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Donation boosts college’s image By Laurie Vandenhoff

there in the industry right now,”

recent donation to Conestoga

College’s machine shop will give students the opportunity to work

valued at days before

cell,

several

“We were

both surprised and

Greg White, co-ordinator of machining programs at the college. The state-of-the-art equipment, which arrived the second week of January, was donated by a local it,”

The equipment will also help number of apprenticeship

manufacturing company with only 30-40 hours of use on it.

While

it was originally designed manufacture a particular product, the department hopes to use

to

White

anticipates

that

the

mechanical technology programs focused largely on CNC (computer numerical control) will benefit most from the new machine. While it is still in the first stages of being

According to White, the college already boasts a third-place ranking for apprenticeships and training within the area, and this

set up, the unit

has already

generated interest from the students.

“The equipment is new and it’s available for them to work on. This is brand new and that’s what is out

“Certainly from our perspective, very difficult to come up with

By Jody Andruszkiewicz The

generosity of local companies, the college has been' fortunate in receiving supplies and equipment.

However,

fate

of student housing in the

implementation Kitchener by council on Aug. 27, 2001 of interim control bylaw 2001-162. which restricts the t)pe of housing in lower Doon and specifically student housing.

While

rough

PAGE

Academic tenure

PAGE

4

a win-win situa-

is

“With

a

economy

in

manufacturing-based

Ontario and our region being one of the prime areas of manufacturing — if we don’t get the donations and the support from the industry we won’t be able to provide the people,” said White. With critical shortages of CNC

and

tool

and die makers

in the area,

students are virtually guaranteed a

job

at

graduation.

White pointed out that the biggest problem holding back the province’s economy in the future would be the lack of skilled workers.

“But with donations such as this...

it

will certainly help us

fill

makes

its

deci-

160 homes.

Greg White, co-ordinator of machining programs at Conestoga College, shows off the new equipment donated to the machine shop by a local manufacturing company. (Photo by Laurie Vandenhoff)

We can train for what is needed today," he said. However, the most important the gap.

thing right

now

to contradict an push for student housing. In 999 the mayors of Kitchener and Waterloo wanted to have suitable rental housing for students in 1

the region.

A

was from

student housing task force

with

created

planners

Waterloo

Kitchener.

and

the

One of

the first things to

“We

anticipate

Some

of student housing, reduce the neg-

single-detached dwelling contain-

ative impact of student

housing

neighbourhoods

better

semi-detached

to

housing situation

in

of the goals of the

were

relationships

to raise the

and

supply in

the

of stakeholders

in

curve.

Some

whistles

on

find

we

that

our

do

will

equipment,”

The department hopes

short

the machine integrated into the programs for September.

the

During the hearing. Janice Given,

Doon

Doon

area.

‘This bylaxv strikes doxvn the provinpolicy

cial

of duplexing without a

sound planning study

Kitchener, said the bylaw accom-

severe action."

modates a

to low er

range of housing

types within the area. Furthermore,

supports a high quality

of

a residential area.

life in

by Dimitri Nenkov. a landlord

lower Doon. Gi\en said the students

at

to indicate

Nenkov

such a

said referring

Doon.

Nenkov

is

opposed

it's

targeting

also said he

to the by laxv

a specific

How'ever. during cross-examination

have

to

everything running by spring, with

examine

it

said

to

lower Doon.

she said

and

bells

don’t normally

principal planner w'ith the city of

full

of these

machines have some

lower

in

working group

learning

White.

fairly

bylaw wasn't targeted

ed area can be used for a duplex, a

a

a

enforcement officers and officials from the three schools all particitask force

new

how

be training the faculty on use the new machine.

in

pating.

residents,

getting the

Region, students, landlords, bylaw

buildings or structures in the affect-

more than

is

equipment up and running.

The bylaw seems

earlier

sion regarding this bylaw, no land,

two 1

COMMENTARY outdated

the board

ing lodging units ha\ ing

start.

it

tion for both parties.

angular area contains approximate-

Kitchener's city hall to appeal the

to

he said. But through the

capital,”

Housing a hot issue lower’Doon area is up in the air. An Ontario Municipal Board hearing convened on Jan. 17. at

off

new

generate

definitely

it’s

ly

get

will

more.

said

the machine for training students from a number of different machining programs.

Condors

marketing really great

for the college as well.”

machine

excited to get

PAGES

a

it’s

students from around the province.

in their fields.

Christmas.

Cool head brings academic success.

think

experience

manufacturing

PAGES.

I

attract a

$500,000,

find the right direction.

perspective,

on new equipment and gain more Faculty learned they would be receiving a computer integrated

Job fair helps students

“From

White.

said

A

because

group of

citi£ens.

Nenkox said he affordable accommodations

a landlord.

.As

offers

to students at three properties. Txx

o of the houses he oxvns w ith duplexed

specifically, but rather at lodgings

his business partner are

in the area.

according proxincial regulations.

She also said there were many legal non-conforming duplexes and other legal uses of the land

duplexing by the city

occurring the

in

lower

bylaw being put

Doon

despite

He

said the third house

as refused

.Also testifying before the

board

in

opposition to the bylaxx was Jim Laxx. a homeoxx ner in the

in place.

xx

in .August.

loxx

er

Doon

area

house containing more than one dwelling unit and a semi-detached

student housing.

house containing lodging units hav-

report in April 2001.

more than one resident. The affected area of lower Doon is from the corner of Pinnacle Drive and Old Mill Road in the

about the task force’s report was

to the

dinary measure with the resources

tabled to council for information

trary

the city has axailable.

ing

northwe.st to Pinnacle and

Valley Dri\e

along it

Doon

in the

southwest and

w here The tri-

Valle> Drive to

intersects with

Doon

Old

Mill.

The

Yet in his opening remarks to the

task force released

A

its

final

staff report

board. Nenkox.

move

who

force

ommendations

increased I'pportunitx

the staff report

looking to

bylaw because it was conto good planning.

on July 3. On Aug. 13, the planning committee adopted the recin

is

to the area, said he objected

Citing the student housing task report

calling

and on .Aug. 27. the interim control b\law was endorsed by council

housing

with a resolution to also create a

housing opportunities

said

the

in the region.

bxlaxx

for

the

for student

.Nenkox also

sexerelx

restricts

in the loxxer

since 1996 and landlord.

Laxx

said

the

interim control by

In

his

Section

passing of this laxx is

argument.

an extraor-

Laxx

cited

38 of the Planning

.Act

must 'ebstantiate the rationale of an xvhich

says a

municipality

interim control bylaxx.

Continued on Page 2


Fate of student housing plan and that a review of the bylaw be carried out fairly and

"I'm not a planning expert but

24 of the Planning Act stating no' bylaw shall be passed for any purpose that does-

also referenced the student housing task force. He said one of

Law

n't

ing

is

in

across the entire

students

small residential care

provided

The

Law

There were 10 in 1997, 1998. It peaked in 1999 with

called.

14 in

is

meeting until Jan. 16. In June 1999, Law said the city was notified of the formation of a landlord association on the lower

Doon

of them were for barking dogs in the neighbourhood. The noise com-

to

plaints reached a high last year with*

However, one of them was a complaint about a

five complaints.

barking dog. said this was an ongoing problem the city has identified but a new bylaw will not change the conditions.

Law

city

was

in

interested

housing in lower Doon,” he said, “they would have had some contact

the par-

good planners, they should have foreseen the growth of it

would

affect

the area.

He

the

said

city

about too

bought land and made ments for students because there is nothing there for them. “If the problem is such as it is today,” he said, “it’s because of the arrange-

poor planning.” After the break. Given testified

But

of housing for students because

Doon

is

with us.”

Allen Goodine told Spoke he has been housing students since 1995. He said the conditions have it

was

10 students to a house.

is

these

The

these students

and

in

in

the official

plan calls for low-rise residential in the lower Doon area to accommodate a full range of housing types with a mixture of low-densi-

from the public meeting he attended the night before. He told the board that he talked to the bylaw officer in attendance

to Given,

city’s definitions

was

have creat-

ed illegal rooming houses in the lower Doon neighbourhood, said Martin, adding that he’s not suggesting the block is filled with

students

environments,

would have to act accordingly or they would be removed. Olinski’s biggest concern came

urban development found around

According

“There’s no definition of household,” he said while the board convening to make a decision.

them

also testified that families are

taking

the

as a

enforce.

near the school.

He

facilities,

house’s

the

would qualify them

important gives

it

if

which household under the city’s definition. That team, he added, under this bylaw could also have up to three lodgers living in the house as well. He also said bylaws like this are hard to

all

a chance to live in a quiet place

sub-

same time, lower home to more typical sub-

at

a football team to a they watched television together and had equal access to

family

said

Olinski

testimony,

his

In

enough.

He compared

students affecting

this type

of which were heritage homes. To retain their heritage designa-

homes cannot be

far

against the bylaw.

Doon many

the

retaining

bylaw, Randall Martin, a resident of lower Doon for 18 years, said he wasn’t sure the bylaw went

the quality of the neighbourhood and the safety of the houses the students were living in. Inc. Students Conestoga President Jon Olinski testified

city’s

tion, these

many

for

testifying

In

bylaw said they were concerned

should have

before the board that lower had some very old houses,

scrutiny.

With the evidence she has seen lower Doon, Given said there are illegal lodging units that do not

the city.

changed since 1996 when

area, but rather to

houses.

students renting from him. told Spoke if the city

how

surrounding the bylaw, the definition of household Given used in her testimony also came under

reduce the number of residents in lodging units outside of or not located in recognized lodging

stantially altered physically.

area.

“If the

Doon

the controversy

In addition to

the college and

study the matter until November and didn’t hold its first public

those seven complaints, three

legal rights.

fall under the city bylaws. Those testifying for retaining the

in

were seven noise complaints with one in 1997, three in 1998, two in 1999 and one in 2000.

life in

.

had such

The new piece of municipal legislation was enacted on Aug. 27. The city didn’t form an in-house working group

immediately despite the landlord violating the bylaw. And because lodgers are not covered under the Landlord Tenant Act, they have no

in

enacting this bylaw.

three in 2001.

would be removed from the home

opinion that the interim

the lower

homeowner was

a

if

possibility existed that the student

adding the bylaw’s purpose isn’t to remove lodgers from the houses in

Nenkov

said the city did not act in a

There were two noise complaints in 1996, one of which was a diesel car. Between 1997 and 2000, there

Of

ity

my

air

caught violating the bylaw, the

control bylaw conforms,” she said,

ents of students he has living with him because he feels he gets qual-

desig-

and expeditious manner

fair

28 complaints. The number of complaints dropped to nine in

2000 and

facilities.

Doon

lower

Goodine also meets

neighbourhoods

residential “It is

offers,

nated R-4. This designation, allows for all land uses that R-3 allows, but also semi-detached dwellings.

complaints in the lower Doon area. In 1996 there were seven complaints where bylaw enforcement

was

rest of

supply and a high quality of

Goodine also said he provides a full-service living environment for students because he was once a student. But on top of what he

businesses and

home

duplexes,

rowdy

neighbourhood. about statistics

the

in

dwellings,

single-detached

city.

the concept of

To dispute

Law

majority of lower Doon is designated R-3. This designation allows

increasing student housthe lower Doon area or

report

the city’s official plan, the

On

the priorities of the task force s

to the official plan.

conform

at

issues.

tradicts Section

said.

have been kept

$5,000 to meet the city’s fire codes,” he said, adding landlords are concerned about safety

the board,

and that

housing use. The housing task force outlined objectives such as satisfying a wide range of housing needs to all residents, increasing the housing

“I spent

Continuing his testimony before Law said the bylaw con-

I

can see the interim control bylaw does not meet all these tests.” he

parties

the

in

ty

association

under control and the conditions the properties have improved.

control.

expeditiously.

the

since

said

formed the

housing task force for doing a lot of the groundwork, he also praised other landlords for policing themselves in keeping students under

to the official

form

He

While he praised the student

Continued from Page 1 He also said the bylaw must con-

up

still

lodging houses.

“They

by

(the city) are planning

default,” he said,

“which

isn’t real-

ly planning.”

A

decision on the bylaw could within 30 days.

come

Meet the Industry Night an eye-opener School of Heatth Sciences awards outstanding students By Sanja Gtibota from graduates Conestoga’s Schools of Health Five

Community

and

Sciences

The award consisted of a recognition plaque and a onethe in membership year association.

Colangelo, the third student

program,

Services received awards for out-

awarded

standing academic and

received the Sunnyside

practical

achievements at a graduation ceremony in December.

Kimberley Colangelo, Wendy Martin and Johanna Rose were the winners from the 48-week practical nursing program.

Rose George

$500

the received Watters Carl

Bird

from Foundation

Scholarship

Homewood

the

of

Guelph.

She was interest

in

recognized for psychiatric

and her desire

to

her

nur.sing

pursue addi-

tional education in the field.

She

also

interpersonal

proved skills

excellent in

dealing

with patients and high academic achievements. Martin won the Registered Practical Nurses Association of Ontario Award for Student Excellence.

The winner was selected based on demonstrated leadership

Award

the

in

Home

for General Proficiency.

She won a nursing professional

RPNAO.

Night

annual Meet the in

Sanctuary on

of

and demonstratand professional

clinical settings

ed personal growth during her studies. Lori Edwards and Keri Hoyt, graduates from the Personal Support Worker program, were

had great experiences in the past with Conestoga graduates. Tom Malinowski, student chair of

SME,

the

The event was held to provide students in the engineering program the opportunity to speak with individuals in their field,

a third-year automated

manufacturing engineering student.

He

said the evening

many

of

who

people from the

was a

great

the

Prior to

really

of great things like

“We hope

know what

who

We feel that our operation ensuring

role

a

plays

that

all

reusable parts do not end up in a landfill or

We

junk yard.

hope

that

graduates will continue to be mindful of the environment once they

graduate into the industry. Karl Wolf, a 1986 graduate of

Conestoga College thinks the SME event was an excellent way for students

for

thinking

start

to

Comdev

what a Conestoga College student can

to

accomplish

a

company

that creates

Conestoga are valuable and ideal employees fro his company. “There are people coming out of Conestoga and coming into our

after

school.”

first-

Vicki Williams,

what

of

is

communication equipment. Philip Young, machine-shop group from students said leader. satellite

are out

there in the industry, to get a

account

to give

students an idea of

expect. This gives us a chance to ask

hand

said.

business.

themselves.

to offer.

questions to the people

this,”

he

General Manager Mike Matich of

show, second-year

don’t

field.

“Students should take advantage

are graduates of Conestoga.

“1

is

opportunity to meet and talk with

Jan. 16.

what the event had

in recognition

company. The college

is

an excel-

manufacturing engineer

lent resource for recruiting new workers. This event provides us

helped organize the event and hoped

Bes Laser Services discussed the

with a good opportunity to meet the

Edwards received a specially designed program pin, which was the Faculty Award for General Proficiency. She earned the award by high academic

for a large turnout.

opportunities available to students

students,”

area, and included Rockwell Automation, a Cambridge company that had two representatives, both

grams.

achievement and effective application of theory to clinical

graduates from Conestoga College.

graduate to

and engineer Manufacturing Conestoga grad Vicki Williams was

opportunities

also recognized at the graduation

ceremony.

practice.

Hoyt was presented with a recognition plaque, the Chair’s Award for General Proficiency

program, for demonstrated leadership and support of her

ciations such as

fourth

theory, effective performance in

book

growth and awareness of the importance of professional asso-

learning,

its

Industry

held

her high academic standing in

reference

theory and clinical excellence, professional and personal

self-directed

of Society Student The Manufacturing Engineers (SME)

mechanical engineering tech student Paula Zirdung was unsure of

and Leadership. She was recognized for aboveaverage performance in both, clinical and theory aspects of the

ability,

By Janine Toms

colleagues.

to expect.”

Faculty

member John Tilelemans

Companies

at the

event were from

the

excited

SME was offering the event.

“We hope

to give students

an idea

of what a Conestoga College student can accomplish after school. When we graduated there wasn’t a night like this,” said Williams.

Cambridge-based

Polymer

graduating from engineering proa major advantage to be able speak to students as a Conestoga

“It is

to

let

them know out

there are

said

there,”

Schlievert,

Environmental Technological

Management

president

of

Quescense Recovery

in Kitchener, acquires

components of old machinery and takes them apart to salvage useful material and then sells the parts.

company

con-

Technologies Inc. creates moulding solutions for automotive parts. They

Schlievert said his

two co-op students from Conestoga and said they have

“The preservation of our environment is key to the operation of our

currently have

a cheque for $1,000 towards the purchase of a computer to assist

with administrative fiinctions of the organization’s activities.

receive the cheque

Matich.

Dave

he said. During the evening the industry SME chapter gave the student SME

is

scious of what can be reused.

On

hand

to

was Conestoga

College President John Tibbits. “One of the reasons (Conestoga)

ranked No.

is

support

1

is

because of the

we receive from these com-

panies,” said Tibbits.

Tileleman’s exceeded,

expectations

were

as the turnout for the

event was good.

“We ly.

We

least

ran out of pizza fairly quickestimate that there was

200 people

here,”

he

said.

at


SPOKE, Jan.

Students can job hunt at job By Julianna Kerr

28,

— Page 3

2002

fair

are usually there with recruiting

purposes

Are you looking

summer

so,

in mind. “Students should .definitely take their resumes,” Free said, “and if

eould help

they want to personalize a cover

for full-time or

employment?

Conestoga’s job

fair

If

point you in the right direction.

The job

always a good idea.”

letter, that’s

on Feb. 6 at RIM (Research In Motion) Park, and is run by Conestoga and three partfair is

ner schools: University of Guelph, Wilfrid Laurier University and

Students

should

sionally as

if

dress

an interview, especially plan to talk to employers.

“A

lot ol

the time, the

University of Waterloo.

are really thinking of

Student employment officer Sara Free said job fairs are usual-

liminary

pretty

ly

various

busy.

Employers from

com-

industries such as

human

puting,

resources and inlormation technology, sign on

to attend.

They

up booths and usually brochures and inlormation about their business-

oiler

set

students

es.

profes-

they were going to they

employers as a pre-

it

interview,”

if

she

said.

“ fake a

good attitude and some confidence, and don’t be afraid to approach the employers. That’s what they are there for.” Free suggested students also prepare a few relevant and interesting questions to ask the employers regarding their business or organization.

Students are encouraged to pick up a guidebook, which will be

Free said the biggest advantage ol the job fair is the opportunity

available in the student employ-

provided for students to network with employers.

half before the job

“When

ment

office about a

week and

a

bmployment

fair.

you’re looking for a job, that's the hard part,” she said. “You don't usually have a ton of

“The benefit to that is we list the company, a profile of the employ-

related experienee because you’ve

contact

been

school.

in

with people, you

If

you network

make an impres-

positions that are available and

er,

“So the

it’s

fair.

sion and get contacts.”

Web

All employers at the job fair must currently be hiring, so they

book it

information,”

she

said.

huge resource even after if the employer has a

a

And

usually in the guide-

site, it’s

as well, so students can look

up.”

Sara Free helps students with resumes and cover

officer

welcome to employment office for

to the

jot

,, (Photo by Julianna Kerr,

Students are always

go

preparation for the

letters in

next month.

fair

resumes and cover

letters,

or even

for help with interviewing.

information.

resources are

available there.

Appointments can also be booked for free critiques on

for people,” Free said, “and they just need to sit down and go over

a few questions.”

There

is

no charge for the job

Upcoming biz bash Course exemption has naughty theme

but participants should

make

sure they have their student cards

“Often times, that’s really hard

Many employment

fair,

with them.

Buses will shuttle students back and forth four times during the day, leaving from and returning to

Door

criteria

2.

expanded

By Janine Toms If

you’re starting your program at

Conestoga

By

I’m wrong.

Tori Sutton

I

will

be subject to a

public beating by

Conestoga students who are searching

still

may

just

what they are looking for at the Computer and Business find

(CBSA)

Student Association's Biz Bash on Feb. 7.

“This is the student body’s chance to find a Valentine’s date

week

the

Whiteley.

and

activities for the

has

naughty.” Graham

CBSA

the

Bob Mclver, dean of academic Whiteley,

promotions and

has been under investigation for

activities

to

be

Last semester’s Biz Bash drew a crowd of more than 300 stu-

CBSA

hoping

naughty."

dents. and the

Uike past bashes, this semester’s Biz Bash wilt not be with-

the turnout will be just as

games and prizes. Valentine's the Following theme, the CBSA has organized a Love Shack, where students will swap elothing to win prizes.

out

103.3

already acquired a full degree.

FM's Mike Marshall

will

this

is

good

time around.

CBSA

The

ing around

has been advertis-school, and

the

is

As

well as attracting

more

stu-

and will

assist

away $1,000 worth of

from the Stag Shop. Molson Canadian will also be

prizes

The CBSA is also looking forward to a special guest. Master T, fonner Much Music is

expected to be

in atten-

dance.

am

under impression he “I

more

faculty

“We would from

members

turn

the is

distinct

going

appear,” said Whiteley.

“And

to if

"Whether

the course

is

like to see

support

other professors, especially

is

been

has

student success

another

college

marketing.” said Whiteley.

received a clear pass from their

accounting professors always come out and show their

tial

“The

in

office

the

CSI

office, the

(Room 1D14).

CBSA

may

one and ini-

be no need to

take the course. Prior to these revisions,

Tickets for Biz Bash are available

year, there

a

student had to

entire degree to be

have an

exempted from

the course.

“The standard was

or through

that they

had

The doors open at 9 p.m., and bus sign-up is available at residence for students seeking trans-

complete their degree in order to be exempted," Mclver said. The course started about five years ago and was deemed impor-

portation downtown.

tant for students'

class representatives.

to

their individual

of

enable

created

to

acquire

skills

students

But

advancement in It was

programs.

it

to

would make

that

as students.

has since been recognized

that students

come

to

the

school

skills

and

knov\' there are students

who

with a whole variety of

now

a student has spent

If

at

dean

(Photo by Janine Toms)

background.

“We

become

clarified in order to

course.

year

criteria

the

Mclver,

requires a year of successful post-secondary education.

mandato-

individual programs,” he said.

The academic

academic support and preparatory studies at Conestoga, says exemption from the student success course

Bob

them more successful

be decided by the

to

exempt from

support.”

in attendance.

deejay.

see

stu-

all

same benefit from this course,” Mclver said. The recent review follows complaints by some students about the

dents were getting the

ry or not

town Kitchener.

giving

determine whether or not

Waterloo.

out to the event.

Marshall will be co-ordinating

that every student

had to take the course. This is an issue that has been reviewed to

course being mandatory.

dents, the association hopes to

in

time.

hoping to advertise at Wilfrid Laurier and the University of

be hosting the event, which is being held at Stages in down-

different activities

some

“The view was

commit-

chance

for

coming

CBSA. is

was mandaeveryone except those to the college having

In the past the course

tory

support and preparatory studies at Conestoga, said the success course

head of promotions

“And anyone who ted

college.

“Anyone who is committed has the chance to be

Graham

before,” said

successfully

a

the student success course at the

body.”

their

for

Valentine’s sweetheart

student

the

with

completed year of post-secondary education under your belt, you may be exempted from having to take

simply don't need it." Mcher said. “Some students might ha\e been

misunderstanding

how mandator\

However. Mcher stresses Conestoga w ants every student completing a general education degree to ha\e the same opportunities as the other programs a\ ailit

is."

that

a protocol for mature students to

sit

down with him one-to-one

to

assess

if

the student success course

would be beneficial for them. Mclver and .McIntosh conducted a sur\ey regarding the course. The two wanted to find out if the course was helpful. “We wanted to know the general of the program." said Mclver. “The other situation that occurs is man\ people are not w ill-

outlook

they need the help

ing to admit

offered in the course."

Mclver student

is

sometimes when a convinced to take the

said

able.

course, thev appreciate

Mature students don't have academic standings but have experience w ith management skills w ithin the workforce. John McIntosh, faculty member and co-ordinator

they acquire from

for the strategies for student suc-

vidual.

cess course,

is

working

to

produce

w hat

skills

it.

ma\ be

fur-

ther refinements," said Mclver.

The

“In the future there

most important element the course

want

it

is

“We want to

is

whether

valuable for the indiit

to

be relevant."

work,

we


Page 4

— SPOKE, Jan.

28, 2002^

Tenure not the answer more than just a debate on higher education,

It’s

an

it’s

a debate on

institution.

Academic tenure

is

an issue that

is

hotly debated.

of holding One definition of tenure means to have the status contract periodic without basis permanent one’s position on a renewals. level

post-secondary For some, this means instmctors at the and never get teach whatever they want to teach students it.

can

fired for

.

the opposite side of the issue

On

is

the argument that tenure

controversial or unpopallows academics the freedom to publish fired. being of fear the having without ular ideas tenure today’s climate of post-secondary education,

However,

is fast

in

becoming obsolete and post-secondary

institutions should

revise their policies.

20th century, Tenure was an important concept duiing the of the century. end the to through 1950s the between specifically or teach about controversial topIt allowed instmctors to lecture ics

without reprise from administrators. aspect of an instmcthis time, tenure was an important

During

to lecture job security because it gave them the freedom to free speech tread right constitutional a having without freely

tor’s

upon. Today, the National Education Association

(NEA)

says

that

higher educaacademic and intellectual freedom in institutions of due academic tenure, by promoted and tion are best protected process, and faculty self-governance.” goes on to further affirm from a statement The

made in the and Freedom of Academic

NEA

1940 “Statement on Principles for Tenure” that “Institutions of higher education are conducted indithe either of interest the further not to the common good and vidual teacher or the institution as a whole. The common good depends on the free search for truth and its free exposition. Academic freedom is essential to these purposes and applies to both teaching and research. Freedom in research is fundamental to the advancement of truth. Academic freedom in its teaching aspect

is

fundamental for the protection of the rights of the

However, research is a major component in post-secondary and tenured professors are the ones conducting that

institutions

it

would appear

MABc/d2

Pot growing getting out of hand about time that people who are caught growing marijuana in their homes are punished appro-

that tenure is

more

self-

local

homes

in

serving the needs of the students.

Rather, tenure

is

protecting those instructors

who have

instructors

part-time

not a good thing because continuity in a course

is

important, a balance of full-time and part-time instmctors, significant probationary periods

things the

NEA

and renewable long-term contracts,

ai'gues against, are the solution.

these options provide against tenure

is

The

all

flexibility

something the institution

is

an outmoded institution that needs to be removed from It may have been considered impor-

post-secondary institutions.

when an instmctor could be removed for teaching something considered offensive, but the times and labour laws have changed. tant

It’s

just not

police

said

they

another 200 to

Thao Van Huong, jail

A jail

shared

for

in

year after Waterloo

home

in

raid found

Huong was

neighbours and

the

families.

recently no one had gone to

of these cases, the peo-

operations are doing so in their

Kitchener

own homes,

bands and even children forced

to

witness the illegal activity, possi-

exposing them

to

They

are

danger,

putting

including

everyone their

The sentence

in

neigh-

bours and families.

of

until jail.

date, local courts have hand-

home

sen-

is

the only answer

to the growing problem of pot farmers and should be enforced

immediately. It’s

hard to believe Huong’s case

was

the first to result in jail time,

but

now

set,

other

local

and provincial

judges should follow

such growing operations.

to clean

It’s

late

about time and to

hil

still

not too

someone with

need

local

arrests don’t work.

They

city streets

House

are violated time and again. to

One judge acknowledged

send the message

out there: Waterloo Region will

handing out a

not stand aside and

Maybe

let

gal business owners get

growing and selling It’s

suit in order

and

up

neighbourhoods.

a big

charge.

We

been

that precedent has

tences to people found guilty of

criminal

charges as well.

but

area,

ed out conditional

with their wives, hus-

the

is

har-

a street value of $219,000.

running these pot-growing

sentence

immediately.

These raids have been numerous, occurring almost weekly in

many

in the tri-cities.

.

vesting 313 marijuana plants with

clanger,

levels of

all

growing problem pot farmers and should enforced

the Stanley Park area on Sept. 12,

2001

putting

a

gained

has

only answer to the

45, will go to

regional police raided his

In a precedent-setting court case

needed now.

government

including their

In

ple

bly

should have.

Tenure

home he

suggestion

the

in

with his wife, 18-year-old son and

To

become complacent with the system. The system needs to be revamped. While more is

more

The

strong support from

sophisti-

garden

The

time.

now

the

are

everyone

same

a

as Huong’s.

operat-

20-year-old daughter.

They are

advent of the Internet has given tenured instructors the at the

ing

in

Kitchener-

homes in the area being used grow dope.

obsolete.

people

operations

In a Jan. 17 Kitchener- Waterloo

there

people charged with crimes such

in

cated marijuana

Waterloo area.

article,

opportunity to spread any message they want and reach

for

Since 2000, police have busted

pot-growing

months

jail

selling the substance.

believe

The

and there

illegal

is

the idea of a five-year jail term for

Kitchener man

to 12

should be serious consequences that go along with growing and

Record

would seem the very concept of tenure is the opposite of what the NEA would have the population believe. In an era where the freedom to publish and exercise a constitutional right to free speech is highly promoted, tenure has become

,

a

serving in promoting the school and the professor rather than in

It

Ontario an judge sentenced

priately.

Marijuana

Recently, Cambridge, Kitchener and Waterloo councils discussed

mid-January,

in

It’s

68

teacher and of the student in freedom in learning.”

research. In that vein,

B

these

ille-

away with

pot.

it

jail

this,

term instead.

who do

will force those

grow pot in their homes to stop and consider the harsh consequences.

getting out of hand.

SPOKE

is

mainly funded from September to

ment from Conestoga Students

Inc.

May

by a pay-

(CSI) in exchange for the

insertion of advertising in the paper.

The views and opinions

expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the

views of Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers are not endorsed

SPOKE is

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Michelle Goring; Online Editor: Tori Sutton Circulation Manager: Jody Andruszkiewicz Advertising Manager: Reni Nicholson; Photo Editor: Sanja Gilbota

Production Manager: Kirsten

Fifield

Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

SPOKE’s Phone: 748-5220,

ext.

address

3691

Web

is

Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. www.conestogac.on.ca/spok? Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke® conestogac. on. ca

299 Doon Valley

site:

tain the

CSI

logo.

by the CSI unless

SPOKE

shall not

arising out of errors in advertising

in

SPOKE

their advertisements con-

be liable for any damages

beyond

the

amount paid

for

the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor

by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions

are subject to acceptance

or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a file

would be

helpful.

lous statements and

MS Word

Submissions must not contain any

may be accompanied by

(such as a photograph).

an

libel-

illustration


— Pa 2e 5

Jan. 28, 2002

Memory improved through mnemonics Continuing

education course teaches important memory-enhancing techniques know about

What do you mnemonics? Nothing? Neither did

my

I took a continuing course designed to memory on Jan. 19.

obviously

From 9

a.m. to 4:30 p.m., he us, entertained us, and

helped us learn the skills improve our tired memories.

to

fur-

instructor

Whittingham has been sharing his memory-enhancing abilities with others for about six years.

marvels

He

the fact that he

at

of

end

the

ol

the

we were

day,

To ensure

success, however, the and methods must be used regularly. Whittingham said if you don’t tools

use your memory, you will lose

it.

life.

“These methods

will

enhance your creativiand the way you

ty

Everybody

from

suffers

occasional

memory

the

said the trick

is

it.

good or bad,”

aren’t

come with an

t

instruction

manual.”

Learning

Whittingham

not to

Relax and let your find what you’re looking

memory

use your mind.”

lapse.

for.

doesn

Peter Whittingham,

still

"It

career,”

“Memories

career.”

mnemonic course

impor-

he said, “just trained or untrained. We’ve got this wonderful brain this marvelous computer - it just

a new

find

he said.

Memory

Whittingham

help you

By

many methods he

the

impressing ourselves and each other with our newly boosted memories.

help you keep your career, further your career, or even find a new

worry about

ther your career, or

even

is

tant,"

areas

his pres-

of the materials something of an art form.

keep your career,

ory

to success in all

Peter

entation

will

loves

opens the door

especially by artificial aids.

“Memory

teaches to improve memory.

“A good inem-

Canadian Oxford Dictionary defines mnemonics as the art of improving memory,

taught

illustrate

he

so much.

Tl>c

Course instructor Whittingham has made

do

to

something

until

I,

education boost

gets paid

methods

“These methods enhance your creativity and the way you use your mind,” he said. “They make learning fun. Studying and learning should be lifelong activities.”

Throughout

Whittingham

the day,

often emphasized the importance of

challenging our minds. “This wonderful brain

of ours

introduced throughout the day included imag-

needs games,” he words and play

ing,

rhyming and using acronyms. Whittingham guided the class of 19

Keeping your brain stimulated is a way of staying young.” If your memory needs a boost,

through fun exercises designed

contact

linking,

brainstorming,

to

the

said.

“Do

cross-

games.

trivia

continuing education

column appears weekly and focuses on fun and interest-

imagine anyone

WayBack

increasing by 12 terabytes each

month.

gather

among

Internet

would

greet

an

1

996

to the present.

largest

with more than 100 terabytes (10

never been a student of

new

prefer the shiny

I

over and in the past.

is

Therefore,

I

was surprised

Internet

of the Internet through

history

development of

sites.

Not only does

this

has of

is

The

intent

show how a

to

in their original

page has

those for

Y2K

The Internet Archive claims it is “working to prevent the

pages.

Internet and other digital materi-

tions to

from disappearing into the

Not only does

this

non-existent pages, earlier versions of still

active..

site

also

it

Web

The

carry

has

sites that

intent

is

to

show how a specific page has evolved over time. There are two problems here you have html

or

is

tion of all the Sept.

1

sites.

site

to

remember

the exact

address in order to find

The other problem

is

that

I

can-

not always promising, spectators

never leave disappointed because this superstition helps

them escape war

a cold reality where hunger,

Any

some members of your

family and your friends are fed up with the snow and cold winter

Anyone can use this service for free. The Library of Congress,

weather.

Smithsonian.

IBM

and the Federal Government Information Clearinghouse are already avid the

Internet archive will defi-

of them

from mild

varies

to

is

the world

and is already well on its way towards digitally chronicling the greatest moments in our history. If you know of any fun or interesting Web sites you can e-mail

And while everyone has a ent way of coping with the

me

to

But again, you must already

know in

the actual

order to find

web it

site

address

on the data-

After you type in the address.

staceyml8@hotmail.com and your suggestion may appear in

at

a future column.

severe

not only an Ontarian phe-

nomenon. People around suffer from it.

an award as the most innovative service in the past five years

ill

treatment.

nitely be useful as a research tool

for this feature.

are

cases that require serious medical

SAD

users.

Some

with seasonal affective disorder that

ing

wrong

differ-

winter

some people choose

if

little bit

warm up

to

superstitious and silly

for

$60,000. TTiat’s a

when

the lot

event

is

of money,

everj one can just

to

profesforecast-

ers.

But

TV

the

screens

can’t

warm up

peoas the

Wiatron Willie Festival can. The event, organized by groups such as the Lion’s Club, chamber of commerce and town of Wiatron. offers

something for everx'one. fist of activities includes

snow sculpting, cross-countrx' skating, curling and a road-hockey tournament to a pancake breakfast, face painting fairs, craft shows and sales, comedy acts and fashion shows. also offers an opportuniu

forget

the

that

usually

to

beginning of Northern the

in February Hemisphere means

that

days are

becoming shorter and cold-

er.

But besides raising the also raises

festival

spirits, the

thousands of

development of the economy. According to an article in the in Kitchener- Waterloo Record

dollars for the local

Februarx' 2001. the festival usually raises about

local

homes

And

$25,000

to $30.0(X) for

schools

and

begins with a

silly

hospital,

for seniors. it

all

superstition that a cuddly ground-

hog called Willie can predict the weather.

This

their hearts.

The budget especially

the

sional

the

depression, there seems to be noth-

be a

of

It

has already received

Web

in so

parts of the world.

Internet Archive.

The

Archive.

the

sets

hear the opinion

The

close.

notice that

base.

it.

is

and homelessness are present

using

their tel-

as

emerges from his predicts weather on Feb. 2. If Wiarton Willie sees his shadow, that means we’ll have six more weeks of winter. But if he doesn't,

many

on

turn

evision

that

Although Willie’s predictions are it

month.

Web

reality

much

an early spring

increasing by 12

public

said.

groundhog burrow and

albino

Archive, intends to chronicle the

page available at that time will be found at the Internet

WayBack

ter-

terabytes each

entire

life if

Whittingham

it,”

hearts

like

Bre-X

well for the rest of your

you challenge

ple’s

just look around. You’ll probably

the compila1

currently

the world with

Bancroft University

improving

of

(Photo by Juiianna Kerr)

9.

the local, residents to

Berkeley, creator of the Internet

of the most popular addi-

WayBack

is

Web

premonitions, the fiasco

it

Even if you are not interested in problems in faraway countries,

Web

past.”

are

One

exist,

and

Library at the of California,

form. The whole

no longer

Bush voting

als

is

called

a compilation of

is

that

sites

evolved over time.

is

is

world

abytes (10 billion pages) of data and

interest-

"WayBack Machine.” WayBack collects Web pages

the

more than 100

graphics or multi-coloured

database

specific

in

pages. ing feature on this site

in

the

the largest database

you won’t find any pleas-

The newest and most

database

WayBack

in

sites,

doesn’t appeal to the aver-

it

ing

also

sites that are

active.

but

Web

age user. Neither does the page appeal to most users. Archive.org is tool, so

earlier versions

Web

still

it

the history of different

currently

is

billion pages) of data

intended primarily as a research

site carry non-exis-

tent pages,

the

be interested

to

Archive at archive.org. This page shows the the

eiijoy

suppose

I

year as opposed to anything that

this

1

nothing

is

in

from

WayBack

for that

tion useful.

find

Jan.

superstitious

involved

site

hits

all

sort of informa-

history.

you

someone deeply

why

lists

College. I’ve

serve

will

and silly. Every February, people seek some fun and frivolity in the Bruce Peninsula, a town between Lake Huron and Georgian Bay. For more than 40 years thousands of people from around the world

not

sites

“Your brain

Sometimes there wrong in being a little

would

Web

department for information on the next course.

methods

illustrates

Doon campus on

through superstitions

of interest to the students and staff at Conestoga

ing

Peter Whittingham

at the

Escape from

History of Internet displayed on archive.org Th/s

Instructor

memory

truly

proves

that

some

superstitions are not only harmless,

but also help to improve the cold reality.


.

alumni with meet students Female technology can

women

Generally a group of

away would not genermuch surprise. But when the

“It’s

CAD

always a good surprise when

“The students need hear other women talk about working

and

said Julia

Biedermann, a teacher of the civil engineering program and an organ-

their

civil

Finhert, a product development at the automotive parts

to

engineer

said despite the apparent slowdown in her industry,

manufacturer, her

work

is

it’s

really an

“I don’t have that practical background. Whether it is building something with your father when you were younger — it takes me longer to catch on,” she said.

both overcame the stereotypes and landed jobs in the technology field. Voss, a graduate of the civil engineering program, now works for

Finhert’s father,

in

rewarding for those

at the full-

both Conestoga alumni

“meet and greet” to share their attended the Women in Technology The event was organized so technology. successes in the field of could meet enrolled in technology programs

women

who

on the other hand,

contacts she

currently

those already

in

(Photo by Laurie Vandenhoff)

the industry.

one thing to read about.it, she said. “But to see someone who “It’s

attended.

has succeeded...” The event was presented by the college’s school of technology

Lindsay Hemmerling, a first-year engineering student, was civil happy with the event because of the

always pushed her into engineering. He boueht her a drafting table

Waterloo.

fresh to the

they can relate.” Despite a poor turnout of only four students, the event was still

rience sometimes needed.

However,

women who were

Voss and Finhert. “They don’t want to hear from job faculty about what a gieat out not We’re get. to they’re going there working,” said Biedermann. “They want to hear from people who are relatively new because

careers and that they lack the expe-

class.

began organ-

knew she need-

field, like

exciting field,” she said. Voss thinks a lot of girls are not pushed hard enough into these

were like many other female, technology students, a minority in their

meaning

even greater.

izing the event she

engineering instructor

too bad because

busy,

is still

When Biedermann ed

“It’s

company

graduates the need for technology

She also realizes that there is a lack of women in the industry.

Conestoga alumni. Michelle Voss and Gwen Finhert both graduated from engineering programs several years ago, and

Being

The tremendous opportunities are communicated to

not effectively

Julia Biedermann,

And to give the event even more impact, the guest speakers attendwere ing the “meet and greet”

woman

herself.

experiences.”

izer of the gathering.

the only

Technologies Inc. in Cambridge and knows the kind of demand like there is for skilled workers

students, she said.

working in the technology industry. “The students need to hear other women talk about working and

Melloul-Blamey Construction

in the indus-

“It’s are doing there,” she said. something you have to get used to.

On Jan. 17 female technology College students from Conestoga were invited to meet other women

work experiences,”

produce

you walk into a meeting or site visit you and everyone wonders what

celebration. projects, there is call for

their

shock

try.

with digtopic of conversation deals skills and design build itizers,

sometimes

ti/oc in hiah schooL before she was even in high school, and Finhert is grateful he did. Finhert works for Polymer

contracting firm

among men working

chat-

ting the night ate

general

service

By Laurie Vandenhoff

and

made and what she

the

Resource

Women’s

dents to stay at school until five at

than having them Time management is about making things happen, rather

happen

everyone By Laurie Vandenhoff Students

who

Monday

braved the cold of

week’s accidental fire alarm, have to endure another one.

last

The

procedures

at

Saturday

Friday

10-30-1 1:30

11 -30-1 2-30

campus usually takes place the third week of January but because

12:30-1:30

1-30-2-^

of the Jan. 17 alarm, students received an exemption from the

.

r 3-30-4:30 4-30-5:30

biannual event. ^

came as a

“It

us as

to

anyone

it

surprise

\

I

i

did for

else.”

5:30-6:30

6:30-7:30 7-30-8-30

!

8:30-9:30

1

9:30-10:30

Barry Milner, physical resources “It

came

Milner,

manager

Fill in

said

of

time

it

2.

physical

3.

if it were a real fire. prompt investigation revealed the cause was a faulty smoke

the alarm as

4.

detector.

“Normally we would be looking for smoke and fire,” said Milner. “But because that wasn’t the problem we had to keep looking.” Students, faculty and employees ly

to wait outside for

approximate-

15 minutes while the problem

was

located.

“Because

this

was not a

dents could not be

let

will

become

drill, stu-

inside until the

workshops, work, then

leisure activities.

Your blocks of study

visible.

Use the time between classes

wisely for things like reading, researching,

For every hour you spend

in

a classroom, expect

to

spend 2 hours

outside the classroom on things like homework, studying, assignments, and reading before the next class.

resources and security responded to

had

like lectures, labs,

and reviewing, not just hanging around.

The alarm went off at 3 p.m. and because it was not planned, physical

that

commitments

Barry

resources at Conestoga College.

A

regular

block of some time for social and

manager

as a surprise to us as

did for anyone else,”

Sunday

9-30-10:30

Doon

the

Thursday

Wednesday

7'30-8:30

and evac-

testing of fire drill

Tuesday

. .

8'30-9'30

will not

uation

to you.

Prepare a weekly study plan. An example has been started

1

f.

4

1

£

w

5.

Make out a month-at-a-glance plan for the semester. Mark tests, finals and assignment due dates. You can see the whole month at a glance and can prepare for those busy weeks in advance. Monitor the time you are spending on the computer. Are you messing around with emails and surfing the Web? Keep this activity for leisure time,

not study

time.

was found,” said Milner. The smoke detector was changed

fault

and as a

result, last

week’s

fire drill

was

cancelled. Drills, however, will

still

be conducted in the college’s

outlying buildings.

hold a sim-

“I think it has to be something centered around lunchtime,” she stusaid, adding, it was hard for

Fire alarm

surprises

to

event in the future.

night.

Group.

leaned about the industry.

Biedermann hopes ilar

For more information on this technique and other learning and study strategies, contact Student Services, 2B02, for an appointment.


SPOKE, Jan.

Conestoga College celebrates Women’§ Week

Locally, International By Reni Nicholson Canadians

Women’s Week from

International

March 3 to 9, with the highlight of week taking place on the

Women’s

International

March

and

rights

Keeping

is

with

by entertainment Charmaine Jones, a doctor at the Hospice of Windsor, and Linda at pharmacist a Gaudet,

Cambridge Memorial Hospital. The women will tell stories

ognize the influence and crucial role played by women in conflict

about their experiences during a

view

to

logically,”

life

and love of

together at a National

12 colleges and universities in

weekend

dents trying to get the pro-life

at St.

the rights of the unborn

defend

on

their

campuses. According to its Web site, the National Campus Life Network

Belgrave

activists,

UBC

the

NCLN, tion of

and

the

and educa-

skills

members, helps inform the post-secondary

activate

Belgrave,

executive

NCLN,

opened the

of

director

symposium and welcomed

partic-

“The NCLN’s

biggest resource

bringing people together to stufacilitate, discuss and inform

is

1

dents,”

he

said.

The symposium began with Belgrave asking students to discuss pro-life activism at each represented institution. Several universities

like

the

University of British Columbia, and the University of Toronto,

Carleton University in Ottawa had well-established and fairly active

groups on their campuses. Many students noted they wantto kick-start their

one

group or get

started.

Bolger, a first-year engineering student at the University

Ben

of Waterloo,

is

part of a group but

looked to the symposium for more knowledge. “I

the

1,

The two women

rode

wanted to continue to learn so can talk and present my

that I

uled to begin at 6 p.m.

Those

interested in purchasing

tickets can contact in

Jayne Thomas

Student Services, ext. 3337, or

Monica Himmelman

in

Alumni

Services, ext. 3459.

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: DEPRESSION

pro-life

Most

Ruba

Jose

ten.

indicate that you or Here are some signs which might depression: someone you care about is experiencing

were invited

pleasurable activities, crying a loss of joy in formerly hopelessness; '^“^hlessness; loss or feeling emotionally “empty”; sexual desire, de p towards key people in life; loss of

FEELINGS-

to

mass with the seminarians the or worship at other services in depending on religious pref-

lot

of

warmth

sense

Bolger said he was inspired by

what the speakers

have identical beliefs

He said, “Knowing there common interest makes you St.

is

lack of energy, insom-

physical aches appetite or the opposite, nia or the opposite; loss of headaches. and pains; digestive problems;

a

feel

rehaVIOUR-

Jean, president of

ones.

Administrators agreed that the weekend was a success and Gray audience of students with the

much encouragement and fight. “We have to have the knowlto edge of truth, the forthrightness courage to get it out there, the endurance withstand threats, and

withdrawal; neglect of responsibilities remember or reduced ability to concentrate,

irritability,

or appearance;

was encouraged

cope with

on by the existence of groups new of prospect the and campuses

keep going.”

shanne or self-doubt.

PHYSICAL- overwhelming exhaustion and

like there is hope.”

said she

of

said.

was encouraging to hear stoother people,” he said. from ries Bolger also said it was great to who be surrounded by people “It

to

characterize

had learned.

attend

left

duration

These experiences weeks, months and even years. affect one in depression, an illness believed to

Saturday and Sunday morn-

Denise

a bad mood or

sadness, loneliness,

ods.

NCLN,

in

“feeling the blues”.

Following the sessions, there were question and answer peri-

city

us have experienced waking up

These feelings are usually of short experience lives. Some people and have minimal impact on our for hopelessness, self-doubt, and guilt

from

Gray and Ruba then had attenthe dees act out the two sides of apoloissue and use the advanced

On

of

erence.

ipants.

ed

and

ing, participants

student population.

Kevin

at

“There is an opporone another for-

Stephanie Gray from

getics they

with the its

Antarctica.

ple.

to reading

conferences,

do so soon. “There are only 70 tickets available and since the number is limited they go fast.

Jan.

pro-choice and pro-abortion peo-

material. its

2000. From there, the cyclists rode south, stopping except continent, every in

Bowl on

making

can lead students in the to seek assistance, direction right

Through

are interested in buying tickets to

Carleton University, spoke about a reasoned defence to

NCLN

from personal sources

said.

human suffering. Two veteran university

resource in educating post-secwell,

Rose

which took place

Principles in Tacoma, Wash., spoke about understanding and changing the present of culture and the principle

provide personal support in helprecruiting ing a campus club in new members and being a

As

in

who

Life

life.

pro-lifers.

student services, warns those

at

and works for the Center for

That means the network will

ondary

to $25.

Women

Celebrating

Conestoga College will be held March 5 at the Waterloo campus dining room, with dinner sched-

mally and informally.” Anna Westover, who speaks

and expand individual life advocacy groups on post-secondary campuses. The network encourages and equips any size group in the defence of

jumps

Joan Magazine, a counsellor

the dinner.

tunity to talk to

tries to support, unify

(NCLN)

the price

She added she’d more students attend

said.

message across on campuses,”

conference to discuss and develop strategies to continue to

Tickets for the dinner and entertainment go on sale Jan. 28 and cost $23 each until Feb. 8 when

in

Magazine

like to see

the World.”

also

chances to peruse and purchase

Forty-two students representing

I

were

There

Campus

Scarborough from Jan. 18-20.

for the

“Wheels

“Students are invited, but in the mostly employees attended,”

past,

times and social

sessions, meal activities.

Augustine’s Catholic Seminary in

Canada gathered

Around

sup-

said.

students

Network symposium

port of Lisaard House,

in

split into six

items from resource tables set up by Birthright, Lifecycle books and Pharmacists for Life. “The conference information is tailored to meet the needs of stu-

Life

trip

expedition

life

Bolger

The weekend was brought

began the

32,000 kilometres across the planet calling their

of abortion

Lisa Hiller

Protection of

cyclists,

Pasadena, Calif, heading the Tournament of Roses Parade,

and entertainment

Measuring mate

Campuses come on issue

240 other

featnre

peace.’’

humanity

the

“Working

human

trip

new millennium. The couple, along with about

national

theme, Conestoga College’s annual Celebrating Women dinner will

The Status of Women Canada said the theme was created to rec-

By

the

Day,

women,

solidarity:

in

al levels.

8.

This year’s theme

for

House, a hospice in Cambridge. Jones and Gaudet embarked on Odyssey 2000 in the wee hours of Lisaard

seeking social justice on the local, regional, national and internation-

celebrate

will

bicycle

fund-raising

as well as the part they play in

2002— Page_7

women

to feature dinner

resolution and peace negotiation,

28,

daily activities.

you to contheir intensity is causing these symptoms persist, or if assistance w,j a is important to seek sider suicide as an"option, it

If

knowledgeable professional. On campus, and doctor are available in Healt Student Services (2B02); a nurse & Safety Services {inside door #3). Student Services (Room 2B02)

A Message

from


9

— SPOKE, Jan.

Page 8

28,

1

2002

Meeting Conestoga’s counsellors By Stacey McCarthy

"Sometimes students come

in

and

asked

if

it

was wrong

problems. I'm able to

"My to me

part series profiling the counsellors

get to the heart of

clients

Doon campus.

the matter to see

counselling

what a student

empathy."

dance around This

the second story in a two-

is

Student Sendees at

in

Do you sad?

around

their

their

worried, stressed or

feel

so Conestoga’s counsellors

If

really

are available for students looking for

advice or someone to

make an appointment

one

visit

of six

at

counsellors

Judy Bates given

best advice I've ever

been

always keep trying and

to

be upset.

develop their

Kraler has been at Conestoga since

if you don't feel for your any more.' That’s trae with

1986. Before that she worked in Edmonton, Toronto, and with family and child services in London.

too

- you must

feel

counsellor says Kraler. is

"You have

a part-

open

counsellor

works

to be a

that in

good

experiences.

You

people and most importantly you must have genuine hope that people

Cambridge

can overcome

Memorial Hospital. She also

in

their

problems.”

Kraler has two jobs at Conestoga.

offers

her time as a social worker, dealing

The

be persistent towards things," says

with sexual abuse victims and help-

helping them overcome personal or

counsellor Judy Bates.

ing to co-ordinate domestic violence

academic barriers impeding

is

to

However, says Bates, might not apply

to all

to

advice

this

people and

sit-

uations.

"Once need

in

a while students

may

want

Even though Bates began her pro-

their success.

fessional

career as an educational

“That involves

assistant,

she says that she enjoys

giving them help

her

first

this

field,

real-

have a suc-

lems aren’t solved, they students’

may

“What I like best about my job here are the students,” says Bates.

Her second job

“They

involves

teach-

start to

are really vibrant, have a lot of ener-

ing an elective course dealing with

academic perform-

gy and great ideas. “I see a huge number of students in a day and that’s great - meeting stu-

test eties.

dents in

selling,” says Kraler. “I

ances.”

Students need to solve their prob-

lems so they can relax academically says Bates.

“Sometimes even

all

different programs.”

Barb Kraler need to

make independent time like

working

relax.

I

for myself doing yoga or pleasure reading.” Bates says that her area of greatest training in counselling involves assessing problems and situations.

in

a

bum

unit in

Edmonton.

“A man I knew for six months died and I was upset,” says Kraler. She went

to

her supervisor and

is

mostly spent counonly spend

hours a week on the elec-

tive.

ment.

She says counsellors don’t ize in specific areas

many

enjoy

really

mature

working with

students

as well,” says have an admiration for those who have come back after awhile to start something new or Kraler.

“I

special-

because they see

different students in a day.

when she knew

However, “the area where I have the most knowledge and extra information is in anxiety and depression

to be.

counselling.”

when

students,

saw the visible connecexists between faculty and I was amazed.” I

The next place she contacted was Conestoga. “I really

enjoy working with stu-

are facing

“Some of them

huge academic

In her spare time Gregory has also

carved out a eler.

for herself as a trav-

Gregory has also been on safari in the Zaire and "Virunga regions of Africa.

barriers,

However, she always comes back Conestoga College and her job as

but because students are so future-

to

oriented, they are able to

a counsellor.

overcome

trail

In addition to spending spare

time with her daughter, she enjoys kayaking, canoeing and skiing.

their issues.”

“I

nate the depart-

make

my

dents,” says Gregory.

“Each day five to six

Counsellor Barb Kraler says the best advice she was given was while

I

and public performance anxi-

job to co-ordi-

Gregory

Gregory has taken extra courses

tion that

I

“Conestoga’s student population

privilege to be involved with their

how

amount of energy

they fit together. “I help students with depression

great, with positive attitudes. It’s a

struggles

because there here.

is It’s

a huge a won-

derful opportunity.”

you

kn©w

oneof hour your time could save

someone’s

life...

Would you help? s'

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Gregory compares these issues to puzzles. “Problems have many different pieces and you have to find

If

USED CD DUTLET

is

outside of Conestoga on these issues.

focus.”

can.

it

Gregory’s

also

masters in counselling. Initially I was looking at hospital counselling,

difficulties.

I

sessions,

a high school and got

way

that

to

back-to-

back counselling

to.”

was where she wanted

but

to help students

want

but says that

“I taught in

fering with their

that is inter-

to see people

arrived at Conestoga she

“I enjoy helping people with problems and assisting them through their

lem

on down the

Carol Gregory Conestoga counsellor Carol Gregory has had a lot of experience in

addition

In

daily

later

of

more.”

likes the hopefulness,

the changes they

stress

school piling on

them, helping them and then seeing

may be having. Conestoga is to help

cessful time here. If personal prob-

affect

treatment programs.

by

added

10.”

them graduate road. It’s good

stu-

about problems

have been made worse with the

love the process of watching

with any prob-

students in any ly

to counsel students

“I

counselling the most.

lems or issues they role at

is

Grade

someone about prob-

to talk to

"My

first

me

motivation and energy of students.

can’t judge other

senior services at

that

to

be a counsellor, “I knew

to

She says she

listener,

discussing other people’s

to

come

dents

knew she

Kraler says she always

wanted

Many

and academic struggles.

skills.”

supervisor said, ‘come back

Several qualities are essential for a

Conestoga and

also

through the Student Services office.

"The

is

talking

Bates

listen to their

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Students can

or talk

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Stars shine at the Golden Globes By Vanessa Laye a night of elegance and

was

ll

glamour as the rich and famous strolled

down

the red carpet at the

59th annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in

Beverly Hills on Jan. 20. in the

Raking

three-hour

awards during the

was drama

telecast

the

A

thought-provoking Beautiful Mind, which took home four awai'ds, including best dramatic

picture.

Crowe,

Russell

who

played

schizophrenic mathematician John

dramatic actor, with Jennifer Connelly (Nash’s wife) winning the best supporting

Nash,

won

petition

an actress in a motion picture comedy or musical for her cabaretsinging debut in Moulin Rouge.

best

motion picture. Akiva Goldsman also received the best screenplay for this motion

actress in a

picture

For

actress. Best

of the big shockers of the night was Sting’s song. Until, for

Winning

Faith Hill’s song. There You’ll Be. Best director in a motion picture

New named Harrison Ford accopts the Cecil B. DeMille award for lifetime (internet photo) achievement at the 59th Golden Globe Awards.

as

comedy.

ing ovation.

action-packed gy, as well as his stunts in Indiana Jones.

Ford

mostly

is

Hans Solo

know

Young superstars need

more than $100 million US at the box office since his acting career began in the mid 1960s.

for his role

in the Star

Wars

trilo-

Ten of his movies have brought

old to wait.”

“My

luck

nated in

in

Many in

the

on jobs But more

singers have taken

movie

industry.

than ever it has been the female pop performers who have made their debuts on the big screen. Janet Jackson, Madonna, Jennifer

Lopez and Mariah Carey are just some of the singers who have made movies. So prepare for an adventure this

month

as

teen

pop

stars

Mandy

Moore and Britney Spears debut their films worldwide. Moore stars in the recently movie A Walk to Remember, which opened Jan 25. This romantic drama is based on 1999 novel written by the Nicholas Sparks that was origi-

released

nally set in

the

quiet down-toearth girl named Jamie Sullivan, who is the daughter of the town minister. Jamie is different from the other girts at her school

Moore

1950s, but has

been adapted to a more modernday setting for the film.

plays

because her care of her

a

priorities

are

taking

father, rescu-

widowed

at ing animals and spending time

But her

life

completely changes

as she falls in love with

Landon

Carter (Shane West). Landon is the only

son of a wealthy family whose only ambiyear tion is to party away his senior at

high school.

The

unlikely pair

meet up

at the

town’s Christmas pageant, where unfolds their small town romance of beauty the discovers Landon as nature, the depths of the heart and inevitably the power of love from

Jamie.

You

will have to wait a

little

best

TV

Rachel Griffith selected as best supporting actress in a series,

made

miniseries or movie

for tele-

holding, I’m nomi-

The members of

the

Hollywood

Foreign Press Association vote for the winners of Golden Globe

Awards. This year’s show was broadcast live on CTV and NBC.

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS for the

AUBREY HAGAR DISTINGUISHED TEACHER AWARD

while longer for Spear’s debut in the movie Crossroads, as it hits theatres on Feb. 15. Spear’s plays a goody-goody straight-A student named Lucy, who reunites with her two friends

(Zoe Saldana) and Mimi (Taryn Manning) whose personal-

Kit

have altered since

Would you

hood days. The trio decides to go on a road at a trip and end up competing musical contest in Los Angeles after a male musician that they met on their journey persuade them to go. The three take you on a wild ride as they tour the countryside

in the

community

is

nominate

demonstrate Distinguished teachers are those who and to their exceptional commitment to students

programs and whose teaching average.

They

skills are

above

also demonstrate leadership in

and in related their schools and/or the college with their professions or in the community.

and

experience growing up and the importance of life.

The buzz

like to

a distinguished teacher?

their child-

work

For more information or nominations of the following committee members:

the

Britney is a biography of Spears life 'and career thus far. You will have to be the judge.

fonns, contact one

film

Greg Burns {2000 Winner) Recreation I

I

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between singing or acting careers By Vanessa Laye

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audience greeted him with a stand-

“I’m too

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the

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work

“Sit down,’’ said Ford.

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a

in a drama TV series was Kiefer Sutherland in his new series 24 and Alias star Jennifer

award for lifetime achievement.

was no surprise when Nicole Kidman won best performance by

to

and actress

Musical Moulin Rouge wasn’t far behind with three awards, including the best picture for a musical or

It

comedic actor went

miniseries or

and

the actor took the stage the

the

wartime drama, also won for best

Leopold, which won the best original song for a motion picture. Sting beat out American Music Award winner

As

won

musical, with

Spin City’s Charlie Sheen. HBO’s Band of Brothers,

One

went to Robert Altman for his on Gosford Park. However, the highlight of the night was when Harrison Ford was presented the Cecil B. DeMille

City

leading star Sarah Jessica Parker taking home the best comedic

Tenenbaums.

Kate

who

category,

television

the

HBO’s Sex and the best TV comedy or

because he missed his llight, won best actor in a motion picture musical or comedy for The Royal

movie

dead,” said Ford,

puns.

The picture also won best score composed by Craig Armstrong. Gene Hackman, who wasn’t there

the

is

cracked up the audience with his

for the top


— SPOKE, Jan. 28, 2002

Page 10

wow horror fans

King and Straub By Michelle Goring

After the bodies of two missing children are recovered,

Horror writers Stephen King and Peter Straub

come

together for a

second time to give readers the Black House. The second part of

The Talisman,

their first novel,

Black House

the

a masterpiece of a

is

horror novel.

Jack Sawyer

who

detective

away from

a retired homicide

is

is

looking to get

the hustle and bustle of

the tortured streets of

To

Los Angles.

get away, he buys a house out-

side

town of French

small

the

Landing and plans a ation and solitude.

of relax-

life

Sawyer has barely moved in when French Landings Chief of Police Dale Gilbertson comes to him pleading As Sawyer

for his help. learns a serial killer

becomes

it

eaten.

The

killer

nicknamed

is

"The Fisherman” by

partially

Sawyer

the local law

finds

that

the

latest

abduction of the Fisherman, Tyler Mitchell,

is

not only a breaker but

most powerful breaker

also the

to

enforcement because of the resemblance to a famous Los Angeles

ever

case of cannibalism.

young

To Sawyer, this is a clear case of a demented serial killer, but as he helps the police it becomes clear that the Fisherman is more than he

territories

seems.

together to fight the dark king and

Sawyer’s forgotten past begins to resurface as he starts to remember a

try to retrieve

childhood of parallel worlds and a journey to another world to save earth.

Sawyer

realizes

the

that

Fisherman is actually an evil being from the parallel world, the territo-

has invaded French Landing. But

ries, sent to

not any serial killer. This one preys on the town’s innocent children.

workings of the Crimson King. The dark king is trying to destroy

gather children for the

live.

dark king gets his hands on

If the

Tyler, he could destroy the

and

subsequently

destroy earth.

biker

a

gang come

Tyler before

it’s

too

However, time is running out. Sawyer and his friends must enter the territories through the dark house and save Tyler before he is either eaten by the Fisherman or taken by the Crimson King. late.

The beginning of

the novel starts

slowly, almost too slowly, as

King

and Straub set the scene for the gruesome tale.

tower

is

what

the dark king

is try-

mutilated bodies and workings of

ing to destroy that will bring an end

the Fisherman, the writers stay true

to the territories.

to

their horror

writing style and

Fans of The Talisman will enjoy

create an atmosphere of suspense,

the

murder and gruesome death. The first novel by King and Straub, The Talisman, is the basis for the Black House. Jack Sawyer’s

The Black House, but thorough enough that readers can enjoy it without having

previous adventures in the territo-

with the events happening in French Landing. ries correlated

Sawyer, the local law enforce-

ment and

With detailed descriptions of the

teleki-

netic beings called breakers.

clear that they are dealing with a

monster as the corpses are

by enslaving

the territories

Also interesting

in the novel is

King’s attempt to incorporate the storylines of his other novels into

The breakers make their appearance in the King novel

many

references to characters

and events the novel

to read

in

is

The Talisman first. in the book is a warning

Included

before the reader gets to the final

King and Straub end the good guys win ending to the story, but add an chapter.

struggle with a cheerful,

additional ending warning readers

this one.

that if they liked the

first

they should read no further.

Hearts in Atlantis.

and now a major motion picture, one of the characIn that novel,

ters describes

himself as a breaker,

Overall, King and Straub did an amazing job comprising the book. The two writers’ writing styles flow together nicely and make a delight-

but the audience really doesn’t get

ful

an idea of what a breaker

who

is.

King also incorporated the Dark Tower series into the book, as the

happy ending,

read for horror fans.

Anyone

enjoys either King or Straub

books should definitely pick one up. It’s worth it.

this

HOROSCOPE By Daniel Roth

Luckiest day; February

Luckiest day: February

3.

almost finished with the

1.

more Week of Jan. 28

2002

to Feb. 3,

Cancer; June 22

Happy Birthday Aquarius! A special someone may surprise you

with

an impressive gift. Relationships with friends and family will also be blossoming this week.

March

Aries;

Whether friend, or a special

it

21

April

be

with

a

someone, you

be renewing an old relationship. This could inspire you to will

develop a new interest or talent. Luckiest day; January 28. Taurus; April 20

Your

creative

May

-

You

will

new

Luckiest day; February

If you are confused as what direction your life

for

you

week. Luckiest day; February

week. inter-

Leo: July 23 - August 22 Challenges and problems are going to be presenting themselves this week. They will not be solved overnight, you will have to deal with the uphill battle for a

little

while.

Virgo; August September 22

-

lift

your

-

ments

may be

battle.

One

in store for

you.

M

next

Pisces:

little

while.

Be

sure to it

may

later.

Luckiest day; January 28.

February

19

-

March 20 You will be receiving

inspiration

spirits.

the

record anything significant,

help you

Luckiest day: January 28. are

blowing in your direction. Expect to have some delays towards the end of the week. Do something creLuckiest day: February

from your dreams for

Daniel Roth is a second-year journalism student who has studied astrology and other clairvoyant issues for three years.

3.

Sagittarius: November 22 December 21 Change and develop-

in

your^

life

should

be

expected. With the resolution of an issue in your life, you may feel as though a weight has been lifted from your shoulders.

23

Luckiest day; January 29.

The chances of a relationweek are high. Whether it is with a new friend or with someone more romantic, look forward to a good week.

Capricorn:

ship starting this

Luckiest day: February

3.

November 21 The winds of change

ative to

2.

October 23

Scorpio:

is

on in the

later

^|i

to

headed, the correct path will be created

20

get through the rest of

winter by discovering a est or hobby.

July 22

Luckiest day: January 28.

energies

will be recharged this

-

surprise

December 22

January 19 If

are

it

feels as

financially bound,

relief is

on

though you

know

that

way. Use any extra

its

income wisely. Don’t spend any-

2.

thing frivolously.

Gemini;

‘lU

May

21

-

June 21

Secrets will be revealed. If

you have had any doubt

Libra; September 23 October 22 Legal matters may arise week, but it’s nothing major.

or curiosity about issues in your life, the problems will start to clear

this

up

higher risk of getting a ticket.

this

week.

Be

cautious

driving,

you

are

Luckiest day: January 29.

Aquarius:

January 20

at

If

you have been strugknow you are

gling over an issue,

A NIGHT OF TEMPTATION When: Thursday Jan. o

31

Where: Sanctuary

M•

01

-

February 18

Why: Why not?

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1

SPOKE, Jan.

28,

2002

— Page 11

Goaltending switch doesn’t stop losing some key saves through

By Jody Andruszkiewicz

as the

New

face,

Humber Hawks on

ation centre

Humber’s lone goal was scored

to

didn’t put together a

by Scott Barnes, his first of the game. However, the Hawks could have been up by more than one

“You

goal except they couldn’t capitalize

Cambrian three days “Again

we

earlier.

60 minutes,” he

solid

loss

brutal

a

said.

because of their

Switching from Jason Lafortune

Andy Hopkins, Rickwood

instead

started

Zadel

Steve

put

puck

the

own

into

Darryl Burns. Bill

him.”

minute

ed for

and

net

the

later

it

later. Under a was 2-2 when Ryan

first

games.

goals in four minutes to take the lost

St.

6-4

right now,” said Condors head coach Greg Rickwood. “We’ve been up and down.” The Condors looked like they were in tough against a physically dominating St. Clair team but solid forechecking and good goaltending by Andy Hopkins kept the Condors

even with the Saints. With a two-man advantage early

Conestoga’s Ian in from the blue

line, avoided a sprawling St. Clair

defender and put the puck high on the St. Clair goalie to

make

Ryan Baird picked up an

like the first with

Rickwood asked

much

started

around and started

Humber

to

swarm

the

Julie

it

1-0.

assist

on

at

speeds

in

excess of 200, sometimes 300 kmAi may seem ridiculous to some.

However, many fans of NASCAR, CART, IRL and Formula One can’t

enough of the sport. Auto racing has been growing into a widely watched sport with

get

of fans attending races each season around the world. However, with its popularity has millions

come

its

with three minutes

make it 2-1 Conestoga. St. Clair got some of their own power play magic as they scored their next two with the man advantage.

Ryan O’ Hagan

got the

first

two points tying the game

of his

at

two

goals apiece. Pavel Shtefan picked up his second point of the game

and put

St.

Conestoga goalie Andy Hopkins hugs the post as swarm the net in first-period action on Jan. 20.

Champion Jacques Villeneuve don’t

drivers

not a taboo subject with drivers, and neither is death though

“Fear

is

a

cials.

fans,

and racetrack

always talk about

death,

over the last 10 years. Overseas,

drivers,

offi-

said

In

that,

said

October 1999. Canadian Greg

of his car the California Speedway during lost control

Moore, who had become one of the most popular and friendly drivers on the CART circuit, sustained massive head

CART

injuries

race,

after

hitting

a concrete

Condors enough manpower

to

defeat the Saints.

“Today

is

the best of our four

Rickwood

said after the

go up another goal Condors got a little bit of luck from the post and the puck never crossed

ejected for arguing with the refer-

the goal line.

situation

Conestoga garnered 16 minutes Like the first period penalties. in with four goals coming on the power play, St. Clair made it 4-2 on

Baird picked up his second goal and third point of the game, making it 4-3 on a power play goal with

next practice. “Four goalies in practice is too many.” After playing four games in

period more than the scoring did. St, Clair was assessed 40 minutes penalties and had their coach

in

ee.

Shtefan’s

second goal and third

It

looked as

if St.

Clair

was going

but the

to

minutes

five

A

minute

In

2000,

Adam

Petty,

Kenny

NASCAR

the

same

speedway

in

New

Hampshire.

On

Sept.

15,

2001,

CART

racer

Alex Zanardi lost both his legs in an accident in Germany. However, it was Dale Earnhardt s death on Feb. 18, 2001 that saw men cry and made grown NASCAR officials face tough decisions regarding safety issues.

Earnhardt, 49.

NASCAR

who had won

the

championship seven times and was known as “The Intimidator.” died after hitting the wall on the last lap of the Daytona 500 in Florida. According to Dave Kindred of series

left in

game.

eight

the second.

later St. Clair

made

after

Sporting News.

it

its

NASCAR

sport

is

s

danger-

ous. but placing the risk with drivers

and

participants.

In fact.

NASCAR

is

days,

the

Condors get

a

break until Feb. 6 when they play their next game at home against Sir Sandford Fleming.

deaths

rule book is different from that of organizations, racing other

acknowledging

also indicated the goaltending would be resolved at the

He

5-3 on a goal from Phil Fraser. In a reversal of fortunes for the

the

wall at 354 km/h.

separate accidents. Petty and Irwin were involved in similar crashes on

Formula One practice sessions. His son and '97 Formula One

players

St. Clair

efforts,”

Gilles Villeneuve died after colliding with another driver's car during

In 1982, risk taker

a feed from Baird. Even pulling the goalie in the minute didn’t give the last

(Photo by Jody Andruszkiewicz)

and Canadian,

tragic accidents:

Moore, 24,

have also been numerous accidents resulting in the deaths of

it

minute minor for roughing was assessed to St. Clair and nobody

Irwin and Tony Roper, three drivers circuit, died in from the

including 29 spectators, have died in racing accidents in the States

there

make

The third period was the antithesis of the second period. Only one two-

point of the game.

Clair ahead 3-2.

Penalties dominated the second

at

left to

Corey Bridges from Conestoga scored a nice goal with slightly more than three minutes to play on

James Arnold scored the first goal for St. Clair by skating out from behind the Conestoga net and sliding it underneath Hopkins to

Villeneuve,

to a recent article

St.

6-3.

Greg Rickwood, Condors head coach

from 270 people,

According

games

Clair scored a short-handed goal

is

not everyone talks about

share of tragedy.

the Charlotte Observer,

discipline.

the best of our four efforts.”

“Today

Here are only some of the many athletes who have been involved in

Graham

Driving a racecar

Condors to play restrained defence and make the smart plays. “We want the defence to keep the puck out of the net,” he said, adding the Condors will stick with the team concept and work on team

meas-

for a stick

pulled the goalie to have a

He

Conestoga would have

Auto racing needs to beef up safety By

strong

illegal curve.

net looking for the equal-

izing goal.

some

urement on Jason Fortier of the Hawks. Rickwood’s gamble paid off with Fortier’s stick having an

Humber dominat-

ing the play but the Condors turned it

weren’t for

it

scored during that power play.

tency

first,

The

period

third

if

it

goaltending from Humber. In a move to gain the advantage,

lead.

streak to four games. “We’re struggling to find consis-

the

Crawford also credited the Condors with playing a very solid defensive game. Rickwood said he wanted the

Clair

Saints at the Conestoga recreation centre to extend their 2002 losing

Fehrman skated

didn’t generate anything.”

game, Simon Protopapas from

second half of the season winless with three different goalies playing in the last four

in

\way

of four points.

started the

Condors

tied

Conestoga scoring chance.

2-1 less

it

minute later, a Less than Conestoga scored again on the power play. This time it was Baird getting his first goal of the game. St. Clair roared back with three

league-leading

ed out the scoring in the second period on a nice two-on-one after a

Young respond-

Humber and made

the goal, his

The Conestoga Condors have

Jan. 20, the

its

(Photo by Jody Andruszkiewicz)

Baird scored for Conestoga. Humber’s Terry Chikoski round-

the

By Jody Andruszkiewicz

the

“All in all,” he said, “with the chances for opportunities on net we

losing streak reaches season-high four

Condors

On

Condors goalie Steve Zadel is helpless as the puck finds to the back of the net in a Jan. 16 game against Humber.

inability to

than three minutes

Zadel kept the Condors game in the first period making

to

Crawford said there was a lack of

1

chance of winning,” he said. “1 think Steve performed to where the team had confidence in

didn’t play very smart with

intensity in his players.

second period A back and saw four goals scored in five minutes. Conestoga tied the game in the second period on a goal by

“We put people on the ice tonight who we thought gave us the best

shot

his sec-

picture-perfect play.”

forth

to a victory.

a

puck tonight,” Humber coach Wayne Crawford said after the game. “We were trying to make the

Zadel ’s strong play.

in

hopes of kick-starting the Condors

in

Smith fanned on allowing Barnes to score ond goal of the game.

Tyler

“We

when

the third period

to play in

on three good scoring chances

can’t play for a period and a half.”

and

20 seconds

the

changing

after

things

in the

advantage

but that backfired with

goal by a solid save.

loss disfieart-

after

especially

ening,

and lost 4-2. coach Greg

Jan. 16

Conestoga head Rickwood called the

it

six-on-four powerplay

chance midway in the first when Scott Foster broke in alone on the Humber goalie but was denied a

the recre-

at

spent most of

Conestoga end. The Condors had a nice scoring

same results. The Conestoga Condors faced the

Hawks

the period

one of the

only auto racing organizations that does not share its safety findings

stubborn its regarding approach to safety and as a result, has made changes for this upcom-

heat

ing season.

On-board

crash

recorders will

now be

NASCAR stock cars. impact recorders have been

the

on

the

IRL

HANS

openly.

data

and

placed inside

Such in

use

circuit since 1993.

The

device will be mandatory drivers, as it has

NASCAR

Shortly after Earnhardt's death, the public learned Earnhardt's seat

for all

had broken during the crash. questions many However,

IRL

remained. Did he die from not

opment

wearing a head and neck support

hopefully decrease the amount of has seen. tragedies

belt

device called the HANS'? Were his injuries worse because he was one

of a few drivers who wore an openfaced helmet? Did the broken seat belt add to the injuries he sustained?

NASCAR

has been taking the

been for Formula One. C.ART and for years.

Also, a

new

research and devel-^

centre will be developed to

NASCAR

come after far many deaths. Look for an emotional return to

Sadly, these changes

too

Daytona for NASCAR on Feb. 10^ CART, Formula One and IRL begin their seasons in early March.

^


SPOKE, Jan.

28,

2002

— Page 12^ 1

2J002JOver 100 Employers in

Full-Time, Contest,

a single location

Summer and

New Location!

Part-Time Jobs

RIM Park WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2002 10:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Visit Doon Campus - Student Employment (Rm. 2B04) Waterloo Campus - Student Services Guelph Campus - Main Office or

^

www.partnersd4employment for Job Fair information and updates

What is Job

TIPS

Fair?

An opportunity for students and alumni to potential

network with

employers

An opportunity to investigate and research career options An event that helps you to obtain information from employers on:

!

for Preparation:

Attend a “Maximizing Job Fair*’ Workshop in the LRC: January 24 at 5:00 p.m. and February 4 at 2:00 p.m. Visit our Web site at www.partners4empiovment .ca for a list of participating organizations

Pick up an Employer Guidebook

Guelph Campus

in

at

Student

Employment or

advance of Job Fair (available

at

at the

Corporate Culture

Educational Requirements

Job Requirements

Fair as well)

Industry Trends

Research employer information available in Student Employment Update your r^sumd and cany some at the Fair

Growth

Salary Expectations

Skills

and Qualifications

Prepare a business card to give employers a snapshot of your qualifications

How to get to Job Fair:

Target potential employers

FREE transportation will

Prepare a

run throughout the day (see schedule for your

campus) Conestoga College

Doon Campus buses

Doon Campus

To Job Fair 9:30

Depart from Job Fair

a.in.

1 1

;00 a.m.

will run four times

10:30 a.m.

12:00 p.m.

Doon Campus buses

11:30 a.m.

2:00 p.m.

up and drop off at Door #2 Conestoga College

1:30 p.m.

3:30 p.m.

during the day will pick

Guelph Campus buses will run once in the morning and once in the afremoon Guelph Campus buses will pick up and drop off at Guelph Campus main entrance

of questions to ask employers Dress and conduct yourself professionally Exude enthusiasm and self confidence Be positive and smile list

Driving to

RIM Park?

See their interactive

citv.waterloo.on.ca./rimpark

Guelph Campus 9:30 a.m. 1

1

1

1 1

:00 p.m.

:30 a.m.

2:30 p.m.

;00 p.m.

4:00 p.m.

Waterloo Campus Access

to the

bus

is

provided

UW

from cither WLU or (See details on Flyers posted at Waterloo Campus)

at

RIM Park on the day of the

Career Opportunities industry

Main Office

JOB FAIR -.FEBRUARY 6


Digital Edition - January 28, 2002