and adults unite Bv BLA.KE GALL officials are

Conestoga College

addition excited to announce the

of

new

two

being

programs

and offered through the training department at the development school.

the

marks semester This software office an of launching with an applications course along applicaadvanced office software

college that tions course at the knowledge the hope to give adults

work

in today's

needed to ing computer society.

Sandra

Goal!

chair

Schelling,

(Photo by Abbi Davies)

boomof

says,

information technology, adults "Our main goal is getting posbe will This school." back to that both sible with the flexibility

programs

Students course," said Schelling. one credits can do all six

offer.

m

semester

simply

or

semester.

Along with

‘Our main goal adults

back

Sandra

is

getting

dents

to school.”

Office Software Applications course part-time certificate

Windows XP

mainly

on

since the entire col-

lege switched over to the

comput-

program this summer. give The program is designed to work to needed skills people the programs with various computer

er

commonly used

in the

workplace.

computStudents will be learning preer fundamentals, databases, sentations, spreadsheets and

word

processing. In total there are ,]iat

six courses

must be completed

credit to

for

two

admission program. The only either students is requirement Secondary must have an Ontario years of School Diploma or be 19 is

focuses

this flexibility stu-

receive

into the years before admission

Schelling,

technology

which

may

courses completed up

chair of information

a

one each

in a three-

stuyear time frame. "This allows the taking while dents to work

age or older. software The advanced office the follows course applications

same basic

criteria.

part-time

also a

is

It

certificate

program,

over a which can be completed three-year term.

on giving This program focuses more advanced computcovering software er skills while students

applications.

Further

information

Conestoga

can be College

found in booklets Continuing Education

(Photo by Carrie Hoto,

the school available throughout training and the visit can or you department located

And

development in

the

Student Client Ser^'lces

building here on campus.

OlinsKi jcn Olinski Jon

(lenj(lef.)

the dealer wins

Sanctuary for the Casino deal, blaokiac. in the P-esiden, of .he CSI, P Chris Brenneman. Winner was n^ris

rp.TTheSrBi;r;.Ke.

Day

held on


1

Page 14

— SPOKE, September

News

2002

16,

Doon remembers

Kitchener, By PETR CIHACEK

victims,” said Zehr, his voice

and

residents

Kitchener paid tribute to Sept.

by flying

of 1

lives in

flags at half-mast, saying

prayers, and listening to a speech

by the mayor and the piercing sound of fire trucks sirens. Last year on the same date, a terrible roar shook the World Trade Center as the

first

plane crashed into

the north tower at 8:46 a.m.

same

time, but

one year

At the

later,

noth-

at

added

ing at half-mast.

those

ice,”

Zehr

said

in

also

firefighters

more than 30

men and women

forms lined up in front of the fire department headquarters at 270 Strasburg Rd. in Kitchener. Behind them, there were three fire trucks and a minivan, all with their lights on. Facing a flagpole with a Canadian flag flying at half-mast, the firefighters observed two minutes of silence and two prayers. After that, Zehr came to the stand and gave the same speech as he delivered to his employees earlier

them.”

is

I

think

important to just reflect on

Zehr recalled he was in a meeting City Hall when he was told about the first attack at around 9 a.m. at

innocent

of

the tragic anniversary.

Just before 10 a.m.,

a recent inter-

lives

around.”

still

view. "The events of the day are

were observed. Kitchener Mayor

the

are

Kitchener

it

all

who

remembered

speaking for themselves and

“We remember

people have to think

that

about the future and “the

the day but

to

will never

forget the victims of the attacks but

not to have a long ceremonial serv-

ing could be heard at the Kitchener

shortly before that.

was a shock.” The mayor said people

were removed and replaced by one Canadian and one American flag. They were fly-

mark

turned on the television and

said. "It all

flags at the City Hall

"We wanted

blue dress uni-

in

that day.

At the end of the service, sirens on the fire trucks were turned on for about 15 seconds to honour fallen New York firefighters.

(Photo by Petr Cihacek)

Kitchener Mayor Carl Zehr delivers a speech at the Kitchener Fire department headquaters at 270 Strasburg Rd. on Sept. 1 1 as part of the 9/1 1 anniversay ceremony. More than 30 Kitchener firefighters listened to Zehr’s speech. Their families and the media were also present. ,

Conestoga’s new E-wing Notice anything different?

you have walked by the graphic design and advertising department just past Door 5 you most likely have. Conestoga College has a new wing opened If

just in time for the start of anoth-

er school year. It

has everything from a

new

window

to an

cafeteria and picture

E-wing

ready for business with 39 classrooms to accommo-

the

amphitheatre. Despite the constant

is

date approximately 1.400 students.

According

to

physical resources,

planning for the $ 15-million project began in October 2000 while construction began in August 200 1

The

cafeteria

on Sept. 4

at

Drummie,

a

managed

to

cafeteria

employee,

explained that she and other cafeteria

employees worked for two

Kitchener.

by the

city’s

They

listened to

mayor.

people would do such a thing,” said

anniversary. College radio station

Trask. “Everybody thought and

CJIQ

a “powerful event” that created a varying reac-

felt

differently.”

88.3

narration

A year later, most of the anger gone but the sadness persists. “We are still sad for who lost their lives, we

is

the people are sad for

the families that were left behind.”

lower their morale.

could

it

who was in that situation.” Deputy Chief Don Trask recalled

270 Strasburg Rd. two prayers and a speech delivered

front of the fire station at

place at another time that

changed the world changed the way we look at the world. And it changed the way we look at our jobs sometimes too.” Sept. 1 1 might have changed the

FM

broadcast a short

by Conestoga Students

(CSI) president Jon Olinski about what happened a year ago in the States. A minute of silence folInc.

lowed the 2fi-minute narration. “We have to remember (the

said Trask. “It

attacks) every year,” said

and

gramming

way

“It

it

firefighters look at their jobs, it

didn’t

makes you pay more to what you are doing,” he

just

attention

“It’s

the

specialist

CJIQ proMark Burley.

most temble thing

I’ve

ever seen and probably the most rible thing that I will

Burley,

ter-

ever see.”

and a team of broadcasting students

Olinski

third-year

worked on two weeks.

the

program for around

In the Sanctuary,

CNN program-

last year’s attacks as

said.

ming was

among his firefighters. “Some people were extremely sad, extremely devastated, some

a little more cautious, but hopefully, they all realize that danger is a part

of their job.”

Stemmlel, adding that the CSI decided to hold this kind of tribute

tion

people were extremely angry that

“I think that

everybody

is

The Doon campus of Conestoga College also honoured the tragic

aired the entire day. “It’s a lower-key day,” said CSI '.'icc

president of communications Jeff

“out of respect” for the victims.

E-laborate

days,

all

day, scrubbing to "get the

place open on Wednesday."

According to Drummie, who has worked for the college for five years, Mr. Sub from the old cafeteria will move to the new wing in about four weeks. For now. Pizza Pizza is the one place to eat.

Business was slow

open

about 10 a.m. Bobbie

in

in

but according to Awender,

is

noise of drills and wet-paint signs,

(Photo by Petr Cihacek)

Firefighters stand

“It’s almost like a death in your immediate family,” said Platoon Chief Rick Awender about the death of his American comrades. “Firefighters throughout the world, it is a big family. And you realize that if you were in another

be you

By MICHELLE TAYLOR

1

actually

their

7 a.m.,

Sept.

saw the second plane going into the southern tower,” he

brave

hopes of saving others.”

Earlier that day,

City Hall as two minutes of silence Carl Zehr spoke to his employees

“We

sombre

“We honour the men and women who gave

but strong. Officials

1

.

to

know, so

here," said

at first,

but

want the kids

they'll

come down

Drummie.

And, how about the new wing? love

it,"

it

"I just

has picked up.

said

"I

Drummie. "They've good job."

done a really Second-year

social

service stu-

dents Lisa Schinke, 23, and Angela

Leeson, 23. agree.

They did

a

"I

think

good job with

Schinke. Both,

it's

nice.

who have most

construction noise doesn't bother

Kerry Smith, 22, a third-year accounting student, agrees for the

most part. The noise doesn't bother him, but he believes the building should have been ready before the "They could have had

this

more operational before they opened it," he said. He does feel the wing was needed. "It was necessary, especially with the double cohort coming (in 2003)." The added space not only accommodates more students, but has a building a

(Photo by Michelle Taylor)

James Cunningham,

29, performs at the

students on Sept. way that students

3.

for

them.

day.

Count your pennies

of

their classes in the wing, said the

first

(Photo by Izabela Zarzycka)

said

it,"

little

Conestoga College students mingle outside the new E-wing while construction continues. On Sept. 4, the second day of classes, work on the wing was not yet complete, but it was open for busi-

polytechnical feel to

ness.

wing

it

as well.

Conestoga College vying

to

a polytechnical institution doesn't hurt

its

With

become the new

chances.

Cunningham

is

Conestoga Residence The Canadian comic was explaining the should budget and manage money. from Toronto and does about 50 shows a year

across the country.


1

News

SPOKE, September

16,

— Page 15

2002

Watch out for speed humps be implemented within two years include a pedestrian trail on the

SANDHAM

By CARLA

west side of Old Mill Road from Pinnacle Drive to the eommunity

Speeders beware as traffic calming measures take shape on streets around Conestoga College. Four speed humps and a posted

trail

a pedestrian refuge.

speed limit of 40 kilometres per hour were erected along Mill Park Drive and Old Mill Road in July

slow

to

after

traffic

a

the

iii

The Lower Doon Traffic Study was initiated by the City ot

through

traffic as well as turning

generated by

traffie that is largely

2001 after area resiconcerns of dents expressed pedestrian safety and neighbourin

hood disruption. During the study

the college," said Mayer.

The

operates

intersection

was discovHuron Road, Mill Park Drive and Old Mill Road were about 57-59 it

College boulevards have a high level of congestion during college elass periods.

km/h.

However, plans are

However, the posted speed limit along most of this route is 40 km/h. "These traffic calming measures will encourage reduced vehicle speeds along the Mill Park - Old

Improvements include widening

Homer Watson and Conestoga College boulevards and modifica(Photo by Carla Sandham)

along Old Signs were recently posted warning motorists of the new speed humps neighbourhood. calmed traffic a known as now is area The Mill Park Drive.

and parking department for they will also con-

the neighbourhood. No follow-up studies have been

improved pedestrian

to

safety at critical locations within

.conducted yet, but Mayer said there will be studies completed on

the

There

new school year

'ery

And

impus.

ticket,"

at

Doon

woes

cception. year's congestion

this

"was caused by

frustration

id

udents ark or

less

"

said A1 Hunter, head

f security.

To help keep

traffic

week of

flowing

weekly parking

security

office.

school.

names

to

add

their

a waiting

to

WHEN

hold,

still

be

Although parking passes sold

rhose hoping to get into designated annual lots

have

will

students out Sept. 3, Hunter said and daily purchase may still

However, these helpful guides orientation ,vere only on hand for

will

tickets

zones.

moothly, eight extra nembers were directing vehicles first

they

pass

the

in issued to those parked illegally designated areas such as fire

who didn't know where to who were parking in the

/rong lots,

he

of

Those hoping

security

to get into desig-

to add nated annual lots will have list. waiting a to their names an Students on the list may have others passes opportunity to buy have sold back. happens when students

SiaUen

Students

are

sure )w responsible for making designattheir in ey are parking 1

lots.

To help avoid ustrations

traffic

for

the

lineups and

next

few

Hunter suggested, "allowyourself a few extra minutes

'eeks.

ig 1

not a get to your lot so there's panic if you're going to be

aad

ate."

Ticketing was light the first were veek, except when cars zones. marked in fire or loading

However, there will now be a fullmne bylaw officer patrolling the

Bnpus. ^'So there

is

a

substantial

loss

paraaibuh’ in ont

This rides decide to take buses or share these situinstead, said Hunter. In refund on ations students get a their passes

list.

the

in

of or doubit vision

HEADACHES

/

headaches Sudden, seven: »nd unusual

/I WEAKNESS

minus a small admin-

Sudden

istration fee.

;ek said Hunter.

RECOGNIZE THE SIGNS

OF STROKE

he said.

although

Most of

to

are

year was no

this

of the speed-

and traffic smooth flow

of traffic exiting the intersection. Mayer said the Region may begin construction this year and continue over the next two year.

After 4 p.m- though, students regardfree to park in any lot

problems

medians

to

islands to provide a

Road and

effectiveness

tions

getting a increase in the chance of

B y STACEY MCCARTHY parking

Mill

humps. Other safety measures

Security tackles parking are

works

congestion.

the City of Kitchener.

He added

in the

reduce the service level to D, meaning shorter delays and less

to

Mill route through the neighbourhood," said Ken Mayer, of the

tribute

at

E during peak hours, he added, which means Homer Watson and Conestoga level-of-service

ered traffic speeds along

traffic

along

College Boulevard. Doon Valley Drive and Old .Mill Road will be constructed. traffic intersection "This includes significant volumes of

neighbourhood.

Kitchener

lanes

bicyele

Also,

Conestoga

study

revealed "excessive speeding"

entrance and a raised median Doon Valley Drive with

island on

vseakness,

numbness and/oe arm or leg

tingling in rhe fact,

While there isn't a noticeable public increase in students using said Hunter year. transport this are livstudents more 100 about helps to cut ing in residence. This daily. commuting back on those

Tctnporar> loss of spetA r

trouble DniiastifKliflj; speech

DIZZINESS Unst

"We hope more will choose pubof driving," he lic transit instead

adiogs or soddeo

especially

with any of the above sigps

added.

While some dentally

lots

have been acciin previous

oversold

students don't years. Hunter said this year. to worry about that

have about 70 Lot 12 has reclaimed year's Espots lost during last construction. In Lot 1

(Photo by Stacey McCarthy)

Glen Neilsen was one

^ec. trSc

of eight extra security

week

at

Doon

members carnpus.

during orientation the right just needed help finding

helping to

He says

lot.

most students

centre, the

behind the recreation has also daily parking capacity doubled. been

HEART

AND STROKE

wing

year to Gates were added this stuwhere daily lots like Lot 11,

exitdents must pay $3.25 upon

ing.

FOUNDATION


Page 16

— SPOKE,

September

News

2002

16,

new canning

Royals open By LISA HILLER

crowd of about 40

facility

which had

fans,

gathered outside, before entering

The people of Guelph got a treat Sleeman

the brewery.

During

recently as royalty visited

had

their time, the royals

Breweries to dedicate the opening

an opportunity to tour the building

of a new canning

before the official opening of the

The

facility.

and

Countess Wessex, Prince Edward and Earl

made

wife Sophie, the

Royal

of his

a brief stop in

of a five-day

city as part

Ontario during which Prince

trip to

Edward presented awards named his

after

Toronto.

in

The royals request

Duke of

the

father,

Edinburgh,

CEO

of the

the

at

of Sleeman

who is Duke of

Breweries, John Sleeman,

chairman

the

Edinburgh's business and

Edward

of

the

Award Charter for came to know Prince

through

mutual

their

am

delighted to host Their

Royal Highnesses and I am honoured and privileged to have them officially open our expanded Sleeman canning facility,"

Sleeman

said.

Sleeman, his wife Julie, and sons, Quinn, 6, and Cooper, 9, greeted royals

the

With close to 100 staff and media on hand, the Countess pushed the button to officially open the new facility, which can fill 850 cans a minute.

The prince and princess were

pre-

sented with souvenirs of their

trip:

Sleeman's black leather bomber

involvement. "I

The multimillion-dollar facility all canned products including Sleeman Cream Ale in a new ban'el-shaped package. Upper Canada Lager and other Sleeman products, including Old Milwaukee produces

brands.

came

visit

canning wing.

they

as

arrived.

Sleeman's sons presented Sophie

jackets.

McCamey, logistics manager Sleeman Breweries, said he had a speech prepared when he met Prince Edward, but forgot it for a minute when the prince asked him Joe

for

Prince

Edward and

"That little, I

said.

Sophie turned

comment threw me didn't expect

to say hello to the

it,"

off a

McCamey

their

time

the plant.

at

and apologized for not being able

tered

to talk for longer.

Hospital,

Many

"He was very engaging."

During

wife

his

Hiller)

Wessex, Prince Edward, and his wife Sophie receive gifts from John Sleeman’s sons Quinn and Cooper, upon their arrival at Sleeman Breweries to officially open its new canning facility. Earl of

he made the jacket himself.

if

with small bouquets of flowers.

(Photo by Lisa

The

Edward and his wife Sophie met with some of the employees

Prince

of the onlookers had gone

by the time the royals

left

Engineering teacher wins

a regis-

to.

The

the Royal Family.

life,

of Britain and

Royal Family first

how

the

connected."

is

Sleernan Brewery was

south

the

of England. Sleeman's family emigrated to

in

Canada

in

1

834.

you need

Ccroi Seto. dietition

SOMEONE YOU KNOVJ. CAU 1 -800-BANTlNG CA«AOI»H otAoeres ASSOCIATIOH

Mechanical engineering co-ordinator Tony Kattenhorn finds sharing his knowledge with his stu-

history

CaH the Canadian

Diabetes Association.” HEIP

Prince

likes

his

enters your

someone to turn

By TORI SUTTON

she

show, Crown and Country," she said. "It is extremely entertaining and has an excellent love

"I

“When diabetes

Aubrey Hagar award

Guelph General

at

said

Edward and

the

brewery.

Mary Anne Bracewell,

nurse

ASSOCIATION j 1 I

canaoiewne OOOIASEre

vww.diobetes.ca

dents rewarding.

commitment

In turn, for all his

CSI advertisement

and hard work, Kattenhorn was rewarded with the Aubrey Hagar Distinguished Teaching award in June at convocation. The award, which is given out

Activities important for students

yearly, recognizes teaching achieve-

So here we go again, more events talk. The student body must be wondering what

ment, concern for student learning,

I do all day if I have time to write a third time about events on campus. But obviously events are important to me. As the events programmer for Conestoga Students Inc., it's my job to love events and promote them as much as I can to the student body. And while I want students to attend events because they will get a lot out of it, I want to let students know what events are can't miss.

curriculum development and service to the

Any

program and

teacher

the college.

the college

at

is eli-

gible to receive the award, but

must

be nominated by a combination of faculty and students. A panel then

They (Photo by Tori Sutton)

Mechanical engineering coTony Kattenhorn enjoys seeing his students

who will win the award. The winner receives a Conestoga College Coat of Arms, a shoulder

ordintator

sash and a professional develop-

succeed

ment bursary of $800.

lege.

decides

Kattenhorn has been teaching

Conestoga for 21 years, starting his at the Waterloo campus, before moving to Doon. He spent 15 years working in the industry

move

before making the

to a teach-

provincial

which he has

sat

as

the

development team

chair

of the mechanical engineering division. Kattenhorn was also a member of that

put

ing environment.

together the project proposal for

Highly respected by both faculty and students, Kattenhorn is known

one

for his patience

when

"Putting tant,"

tant

and understanding

dealing with students. students

not to

forget

is

imporimpor-

that

it

doesn't

always come easy. Problems in a

stu-

dent's life affects their performance."

As

co-ordinator,

not

only

is

Kattenhorn responsible for keeping records and running the program, but also dealing with issues and co-op

Additionally,

work

all

two recently approved

student

terms.

Kattenhorn

has

been involved with Skills Canada

at the col-

lege.

Although

"It's

first

said Kattenhorn.

of

applied degree programs

it

may

seem

Kattenhorn has a lot on his plate, insists he wouldn't have it any other way. He admits he rarely he

refuses

when someone

asks

him

to

do something. "This

isn't

Kattenhorn

just

to me," something I

a job

said. "It's

have top names like James Cunningham, Rick Bronson, David Acer, Wade McElwain and Tony performing for you over the course of the year, it's plain to see that missing out on these amazing events is a bad idea. The CSI also does things like offer bus trips to the Bills, Maple Leafs and Raptors. If you like to travel, you can sign up to go to Montreal for New Year's Eve or Elorida for Spring Break. Imaginus posters are coming to the school. We have a pool tournament and a euchre tournament if you like something a little more low key.

Lee

s

for 10 years, five of

can a student miss out on a toga party, Oktoberfest, Fred Penner, Sex with Sue and a luau in April? I have railed in the past about students participating in student life. However, this time I want to tell you that you need to attend the biggest events this school has ever seen.

When you

after leaving the col-

at

career

are all can't miss.

How

need to do." Nominations for the 2003 award open in January and close in March.

all

What I'm telling you is that we have something that caters to every You don't have to party hard in The Sanctuary every night we open In fact. I'd rather

Variety

is

you take

student on campus. the bar.

in everything.

the spice of life and as

I

have said

in the past, student life is

not

all

about drinking in The

Sanctuary.

Being a student for seven years, for the most part, I know what students like and don't like. So the CSI has all my experience to program all these events. And because I "know what I'm doing" (you can insert your uncontrolled laughter here), I know that this is going to be the best year the CSI has had. It's only going used

to get better too.

The simple

fact is that student life is for everyone. If something doesn't interest you, I know for a fact that something you will want to get involved in. So while you sit there and read this, remember that there is no limit to the amount of activities you can participate in unless you put a limit on yourself. And school is the place to remove your limitations and enjoy life.

there

is

— Jody Andruszkiewicz

CSI events programmer/co-ordinator

^


Entertainment

Signs

thrills

August,

beginning of

the

at

Mel Gibson

the

Top 10

at the

box

like moments, two films, and the cinematography by Tak Fujimoto

Shyamalan's

office.

thanks to the

little girl

(Rated out of live stars)

makes appearances

aliens,

in

all

cope with his wife's death, his beliefs, and the impending alien

three

But unlike the first two movies. Signs has no surprise ending and the movie unfolds slowly, letting the dialogue and actions of

views saying, "Daddy, there's a monster under by bed, can I have a

was no

there were several and many angry aliens. really wasn't what the

but

monster,

(Internet photo)

ries the picture as a father trying to

in the pre-

glass of water?" Well, there

first

(The Sixth Sense) does a wonderful job of creating the slowly building suspense. But it is Gibson who car-

IT

The generthe movie

impression was that was about crop circles and

al

share of scary cdge-

its

of-your-seat

Everyone saw the previews all summer long on television and in the theatres well before the August release date of the film.

— Page 17

and entertains

Signs has

thriller

Signs has recently passed the $200million mark and continues to be in the

2002

16,

Hess and family to believe there is more going on than neighbours playing a practical joke on them.

Bv JASON NOE Released

SPOKE, September

his

farm.

Along with

films.

arrival

Gibson and family carry the

being genuinely creepy Signs has a number of funnier moments as the family tries to. come to terms with what is happen-

at

at

pic-

times.

Signs

is

a

thriller starring

Mel Gibson and Joaquin Phoenix.

do it instead, which probably seemed boring to some who expected a fast-paced film. The

the No.

main reason people may not have enjoyed the film was the lack of

in

aliens or a surprise ending.

hold for Signs?

actors

1

The

spot.

action

film

X

knocked Signs out of the top spot for a couple of weekends

Triple

August, only to

fall

weeks ago. What

behind three

will the future

It's

likely the pic-

crop circles

ture.

But

Gibson plays Graham Hess, a farmer and former pastor who gives

what could happen. The movie Signs has paid off for Gibson, becoming the highest

up his religion after his wife is killed in a terrible car accident. His

grossing film in the actor's career and the second highest for

finding his faith than about an alien encounter and the lack of a surprise

Shyamalan, following The Sixth Sense, which earned $661 -million

another wonderful, character-driven thriller in Signs despite the lack

brother Merrill, played by Joaquin Phoenix, moves in with Hess and

didn't help matters either.

most summer films. Signs required you to think after you had left the theatre and no

of spaceships, aliens or special performance Gibson's effects. alone is worth the price of admis-

that

movie was about at all. This was writer/director M. Night Shyamalan's third film, following his 1999 blockbuster The Sixth Sense and Unbreakable from 2000. Almost two years later, he returns

Shyamalan's home Sense and

originally began as a vegetarian recent(no meat) restaurant but has animal (no vegan a to ly switched

products) menu.

"There was a need for this type of says manager Tanya McEwen. "There isn't anything like

restaurant,"

fill

what to order, be more than happy to make a recommendation, or if you food prefer, you can sample the you're unsure of

the staff will

a decision.

have people come in at our menu," says

to

"but we're not here to

convert anyone."

found the staff to be friendly and very knowledgeable about the 1

They

told

me how much protein and what kind of vitamins were in each meal.

ordered the special of the day,

served with

which was and salad tor

tofu,

rice

opens

he '|^-)ut ordering something that ^wuldn't pronounce, went with the

in

disappointed?

Star Trek-Nemesis

December.

Art

^eicr

Wildlife

Giant-Sized Posters

hours

»

However, a downside that the inside is

Photography

to the cafe

much

too small.

I

the Aquarius seats only 25, but to each tables are lined right next that it other making it so crowded move. to is difficult Aquarius has theme nights

lOOOs OF Posters

an international allyou-care-to-eat buffet on Tuesday

including

and a vegan pizza as well as an night, pasta

nights

and open

mike night on Thursdays. Customers are encouraged bring their

own

to

THE

IJVIAGIIMUS

instruments and

perform. finally, there is a

Sunday vegan

which offers brunch, totu. French toast and scrambled 10:30 a.m. from runs brunch The to 2 p.m. cafe's hours are

Monday

to

Wednesday. 11:30 a.m. to 8 a.m. Thursday to Saturday, 11:30 10:30 a.m. Sunday. and p.m. to 10 to 8 p.m.

Music

Frames & Hangers

mits.

And

who were

Don't worry.

place Cajun tofu

p.m.:

very hesitant

burrito entree for $6.95.

alien fans

Fantasy

artframes and other colourful choose can costumers work. Also, weather perto sit outside if the

The

$7.95.

My friend, who was

movie has

yellow are decorated with bright

a

niche."

1

the

me was the bright atmosphere. The and walls are painted bright blue

is

blacken Cajun

The word of mouth

sion and this will be a hard one to follow-up for the actor. As for you

My

Contrarily, I found the

It

food they were serving.

with

•'Fine

bland side.

Katie

McEwen,

movie

in

date

Cafe Aquarius, located in be appetizing but much too Dwn Guelph, offers a completely _ to of water I had to keep a glass spicy. egan menu that I found both appeorder to finish it. The rice in handy izing and inexpensive. was fluffy and had just the right Healthy dishes such as tofu temamount of spices in it. paste) seed leh and tahini (sesame Both meals, including drinks, menu. the on found ;an be at to only $19.45. And came unappealBut if these names are tip. to have don't Aquarius you more ng to you, you can order retrieve This is because customers and ^amiliar dishes such as rice napkins, pour their own cutlery and 3ean burritos. clear their their own drinks and The cafe, which is located on 84 tables. own by Wyndham St. N., was started Another thing that appealed to Miller about five years ago.

and laugh

the

into the fall,as

in large porfriend thought his burrion the tos were filling, but a bit

down-

make

discuss

friends.

Top 10 well The Sixth Sense did 1999. Shyamalan has created

ture will stay in the

Both meals came

ifficult.

"We used

unlike

mood. It let the camera angles and actions by the

create the eerie

But much weirder occurrences the crop circles, leading

Healthy eating doesn't have to be

before you

But,

generated over the past month has without question helped keep it in

tions.

If

ending

doubt

LESLIE LEACHMAN

to

the

most of the summer blockbusters. Signs didn't rely on special effects or explosions to carry the story and

after

Cafe Aquarius caters to the vegan crowd

had

movie was more about Hess

appear in Hess's com field, which he shrugs off as nothing more than

follow

We

misled that

people not like the film? Unlike

Unbreakable were also filmed in Pennsylvania and the director

this in the area.

felt

two years ago. So why did some

a hoax.

Rxi

probably

her

Sixth

The

state.

Many

death. Shortly after, strange circles,

two children soon

his

with Gibson in Signs, a movie that in entirely filmed was Pennsylvania,

ing, or with

POSTER SALE

-*


! :

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; SPOKE, September

Page 18

16,

Entertainment

2002

HOROSCOPE Week of

narrow minded and not worth getting upset over. Luckiest day: September 18.

scious world.

they're

Luckiest day: September 19.

September 16-22 Cancer: June 22

-

July

speak. A poorly phrased sentence could leave you in a lot of trouble. Budget your money carefully the

November December 21 Unexpected bills or costs will have you scrambling for money. So make

next

sure you pay close attention to

Sagittarius:

Happy Birthday

Think

Virgo

little

you

before

while.

Luckiest day: September 22.

22

-

Leo: July 23

-

Capricorn:

An fate

unexpected twist of leave

will

you

upset.

Someone who you thought was way

close to you could be on their

out of your

life.

Luckiest day: September 16. Aries:

March 21

-

^

A

December

long struggle with

something has left you drained. A from your troubles is coming soon. But be patient, change

relief

won't

come over

night.

Luckiest day: September 19.

April

Someone with may have a

Virgo: August 23 September 22 If you have felt under a

on the way. But be warned of a new situation creeping into your

Aquarius: January 20 February 18 If a conflict in your life is wearing you down, and people around you want you to choose sides between them, don't. Let them

life.

work out

a fiery disposi-

significant infiu-

ence on you this week. Be careful not to say anything to anger this person, they're not to be trusted. Luckiest day: September 19.

great deal of pressure lately relief is

Luckiest day: September Taurus: April 20

-

students

Residence

Gemini:

May

21

-

June

Participating in this seminar paid

Lor every time Cunningham used a student for a demonstration or to answer a question the stuoff.

will

be finished as planned.

If

something unexpected happens know it was meant to be. Luckiest day: September 22.

Pisces: February 19

-

between five people, one person walked away with $100 in cash.

a

you

Cunningham showed the five students the moves that they had to

be helping you with a situa-

do, and then gave each individual

March 20

Someone who has great deal of influence over will tion.

Make

sure they

considers Kraft dinner a

Most of

the

group raised their hands.

He

stated that studies

show 68

per cent of students need financial

However, according comic the number is much help.

His belief

is

that the

to the

higher.

number

is

in

the high 70s.

Cunningham does a show all over the country and can be seen on the

latest

commercial for the Or you

sport utility, Lord Escape.

can catch him at a Yuk Yuk's club where he does stand-up comedy. He usually visits Kitchener two or three times a year.

dent received a $5 reward. waiting for one student at the end

know how

helpful they have been.

Luckiest day: September 22.

21

Pay close attention

ways of saving and stretching money. the

of the seminar. In a dancing contest

September 23 October 22 If you put effort into your work, events and situations Libra:

A dramatic change will take you by surprise. The winds of change are inevitable in your near future. Be prepared for unexpected news. Luckiest day: September 21.

and

"Who

basic food group?"

However, the big reward was

Luckiest day: September 17.

17.

at

Conference Centre to help the students save their money. Combining humour and advice, James Cunningham, 29, spoke about the ways that students could stop being poor at college.. The one-hour seminar called "funny Money" kept the audience laughing and participating as

the situation.

May

20

S

to

Cunningham explained

19 tion

advice

Conestoga

AugusT

22

ed with laughter and loud clapping when Cunningham asked,

A Canadian comic recently gave financial

Luckiest day: September 20.

shocked by a big surprise, whether it be good or bad. something very big should be happening to you on your birthday. Expect the unexpected.

By IZABELA ZARZYCKA

your finances, don't splurge on anything.

You'll be

Saving your funny money

20 to 30 seconds in the spotlight to show his or her moves. Cunningham used humour and

CHECK OUT THIS ISSUE OF SPOKE

an interesting Power Point presto

what your intuition is telling you. Expect unusual dreams this week, the meaning of them may help you solve a problem in the con-

Scorpio: October 23

November 21 Someone stubborn

-

will

be disrupting your life. But don't snap at them, just remember

show the students how a budget for themselves,

entation to

Daniel Roth is a third-year journalism student who has studied astrology and a variety clairvoyant subject for four years.

to

set

pay off debts and invest

in

mutual

funds.

The group of

students respond-

ONLINE! www.conestoaac.on

r,a/c:nr>Uo


— SPOKE, September

Page 19

Sports

2002

16,

Pronto Maple Leafs looking strong R y JAMES

K.

DOYLE

for

who is

1

He

1

Gary

Fitzgerald through the free agent market. The Leafs, however, were

he can

unable to grab any big name free agents such as Bobby Holik, who New York the with signed

er

Forwards will be strong again

up front. Centre Mats Sundin, the Leaf captain, will again be counted on to lead the offensive charge. Sundin is coming off an 80-point season (41 goals, 39 assists) and will again be the go to guy. But

need help.

coming

off injuries

swing

at

Conestoga College. The college has always offered a wide an'ay of varsity piograms stucan try dents attending the college

club.

Renberg notched 14 goals

Corson and Travis Green will be looked upon to play a defensive role.

They should both see penalties,

time killing also be counted on

lots

but

of

will

at the offensive

end of things. The biggest improvement this year should be in centre Alyn McCauley.

coming Dallas, role to

smooth

more

off his worst

NHL season

where he lost the Marty Turco.

number

skat-

to lose.

will

But old age

is

Centomo

will

be waiting

Johns another year for their chance, but will be ready lor the in St.

call if

Belfour or Kidd

falter.

Overall

1

Toronto should be able

The 37-year-old Belfour highly aggressive goalie

in

Sebastien

is still

who

a

hates

starting to

catch up with him, and Toronto be his last kick at the can.

may

The Leafs, who also lost backup Corey Schwab, signed Trevor

tend again for

first

place

con-

to in

the

Eastern the and conference championship. Conference However, the West is far superior to the East and whoever comes out on top should be able to win the Stanley Cup.

in the defensive end.

Robert Svehla was brought

in

from Florida to bolster the attack from the blueline. He is a solid defenceman and will be expected to lead the younger players in the locker room.

The

rest

of the Leafs defence the

start

to

questionable Youngster Karel Pilar self a spot

Jyrki

at

is

year.

won himon the team with a

good post-season, but perienced

DON’T GET

is still

inex-

the top level.

Lumme's

years are

best

behind him and Aki Berg

is

a fifth

or sixth defenceman at best.

Anders Erikson split his time season between St. Johns and

last

Toronto, but don't expect him to

Conestoga

let,"

she said.

Many varsity programs are include; already underway. They women's fastball, men's outdoor soccer, soccer, women's outdoor men's rugby, and golf.

for.

De Haan,

a

media

for representative Conestoga varsity sport teams, parthinks it is important students

relations

varsity

will

It (sports) gives students variety... outenergy positive gives them a

Varsity sports are in full

in

who

a

who

Quinn

who has won everything a goalie can win in the NHL, but still has question marks suiTOunding him. He is

be Quinn. Pat by heavily on relied Kabcrle will need to shoot the puck more Irom the point to help out offensively, and use his body

another play-

to step into a big role for the

is

defenceman

left

is

array of varsity sports

B y NICK HORTON

ticipate

Tomas Kabcrle

This

to

Stanley

1

not afraid to use his body.

is

ing

control a game.

need

available at

Stephanie

he

had surgery on

is

lor best

broke out 17 goals and He also had

jumped

fullll his

goalie who needing a number can win in the NHL. That meant the signing of Belfour,

adding 26 assists. 129 minutes in penalties, showing

him over the 20-goal mark. Shayne as such Forwards

Jose.

out

behind

and 38 assists last year. Playing with Sundin again should help him find a scoring touch, and get

who

Phoenix, and Teemii who stayed with San

Wide

still

Mikael Renberg

in

still

after he

the

McCabe

year scoring

last

Roberts' both his shoulders. absence will be a huge hole to fill. His playoff performance last year showed that although he is aging,

added backup netminder Trevor Kidd and fourth liner Tom

he will

to put that

Cup dreams. be

Trophy candidate

defenceman.

Roberts for at least until the

new year

other end of the Yushkevieh deal with the Florida Panthers. In addition to Bellour, the Buds

The Leafs

a Norris

has

Joseph

Detroit to try and

anchor on the Leafs bluelinc this season. He is a rugged two-way defenceman who one day will be

him and step into a leading The Maple Leafs will be missing their top power forward in

agency as the teams new number netminder and delenceman Robert Svehla was on the

Selanne,

need

will

Curtis

at the

level.

Defence Bryan McCabe will

role.

free

Amonte,

same

to step in

backup. Kidd

Goalies

1

he will be expected to perform

on the regular season, but turned up absent in the playotls.

both with new teams. Ed Belfour was brought in via

Tony

had 20 goals and 31

Reichel

goal-

assists

Rangers.

24 goals and to show up

The Russian, every game. possesses a lethal wrist shot, man. 50-goal potential a

tender Curtis Joseph and bluelinc mainstay Dmitry Yuslikcvich arc

ended up

need

Rciehcl.

to the suc-

Number

cess of last year.

tallied

and be Beltour's a former number away in wasting was who I, Florida behind Roberto Luongo. Kidd posted a 3.31 goals against average in 42 games with the woeful Panthers. Youngsters Mikael Tellqvist and

Kidd

have an impact on the team.

After stepping into Sundin's role on line in the post-season, the number

Another player who the Buds need some oflence from is Robert

stack up against the competition? The Leafs will begin training

camp minus two keys

who

assists, will

33

The Toronto Maple Leafs are coining off one of their most suecessful campaigns this decade, but how does the 2002/03 team

Alexander

winger

Right Mogilny,

sports.

"It

interested in the

Students

game schedule

can find for any of these teams site them on the college Web by or (www.conestogac.on.ca)

checking out the bulletin board

cenpostings inside the recreation tre.

Other varsity sports teams that badhave yet to begin include and soccer indoor men's minton, women's indoor soccer. Tryouts team the men's varsity hockey

FOR

b

C4B

for

are

still

ongoing and

will continue

until Oct. 15.

Although the college offers a they

wide airay of varsity sports, implement a varsistill have yet to ty basketball

program.

W voM.V<r>e^ one hour

of your time

could save

someone’s

life... Order before October 20, 2002 *9.95 and get installation for only f*

call

->

-at

Kalf

1-888-ROG!iRS1 (76|^71)

exclusive today to take advantage of tHil student offer. iacey receJvi^^'

For clinic information, call; 1-888-871-7201

CANADIAN BL OOD SERVICES ~Blood.

It'S

in

you

to give.


Page 20

Sports

— SPOKE, September 16, 2002

The good, the bad and the ugly By

youngsters were

MARC HULET

The 2002 baseball season began like an episode of M.A.S.H.

much

Blue Jays. Their

for the Toronto

infirmary was full and the team a number of walkingwounded. Inexperienced, nervous players looked more like bumbling comedians than professional

hosted

The only thing man in women’s

baseball players.

missing was a clothing.

Veteran starters Esteban Loazia and Steve Parris opened the season on the disabled list and missed most of the first half. Neither Loazia nor Parris, both free agents after the post-season

an end, and their hefty salaries will be back next year. They were merely adequate after coming back from their injuries and will be replaced by cheaper

comes

to

and younger players. Chris Carpenter visited the three

times before finally

cumbing that

to

a

requires

DL suc-

shoulder ailment surgery. Best-case

nine months. But given that Carpenter is a free agent after 2003 the Jays may chose to let him go now and not have to pay his salary.

Roy Halladay

^ QL

and

bevy

hold

down

fort.

of

impressive with a 4.28 ERA. Unfortunately walks have also been a problem for him. Pitching

is

by

far the

weak

point

of the Blue Jays but minor leaguers Dave Gassner, Vinny Chulk

and Francisco Rosario

aren't far

In

bullpen,

Bob

File

reliable

2001

was a bust after and he

seen struggling in the minors with a bloated ERA. last

Kelvim Escobar has been liant at

times but,

much

bril-

like the

closer before him, he has been ter-

inconsistent and never appears to put full effort into a game that doesn't present a save ribly

opportunity.

Corey Thurman, a Rule 5 draft pick from the Royals, has been

the first Jay since Alfredo

1979 to win the American League Rookie of the Year award. Vernon Wells, technically a Griffin

in

rookie in 2001, has impressed in his first full season. His defence is

Hitting

is

the area

where

Jays'

Devon White field

Winning is great but the Blue Jays won’t get to the World Series again if their fans and their ticket sales don’t support

them

through the tough times,

as well as good times.

should be getting excited. Toronto boasts some of the finest young hitters in the majors and more are on the way. Eric Hinske has become a fan favourite at the hot corner after some early defensive struggles. He has shattered almost every rookie record in Blue Jays' history. He has tied or passed former Jays' rookies such as Shawn Green and Fred McGriff, both of whom went on to have all-star fans

seasons. Hinske will most likely

for

the

patrolled

World Champion

of weeks strongly.

Second baseman Orlando Hudson came up at mid-season and has rejuvenated the Jays with enthusiasm and hustle. Josh Phelps, another mid-season call up, has shown tremendous power and the knack for driving in his

Enough

so, in fact, that the

Jays could afford to try and find a taker for Carlos Delgado and his large contract in the off-season.

The Jays

also

obtained help

from an unlikely source. After shortstop

Felipe Lopez struggled early on and was demoted to the minors, utility infielder

Chris

Woodward

was given the job and

an> sports ieague .

-eiuse 10 tssue tickets

wt>.oh are from the otdC «|5or! reaweet T^tiese itWa loemher teams placers a»hteres pcrsPnalitW or rther affiliates arts' t-m “ and rrioy the aggre;jale watering or prixe payeof. ftif PSOLii^

uear.'-ig ally seiecttori

m

hasn't

looked back. His 13 homeruns, in half a season's worth of work, is a

opportunity to win his job back if Woodward can continue his solid

around play. Other solid young players such as Russ Adams, Dominic Rich and Guillermo Quiroz are on the way. all

2002 was

definitely an up-and-

down season and one

that

to watch.

However,

fickle Jays' fans

need

remember that we were spoiled early on by some great teams. The Chicago Cubs have some of the to

I

'

most loyal fans they haven't title

won

in baseball

a

World

and

Series

since 1908.

Winning is great but the Blue Jays won't get to the World Series again if their fans and their ticket sales don't support

them through good

the tough times, as well as times.

Success

isn't built

overnight and

the New York Yankees and you have $150 million to throw around each year, you can't rhaintain success for indefinite periods. Eventually you have to start over. But with this group of young, exciting Jays it's going to be a lot

unless your

name

is

of fun.

with, ^

4-^

P0l

was

especially disheartening at times

testament to his power potential and Lopez may not have an

sTS JUST A GAME. FiAY iS^»5ia.Y. ?S 0 irHE IS governed the R'<ie5 reafteoting PROUNE 'i's-rfti.o,

centre

Blue Jays. He has also driven in 8 1 runs and could possibly eclipse 100 if he finishes the last couple

runs.

the

rookie

was

become

the best Jays' fans have seen since

off.

outs.

starting the season injured

has Carpenter back in

scenario

left to

Halladay pitched his heart out and looks like the ace the Jays have been hoping for ever since Roger Clemens and David Wells skippedjown for the mighty Yankees. Halladay’s win total, at 15, would have been much higher with a little more run support and bullpen help. His ERA, however, has remained one of the best in the American League all season. Rookies Mike Smith and Justin Miller were obviously not ready for the major leagues and their walk totals were alarmingly high. Both Smith and Miller have allowed more walks than strikeouts, whereas a quality pitcher would usually have at least a two to one ration in favour of strikethe

ert fnwtfats,

Digital Edition - September 16, 2002