Page 1

'

34th Year

Bearing By Kirsten

good cause

for

all

it

an attempt to stay on his

Fifield

instead dragged her

Two members

of Conestoga’s stu-

7.

new

pus

in bright

Jon

to a

polar plunge at the college’s

Ginny Hawkrigg, CSI vice-president of

Doon

student activities

purchased the revealing

About

undies the night before after the two

would be a great way

1

to

as weird as

we

could

But before the event nerves started and the pair hid in the

to take over

office until

it

was

their turn to

jump.

“We

heard

talkies,” said

we

were a

turns out they

it

early, as the

two jumpers

“It

tion,”

them had yet to plunge. “There was no way we were hangwent

for

it,”

he

said.

we

“My

just

“Those things

was

biggest fear

sure everything

that

fall off. I

would

the

wasn

crashing to the floor after hitting a

stay tucked

patch of water

Mothman a

for Richard Gere.

PAGE

left

ous jumpers. “I saw Jon go

Their sprint through the cafeteria

was halted momentarily as Olinski, and then Andruszkiewicz went

hit

(Photo by Kirsten

Stroke Foundation.

lot

Fifield)

t

in.”

new

come

Jody Andruszkiewicz, CSI vice-president of academics, leaps into the pond during the 20th annual polar plunge fundraiser on Feb. orange 7. Andruszkiewicz and CSI president Jon Olinski wore thongs during the event, which raised $2,000 for the Heart and

are not comfortable.

thong was going to

to leap into the

tion rate.

bit

in front of

ing out in the cafeteria so

temperatures and icy gusts of

dent of student activities, said the polar plunge is always a successful event because of its high participa-

OK

over the walkieAndruszkiewicz, “and

started to run.”

But

laughing,”

said

behind by previ-

down and

I

started

Andruszkiewicz.

“But then front of

me

this

stepped out in

girl

and there was no way

could stop.” He covered

his

face

described grabbing onto the

as

I

he

girl in

always draws a she said.

lot

be seen

to

“A

lot

lot

of attenof people

out to watch and there’s also a

of media coverage.”

Hawkrigg, who has leapt into the pond the past two years, said there is no way to prepare yourself for the jump. “You just have to run and do it, she said. "You can't think about it, you just have to jump.” For more polar plunge photos turn to Page 8

11

A

8 other students braved the

pond during the which raised $2,000 for the Heart and Stroke Foundation. Some donned more than skimpy lingerie. Garments ranged from boxers and bras on top of shirts to super hero type costumes and bikinis. Ginny Hawkrigg, CSI vice-presi-

possibly go,” said Andruszkiewicz.

CSI

1

fundraiser,

decided to go above and

beyond and go

C

wind

heighten the publicity of the event.

“We just

all

about it, you just have to jump.”

campus.

it

of

“You can’t think

flashy attire as part of the 20th annu-

decided

“But

said.

anymore.” of

president

president of academics, sported the

Olinski

but

thong just wasn’t that embarrassing

Conestoga Students Incorporated and Jody Andruszkiewicz, CSI vice-

al

feet,

with him.

those people, wandering around in a

level

orange thongs.

Olinski,

bad for her,” he

“I felt so

on Feb. as they ran across the back cam-

body

down

after falling in the caf in front

dent executive took representing the student

— No. 7

at the Biz

Bash

By Janine Toms Forget all your troubles, forget all your cares and go downtown! That’s where many Conestoga students headed Feb. 7 for the Biz Bash at Stages Night Club in Kitchener.

Approximately 200 students were in attendance as was Master T, a former V-J from Much Music. The theme of the night was Cupid Gets Plastered, a preValentines party.

Men’s soccer team shut out 4-0.

PAGE

By

1

1

p.m. everything was in

full

swing.

13

The dance

floor

was flooded with

partygoers as multiple disco balls sent a shimmering glow over the

COMMENTARY.1 Students need financial help

PAGE 4

crowd and stage lights beamed deep red. blue and green hue.

a

Everyone's attention turned to Mike Marshall the stage as

MC

announced the Tunnel of Love participants. The tunnel was a wooden cabinet encased

in

removable curtain.

glass

with a

Biz Bash on the annual computer and business student association s (Photo by Jamne Toms) Mike Marshall. event featured the Tunnel of Love, Master T and

About 200 students took part Feb.

7.

The

in

MC

curtain

was

male participants were paired off and

clothing

before

removed

revealing the contestants

sent inside the shack.

regardless of their apparel or lack

The

three female and three

Each couple within the shack had exchange to seconds 30

thereof.

the

Contestants

were

scantily clothed revealing

seen

much

of

what nature had given them. Contestants did not seem to mind the the

self-exposure

audience.

received a prize

nor

did

Each participant from the Stag Shop.


Page 2

— SP OKE, Feb

18,

.

2002

Student’s cabinet travels to Manitoba By Sanja Glibota While most rooms and hallways were Conestoga College at enveloped in silence on Feb. 9, the woodworking centre was echoing with ear-splitting noises, thumps and squeaks. But the 12 participants in a woodworking apprenticeship contest were so absorbed in finishing their projects on time that they didn’t find the noise they were making distracting. The competition, sponsored by of Chapter Ontario the

Woodworking

Architectural

Manufacturing Association of Canada (AWMAC), began at 7:30 a.m.,

when

the participants started

building a cabinet based on identical

drawings and instructions. “I

didn’t

going

when close,

most

think

finish,

to I

was

I

realized that

I

was

but

was the

exciting point of

the day.” Kevin Hodgkinson, co-op woodworking technician student

The

contestants,

third-

and

them with all other required components and supplies. Though nine hours seemed like more than enough time to complete the project, one of the four

“There are a

lot

within

nine

The contestants were allowed

to

use their hand tools and compa-

such as Devilbiss, Ryobi, Rower Tools, Anmac, Senco, Binks, and Lee Valley provided nies

of people

Hans Cullman, a qualified neyman, minutes before

job

who

7

to:

7

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7 ,

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77

to

7,7777

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enrolled in nursing programs,

Although only three participants had completed their cabinets, Cullman said he was not disappointed with the skills and knowledge the contestants showed. “You must realize that most of these people here are at the begin-

as well as to experienced nurses

ning of their careers.

And

it

:

.

7

long day and everyone

But

you

have

to

.

..

77

7

confidence in yourself. You can’t look at your neighbour. You have to concentrate,” he said. Kevin Hodgkinson, a third-year co-op woodworking technician student, could not believe that he completed the project on time. “I didn’t think I was going to finish,” he said. “But when I realized

I

was

close, that

was the

"

Andy

woodworking technician student, puts final touches on his cabinet at the AWMAC Woodworking Apprenticeship Contest Feb. 9. Among 1 2 contestants, he was one of the three who completed the project in nine hours. (Photo by Sanja Glibota)

most exciting point of the day.” Hodgkinson won third place and a $100 prize. Second place and a $200 award went to Dave Eves, a woodwork-

community.

For more information or nominations forms, contact one of the following committee members:

The

7'

77

.

...

7.,

April.

Shan

the

second-year co-op woodworking technology Dickie,

a

student at the college. a

$400 prize and

He

received

his cabinet will

The

national winner will attend

life.

National

Convention, free of cost. He will be recognized at the convention

and receive a cash

.

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,

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2 p.m.

Similar tails will also he licKl :

AWMAC

you

knew

7

AWMAC

apprentice at the college. The winner of the contest was ing

'

7

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Chapter of will judge the entries from across Canada and declare a national winner by the end of

7

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Ottawa on Feb. tot toC 7.7.

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prize.

Stereo equipment target of break-ins in By

January

Tori Sutton

of vehicles, makes the area a

Conestoga College has had a

tar-

1 - 888-871

-7201

O CANADIAN BLOOD SERVICES Blood. IBs

in

you

to give.

ext.

3613 3283

ext.

3280

ext.

ext.3682

ext.

3392 3223 3269

ext.

3271

ext.

3381

ext.

ext.

However,

of theft

this type

is

of car break-ins recently,

not limited to the college. Thieves

with vehicles being targeted both

also hit other areas with a high

day and night. Three vehicles were broken into during the day on Jan. 23 and three more cars were robbed on Jan. 29, while their owners were in evening classes. All cars were parked in Lots 10, 12 and 3. In the last few instances, thieves gained access to the cars, mostly Japanese and other foreign imports, by breaking windows. In one case, a vehicle was broken in the

owner was only

school for 10 to 15 min-

utes.

Hockey equipment was stolen from one car, although stereo systems seemed to be the target, said Ai Hunter, supervisor of security services at Conestoga College. Audio equipment was also targeted in the Jan. 23 break-ins. All incidences were reported to Waterloo regional police.

The Nominations open on January 15, 2002 Nominations close on March 15, 2002

.

Manitoba

into although the

& Professional Development

7

be sent to Winnipeg.

rash

in related

Taylor - Health Science & Community Services Mike Thumell - Applied Arts Greg White - Trades & Apprenticeship Rudy Hofcr - Engineering Technology

77,77777,

7

toy;

Faiers, a second-year

Would you help?

commitment to students and to their programs and whose teaching skills are above average. They also demonstrate leadership in

Titia

:

get, said Hunter.

demonstrate

Greg Burns (2000 Winner) Recreation & Leisure Services Diane Kraft-MacDonald - Business Paul Latour (200 1 Winner) - Academic Support John McIntosh - Acad. Support & Prep. Studies

7

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exceptional

their professions or in the

7

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For clinic information, call:

and

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oneof hour your time

a distinguished teacher?

their schools and/or the college

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nominate

who

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Distinguished teachers are those

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someone’s like to

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have

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difference

“It’s a

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7.

to....

makes

whether you’re in it for two or 54 years like me.” Conestoga College graduate Greg McFarland, a judge at the project competition and a manager with J.F. Gillanders Co. Ltd. in Toronto, said he knew exactly what the contestants were going through. Two years ago, while he was still a co-op student at the college, McFarland won second place in a

L 7

could save

Edie Torbay, Chair of QA

77 .

cabinet by 5:30 (p.m.).”

AUBREY HAGAR DISTINGUISHED TEACHER AWARD

work with

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for the

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CALL FOR NOMINATIONS

Would you

7

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the

making

finish

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Canada on Feb. 17

fairs in

jour-

“There will probably be about seven people will

>7

.

competition ended.

tired.

workshop

:

.

77

haven’t finished yet,” said judge

who

0

7:2

-

7

graduates from woodworking programs, received the drawings

in the hours.

7 7

7777

time.

the completion.

one week prior to the competition. But the cabinets had to be constructed under supervision

.

judges in the competition didn’t expect everyone to be done on

fourth-year apprentices and recent

at least

to

college’s location, near the

401, as well as the large number

volume of

cars,

apartment

like

buildings and plazas.

“The more eyes and ears we have out there, the better.” Al Hunter, supervisor of security services

To prevent

a

car

break-in,

Hunter suggests students use cover plates on their stereos and keep valuables out of sight. However, some thieves will case parking lots, watching where car owners place their belongings.

Any

student

who

sees suspi-

cious activity in a parking

encouraged

‘The more eyes and have out

lot is

to notify security.

ears

there, the better,”

we

Hunter

said.

“Students and

staff

greatest resources.”

are

our


SPOKE,

Conestoga students Two

By Vanessa Laye and

dents were to have an appoint-

ment with the mechanic as

College on Feb. 7 taught a few

some very important

Upon

response course.

les-

sons.

‘stop, look

as police officers rushed into the

building witlhout considering the

on the scene, the pair found the mechanic unconscious. Following procedures taught in

consequences, which left four dead. Since carbon monoxide is a

LASA

colourless, odourless gas,

courses they called

more

the scenario

“More

made

it

for help. Students arrived to rep-

recreation cen-

resent the security and police that

five)!seconds and you’re down,”

would be found

said

tre.

A

in the

was broken

two sections,

into

and B.

at

any accident

Fire

students

fighting

came

in

gear

the activity.

scene, along with paramedics and

eventually

In addition to the students at the

who

college

participated,

Journalism

and

from the

outcome of

part of the

LASA

scenario, one of the

cause of

the

engine repair shop

ing students posing as police and

stu-

repair

Although both scenarios were set up exactly the same, both did

up in the recreation complex. These stuset

mock

Douglas said

scenario organized every year for

after

By Stacey McCarthy

to

be a hero,

now

number of programs.

Four people are dead after a faulty propane heater leaked carbon monoxide into an engine repair

mock carbon monoxide

facility in

Kitchener on Feb.

7.

students were taking

dispatcher received an emer-

gency call around noon from Elg asking for police and ambulance

regional hospital and treated for carbon monoxide poisoning.

of their course. In

conjunction

with

Waterloo

the

mock

students

staged

so

learned

skills.

accident

could

first to arrive.

at

They entered

was

apply

Conestoga College students Kaila Sigston and Mary Elg. mechanic

of the officers

the scene are

but

dition,

still

they

who

collapsed

in serious

are

con-

expected

to

the building without breathing appa-

recover.

ratus.

Elg and Sigston were conducting a health and safety audit at

Conestoga security supervisor Mark Buchanan arrived after police

regional police and Kitchener firefighters,

Two

Waterloo regional police personal

were the

part in as part

leak

removed

assistance.

This was the setup of a scenario that college security personnel and

the repair shop as part of their

course.

and found Elg, Sigston, Southcott and three officers unconscious at the

Officials at the Ministry of

Cambridge

firefighters

Recreation centre

scenarios were held this

“They

said

is

getting larger,”

Don Douglas,

co-ordinator of

tion

Security

A

personnel arriving at

scenario found a mechanic,

two students and

three police offi-

it

grand opening of Conestoga s improved recreation centre. "There are a lot of little things that still need to be done," said

the Waterloo regional police pro-

vided vehicles and assistance.

grams participated in the scenario. The media attempted to get

take part in several

centre will be the culmination of what Martin called a very long

process which saw problems from the start.

who

worked through

Christmas holidays to make

a

weight rooms open for student use

in

is

up

facility.

It

ecstatic about the be completed by the

is

will

6.

September but that was continually pushed back because of problems. The rooms opened for use during the second semester.

at the

new

along

facilities

the unbelievable reaction

from

has helped change the recreation centre. the of image “I’ve got to get the impression (to

week of

the students) that the rec centre just a building

"We to

still

have a few deficiencies

work through." Martin

Some

said.

of those deficiencies are the

shower floors

in

the

new

fitness

area not being installed properly

up the road, he

is

not

said.

In try ing to create that impression.

Martin said he

is

trying to build a

culture around the recreation centre through promotion on boards across the college and

on

their

Web

this

culture

because Martin said

he had one female student in third approach him about w hat the y ear recreation centre offered. 55 hen he told her about the free

yoga classes

him she Guelph know w hat w as

offered, the student told

had joined

club

a

because she didn

t

in

on campus.

available

Students don't get everything for

have

to

pay for the

sealed massage session and to book a personal trainer. Fifteen one-hour

with

costs a student

a

personal

S300 while

trainer it

can

cost $1,000 or ntoreat a club like

Goodlife.

said the emphasis on the

students

rec centre,

However, building will take time

sessions

w ith

7. the first

trials

Kitchener courthouse.

ecstatic about the reviews of the recreation centre and estimated the

programming and

week of Jan.

few weeks students

have to prepare reports and

of duty and was right at my side ever)' day. Martin said. Despite the problems. Martin is

He

the

In the next

will

free as they

use of the recreation centre over 1.500 per cent.

were funding issues that resolved over the partially were summer when Conestoga Students Inc. contributed $75,000 in funding First there

on time, delaying Originally. Martin construction. wanted to have the fitness and

Personnel from the Cambridge department, paramedics and

fire

grand opening

for

call

the recreation

arriving

“From a planning point of view, came together well.”

medics and security personnel. A number of students from the broadcast and journalism pro-

week of school. "Pete w'ent above and beyond the

for Mar. 6."

rooms not

As for the outcome of the event, Douglas said faculty are pleased.

alerted police, firefighters, para-

first

ation centre, "but they will be ready

>onse to changes at the

learned.

everything

sure the recreation centre's fitness area would be ready for use by the

grand opening on March

He hopes that when students go out into the real world they will remember the lessons they

one of their classes. A call from Elg from an emergency phone outside the facility

the

director of the recre-

There were also problems with the steel being used for thd recreation centre's new fitness and weight

using the

detect

senses.

ful,” said

part of

recreation centre,

sources of income from elsewhere.

as realistic as

“Students had to be very careDouglas, adding that a lawn mower served as a “red herring," forcing students to be attentive when assessing the scene.

gym.

duct a health and safety audit as

be ready

will

director of the

was

to

difficult

human

Mark supervisor Buchenan said a carbon monoxide leak from a faulty propane heater was the cause of the accident. “We don’t know what happened though,” he said, “'t here wasn’t an engine running when we arrived.” LASA students, Kaila Sigston and Mary Elg, were meeting with mechanic Jeff Southcott to con-

Martin and Peter Schlei.

Martin,

company that made sure

possible.

takes care of maintenance at the

/

said.

the scenario

and had to be re-installed. He also noted the heating system in the new fitness area had to be redone.

year over the next six years. However. Martin didn't have all the required money and had to raise

and

Four people died compared with one in the B scenario. Environmental Acute and

“Our program

he

incident.

then

It’s not quite there but the finishing touches will be ready tor the

The completion of

failed to stop, look

of students participating.

Labour

By Jody Andruszkiewicz

Tony Martin,

emo-

listen,”

have stalled an investigation into the

scene.

scenario

year to accommodate the number

repair facility located in the

arrived wearing oxygen tanks and the unconscious from the scene. The victims were taken to a

A

A

in the

tion of the situation.

cers unconscious in a small engine

See photos on Page 6 and 7

Jeff Southcott and officer Nils Varga killed at the repair facility at Conestoga’s recreation centre.

students

the

be cautious when they are in

you’re a dead hero.”

were

how

students got caught up in the

Security

Four dead

be

to

responded to each.”

ed to be a hero,”’ Douglas said.

it

“You wanted

security officers.

Douglas. “The issue

The use of carbon monoxide was significant because the gas is odourless and colourless, making

tal

LASA

Students from the college were

said

to play a part.”

ferent.

mock

was going

“They may look back and say, ‘I remember at college when I want-

the field.

a

tion,”

helped stage the event,

to

two

actually

Safety Services, the

reported

at

front-page

sham.

students in a

scenarios

program (LASA). "There are 48 LASA students and we wanted to give everybody an opportunity

dents

treated the survivors, includ-

two

ended up being very different. “You can never predict a situa-

can remind them

was a carbon monoxHowever, the way both scenes unfolded was slightly dif-

and the mechanic were dead at the scene. Nursing students at a field hospi-

be

typically

The

at

This

news, but the whole thing was a

actually participating in a

said

other,”

would

7.

the law and security administra-

dents because

stu-

monoxide accident

be beneficial to stu-

ide leak.

In Scenario B,

a carbon

and

a bit less cau-

the

Four people are dead and two

Two

may

level

the accident

dents arrived

co-

"They failed to stop, look and listen and then act. They got caught up in the emotion.” However, mistakes made at this

broadcasting

listen’

information from security but were kept back from the scene and were greeted with a “no comment” when asked questions.

are in serious condition following

Douglas.

the event.

As

than

tious

students were also called to cover

to oversee the action.

In both scenarios, the

inspectors

LASA

the

for

“One group was

recreate a real

to

Ministry of Labour.

the

Cambridge fire department and Waterloo officers from the regional police were in attendance

in

breaths,

police foundations programs.

full

the opportunity to participate in

three

Don Douglas, program

ordinator

scene.

This was to allow more students

than

By Laurie Vandenhoff

Conestoga College on Feb.

realistic.

This year the scenario, which took place

and

Scenario A, students posing

In

arriving

their

Students failed to

same outcome.

not have the

part of

emergency

security

their

The annual accident scenario that took place at Conestoga students

learn from scenario

accidents produce different outcomes

Tori Sutton

— Page 3

Feb. 18, 2002

site.

"We've created something great for the students."

When

Martin said.

the grand opening occurs

on Mar. 6. there will be a ribbon cutting ceremony at 6:30. a hockey same at 7 between an alumni team and the varsity team, two

men s and w omen s alumni teams will take on the men s and women s varsity teams respectively and all the instructors

soccer games,

will be

evening.

giving free lessons that


THE CONTROVERSY CONTINUES AT CAFE CALISA

Tuition deregulation

not good for students Even though Universities Minister Dianne Cunningham recently from Queen’s University in Kingston to deregulate undergraduate tuition, the government needs to take a serious look at the growing need of student aid and the damage of soaring rejected the request

university costs across Canada.

On Feb. 6, university students came together during the Students Day of Action to protest the deregulation of undergraduate tuition and demand the government impose a tuition freeze and increase funding to public education. Outside the Ontario legislature, students from Kitchener, Guelph,

Peterborough and Thunder Bay rallied

hope

in the

that their voices

would be heard. At the University of Prince Edward Island in Charlottetown, about 70 students held a sleep-out, pitching tents on the university campus in temperatures of -30 C. Similar camp-outs occurred at the University of Ottawa and

Mount

New

Allison in

Brunswick.

In St. John’s, Nfld., student leaders said thousands

marched

to

and

entered the provincial legislature where they met with the education minister.

In Halifax, about 200 protesters occupied the main floor of the Royal Bank building.

At

WLU,

undergraduate and graduate students were urged to walk

out of their classes during the afternoon to sign petitions, listen to

speakers and create a strong voice supporting a tuition freeze.

A

petition at

WLU,

which has accumulated more than 1,800

natures, asks Ontario’s restore

MPPs

government funding

to freeze tuition fees for all

sig-

programs,

education and reduce tuition

to public

fees for all graduate, post-diploma and professional

programs

that

Confidence needed to say no

have been deregulated since 1998. taught at an early age

Self-esteem

would have moved from the government to university administration. The students were concerned that this policy would

about safe sex, but astonishing

plays a big part

mean dramatic

aren’t listening.

Deregulation would have meant tuition levels for arts and sciences students

campuses.

tuition increases specific to individual

Without the intervention of the government students say the eventual result

to freeze tuition hikes

A

two-tier system,

We’re

all

statistics

show

that

many people

especially, aren’t

it comes making sure

to

the

Almost 25 per cent of HIV cases diagnosed last year were women.

engaging

able to afford the costs and therefore be denied access.

Of

In an article in the Feb. 7 edition of Echo, students pointed out that while the university cited cuts in

funding

to

support deregula-

have been moving funds out of the general operating budget into an endowment fund. In the education material they

tion, they

stressed that deregulation

is

unnecessary

government has the largest surplus

al

at a

time

when

the feder-

Canadian history

in

-

$12.3

billion last year.

government imposed a two per cent cap on fee increases in the core arts and sciences programs in 2001 for each of the next five years. However, the cap does not apply to some professional and graduate programs including medicine, law and master of business administration

(MBA).

In

medicine alone, tuition for first-year students ranges from $8,500 at the University of Ottawa to $14,700 at the University of Toronto. Although some universities defend the high tuition costs as necessary to recruit top-notch faculty and improve technology, associations such as the Ontario

medical school

is

Medical Association claims

becoming a place

it

worried

is

for the rich, and that high

tuition will intensify the doctor shortage.

more energy

into finding

ways

to increase assistance for stu-

dents and increase funding of public education. Without will surely face a two-tier education

it,

students

system or even worse a

zation of the university system that will deny to

Canada states. The Health Canada statistics Statistics

released in attention

many

privati-

students access

post-secondary education, not because they are incapable, but

because they cannot afford

May

didn’t

deserved,

they

news conference, held 7,

in

get

a

Ottawa

In fact,

dumped

have the confi-

This strength will then lead to the

to

power and

unpro-

are scary.

HIV

victims

less than

10 per

Prior to 1995 most

were men, with

women, according

something girls

had

the

in

The lethal virus has been around for more than 20 years, and until recently Canadian

women

coming

with HIV.

in contact

need

weren’t

However, despite the concentration on sex education in the people are practising unsafe sex.

needs

to get

done

be

to

women

feel

themselves tested;

before these girls become sexually active.

to better

to be more motivayoung women to avoid

There needs

aspects of their

tion for

lives.

unprotected sex.

The

48 per cent from the number

testing

self-assurance they

Feb. 8 Record article.

Near the end of 1999, an estimated 6.800 Canadian women were living with HIV. That’s up

HIV

free

is

available throughout the city, but

before more young

more young

all

to a

to unpro-

would be able

forefront.

The numbers

no

will to say

Sure there

fear they will be

they insist their partner

wear a condom. If

have strength within them-

selves to do anything they desire.

tected sex.

some

if

should teach these young

girls to

brought the numbers of

school systems, more and more

it.

lings

is

tected sex.

HIV-infected Canadians to the

cent being

in

Some women may not dence needed to say no

the

but

1996.

Instead of trying to raise tuition, both institutions should be putting

were

per cent

51.5

teachers, parents and older sib-

they’re

safe.

under age 20, a report released

from

on Feb.

In an attempt to alleviate the problem, the

that

those,

sex

life.

positive

for

self-esteem should be presented at an early age. At five- and- six-years-old,

when

Young women

getting the message.

predictable:

Encouragement

women

for

where students from wealthy families are able to attend university while those from modest, working-class backgrounds will not be

is

better all aspects of their

Safe sex education

is

federal, provincial and local

governments should get together

important

for teenage girls, but self-esteem

and create a program

and

free

encouragement against unprotected sex must be a mandatory component as well. The difference between love and sex

needs

to

Educators must

be

clarified.

instil

confidence

that offers

weekly sessions promoting and

self-reliance

confidence,

rather than questioning the

HIV

epidemic and wondering how

the

numbers got so high so quickly. Even if just a few mothers and

young women before teaching them about the dos and don’ts of in

daughters

attended

posed meetings,

few more

pro-

women who would

sex.

a

more young girls had selfassurance they would be able to

comfortable enough

If

these

would mean

that

an unsafe way of

to say

no

be to

life.

SPOKE

is mainly funded from September to May by a payment from Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) in exchange for the

Keeping Conestoga College connected

insertion of advertising in the paper.

expressed

this

are not endorsed

SPOKE

is

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Michelle Goring; Online Editor; Tori Sutton

Circulation Manager: Jody Andruszkiewicz; Advertising Manager: Reni Nicholson Photo Editor: Sanja Glibota; Production Manager: Kirsten Fifield

SPOKE’s Phone: 748-5220,

ext.

address

3691

Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario,

Web site:

N2G 4M4.

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke @conestogac.on.ca

The views and opinions

newspaper do not necessarily reflect the 'views of Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers in SPOKE in

tain the

CSI

logo.

by

the

CSI unless

SPOKE

shall,

their advertisements con-

not be liable for any damages

arising out of errors in advertising

beyond the amount paid for must be sent to the editor

the space. Unsolicited submissions

by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a MS Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not contain any libellous statements and

may be accompanied by

(such as a photograph).

an

illustration


SPOKE, Feb.

Research By Julianna Kerr

Motion job

in

descriptions and lots of goodies for

What

on hand

greet

to

students

local

looking for jobs on Feb.

The 2002 Job

Admission and transportation to the job fair were free with a student card. Once inside, students had

6.

Fair

RIM

at

University

cess,

network

to

many

from

enforcement a.m.

10

outdoor p.m.,

3:30

Jo

employers were available to answer questions. Booths were set up by each organization. They

search

their interest in the organization

and the position available. list of suggested Free’s

Since

only

has

college

the

confess to being a meteorologist. information Milner gathers faculty coming from from Guelph, Stratford, Cambridge

closed two times in five years as a

some

result of the weather,

dents

stu-

may be wondering what

takes to get a

snow

The decision

and the surrounding areas. And, he consults with local transit authorities to find out what

it

day.

to close the school

on a given day isn’t an easy one, according to Barry Milner, physiat resources manager cal Conestoga College. "We have a procedure in place which Has served us well," He said. Milner has Web sites, including the Weather Channel and the

always updated on the Weather Channel and Ministry of Transportation Web sites,” Milner said. “A number of our clients come by public are

transportation.”

Loop

He is also on the phone to the plowmen moving snow at each

Intelecast, at his disposal to continuously check weather patterns.

of Conestoga’s campuses. “They can tell me the current condi-

Radar

States

United

for

How many

people would

1

be

How

become

did this position

available?

Do you

have a training session

new employees?

for

An employer guidebook was ing

in the

all

job

students participat-

fair.

listed contact

names

for organ-

izations represented at the

well

fair,

positions

available

as

as

and

employer profiles. Conestoga co-op adviser Violet Boutilier

was stationed

at

the

“The turnout from students was “I saw many

fantastic,” she said.

neatly

dressed

Conestoga employees (from left) Shirley Donczyk, Violet Boutilier, Charlie Matjanec and Julie Welch were official greeters for stu(Photo by Julianna Kerr) dents at the 2002 Job Fair, Feb. 6. wished to meet.” Job search resources and information are always available to Conestoga students and alumni in

appeared serious about meeting with potential employers. Several

doors, greeting students.

students

who

tions at each

campus.”

students mentioned they had specific

companies

in

mind and had

researched which employers they

employment

the student

office.

had already been put down, which melted the rain as it landed. “That meant that we could

open was based upon roads being in reasonable condition and they weren’t going to get worse. “We closed on the Wednesday night because the storm was identified to reach us from the Ohio Valley at 8 p.m.” Milner said. “People would have been safe getting in for continuing educathe schools

Dave Stewart, continuing eduadminister; Donna Runions, college academic and administration services; Wally Ebner, campus administration; and Milner gather information

cation

that is fed into a central source,

the registrar Fred Harris.

their drivers are saying.

“Road conditions

you looking

close Conestoga College

However, he said he doesn’t

Hiller

a success

reporting to?

It

Few storms can By Lisa

skills are

available for

interesting questions that reflect

company

brochures,

offered

job

Student employment officer Sara Ffee said students should always prepare questions of their own for an interview. Students should ask relevant and

recreation.

From

as

questions and interviews.

with

sectors,

and

well

Conestoga’s table focused on

including information technology,

law

as

resources.

— Page 5

an employee?

ing the event offered useful tips and

Students were presented with the

employers

partner schools sponsor-

suggestions for employment suc-

of

Guelph, Wilfrid Laurier University and University of Waterloo. opportunity

The

tion.

in

schools:

partner

in

access to a great deal of informa-

Motion) Park was sponsored by Conestoga and three (Research

2002

questions include:

interested students.

More than 100 employers were

fair

18,

The decision must be made by 5:30 a.m. in order to be able to inform all clients and staff before they head to the school. “We consult with him, and he makes the final decision,” Milner said. “Our major concern is the safety of our clients, we don’t want to put people at risk.” On Jan. 31 the decision to keep

the

be open.” Milner said Harris and other

work as a team to do the right thing for the college.

administrators

“We

take pride in trying to

the right decisions,” he said.

tion classes, but not safe getting

out and might have been trapped we hadn’t closed.” According to Milner, on the Friday the information didn’t point to conditions being severe enough to close the school.

if

“The freezing rain came later than expected,” Milner said. “Salt

make

“We

won’t please everyone though.” For example, Milner said closing the school on a test day when a student was prepared could completely throw that student off when they have to do the test on another day. “There’s an impact on the clients

if

we do

or don’t close

the school.”

Lack of people power cancels silent auction ome is where the heart

money for children with autism delayed; event may be rescheduled for April

Raising

items sitting out.” she said, adding, it's too much responsibil-

By Daniel Roth

A

silent auction to raise

money

ity for

due

to a lack

7,

was cancelled

I

of volunteers to run

the event.

The

auction’s goal

money

to

was

to raise

a single person.

send children with

items

disability

young

which appears

age, to

camp

Laura Caughlin

is

for a

at

member Chapter County Waterloo The of of Autism Society Ontario. is

auction co-ordinator

grateful to the college for

allowing her to use the space in the Sanctuary' but is disappointed

She said volunteers would have been needed to set up before the auction and help distribute the prizes afterwards.

Caughlin

said

she

has

approval to run the auction

the at

the staff to run the event properly.

Fairview Mall. She is aiming to hold the auction in April, providing she gets

She said she would have needed at least four people at all

the help she needs, and she is not fussy when it comes to volun-

times.

teers.

the event had to be cancelled. However, she just didn't have

"You

can’t just have

at the event with

one person of those

all

"If

do

someone would volunteer to it would be

the smallest thing

lot.”

some

experi-

“I could use people to help me with marketing, advertising, promotions, law and accounting.”

Student-friendly return fares from Kitchener.

she said.

Guelph

$11

Toronto

$25

Caughlin is also open to the idea of having different types of

Peterborough

$51

Belleville

$61

Dttawa

$114

Sudbury

$114

entertainment

the co-ordi-

nator of the event and a

She

Laura Caughlin. I

doesn’t have to be a

ence.

sitting out.”

a

week.

beneficial,” she said, adding, “It

dents looking to get

“You can’t just have one person at the event with all those

autism, a complex development

too.

All types of people could benefit from the event, especially stu-

for children with autism, sched-

uled for Feb.

Free laundry

is.

at the event.

“There's lots of opportunity to get experience." she said.

She would hke to double the number of items by the next auction and would be grateful for

GST not

Visit

www.greyhound.ca

for

included

more discounted

destinations.

any donations.

“Even items which have been marked down by retailers people might buy.” she

Anyone

said.

interested in donating

time or prizes can reach Caughlin by phone at 743-1422 or by e-

mail lacoughlin@sympatico.ca.

at

For information, contact: Student Life Centre, U of

W

888-4434 15 Charles Street W.

585-2370

GREYHOUND CANADA*


Taking the polar plunge

Police foundations student Lazaro Escobar climbs out of the participating

in

the 20th annual polar plunge at the college.

pond

after

(Photo by Kirsten

Fifield)

Lazaro Escobar takes a flying leap into the pond in full costume Heart and Stroke Foundation. The event raised $2,000.

to raise

money

for the

(Photo by Kirsten

Accounting student Jessika Kunkle and an unidentified into the icy waters during the polar plunge on Feb. 7.

man

take a leap of

(Photo by Kirsten

An

unidentified

were supposed

man

ran from the crowd of spectators to join

to register with the

CSI before jumping.

in

Fifield)

faith

Fifield)

the plunge. Participants (Photo by Kirsten

Fifield)

Journalism student and CSI vice-president of academics Jody Andruszkiewicz shows off his better side after jumping into the pond wearing an orange thong. (Photo by Kirsten

Fifield)


Page 7

— SPOKE, Feb.

18,

2002

Co-op enhances student experience By Julianna Kerr

said. “It helps

with the long-term

so you don’t find yourself wonder-

Students and employers taking

ing

Co-op

Co-operative

from March

1

at

Doon

The Canadian Association

It

go

on

have

to

better

salaries.”

practical experience

and employ-

Boutilier said one of the major

growth and quality of co-op pro-

grams across the country.

at

Boutilier together

all

ensuring

to

said

CAFCE

benefits

the

“It

to

gives people an opportunity to

pick the

right

career,”

sell

themselves

Boutilier

bring the

same work

terms and then hire them after graduation. Boutilier said

important for

it’s

ing with everyone

- including peo-

who may have

ple in the industry

office provides assis-

and mock interviews. Co-op eligibility and availability depend on each program, but a lot of it is based on marks and ability.

experiences. “It

helps students

tance with resumes, cover letters

Canada. Co-op offers students important and unique

in

some

Many employers

students to realize they are compet-

employers,” she said.

The co-op

and college co-op programs

versity

to

Conestoga.

puts

the guidelines for uni-

Conestoga deals with a number of organizations that hire students

students back for subsequent

ment contacts. co-op students is a career development course offered

dedicated

skills

job prior to making a commitment to hiring them.”

in

their field prior to graduating, they

a national, non-profit organiza-

tion

most

the

applying the

Co-op students graduate with

had some experience

they’ve

for

would have

starting

that students

she said, “is that because

like,”

(CAFCE)

Co-Operative Education

feel

with

success

on a regular basis. “Employers like co-op because it gives them an extended job interview with students,” Boutilier said. “They get the opportunity to see how the student performs on the

“The other big thing

throughout the

we

they’re learning,” she said.

finishing school.”

also helps students put the

puts theory into practice.

week.

is

career just

in the right

skills they’re learning into action.

8 to 22.

The week is recognized across Canada, and is designed to boost awareness of co-op programs. Conestoga co-op adviser Violet Boutilier said an information booth would be set up in one of the main hallways

you’re

when you’re

co-op will be saluted during Education Week,

part in

if

usually offered to the stu-

“It’s

dents

years of experience.

“Employers are looking son to

for a per-

their job needs,” she said.

fill

Go-op helps students jump ahead a few steps in a highly competitive

job market.

Students dissatisfied with CSI’s work By Lisa

night to watch

Hiller

Canada play hockey

Second-year marketing students Emile McLean and Steve Coleman Students Conestoga think Incorporated needs to do a better job improving and promoting its

Olympics. McLean noted that many students probably don’t stop to read the complicated-looking posters and advertisements on the walls and bulletin boards throughout the

events.

school.

in the

McLean and Coleman, who was

“The

elected as the CSI’s vice-president of activities in the spring of 2001

events

quit

but

shortly

posters advertising the extravagant,” too are

McLean

“They belong

said.

“If an activity is feasible

ideas.”

Jody Andruszkiewicz, vice-president of academics, said, “We’ll take everything said- into account, but if there’s something we can’t do, there’s a good reason for it.”

And

there isn’t

enough

always open to suggestions and ideas.” Ginny Hawkrigg, CSI vice-president of

ted to addressing the issues that concern its membership, while pro-

Coleman

said he finds out about

events too late most of the time.

ing to the college student hand-

CSI up-to-date and making

He suggested keeping

book. Social enhancement was what McLean and Coleman wanted to bring to the attention of the CSI

executive members.

Web

site

U

if

A

formation of study groups can be one about difficult material. answered questions get

ENVIRONMENT. The

BENEFITS OF GROUP LEARNING

the

.

M

.

that education

Sanctuary (notices of events on cards or coasters on the middle

together to solve

suggested many know what the CSI or does and who its members are.

variety.

"Put more effort into endorsing yourselves and what you do, he

He suggested more awareness weeks, comedy and dinner nights, bands perform and at the college instead of larger conhaving local air

certs.

Coleman suggested having

a

is

wf'

also

students don

said.

of activities for the CSI. said she is available for consultation most in the

CSI

'with

material

Look

«

Look Look

for for

by working

and therefore develop a

better

.

people for dedicated students. Find some of your academic goats.

.

.

Ginny Hawkrigg, vice-president

days

difficult

their problem-solving ability

HOW TO FORM A STUDY GROUP

t

students

questions.

Study groups encourage interaction understanding of subject material.

l “i

thoughts that there are not enough social events put on by the CSI, and the ones put on are poor with little

when

is

encouragement and support. Alt members of the group can improve

in the

of tables).

longer

are retained Groups study facilitates active learning. Lessons process. are actively engaged in the learning brings more perspeebves together, "Two heads are better than one”. Group study sessions. which usually leads to more productive study that increases confidence, reinforcing Students develop a sense of camaraderie can be a source o, a co-operative exercise. Fellow students

sure there are always table-talkers

McLean

(Photo by Julianna Kerr)

IN THE COLLEGE GROUP STUDY HAS LONG BEEN A SUCCESSFUL STRATEGY of the best places to

:

his

already making preparations for

March.

Y BR0UP

nr. in

activities

viding opportunities for social and educational advancement, accord-

is

Week in

¥% i/

advertis-

“I’m

2002 on Jan. 29. The CSI is the student governing body for the college and is commit-

Violet Boutilier

Co-operative Education

in

ing about events.”

ing of

stating

Co-op adviser

magazines,” Coleman noted.

thereafter,

approached the CSI school of business representative Jay Mielke about talking at the first CSI meet-

McLean began by

and we

have the money to do it, I am not opposed to it,” she said. “I’m always open to suggestions and

you are comfortable with and who share

take notes during class.

people

who ask questions and

people

with similar goals but different

backgrounds and methods

of

Larger groups are harder to function in. Umit numbers to five or six members. interested students to contact you. asking board Post a note on the bulleting

.

office.

KEYS TO EFFECTIVE GROUPS

their performance are usually good Motivated students. Students who care about and taking notes in class assignments completed attendance, participants. Regular are good indications of student commitment.

.

for the

sky

Small groups have Keeping a group small encourages participation. generate more ideas when and time meeting on a agreeing fewer problems decisions. difficult to get together or make brainstorming. Larger groups make it too

.

Group

.

should meet early in the semester Study groups versus cram sessions. Groups prior to exams is not the sessions review Having it. throughout and meet reguiariy

size.

only reason to form a study group.

.

what they should bring to each Accountability. Each member should be clear on before going to the group and <»me own their on work should Members meeting. be a review of the matenal that prepared for the session. Group study should individuals

v

have already covered.

2B02, for an appointment with the For more information, contact Student Services. Advisor. Learning Skills


Accident scenario

prepares students world

for real

A firefighter

student carries out the faulty propane heater responsible

the gas leak during accident scenario A.

i-irengnter

ana paramedic students help victims during accident scenario

(Photo by Lisa

for Hiller)

B.

(Photo by Michelle Goring)

An event

staff member helps paramedics fasten safety straps on a stretcher before loading a victim into an

ambulance.

A

firefighter

scenario A.

student puts an oxygen

mask on one

of the victims of

(Photo by Lisa

Hiller)

e ed^to the hos

S

lent

^^

(Photo by Lisa

Hiller)

MMi eVent staf*

mem :>er secure *

a victim on a backboard

to

be transport-

ita|

(Photo by Lisa

Hiller)


SPOKE,

A

firefighter

to pull

student

another

trips

Feb. 18,

2002â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Page

over one victim while attempting

to safety.

(Photo by Laurie Vandenhoff)

A paramedic

student and an event organizer load an unconscious student police officer onto a

stretcher during accident scenario A.

A

(Photo by Michelle Goring)

victim lays

colleqe, after

the makeshift hospital in the nursing wing of the being transported from the accident scene.

in

(Photo by Lisa

The Cambridge Firefighter students pull tre

9

an unconscious student police

during accident scenario A.

officer

from the rec cen (Ph0,c by Lisa

Hlll>

Fire

Department participated

students to arrive at the accident scenario

in

in

Hiller)

the scenario, allowing firefighter

an actual

fire truck.

(Photo by Michelle Goring)


.

Page 10

— SPOKE, Feb.

18,

2002

Sciam.com a great information Here you are able

By Stacey McCarthy

tons of cool facts and information that could be of interest to students

dating back to 1993.

This column appears weekly and focuses on fun and informative Web

and teachers.

published earlier than

of interest to the students and Conestoga College. at staff

function and a set of useful, specialty links to aid you in searches.

Sciam.com has both an archive

sites

The archive allows you

Have you ever wanted to know wi ? your stomach growls? What about how tyrannosaurs get to their feet with such little hands after

its

answers to these and many other scientific questions. to be interested in

pay

to

that

you

to

Scientific

for

issues

has

It

is

American

article

1993 you

Which

science.

your area of

on is

miniature

this

excellent

if it's

interest.

However, I bypassed it in favour of something I could understand

My

environment or geology. The main page of sciam.com also has both trivia and poll sections. The trivia question of the day is,

what marks the end of a black

find will researchers and sciam.com useful as well. It is -well laid out and written in a language most could understand even if they aren’t budding scien-

hole?

tists.

Care

favourite link on this page

the “ask the experts” section.

to take a

all

are also able to

know of any fun or

If you

guess?

interest-

you can e-mail me at staceyml8@hotmail.com and it may

Web

encourages your opinion on questions like whether

ing

you believe global warming

appear

The

better.

was

page is geared towards the scientific community, regular browsers

acids are

and secrets of digestive There is even where you can find questions about math,

news

and

articles

are

answers to computers,

American. to stomach growling

here.

of the links on sciam.com takes you to a collection of information on nanotechnology.

winter.

an archive

You

The answers

One

warmer

check past polls including whether you would want to travel in space, or if obesity should be considered a disease. While the information on the

Scientific

orders or reprints.

There

responsible for the

to e-mail ques-

tions to experts that subscribe to

must send a special request to "sciam.com by e-mail to get back

releases galore

view the issues. Each issue costs $5 and you have access to purchase issues for only 30 days. While searching, you have access to the full archive of have

out Scientific American's sciam.com for at site

Check

You don't have

title,

author, date-or issue.

The only downside

science to enjoy this page.

monthly

journals based on keyword,

falling over?

Web

published in

articles

American

Scientific

specific

for

to search

you need an issue or

If

site

poll section

is

sites,

a future column.

in

Network gaming a big success on campus 50 people attended according to Kate Schwass, promotions co-

By Daniel Roth

A new

type of interactive enter-

ordinator

the

Waterloo.

has

tainment

arrived

at

for

Campus Cove

in

basement of the University of Waterloo’s Student Life Centre.

over

tne

Campus Cove

in

jocated in the

tried it,”

in

Waterloo have

she said, adding, “But

it

work because not enough people had interest in it.” She said the first day it was

didn’t

available

playing

not

too

many people

home

at

ADSL

the friendly

is

open to the $3 an hour you can enjoy the newest gaming

community and

home can get lonely. Campus Cove gives you the opportunity to sit down with your Playing

Kate Schwass, promotions co-ordinator

at

ness “It

arrived, busi-

it’s

was slow on

the

day but

new gaming system.

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“Network gaming

first

we have had

recently

online

customers e-commerce, forums for each of the interactive

game all

special events.

Anne Frank’s voice SWAP USA

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would symbol of hope and per-

walked the streets to get to their new home. Not only is the diary a first-hand account of what some Jews went

Anne

forced into hiding

when

her sister

Anne

attic.

describes in detail the ins-

and-outs of her

Her

fear

new

living quarters.

evident as

is

is

the

through to escape war, it also tells trials to maintain composure

was asked to report to the Nazis. Only weeks earlier, Anne had turned 13. One of her gifts was a

of the

plaid-covered diary.

with her mother during her stay in

a young who faced almost

girl

faith of

during hard times. Anne finds it very hard to live the attic.

The mother-daughter

tionship

is

as

is

explored in great

rela-

detail,

Anne

is

often faced with difficult

feelings of guilt

the world a hope for

sister

when

she sees her

responsible for their situa-

tion.

and peace.

She

details

also

her journey

through early adolescent, including years

later,

the

thoughts and fears of a child living in hiding from forces she could not control

is

revealed in The Diary of

Anne Frank. The first entry is Sunday, June 14, 1942. Anne cheerfully details the

events

surrounding receiving

She

lists

other items she

including

a

puzzle,

first

love with fellow attic resi-

As her life in the attic becomes a permanent fixture, Anne’s personal growth begins to emerge. In an entry on Tuesday, March 7, 1944, nearly two years after going into hiding, Anne’s style and voice have changed. it

think

now

“If

I

all

seems so

different

of my

unreal.

Straight

away Anne’s

and curiosity

is

intelligence

evident. This will

clearer as the reader con-

are

a

in

her story

remarkable.

is

Frank’s words

as powerful

still

today. Anne’s final entry is Tuesday Aug. 1, 1944 and her personal turmoil and hope for the future is evident as she waits to be taken out of the attic and

back

On August

4,

into the light.

1944, the Franks

were betrayed and Anne’s diary was left behind and found at the end of the war scattered across the

and

their friends

was

raided.

attic floor.

Anne was taken to BergenBelsen after spending time in Auschwitz. Only weeks before the liberation in

March of 1945, Anne

life in

It

was

1942,

quite a

Anne who enjoyed

that

Anne Frank but her

died

words are

at a still

young age, as powerful

today. In uncertain times such as these, the faith of a

young

girl

who

faced almost certain death, offers the

world a hope for love and

peace.

The Diary of Anne Frank

is

one

of the most widely available books in the world.

comes

heavenly existence from the Anne who has grown wise within these

her father allowed more entries to

walls.”

be published years after

When Anne moved she was thrust into

pals.

become

share private

to

died of typhus.

dent Peter.

a

money which she wanted to use to buy a book called The Myths of Greece and Rome. The final words of that entry are

brooch, books and

become

her

come

to

the attic

sibling rivalry.

certain death, offers

her telling her diary they’ll be great SWAPis a

years

war broke out in Europe as Hitler began his campaign to rule the world. In 1942, a young Anne Frank and her family were In 1939,

receives,

University Shops Plaza, 170 University Ave. West

never knowing that

middle.

the diary.

II TRAVEL CUTS

thoughts,

pathy her family received as they

Fifty-nine

Experience another, culture

ability

severance,

Increase your appeal to future Canadian

employers

peek into the

in the world.

keep faith Anne’s

sym-

love

emergency support

1942, read-

9,

ers are given a

The

begins!

Thursday, July

eternal

With war being waged on the other side of the world, one may wonder what is going through the minds of children caught in the

work

experience Flexible

tinues.

On

active discussions

centres,

with employees and other customers, as well as promotions and

about adding,

is

Inc.’s

www.estarburst.com,

site,

offers

atmosphere,” he said, “We have installed Pentium 4

of people waiting to play,” she said. list

Coin Machines

Starburst

Steven Tan, general manager for Campus Cove and a Starburst employee, is excited about the

is better.

is

for

cafe in Waterloo.

friends and play.

has gotten out

connection.”

Campus Cove

atmosphere.

used the system. But since word

in the area.

“Other places

Coin Machines Inc. owns the Campus Cove and had network gaming installed at the end of January. The opening ceremony was held on Feb. 5 and approximately Starburst

attracted to a

really surprised.”

“It's been a huge success, we’ve been really surprised,” she said. Schwass was unsure of how the new network gaming would go

University of Waterloo. Network gaming has started

computers with a superior video card, 19-inch monitor and an

The reason someone would be gaming cafe over

been a huge success, we’ve been “It’s

into the attic,

a

world of

tells

cling to her

how she is trying own ideals as well

of

in different versions, as

its

first

publication.

The Diary of Anrre Frank can be found

adults and their ideas.

Anne

It

in second-hand bookstores low as 50 cents, which makes

to

for as

as

accessible to

all

readers.


9

Mothman Prophecies By Michelle Goring

something

When The Mothman Prophecies is a spine-tingling movie that is sure to

happy man. house Mary, seems to

first

wife

beautiful

(Debra Messing) his

life

be perfect.

When

accident

car

a

leaves

Mary in the hospital, Klein is left wonder what it was that she saw that caused her to crash. to

Linney) explains to Klein that people are on edge because of the weird disturbances happening in the

recover from surgery,

thought he was which should have

to

taken him

begins.

years after his wife’s death

Klein

is

still

trying

to

put the

pieces back together.

least

at

six

hours to

Mothman

ings of the

Egyptian times. According to legend, the Mothman appears before a great tragedy occurs.

the

reactor

meltdown

at

Chernobyl.

Klein realizes that time ning out as he

Being the ever-curious decides

to

stay

reporter, in

Point

on true events, The Prophecies is a thoughtprovoking movie that documents sightings of the legendary

dent.

movie explores

The longer Klein stays in Point Pleasant, the more frequent and

the motives behind the

intense

sighting

hours

way on

later, after

losing his

a deserted country high-

way, his car breaks

down and he

The homeowner not only

threat-

ens Klein with a shotgun but also

him he was expecting him. According to the homeowner,

tells

Klein had arrived for the past

at the

two nights

same time asking

at

farmhouse exactly the

to use the

phone.

out

Based

help.

Two

run-

people of Point Pleasant.

goes to a nearby house to ask for

Klein leaves early on an assignment from Washington, D.C. to Richmond, Va.

date,

is

tries to figure

Mothman

attempt to dodge a blind

recorded

largest

sightings occurred just before the

unexplained phenomena in the town. When one of the local townspeople shows Klein a picture of what they had seen, he realizes that what is happening in the town is connected to his wife’s car acci-

In an

sight-

date back to

what horrible tragedy awaits the

drive.

Klein

phenomenon first-hand. From Leek he learns that

One of

town of Point Pleasant.

dies and the legend of the

Mothman

Two

The homeowner calls the police and Sgt. Connie Parker (Laura

Klein suddenly realizes that he is 400 miles away from where he

Unable

Mary

true,

dealing

New York to talk to paranormal expert Alexander Leek (Alan Bates) who wrote a book on the mystery of the Mothman and experienced the

John Klein (Richard Gere), a

his

is

with more than local hysteria and

respected Washington Post jour-

with

comes

event

he rushes to

their seats.

After purchasing his

believer

about to happen.

that is

the

Klein realizes that he

keep audiences on the edge of

nalist, is a

make you a

will

1

Pleasant

to

the

explore

the

sightings

of

the

Mothman become. One of the local townspeople to Klein and tells him that he has talked to the mysterious Mothman and he has prophesied

comes

Mothman

Point

in

W.Va., that began

With

facts

in

The

all

Mothman

documented

movie Web site background of the

including a world

shows

map

of the sightings and interviews with peothat

occurences

that

began

in

the suspense-thriller

The

the town of Point Pleasant, W.Va.,

1963.

the

location

ple

in

(Internet photo)

who have

terious

Some

over the world.

gives detailed

Mothman

from John same title, the

in

based on the unusual

is

the uncertainty of

and

official

Richard Gere and Laura Linney star

Mothman Prophecies. The movie

taken

Keels’ book' of the

appearances

Pleasant,

1964.

Others believed he was the terriclimax of a 200-year-old

witnessed the mys-

phenomenon. thought the

fying

Mothman was

curse.

One

an angel or a devil.

With

UFOs

people spotted in the skies, some thought it only natural to assume the Mothman was an alien. all

the

were

thing

is

for certain, if

you

believer of the legend before experi-

not

a

Mothman encing the

movie, you will be

afterwards.

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Luckiest day: February 18.

By Janine Toms

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On my

last

outing to Pho

Ben

chose the spring rolls as my starter (menu item #501) and a shredded chicken vermicelli soup as my main course (menu item #1

I

18).

The soup

is

a flavourful broth

with large pieces of shredded chicken, lemon grass, and an abundance of rice vermicelli.

The house’s best seating found

in the solarium,

it

mention

that

after

bill I

recommend

Just

writing about

Thanh makes me want for a bite with friends!

learn about other

cultures and languages

A FUN way to get involved with campus activities over 200 students participate in Peer Helping

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unique Viet-Thai culture offered, my dining companion and I walked away with a combined

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I

filling

selves to capacity with palatepleasing meals and enjoying the

EXPERIENCE?

An

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del-

become one of my

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DO YOU WANT TO GET1NVOL VED IN

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Virgo: August 23

are seated,

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a multitude of unique aromas and the buzz of an almost alwaysrestaurant,

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of good things are

you something.

“As you walk through the front doors of the

hit

.Once ordered, the meals are promptly prepared and delivered to the table, though often in an oddly timed order. For instance, in a party of two you may receive the main course immediately, then perhaps an appetizer, and your drinks may show up somewhere close to the end of your meal.

leaves are placed in the soup to accentuate the taste of the dinner. To top off this foreign feast, I had a freshly prepared mango

shake made with real

Dishes of beef, lamb, pork, fish and chicken are offered in a variety of authentic Vietnamese and

in

Pisces: February 19

March 20 You will be

accommodate

jasmine tea along with menus and a coded order form, which is used to help bridge the language

Luckiest day: February 22.

August

to

A

side plate of sprouts accompanies the dish and fresh basil

I

servers that

-

Be

will

the supplied order card.

one of the you will have throughout the course of your meal delivers a steaming pot of

many

l8.

November

-

each numbered

corner of King

room immediately

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Luckiest day: February

at the

downtown

you.

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restaurant located in

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tantalizing meals to choose from,

doors of the restaurant, a multitude of unique aromas and the buzz of an almost always-filled

November 21

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If you’re reading this piece you’ve just found a hidden gem in Viet-Thai cuisine. Pho Ben Thanh is a wonderful

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hard to find fault with any part of the experience. The menu offers more than 50

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Luckiest day: February 19.

best.

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Pho Ben to

drop

in


SPOKE,

Condors ‘mentally By Jody Andruszkiewicz

to lose in that situation unless

key game,” Johnstone

it

said. “In

is

played particularly brutal soccer

mindset.”

losing 4-0 to F.C. Benfica at the recreation centre

They had the

on Feb.

more

describe

first

game even

Johnstone said, and that

beginning, set the tone

terrible passing

blue cards.

for the entire

Two

players,

have never been able to find a

“I

way

shake up a team that has

to

decided to Johnstone

He was

it.”

The Condors were down the

The Condors were overconfident

attitude cost the

and a terCondors a game they should have won. "They were mentally lethargic,” said coach Geoff Johnstone after the game. “It’s the only way I can team

rible

in that

game. Bojan Djokcvic and Dino Vukmanovic, even picked up

in the

second half but a serious lack of

teamwork,

win once they get

prior to the

7.

a few scoring chances in

half and a few

first

to

1-0 after

stroll

through a game,”

said.

also concerned about play-

ers playing too

He went on

half and because the Benfica

goalkeeper made some excellent

much

soccer.

to say that despite his

concerns about his players and the

saves in the second half, his shutout

loss,

was kept

focusing on tournament play on

intact.

“It’s actually

them

preferable for

Lack

Condors would

the

be

still

A Condors

Even

the coach got into the act. Conestoga Condors men’s hockey coach Greg Rickwood was assessed a game misconduct penalty at the end of the Condors’ game against Sir Sandford Fleming after tearing into the ref-

forward watches as the F.C. goalie

Rickwood of

the game,” said

The game

had on the match. He said he had guys on the bench he wanted on the ice but because of the penalties, they were stuck on the bench. “We were very fortunate Fleming didn’t capitalize on some

started off chippy

and

rough and ended the same way. “It’s

disappointing

that

one guy can

a game

ruin

like that.”

Greg Rickwood, Condor hockey coach

I

the

effects the officiating

of their chances,” he added. However, Fleming did capitalize

Condors

During

the

defeated Fleming 7-4 on Feb. 7 at

almost

three

the recreation centre.

Rickwood could have also complained about the amount of penalties as Condors forward

on the Condors early in the first as they picked apart the Condors shoddy defence and made it 1-0 on a goal by Mark Robinson. The Condors tied the game on a power play goal from Ryan Baird. Sloppy play by both teams dom-

Craig Bannister chalked up six

inated the

first

minor

the

lack

of

can

disappointing that one guy

ruin

game

a

Rickwood

like

said after the

that,”

“This guy definitely let them back into the game,” he said. “I

was

think he

definitely for them.”

wasn’t the amount of penalties that had Rickwood so steamed, It

in

Condor

the 4-0

loss on Feb. 7. (Photo by Jody Andruszkiewicz)

steams hockey coach

but rather the lack of penalties.

eree for brutal officiating. “It’s

makes a save

weekends.

of penalties

By Jody Andruszkiewicz

coach

lethargic’:

a

experience as a coach, a team won’t

do much

— Page 13

my

A usually solid Conestoga Condors men’s indoor soccer team in

Feb. 18, 2002

were However,

there

fights.

infractions.

“You

Teamwork

game

can’t get into the flow of

the key

period, along with officiating.

The

Condors took the lead on a

pretty

With

make it 5-2 on a goal mouth scramble that goaltender Andy Hopkin, making his second consecutive start, had no chance

first,

on.

wraparound goal from Ian Fehrman and then 15 seconds later, Fehrman one-timed the Condors

to a two-goal lead.

10 seconds

play in the the Condors scored again. left to

Like the first period, spotty officiating was the theme of the second period. Two more goals from Fleming,

“We were very fortunate Fleming didn’t capitalize

some

play goal to

on

of their

chances.” Rickwood

one through Hopkins’ legs and the other that he should have had but allowed through, brought Fleming to within one goal. However, Conestoga scored two more goals, one on an empty net, in the third period to

Conestoga opened the second with a quick goal, making it 5-1. But Fleming scored a power

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

make

the final score 7-4.

Condors one point of Seneca ahu moved them three points ahead of Cambrian.

The

victory pulled the

to within

Suicide

When we are going through difficult times, may seem hard to believe the pain will ever end. Suicide may seem like the only answer to problems. People who have considered are suicide may feel helpless, desperate, or that there is no hope in their lives. If you it

in

2-1 win for

women’s soccer team the True North keeper on a great

By Jody Andruszkiewicz Even in a building year, the Conestoga Condors women’s indoor soccer team can still put together a solid game. Playing against True North on Feb. 5 the

at

the recreation centre,

Condors pulled out a

2-1

But the Condors lead was short-lived as True North scored a goal a few minutes later that deflected off a Condors defender and ricocheted into the top

are •

corner.

is

definitely a building

coach Elaine Keller. "But they are coming together which is really nice.”

year." said

This time she scored off a

goalmouth scramble when the ball squirted loose and she had

forth first half.

by a goal, the True North team seemed to tire and the Condors controlled the game the rest of the way. “They have more confidence

the entire net to shoot

at.

Up

However, that couldn’t help Condors put the ball in the net at all as the first half ended

the

tied 0-0.

when

But the second half is paid off. Melinda Wilkinson scored a

on

the court and together,” said

“The

Keller.

very pretty goal, putting

have fun out there, knowing they have the chance to win.”

past

if

a friend

may be

suicidal,

here

signs to consider:

Talk of - escape, having no future, being alone, feeling hopeless or helpless, suicide, death, or plans for suicide; Feelings of - desperation, hopelessness, disconnection from family and friends; with Situation - relationship problems, work problems, school/failing grades, trouble lack of interest/pleasure in all things, lack of physical energy, disturbed sleep, loss of sexual interest, loss of appetite; Behaviours - alcohol/drug abuse, fighting, lawbreaking, emotional outbursts,

Physical

Changes -

you suspect that a person may be suicidal, ask them about it, encourage them to share what is happening with them. Talking about suicide with someone does not support suicide; it only shows that someone cares about what they are going through. If

Suicide is a permanent solution to a temporary problem. applies to you or someone you know, ask If you feel that any of this information Services. Student in counsellor speak to a

girls are starting to

their efforts

it

some warning

unbearable, or you are wondering

dropping out of school, prior suicidal behaviour, putting affairs in order, giving away prized possessions to friends and family, telling final wishes to someone close, a sudden and unexpected change to a cheerful attitude, behaviour that is out of character (i.e. a cautious person who suddenly becomes reckless)

Condors on their heels but they rebounded, once again with Wilkinson scoring.

was that togetherness the Condors displayed in having solid ball control in a back and It

life is

the law, family breakdown, sexual/physical abuse;

This goal seemed to put the

victory.

“This

pass up the middle between two defenders from Nicole McKee.

thinking that

A message

from Student Services (Room 2B02).

to


i

Page 14

— SPOKE, Feb.

18,

2002

Team Canada

Elvis king of our hearts

be for hockey gold

By Lisa

fighting

will

By

Julie

With the recent gold-medal loss ‘by the Canadians at the World

Team Canada

place finish for

Nagano

Olympic puck is dropped? But with names like Paul Kariya,

the

at

Joe Sakic, Curtis Joseph and Scott Niedermayer, Team Canada, with

1998, there seems to be

in

at this year’s

an urgency

Olympics.

coach Pat Quinn, looks strong. However, the roster will not have

Even Wayne Gretzky, executive

Team Canada,

director of in a, recent

he

admitted

Canadian Press

isn't interested in

the easiest of battles since the United States and Czech Republic teams are also full of NHL stars.

article

anything but

gold.

Jaromir Jagr, of the Washington

“We’re taught from a young age this country how important hockey is. We understand the perception in this country to win at all costs and get a gold medal,” he

is the Czech captain. The team boasts stars Patrik Elias, Petr Sakora and Dominik Hasek, who

Capitals,

in

will all

be looking to defend their

gold medal win

said.

at

Nagano four

years ago.

“When

Team USA,

NHL

these

players step on the ice at the

they

know what Olympics

Team Sweden, article. Press Finland and Russia will also be the “Dream Teams” to watch. “This is going to be one tough

be

will

like.”

Wayne

Gretzky,

tournament,” said Brooks. “There

executive director

be a lot of great athletes and a of great teams in Salt Lake.”

will

Team Canada

lot

this

country

players going over to the

by asking players who aren’t healthy enough, to

Championships

think they forfeit the

Games. “They’re bigger heroes

if

they

say they can’t play,” he said. Included among those recovering

from

injuries is Steve

the Detroit

Yzerman of

Red Wings, who underin late January.

went knee surgery

On Feb. 1, it was reported Owen Nolan of the San

that

Jose

Sharks had a sore back. After hip surgery earlier in the

NHL

season,

pressure and

how

how

to

important

Prom

Conestoga Mall 747-1290

they

ice at the

playing

in

the

the

will

STMS St.

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at

He came back

let

to

his injury

compete in

Elvis Stojko strikes

I'd say he’s

done us proud.

after finishing

a familiar a skating

(Internet photo)

routine.

If you’ve seen or heard anything about Stojko during the height of

his career,

you may have heard

heart,

guts,

strength

Winter Japan,

been the strongest, most consistent skater in the world, able to defy odds and never be counted out of the medal race. I always believed he could com-

career, he has

plete his triple axel in his sleep because he lands them every time. I’ve seen

him miss

twice in 16 years. Four years ago

his triple axel

at

the

Nagano, one of Canada’s golden hopes. Going in he was as sure a bet as there was.

the

and

1998

Olympics in was Stojko

He performed

his programs perCanadian national championships in Hamilton, he

fectly

at

the

some perfect 6s for presentation after his free skate. Little did Canadians and the received

world know he had suffered an injury after that program and kept it hidden. Despite a painful groin Stojko skated in the injury,

i

NOT VALID ON SALE MERCHANDISE. NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER PROMOTION.

skated as well as

and physical condition

pose

NHL

894-0770

let

medals.

The last NHL game before the Olympic break will be played Feb. 13. Look for the gold medal game

Fairview Mall

He

to

But after more injuries and people competitions, missed thought the terminator (as he has also been called because of relentlessness), wanted to go out healthy

be

whatever the occasion

the

1999.

the

like.”

on Feb. 23 and the regular season to resume on Feb. 26.

was

Canadian junior championship, seven senior Canadian championships, three world championships and two Olympic silver

won

pressure of

Olympics

it

more than 16 years ago, Stojko has

Olympic Games,

know what

didn’t.

Stojko rested and heal.

is to

MEN’S SHOPS

ONE VOUCHER

He

NHL

on the

Suit, Interview Suit,

213 King

competitive season.

30 years old on March 22. Since his amateur career began

will be

play for Canada,” he said. players step “When these

THIS ENTITLES THE STUDENT BEARER TO 10% OFF THE PURCHASE OF ANY REGULAR PRICED MERCHANDISE

Suit,

fig-

retiring after

World it

ending his

risk

would allow him. He was one of Canada’s sure things, talk about pressure, and he didn’t let us down.

handle

Staz Bucks

Grad

He

his ability

teaches junior

that

weeks. Gretzky addressed the issue

he

Because

I think he didn’t want Canada and himself down.

Gretzky said Team Canada will be ready for any pressure. “We have a system in place in

However, the 23-man roster has been experiencing some problems with injuries over the past few

.

Barrasso.

Placid, said in a recent Associated

in

is

consistency tossed around. That’s because, throughout his

Herb Brooks, coach of Team USA at the 1980 Games in Lake

the

ure skating icon,

includes stars

York, and

did

Olympics.

of.

words

Red Wings, Mike Modano, Mike

Olympic Games,

pressure of playing the

with captain Chris

Why career?

the time

The King, Canada’s biggest this year’s

medal.

would have conendure one of the most skaters

a figure skater, can suffer.

Olympics, he put in a fine performance, one that Canadians can be

proud

capturing

in

silver

painful injuries an athlete, especially

Canada’s Elvis Stojko, who’s recently been thought of as old and unable to keep up with his younger challenges, is once again healthy and strong. Although he did not win a gold medal at the

Chelios of the Detroit

Tom

tinued to

Now

Eric

second Olympic

Not many

ior figure skating competitor.

Lindros will have suffered before

over the holidays and a fourth-

his

He’s been dead, out with an injury, the dark horse, and on top of the world in his 16 years as a sen-

concussions

additional

Championships

Hockey

Junior

sheer determination

Olympic Captain Mario Lemieux may have to rest up in between games. And who knows how many

Graham

Olympics, showing heart, guts and

Hiller

S

*

1

LL f

4

1

and with a great skate. He had one at -the Canadian championships in early January. For the first time in a while it seems, he landed his quadruple-toe triple-toe

combination, a

jump he

was the first to land in 1997. Heading into the Olympics, he was as physically fit and confident as he was when he won his first world championship in 1995. He had a quad-Lutz, which no skater has successfully landed in competition, in his back pocket and he was hungry for a third stab at the Olympics. Unfortunately, there

was no storybook ending.


SPOKE,

Feb. 18, 2002

— Page 15

Mets poised to capture NL East decade

Atlanta’s This article

part

is

the second in a six-

bad

Major

outlining

series,

aged

Baseball fans are dripping with

wrong

This off-season has seen a number

They

Mets were unhappy with his climbing walk totals and bad

times

last

of giving

hits

ERA

went

The National League East has New York Mets make a large number of changes and the Atlanta Braves make a couple key acquisitions.

D’Amico.

seen the

The Philadelphia

Phillies, Florida

Former all-star starter John Smoltz

Marlins and Montreal Expos have

made almost no changes

to

their

One of

Marlins and the

season for the eliminated.

Major League baseball

was eager

to

contract

struggling

and the Marlins and Expos are two of the least competitive teams in the majors. T/ic Expos have had horrible

franchises

attendance records for

now and have

many

years

not fielded a compet-

team since the strike-shortened 1994 season. The Marlins, one of the youngest teams in the majors, has not had itive

much port

him

they

since

won

World

the

But baseball failed in the attempt teams - at least this

2001

injury but,

Braves,

a solid

is

still

won 20

has

times

starter but not nearly as

or

the

for

starter but

dominant as

nate

he has been. Glavine struck out only 16 batters in 2001, his lowest total

since 1989.

A

hot streak in the sec-

ond half of the season, where he went 9-2, helped improve his overall record of 16-7. His control was problematic, as well. He allowed 97 walks - the most ever in 15 seasons. Rounding out the rotation are Kevin Millwood, Jason Marquis and

all-star starter

to

lost

19

at

be seen

if

It

healthy, he

is

The Braves made a major move by acquiring Gary Sheffield from the Los Angels Dodgers. Sheffield has been known to have a bad attitude at times but, when happy, he is one of the most

He

basemen

over 100 RBIs the past three sea-’ sons and hit well over .300.

hauling the roster and adding an eleto their

homeruns, 103 RBIs and 35 stolen bases the past three seasons -

The Braves other two best hitters, Chipper Jones and Andruw Jones,

sorely lacked last sea-

unprecedented numbers for a second

will

for the rest

of the division.

ment of speed and power lineup that

it

The pitching has some changes.

also undergone

long as he stays healthy,

should greatly improve his record from 2001.

He

11-11

did however

have a respectable 3.31 ERA. The other starter remaining from 2001.

Steve

Trachsel,

will

hold

down the fifth spot in the rotation. He will give the Mets innings but not much else. Astacio, Pedro Newcomers Shawn Estes and Jeff D'Amico will middle three spots, although they all have histories of in

the

injuries.

The Mets have lefty Bruce Chen and youngster Dicky Gonzalez to

hitting in the

Mets

spot in the lineup the

third

Armando Benitez had

offences this side of Texas.

And

if

that

wasn’t enough, the

Mets added another slugger in the form of Burnitz. He cranked 34 homeruns last year but has averaged 132 strikeouts over the past three seasons, including a whopping 150

a

slugged 36 homeruns last season and 43 in 2000. He also averaged

surround Sheffield in the lineup. Chipper has excelled the past few

seasons as the Braves’ leader.

He

has averaged 40 homeruns

and a .320 average the past three years. He also agreed to move to the outfield so the team could sign third baseman Vinny Castilla in is

a surprising

but in

2000 no one want-

ERA. He

should

coming

off a disap-

And what can be said about the

futile

Expos? They have no hope contending in 2002 with a lack of of

quality pitchers

and

hitters. Turk Wendell. Ricky Bottalico and Rheal Cormier provide solid support in the pen.

The 2002 starting lineup is exactly same as 2001, except catcher Mike Lieberthal is back after missthe

ing

much

of the season with a knee

The

lineup, led

Scott Rolen and

by Bobby Abreu,

Jimmy

Rollins, has

an intriguing mix of power and speed. Three batters are capable of

more than 30 bases and five players are capable of hitting more than 20 homeruns. The one change that may occur is in centerfield. if rookie Marlon Byrd can win the job in spring training stealing

Byrd

offers

a mix

of power,

seasons under his

diverse

should be the team to beat

in the

East

If

Division.

belt.

lineup

Braves’

domino

with the free-spending Mets.

years. Their pitching

is

solid as

always it

has

it

in

the

should have a

the

but not nearly as legendary as

.303 in

flourishes

Sheffield

dominant team in the east for close to a decade but they have not made the necessary changes to keep up

The Atlanta Braves have been

hit

pitchers

lineup

if

their

young

prove themselves and

Mesa continues

his solid pitching.

and

The Florida Marlins, although

lead to one of the best offensive sea-

earmarked for extinction, have a number of promising players on

effect

on

all

the hitters

sons for the Braves in a number of is still

enough, although lacking to

strong

in depth,

match the Mets.

Spoke can now be read

has dominated

was drafted

203 batters in 140 innings overall in 2001 including 24 batters in 24 innings at the major league level. The Marlins lineup is second

.

,

only to the Phillies in power. Outfielder Cliff Floyd hit 31 homeruns in 2001. Preston

Wilson, Derek Lee and Kevin .. Millar all hit more than 20 homeruns. Third baseman Mike Lowell hit 18 homeruns but was second to Floyd’s 103 RBIs with 100. Catcher Charles Johnson hit 18 homeruns and had 75 RBIs but he is most valuable with his defence and work with the young pitchers. He is perhaps the best overall catcher in the National League. And what can be said about the

Expos? They have no hope of contend-^ ing in 2002 with a lack of quality

pitchers and hitters.

Pitchers Javier Vazquez, 16-11 and a 3.42 ERA, and Tony Armas. 9-14 and a 4.03 ERA. are the only beacons of pitching hope for Montreal. The rest of the staff is embarrassing - some teams have better talent in the minors.

average and 24 homeruns in 2000. and Orlando Cabrera. 173 hits and

2000, but he’s only 24 and has six

he

He

base but his contract has scared off

their pitchers stay healthy, they

after

highly anticipated rookie in the

The best hitter on the Expos is Vladimir Guerrero and his 34 homeruns. 37 steals and .307 bat-

If

His average slipped to

2001

,

from incumbent Doug Glanville. The Phillies have tried the past two seasons to rid themselves of Glanville and his inability to get on

and

in

2001 shortly after returning from an injury. Penny struck out 154 batters in 2001 and had a remarkable 3.69 ERA in only his second season. Beckett is perhaps the most

futile

injury.

.251

potential.

2001.

loaded with

is

A.J.

Burnett threw an elusive no-hit-

the minors since he

the Mets’ lineup gels together

in

year but

pointing

Penny,

past 10 years.

prospective trade partners.

the off-season.

Andruw

ERA

Mesa had

year with 42 saves and a

speed and has much better onbase skills than Glanville. The Phillies have a chance to win a playoff spot with their

Their rotation

in if injuries occur.

Closer

of baseball.

should have one of the most potent

A1 Leiter remains the ace of the staff and, as

fill

He

in the history

has averaged 121 runs scored, 21

baseman. With Alomar

son.

fill

the

Brad

in

easily revert to his old form.

risk starting. rest of the

Braves' bullpen is thin with the departure of Steve Karsay, Steve Reed and Odalis

one of

pitchers

is young dominant

of the rotation of potential

be watched closely because he could

he will be happy only

The New York Mets are poised to have an outstanding 2002 after over-

- which bodes well

2.34

last

ed him or his 5.36

remains

feared hitters in the majors.

year

Closer Jose season

The

the

rest

full

out of high school and struck out

most dangerous power hitters in the game. Alomar is one of the best second

to eliminate the

the last three spots.

almost left via free agency in the offseason to find a team willing to let

him

one game and roughed up the

The but

ter in

this season.

season.

last

is

Terry Adams and youngsters Brandon Duckworth, Dave Coggin and Nelson Figueroa will fight for

where he showed domitimes

number 2 inconsistent - domia solid

is

arm at risk for an injury because of the resulting high pitch

Burnett and Josh Beckett.

John Smoltz

Braves

he

control has

next.

pitching an inning a game, as he

season with an arm

when

Randy Wolf

number two

recently

baseman Vaughn missed

First

entire

who

Glavine,

five

nance

fan support or financial sup-

Series in 1997.

Tom

more games

the pen,

risk starting.

saw him go 15-7

that

ERA. His

counts.

two months of the season.

A slew of arm injuries chased him to

willing to let

2001

his success.

in the last

Perez.

team

in

puts his

around

hit

will close for the

Braves this season. It remains to be seen if he will be happy only pitching an inning a game, as he almost left via free agency in the off-season to find a

Expos, was that they were almost

son

improved each of the past three seasons and is the driving force behind

Former

close for the

will

the key problems this off-

1

Robert Person had a breakout sea-

sons and he got

newcomer Albie Lopez, who games in 2001.

rosters since last season.

if

with a 4. 19

1

rectified that this off-season

total

in

and he has the ability to win 20 games in the majors. The only thing holding him back from dominating the league is his lack of control. He allowed 12 walks in 2001 and has averaged 101 the past three seasons. That puts far too many runners on base and tion

has risen each of the past three sea-

the

at

also

games. His homeruns-allowed

in

the division and solid,

not spectacular, pitching.

season despite winning 17

in

2002. They have the best overall lineup

by acquiring Mo Vaughn from the Angels, Roberto Alomar from the Indians in a blockbuster deal and from the Burnitz Jeromy Milwaukee Brewers, along with

changes.

one of the

still

is

team compete

Phillies are the other

but even he looked mortal at

the laughing-stock of the majors.

roster

significant

His

Greg Maddux

The

the east that can possibly

game

but

from 2.61 in 2000 to 3.77 last season, which is high for a closer. The Mets’ lineup last season was

us.

make

time.

form

the

up

The Super Bowl has come and gone, which can only mean one thing - spring training is almost

the past. Holes, in the

in

a quick end

to

best pitchers in the history of the

habit

anticipation.

43

to save

games

mid-February and the regular season begins on April I.

been

of old age, arc beginning to show.

He man-

season.

catchers report to spring training

of teams

by

season

his standards last

League Baseball's six divisions and how each team looks heading into the 2002 season. Pitchers and

upon

dominance coming

of

ting average. Jose Vidro, a .330

97 RBIs from the shortstop position. are the only other aboveaverage hitters on the Expos. Salary-dumping trades by the Expos have robbed them of some of the best players in the majors, including Larry Walker and Pedro Martinez. The

money

Canadian Ryan Dempster is the leader of their young starting rota-

Johnson

For the latest college, entertainment and sports news, as well as games, puzzles, weather and reference links, visit www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

Expos even had

Randy Johnson at one point. The Expos would be a far different team if they had had the

their team.

online!

"

to

Montreal.

keep the likes Martinez and

oL in


Page 16

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; SPOKE, Feb.

2002

18,

CSI Elections Nominations open Feb. 11 Nominations close Feb. 20 Nominations being accepted for President Vice President Academics Vice President Student Activities Vice President Communications

Japp

Elections will be held March 19 isi

21

-

"

Events Feb. 21

-

Campus.ca X-Country toi Feb. 25 - March 1 S| Breakaway Tours Daytona feeach

j%

information at CSI March 13 - Simon B. Cotter in the Sanctuary @11:30 March 17 - Wrestieman a X8 at (tickets on sale April 2 - Jason Rouse in the Sanctuary at 11:30 '

Contact the CSI at 748-5131 or listen @conestogac.on.ca or watch the Id Boards for

more

info

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