Page 1

33rd Year

— No. 71

College VIP/CIP day a success By Sarah McGoldrick

In the afternoon students were invited to the recreation centre to

Conestoga

College’s

learn offer.

Information Program days were a

The day ran smoothly with only^ minor parking and food service delays. Lot 10 was one of the more jammed lots, with students using no parking zones and blocking lanes

huge success

this year.

The event was held on Nov. and Nov.

14, allowing students

guests to learn

13

and

more about Ontario

colleges and the programs

they

along

Students began arriving at 8:30 a.m. from high schools

students from one event to the

area and from then on were given a perspective of college

other.

In order to maintain a positive

life.

Event organizer Jan Stroh said VIP/CIP went better than predicted.

flow and to relieve some of the parking problems, classes in some

Stroh said attendance was up on

programs were cancelled.

Wednesday by 400 people, bringing

p^Q£9_

Stroh said

high school students.

some program

that

information sessions had between

60 and 70

She added ical

what

see

that security

and phys-

resources were just two of the

many departments that helped make the day a success.

ours, while being given the opporto

volunteers went

she said.

students.

Students spent the day learning about potential academic endeavtunity

many

“auove and beyond” their duty. “Staff doing their regular daily tasks did an amazing job this year,”

participation in the event to 2,900

She added

made

were

throughout the day in order to guide

over the

all

to

lots.

Announcements

offer.

Exploring benefits 61 , aromatherapy.

what various colleges had

Visitor

Information Program and College

VIP/CIP day

facilities

Conestoga College offered.

will

be run again

(Photo by Julianna Kerr)

next year.

College makes-presentation

CSI board

to

College employees Sara Free (pointing) and Nancy Roszell direct (VIP/CIP) on Nov. 14. high school students to seminars during

of directors

By Michelle Goring

The college decided

to give the

CSI executives get $1 ,000 bonus

presentation because of the appar-

Members

Conestoga

of

College’s executive gave a presen-

Getting fired-up over

tation to the

pottery.

Inc.

.PAGE

10

Conestoga Students

has not been allowed to see the proposal is because it is consid-

achieving polytechnic status.

cor-

advising the

The

presentation outlined what a

polytechnic institute college

11

COMMENTARY Don’t alter airline plans.

PAGE

w

is

trying

to

is,

why

the

upgrade to

is,”

petitive activity.”

Simmons

told the board that a

institute that

The college

is

the polytechnic

is

a post-sec-

has no more

trying to achieve

because,

status

according to Simmons,

is just

it

polytechnic status, the difference

another step in the development of

between a polytechnic school and a college, and how the change

the college.

could effect students.

try,”

to Simmons, According Conestoga submitted the first polytechnic proposal three weeks ago. The six-volume proposal covers why Conestoga College

believes

it

should be chosen to

become a^ polytechnic institute. Simmons said the college could receive a decision in the spring of

4

resigned his position forcing the

to

what our business plan Simmons said. “This is a com-

ondary

is

2002, but because of the resignation of Premiere Mike Harris, it

might be longer.

members of

degrees.

“We don’t want other colleges find out

and Howard Noble, an expert in community colleges and polytech-

who

executive

then 20 to 30 per cent of its proapplied available as grams

ered confidential.

polytechnic institute

college.

Two

Conestoga Students Inc. received a $ 1 ,000 bonus during the student union board of directors meeting on Oct. 30. Jody Andruszkiewicz, vicepresident of academics, and Jaime Taylor, vice-president of communications, each received the bonus for the extra time they put in over the summer. In July, Steve Coleman, the of activities, vice-president

porate development and planning,

nic institutes

Andruszkiewicz said he spent

the reason

the Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI)

Simmons, vice-president of

PAGE

Simmons explained

board of directors Oct. 13,

vice-president of training and development and continuing education, Mohamed Hamoodi, direcRon development, tor of

break.

By Michelle Goring

proposal.

outlining the college’s plans for

Presenters included Pat St. John,

Taking a parenting

ent secrecy around the polytechnic

demand of

“It is the

the indus-

he said.

Part of the criteria for applying for the

polytechnic status

is

to

offer unique degrees or degrees in

programs offer

that

currently

do not

them. This would include

woodworking, health and information technology. Other areas the college

may be

looking

at in

other executive

members

to

the

next

school

year,”

Andruszkiewicz said. “It hurt us because we lost an important part of our team at an important time.”

According to Andruszkiewicz, he quit his part-time job as a bartender at

The Walper Pub

in

order

to put in the necessary hours to

get

the

Students

work

at

(CSI)

Conestoga finished.

communications, electronics and mechanical engi-

Taylor took off two days a

neering.

from her full-time summer job

the

future

are

Continued on Page 2

do

double duty. “Losing the activities person was hard because the summer is when we do all our planning for

help.

Inc.

week to

an average of 45 to 50 hours a week in the CSI office, adding the

amount of money both executives lost

due

to putting in the extra

was substantial as the monthly honorarium ^or CSI members is only $480 a month.

hours

In addition to the

granted, a motion

bonus already

was presented

board of directors at the meeting to raise the CSI honorarium to $725 a month. That way, according to Andruszkiewicz, the to the

CSI jobs would become part-time jobs for students holding the positions.

“Most students

who go

to

school have a part-time job and

work an average of 20 to 24 hours week plus go to school full time. CSI executives have jobs, go to school full-time and run the a

student union. If the honorarium

were raised, the executives could spend more time concentrating on CSI duties. The rationale was to

make

it

a part-time job becau.se

what it is.” The motion was defeated due to the fact that although Taylor and that is

Andruszkiewicz put in the extra work, the honorarium should not be changed on a permanent basis.

Continued on Page 2


Page 2

— SPOKE, Nov. 26, 2001

new

Alumni welcomes By Julianna Kerr

number of

areas including graph-

design,

marketing and engi-

ic

Conestoga’s Alumni Association welcomed its slate of officers for

2001-02 at the eighth annual general meeting on Nov. 2.

neering technology.

“This college has a he said.

Norm

is

Bertrand, a 1985 graduate of

lot

going for

it,”

The Alumni Association

1

The new association president

relies

on help from willing volunteers. The group’s mission statement

business administration and man-

describes the association as a net-

agement studies. Conestoga College President John Tibbits kicked off the meeting with a report on last year’s activities on campus. He said he was proud of Conestoga’s accomplishments and

work of volunteers committed

listed several highlights.

"I think you. as alumni,

should be proud of the college,” he

really said.

"One of the major achievements year was getting our ISO 9001 certification. That was a real employee effort - everyone got

He said another achievement was the

college in order to create a lifelong interest in the success of the college.

The association’s volunteer management committee defined plans for 2001-02. One of the major goals of the committee will be to create a database or filing system.

'the

of

new far-reaching radio CJIQ-FM. “We’re always to find ways to make the col-

school’s

signal.

trying

Chair of the committee, Alycia Punnett, said the database would

be a system to track volunteers within the association.

The

significant initiation

to

an active partnership among the alumni, the community and the

this

involved.”

system will

filing

assist

with future recruiting for specific volunteer positions when help is needed.

uing to grow. “You can see signs of it all around.” Full-time enrolment

Chair of the external marketing and events committee Jennifer Wallage was also on hand at the meeting. The committee’s goal is to plan, implement and evaluate events for alumni and student populations to raise awareness of the associa-

and

tion

lege a better place for employees

and especially for students.

It’s

absolutely essential in this day and age.”

Tibbits said the college

is

contin-

numbers

application

have

increased this fall. Also, student success over the last year has been substantial in a

and

the

benefits

it

provides.

Events from

year included a corporate challenge, a fund-raiser

College outlines

last

college has no intention of getting rid of the one-, two-

and three-year diploma and co-op programs currently offered. The CSI board of directors asked about the possibility of tuition increases and having a road

clear

who

map

for

students

are graduating from a pro-

gram

that

status

may

receive degree

after they

are gone,

so

grams are mandatory.

The CSI .was about

how

''

also

the polytechnic race

standing of the college, especially if the college was turned

down.

The KPI surveys establish benchmarks of excellence at Ontario’s colleges. are based on independ-

ent surveys completed by students, graduates and employers.

A

and

how

The executives said that there would be no tuition increase for programs that did not incorporate degree status, and that as a

a college ranks in the KPIs,

Noble said the college is unsure about how becoming a polytechnic institute would affect the College but the executives

agreed to look into

Fairview Park Mall and a skatparty, which will be held again in February 2002.

it.

Asked what would happen

if

currently offered.

ing

Outgoing chair of the financial planning task force S^arah Todd announced the creation of a Special Project Fund. Money raised by the

All requests for funds will be reviewed by the financial planning

Reduced

Alumni Association

task force.

for

individuals

The committee sales

to

offers

students

every

The

groups attempting to

rated

She would also

ation centre.

College representative presentations took place in the

main building of Conestoga from 12:30 to

gram-at-a-glance booklets. Funky pens and keychains were

1

CSI executives, including Ginny

1

many

:30 p.m.

Stroh said she believed that the

CIP event went very out

Criteria

well.

The

only problem she saw was the amount of garbage left by students.

bonus will have to be would include working more

“We

hours than required.

said.

Both Taylor and Andruszkiewicz would be eligible for an additional $1,000 bonus for

now,

the

the

fall

semester. a

month per member

would be considered on a monthly

basis.

the

four

months

in

and Hawkrigg would be eligible for November and December. tall

.semester,

the

do

it

like to see all of

Liaison officers from

all

the par-

ticipating colleges attended.

Volunteers from Conestoga’s admissions centre, the informacentre, faculty from the School of Business and the dean from Health Sciences were available to help answer questions and tion

staff tables.

Representatives Conestoga’s residence,

from

OSAP and

the recreation centre were also on

(the

CSI executive)

will obviously

have to justify the bonus,” Andruszkiewicz

Hawkrigg, the new vice-president of activities, an opportunity to receive a bonus for

The bonus of $250

to

hand.

for the

established but

with

again next year.

The event ran from 6 to 8 p.m. on Nov. 13 and then from 8:45 to 11 a.in. on Nov. 14 in the recre-

form of pamphlets and pro-

considering giving

different

the colleges out to the event.

the one-stop

of the 24 Ontario colleges attended the eveiTt on Tuesday and returned the

posters in the

theme and said she hopes

Ontario colleges.’

Visitors received information in

Twenty-one

many

Cruise through 24 Ontario colleges.” Stroh was pleased

in

welcome

with

shape of license plates with the logo “Test drive your future.

your future. Cruise through 24 different

shopping model. the

do a presentation.

The theme for CIP night was Test drive

general public to browse

counsellors

Continued from Page is

colleges that ask college representatives to

charge of student recruitment and admissions, says parents, students and guidance

behind

Guelph campus’s Ford Mustang, which was built by students. As well, the campus was deco-

through different colleges from Ontario in one area. Stroh,

left

The CIP night had a Drive your Future theme, and featured the

Information Program (CIP) was an opportunity for the

out the meet-

ing by thanking all volunteers for their hard work and dedication to the association.

during theVisitor Information Program (VIP) day. Conestoga is one of the only

College

that bridge if

for executive

to

Monica

services officer

tions

event.

programs

“We will cross we come to it,”

Instead, the board

go

Alumni

Himmelman rounded

a success: Stroh

according to Jan Stroh, a liaison officer who co-ordinated the

colleges.

the three

The one-time funding opportunity will

nity.

who have

projects or proposals that represent the association’s mission statement.

The College Information Program held Nov. 13 in the recreation centre at Conestoga College was a great success

posal, Jon Olinski, president of

Board considers additional bonus

set aside for

is

or groups

enhance the partnership between alumni, the college and the commu-

next morning to hold presenta-

available as giveaways from

degree pro-

year.

night

the board voted against the pro-

to applied

ticket

prices were available Blue Jays games, African Lion Safari, Paramount Canada’s Wonderland and Sportsworld. The committee is looking at expanding the selection of tickets

polytechnic institute clear course maps for students returning or switching from diploma

the CSI, said,

Kerr)

at

worried

they can return to the college

degree.

by Julianna

By Nicole Childs

-

percentage of government funding is directly related to

incorporate the courses already taken into the applied

Tucker, Glenn Campbell.

Only problem was garbage students

would affect the No. 1 Key Performance Indicator ^ (KPI)

They

The 2001-2002 Conestoga College Alumni slate of officers was announced at the annual general meeting on Nov. 12. Members include (left to right, front to back) Monica Himmelman, Jennifer Wallage, Sara Mane-Thompson, Tara Llanes, Alycia Punnett, Ellen Menage, Norm Bertrand, Brett

CIP

criteria

for polytechnic status Continued from Page 1 The college executives assured the CSI that the core of the college would not be touched as the

officers

“But what the board I have no idea.”

The board

is

looking

will determine

for, right

whether or not

the bonuses are warranted at the CSl’s last

board of directors meeting on Dec.

15.


SPOKE,

— Page 3

Nov. 26, 2001

7

OntarioLearn

com growing

By Lisa

developed

online and contain course infor-

Hiller

mation, a

When

OntarioLearn.com began were five courses

Everything

300

according

tory,

Students must

in its inven-

to

Bowman, Conestoga

come

the

via

hosting

is

the

was that do develop and host

them because the

lege to write

College’s

college hasn’t found a

way

educational-technology co-ordi-

able to proctor students

nator.

yet.

to

colleges

Bowman

courses,”

to the col-

Elizabeth

OntarioLearn.com is a consortium of 22 Ontario colleges whose mandate is shared development,

and

course. “Part of the agreement

done

is

Internet except the final exams.

available online. there are

of the college and

school policies.

in 1995, there

Now

map

be

online

said.

Conestoga College has developed and hosts eight courses. Its first courses were Dealing With Difficult People and Continuous Improvement Processes.

The

“Part of the agree-

ment was that colleges do develop and

expenses and delivery of courses online or over the Internet primarily through the use of the FirstClass, WebCT, Blackboard or Unilearn Conferencing systems.

Elizabeth

Bowman,

educational-technology

Courses are delivered online through a combination of specially designed Web sites and/or e-

which was developed and

1,

co-ordinator

is

hosted by Algonquin College.

Bowman

host courses.”

OntarioLearn.com

first

course available was Accounting

of people registering for online

women between

the

ages of 22 and 40.

They

are

rapidly with

The big misconception Bowman has heard about online courses is that they are easier.

the

She said the opposite is true. “They are probably a lot harder and more time consuming.” In the Accounting 1 course for

to

example. Bowman said there is an assignment due every day and the

exam

is

“You

tough. definitely have to be self-

motivated,” she said.

popular with sections said

students

filling

students

have

it saying they will never go back to a classroom, or hated it saying they need other

tions.

trend. It’s a next generation thing,

continuing education catalogue.

lum and

according to

Students can register for OntarioLearn.com courses by filling out the registration forms in the Con-Ed catalogue and taking

access courses available at other

According to Bowman, the OntarioLearn.com format also benefits single parents and shiftworkers.

Bowman

its

is

the students being able to

colleges.

All colleges are registering col-

which means students can register for a course at any of the 22 colleges involved, but that college may not be the one that has leges,

them to the Registrar’s Office. According to Bowman, the start-up packages are available

on parking and babysitting and shiftworkers can accommodate because they don’t

the courses

has become a

Bowman.

she started working with

OntarioLearn.com said there

in

1997,

were approxi-

only

logically

become

have

to

be

too techno-

advanced for what most

people have in their homes. Also she said OntarioLearn.com courses should become true distance education courses where

exams and buy-

Bowman is also hoping OntarioLearn.com will offer programs in the future. Students cannot take programs or obtain certificates through online courses now. She said she hopes that eventually

all

the

college’s

become

full-time

true distance

courses and be offered through the

site.

The goal would be

to allow stu-

mately 40 students a semester tak-

dents to complete programs and

ing the courses.

get certificates online.

Now

there

are

about

300 a

semester.

money

to raise

its

program wants

future, but noted they

careful not to

courses will

CBSA fund-raising

Conestoga hosts skills day for tech

Single parents are saving costs

When

is it

as

interactive in the

ing writing final

Ontario colleges sharing curricu-

these courses in

OntarioLearn.com

115 of Winter 2001 lists

the

become more

ing their books online.

people around. The end result

Conestoga College

behind to have

idea

Bowman said

each

needing credits and women working towards completing certificates and upgrading their educa-

The

mail.

Con-Ed catalogue

advertising.

been

semester.

Bowman

spreading

is

word of mouth and

students can do everything includ-

has

either loved

full-time

OntarioLearn.com

hours.

OntarioLearn.com

said the vast majority

courses are

any specific or regular

require

rapidly

for

“I think that’s going to be just around the comer,” she said.

blitz

banquet

By Nicole Childs

courses

The Computer and Business Students Association will be hav-

By Shannon McBride Conestoga’s

campuses Dec.

Doon and Guelph

will host

a

day on

skills

6.

The annual event is organized

in

an effort to introduce Grade 7 and 8 sUidents to programs and courses related to trades

About

650

Waterloo

There will also be two sessions at Guelph campus. Each will start a

ing a two-week fund-raising blitz

half-hour earlier than the sessions

change.

at

Doon. During these sessions the

dents will take a closer look at the trades

ticipate in

demonstrations relating to

electri-

cal-engineering, machining, robot-

Upper Grand district school boards

ics

workshops and demonstrations held throughout the day at the two Conestoga campuses. The day is organized by a committee made up of representatives from Skills Canada Ontario, the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program, faculty of Conestoga

and woodworking. At Guelph campus the students can see and participate in plumbing, automotive,- welding, industrial

maintenance and carpentry. 'The organizing committee will

be trying in as

to get students involved

many hands-on workshops as

They hope

peak the the skills and

that this will

students’ interest in

school boards involved.

trades offered at Conestoga,

There will be two sessions

The

Due

at

Computer

This year

to safety

precautions, the

students will have to

raise

CBSA pro-

competition. Proceeds will be used for the awards banquet and to sponsor the annual marketing competition. year CBSA provided This

$2,500 for the competition. The association also provides

sit

back and

students at the college to read.

This year’s fund-raiser will feaboxes of chocolate-covered

ture

almonds

for

$2 each and magazine

subscriptions at varying prices.

Ben

Mills,

watch several demonstrations performed by both students and facul-

CBSA,

to 2:30 p.m.

ty at the college.

ferent

be from 10 a.m. to

(CBSA)

vided $2,500 for the

12 p.m. and the second from 12:30

first will

Business

and

Students Association

free copies of the National Post for

possible.

College and members of the four

Doon campus.

the

will par-

workshops and watch

Catholic, Wellington Catholic and

are invited to take part in several

Chocolate will be sold by Door 5 November to help

near the end of

money.

At Doon campus they

from

Waterloo

regional,

and 'technology courses

available at Conestoga.

and technology. students

stu-

so students should save their spare

vice-president

of

400

dif-

said there will be

magazine subscriptions

to

choose from.

The

Corrections

will

CBSA

be

guarantees the price

scription price In an article

on Utopia

in the

Nov. 19 edition of Spoke, the president

of the Computer and Business Students Association incorrectly identified. is

a

The

president

is

in fact

(CBSA) was

Joe Bentley. Also, Utopia

CSl event being held on Nov. 29 in the Sanctuary. same edition on Viva Cafe it was

Also, in an article in the

ic

meals and drinks are sold.

Spoke apologizes

for the errors.

else.

The chocolate almonds ing

College

the

sold dur-

Information

Program (CIP) day were stated the

business offers only organic food. In fact, both organic and non-organ-

where

good as any subyou will find any-

at least as

just

a

quick sales preview.

The

fund-raising blitz will

begin

not

the

last

November when can be purchased at Door 5.

they

officially

Monday

in

until

Computer and Business Students Association President Joe Bentley sells chocolate-covered almonds to raise money for the annual awards banquet. Bentley was inside Door 3 on Nov. 14. (Photo by Julianna Ker


Page 4

— SPOKE, Nov.

Commtntai^

26, 2001

TiM

crashes change your plans Don’t

let

I

Hof^IoMS

THINK HE’S HAPPY TO SEE US!

.

NowOPEKII

New York City on Nov. 12 Airlines flight 587 crashed into a

Another tragedy struck

when American

suburb in Queens. The Airbus A300 departed from John F. Kennedy International Airport at 9:14 a.m., en route for the Dominican Republic. Only three minutes later it crashed into the waterfront neighbourhood of Rockaway Beach. All 260 passengers and crew as well as five people on the ground were killed. Five infants were included among the dead. Plane crashes are never good for an airline’s business, but this one comes at an extremely vulnerable time for North America’s travel industry, which is still suffering from the effects of the Sept. 1 1 terrorist attacks on New York. More than 100,000 workers in the airline industry have lost their jobs in the past two months. Canada 3000, Canada’s second largest airline, went bankrupt, mostly because people stopped flying after four planes were hijacked on Sept. 11.

Now

this.

Flight 587 was not hijacked and all evidence suggests it wasn’t sabotaged. mechanical failure

A

caused this tragic crash. The same thing happened in 1998 when Swissair Flight 111 went down off the coast of Nova Scotia killing 229 and when the Air France Concorde crashed into a hotel outside France killing 113. Thousands worldwide were shocked and saddened by these accidents, but they continued to live their

by travelling by air. The crashes didn’t stop them from heading south for vacation, or to the west lives

I

I

I

coast to spend Christmas with their families. And neither should this crash. Yes, it’s tragic and yes, these are uneasy times we live in, but life must go on. Don’t cancel your trip to Florida or Mexico this

Take that Caribbean cruise; do the things you’ve always dreamed of. The longer North Americans stay away from airports, the more jobs will be lost and the deeper our economies will slip winter.

into a recession.

Why Do you to

Do you doing

can’t keep ourselves sheltered in our homes, under blankets, watching the latest news on CNN.

our

lives.

ever wonder what

we

are

Most of us

must realize things built by man will eventually falter. Car brakes fail, boats sink, trains derail and planes crash. It’s something that can’t be avoided, but the one-in-a-million chance must be taken to keep North America out of economic peril. Flying is still the safest mode of transportation and everybody must use it.

You don’t hesitate

to get in

your ear after seeing an

accident on TV, so don’t cancel those flight reservations because of this.

the

same

now, since

I still

won-

months

good

find a

are here to get an edu-

Heck,

week

job. Others are here

still

know what

don’t

they want to do with their

I’m here because

become

I

realized a long

was not going

I

to

even

am

I

if I

interested

in,

I

still

be close to the action,

to

couldn’t be right on the

playing surface. So,

I

thought,

journalist.

It

why

not

become a

every instructor

likes to stress. is

I’ll

so

I

can sneak in a

little

be honest with you,

become one of

I

nap.

the laziest people

I

minute

to

do

I

ail

of

until

my

the

last

assignments,

tickets every

but

it is

if I

million dollars,

was due.

it

week

years old, and

waited

still

me we all

that I

It is

But

their

buns off to get a project done, but

really,

when you

it,

nobody wants

can be agonizing when you are the

to

work

With

to get

the

all

And

one finished.

work

complete over the

managed

I

I

know

that this is

my

life.

there

are

for the rest of

Honestly,

when

I

what

wonder why in

my

l

I

to

still

And

that just

was

possi-

now employ-

colleges and universities are

towards meeting

So, whenever

This

tioning

I

why I’m

find myself queshere,

two years ago.

and work hard so

am

we have

might be the reason

remember

I

think about

work,

us are here. Getting a job

question should have popped up

and with most assignments being

certainly not going to quit

good

that

I

have I

I

to

have

to

be here

can make a

living.

SPOKE

i.s mainly funded from September to May by a payment from Conestoga Students Inc. (CSl) in exchange for the

Keeping Conestoga College connected

insertion of advertising in the paper.

The views and opinions newspaper do not necessarily refleet the views of Conestoga College or the CSl. Advertisers in SPOKE

expressed

in

this

are not endorsed

SPOKE

is

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Kirsten Fifield; Online Editor; Michelle Goring Circulation and Advertising Manager: Derek Lester

Photo Editor and Production Manager: Dwight Irwin

Phone: 748-5220,

ext.

address

3691

Web

is

299 Doon Valley

site:

Dr.,

Room 4BI4,

Kitchener, Ontario,

CSl

logo.

by the CSl unless

SPOKE

shall not

arising out of errors in advertising

beyond the amount paid

the space. Unsolicited submissions

by

9:.'10

their advertisements con-

be liable for any damages

must be sent

file

N2G 4M4.

www.concstogac.on.cii/spoke Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke ©conestogac.on.ca

for

to the editor

a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance

or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a

Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

SPOKE’s

tain the

would be

I it

the employers’ needs.

here,

year.

you

education and experience.

do

some days

am

told

order to survive.

built specifically

third

the

ers are looking for post-secondary

would

want

I

to

ble 25 years ago, but

would be happy with choice, and

I

right out of high school

and a couple months, you would

my program

in

many of

to

two years

last

know

that should prove

it

one rushing

I

is still telling

Remember earlier on

funny to

working

else

have always told

have a chance.

to you.

minute.

turned 18

I

ever win a couple

lion to one, but that

last possible

someone

lottery

odds of winning are about 14 mil-

was lazy? Well,

see

I

since

myself, “I’m outta here.”

also not

have five roommates, and

and I’m

end up waiting

write

right

have been playing two

I

one

is

would make me just now and leave school.

put off our assignments until the

have

you’ll ever know.

to

pack up

not a good thing

is

at college,

think that

happening every second

of the day, and unfortunately doesn’t stop

have

had a

an easy habit to break.

did not take long for

nalist is hectic, as

News

to

a professional athlete. But

with sports being basically the only thing

I

until the night before

Procrastination

lives.

I

that in mind, there

situation that

column, and

this

for the rest of their lives just yet,

time ago that

one

only have five more

I

to go.

But with

don’t

I

assignment -early.

because they don’t want to work

and some

why

der

start at least

me to find out that the life of a jour-

We

due week,

cation that will hopefully help us

We’ve got

to show the world that terrorists and freak accidents aren’t going to stop us from living

-

to college?

this for?

wanted

We

ever question yourself as

why you went

why now?

college,

helpful.

lous statements and

MS Word

Submissions must not contain any

may

(such as a photograph).

be accompanied by an

libel-

illustration


'

Sexualityandu.ca offers free advice and

This column appears weekly

focuses on fun and interesting Web

of interest to the students and Conestoga College.

sites

Is

risk

Society

of

and Gynecologists of Canada teamed up to launch

A

sexualityandu.ca.

the

Sexualityandu.ca

describes the

Web

site

as being

adults,

devoted to taking a “real life approach to the questions and issues that Canadians of all ages

was

if it

Web

site to

as informative

designed as

and teachers and

The informa-

and tools vary depending on what area you are in.

number of

section has a

fun and informative areas.

see

and well

infections in a

way

that teenagers

can understand - without big med-

'

words only doctors use or

et.

ical

was impressed initially. The Web site employs an elfective mix of pictures and graphics to

patronizing parental language.

I

You can

STIs works,

The

In this section

incorrectly,

ple

wreaks havoc on campus

me

Intruding

Pests

important

it

started

all

it

vour

McBride

here ihina in iho

into

my

ing students of Conestoga.

like wolves.

They came

.scarier

than

And I

You can

When ly

was

it

^

tour.

to

What

be doing? in the

arrived safely

Spoke newsroom, I felt a bit better. BuC it was only a few hours later I

when T

I

n’t I

started to get hungry.

decided to trek

teria for

at

stuffed

of kids giving themselves an

Once^l

Y

some

f

got to

my parking

lot

down to the cafe-

te eating that day

--

The

Sexualityandu.ca

pregnancy, menopause and mastur-

and informative

bation.

ple of

As

is a section on livyou choose whether

well, there

ing the

life

you’re gay or straight.

The

is

“What

the

you’re never too old to learn.

For

a sec-

is

and teachers. In this section you can learn how to talk about sex with your child. tion for parents

is

area.

fear of flying before

way

has found a

site

to

ages without

all

ing medical terms. If

you’re looking for information

about sex or related issues then sexis

a great place to go.

you know of any fun or interesting Web sites you can e-mail me at king_koala@yahoo.ca and your suggestion may appear in a future If

column.

you’re

remember

the attacks

if

like

worse. At least

Then

after

trip is

done, you

have anyway. the hassle

of boarding a plane and travelling somewhere, only to go through it all over again upon your return? I won’t any time soon. Say for example you’re going on a trip down south and are really

get

psyched up about

exciting

your

go

to

through it over again. hate

I

all

flying

and always have.

seems

all

It

it.

but

once parts of the plane start moving and creaking, I’m ready to bail out. Don’t worry, I always remember the safety procedures on a plane. I doublecheck where the exits are, even though they are always at the back of the plane and to the sides.

Each airplane incident contributes to

ing.

The Web

inform people of

me anyway.

point,

Sept. 11, chances are you’ve gotten

TV

peo-

has worsened

of flying

Expect to wait awhile before you’re on your way to that sunny place. There is heightened security everywhere because of the Sept. 1 1 attacks on the United States and more thorough aviation safety checks in light of the plane crash Nov. 12. After waiting several hours and finally getting on the plane, you may still be nervous until the plane stops at your destination

site for

ages.

all

ualityandu.ca

those parents out there

all

a very helpful

is

Web

patronizing.br droning on with bor-

makes use

adult section also

dreading “the talk” there

all,

and domestic vio-

lence.

of diagrams and descriptions of the

teenager’s section

with male and female sex-

ual dysfunctions,

Adults can learn about sex during

is

section for health profession-

als deals

in the teenager sec-

other about contraception.

I

gay teens and sex anatomy.

tion.

also learn

The most

my

see on

I

fear of fly-

recent ones

I

How would you spend Men

can

Concorde crash, on the United States and the American Airlines plane that crashed in New York. With mechanical failures possible at any point in the flight, I am always on the edge of my seat - sweating of course and wanting a glass of water every two minutes. I used to think flying was safer are the

than driving. light

of

airplanes

I

Maybe

is

it

but in

the events suiTOunding

all

would much

rather drive

thousands of kilometres for a week instead of flying there and risking

my

life.

am

being paranoid I woiry too much about accidents happening. There’s no doubt I will board a

Perhaps

I

about everything but

when

plane again but

is

the big

question.

your

Now

I

don’t really

mean

morbid, but sometimes

Be determined to see

ers.

to be so

we need

get a better perspective on

to

what

day?

final

Janine

ily

and

you know how you them, or perhaps,

call

who come

Live your

to

feel

up those old mind from

to

its

to

others’

Please

we

have.

taking a trip

down

south that you might otherwise put

fullest.

Absorb everything you can. Learn

off for

later,

I

know we only

in this

world so

get

let’s try

to

Why

not try to

impact

don’t

justify postponing our dreams.

What about life

as far as

dards our society has

not

try

Young people, myself included, feel we are immortal and therefore

about

Now

one chance

and

take for granted the time

friends. Let those closest to

kid.

make our mark. Not by being richpr beautiful, these are the stan-

weaknesses.

Toms

You should spend time with fam-

dance lessons you never got as a

yourself succeed criticize

really matters.

time to time.

wanted to wait in a three-hour and miss all of my classes.

passion for oth-

it?

would-

I

about yourself, and have com-

with guns, planes crashing

down, and war beneath our feet; if this was the last day of your life what would you want to do with

not unless

away than

1

somehow it was day knowing that

that

when

mo.st of the stu-

or setting up those

in

someone's life? never get a second

You

will

chance

at

this talk

made for us. make a positive

this

day.

And

with

about what happened

all

last

week

on Survivor and Ally McBeal, I wonder when we’ll stop passively watching the world as

it

goes by and take a more active role.

,

Generally,

I

am

there.

ue to invade my privacy and make a mess of my school year after

my extra

long walk to

weaving in and out of mobs of students, I soon learned

the college,

Spoke wants

campus. not one to com-

to

hear from you. Write a

letter to

the editor.

phlets littered around the

plain, but if the.se students contin-

took

Got something to say? Do you have a beef?

had left, 1 realized their full effect. The cafeteria and Sanctuary were full of gart)age and there were even more of those pamdents

those students hadn’t paid to park

I

much

reproductive organs because, after

friends

food.

quickly found out that

Later on,

it

angiy, but

As

with as

that.

you had a

to discuss periods, masturba-

tion,

topics not dealt

what the best contraception is for you and get tips for talking to your significant

Sex”

how

line

normally do. This always makes

^

could hardly get on the

pack

forced to park farther

thing

Well, lost or somi.

were they supposed

full

worse

r

WHO

1

love and

if it’s

ai

aimless sclf-guided

of school buses obviousbelonging to the VIPers. I was

me

amved

know

ihe n

sMdi'il

full

that age.

was

finally

elevator because

field

remember being

is

.

they were a lot

in

loi V

Dooi .5 and had to 110 11 1\ push my way through another laige gioup ol I

They were all carrying these white plastic bags that said “Conestoga College” in bright red lettering.

‘iiidiMfs

>i’l

appreciated.

Boulevard when billions of peo-

coming

ch

lirt'h

I

of view. They were jaywalking across Homer Watson Boulevard Conestoga College and Boulevard and I soon realized that these were not the law-abid-

bags with

those

mloimaiive p.imjdilcis

remembcied I was driving down Homer Watson ple started

siufling

into

wasn’t

It

bcaiuiful patlis

and boulevards of C'oncsloga polluting our gorgeous grounds. Apparently all ilic h.iid woiK pin

morning Now being a jouniahst I was "in the know, as thev say, and deep in the bacl? I'f iiiv mind I knew It was VIP d.iy. but it wasn’t the most important thing I had Ions belore

careiipi'M Ihc

Icssiy

Shannon

to think about that day.

lliow

wcic

strewn

rcdi/e how

li.-''

of

niriiiv

Imj'*-

discovers you.

it

do

but must they It

I

’I'hc

just Vitsilv

to discover

is

destiny beloic

it’s

bags. contents ot

plastic*

of VIP day. rills day is dedicated to helping students find then fiiluie schools and vice versa. I’m not sure what VIP is supposed to to

in

white

those

personal space as part

mean, but

that

to

number of different

I

Would you go through

was

what

14 wTial seoified like..billions b( high schcKrl students N'o\

my

-

how

ious overlapping themes but also a

assumed no doubt like most peomost teenagers were

use contraception.

is

In the adult section there are var-

learned that only

I

is

and sexual abuse and coercion something, sadly, most adults don’t know enough about. Parents and teachers can also learn

15- to 17-year-olds

60 per cent of

If

invaded

on contraception

section

the time

This section has information on “the good and not so good” about sex,

also quite in-depth.

when

learn

right to discuss sex, sexual health

bet there

understanding your sexuality.

diagrams of each organ and when you move the mouse over them the names of each part pops up. There are quizzes on pregnancy, STIs and AIDS risks.

Fear

VIP day

On

male and female

sexual organs. There are also useful

You can

it

something here

I

you didn’t know.

It

Perhaps the best part of the

how protechow peo-

also learn

tion against

extremely in-depth.

is

smarter than

describes sexually transmitted

It

appeared in the pack-

it

broken down

parents

The teen

visited the

is

tion

After receiving the information I

to

parts for teenagers,

health professionals.

experience.”..

packet

thing

main

into four

a guide to your body

is

know

course you think you

but

all

tions of both the

not the easi-

Of

at risk

describes the functions and opera-

accomplish.

society

you are

graphics

est

press release

by

There

if

nice

It’s

Obstetricians

distributed

area that

site.

Marc

mind? the

The and

the

Hu let

weighing heavily on your 8

to get an infection.

have a balance they can appeal to a younger visitor or an adult.

avoiding sexually transmitted dis-

On Nov—

vis-

its

wondering how to reduce the of unwanted pregnancy or

eases

ple get

anyone who pictures

staff at

them and

catch the eye of

year,

uate

I

may

,

Letters

Letters to the editor

can be e-mailed

to

must be received by Tuesday

at

noon

for the following issue.

spoke@conestogac.on.ca, dropped off at the Spoke newsroom (see address at bottom of page 4).

be motivated to grad-

on time.

Please include your

full

Anonymous

name, address and phone number. be printed.

letters will not

at

4B14, or mailed '


Page 6

— SPOKE, Nov. 26, 2001

Eatertatninent Student doesn’t fear career stereotypes By Denis Langlois

Although most people attend colwith the goal of achieving

lege

This

is

the-

third cuticle

on students

series

in

a

non-trcidi-

in

tional roles.

Conestoga College’s school of engineering technology has more than 14 full-time programs aimed at

educating

students

about

good marks, receiving

a diploma and then getting a career in a related field, Oliveira said she is doing it to attract more women to maledominated fields as well. “I sometimes feel the pressure to succeed because I am one of only a

careers ranging from civil engi-

handful of women,” she said. “I

neering to robotics and automa-

encourage more programs usually dominated by men.” "I also want people to know technology programs are for women as

Although

tion.

relating

the

stereotypes engineers are less

to

severe than in other professions,

some programs

are

only asso-

still

ciated with men. In

different

are

pro-

minority

the

and therefore fewer women may apply for that program fearing they

may

women

be the only one.

Angela Oliveira,

a

Oliveira considers herself a feminist al

and said she wishes the gener-

public would have

mon

Another reason Oliveira said she chose a technology program is because she works better with men.

“Women

first-year

design and analysis student, said she has been questioned about

why

When

exist

is

has always been like that, racism to anything.”

and it from

are.

After college Oliveira said she

stereotypes

when applying

will

for a job.

is

not

She

said if there are any, she will prove that she

can do the job as well as a

man. “I will

society

men

around men I find we think the same about technology and designing,” she said.

me.”

fashioned beliefs.

viewed as being

Angela

Oliveira,

a

first-year

design and analysis student,

show them

I

am

capable,”

she said. “If they don’t trust me, I will tell them to put me to the test.” Oliveira said she always knew

Grad follows

she wanted a career requiring her to

use her love of

art

and desire

to

design.

doesn’t

home.” Although she

er student

only in her

first

two

taking

semesters

University of Waterloo,

at

He

College.

Dugaard asked

down

their

the class to write

goals

for

the

future.

After reading a few aloud, he asked several students

how

they iilanned

Brad Dugaard, a graduate of Conestoga College’s journalism program, speaks to first-year journalism students on employment opportunities.

(Photo by Kathleen Deschamps)

“The piece of paper you get isn’t to get you anything, it’s all what you make of it,” Dugaard

going said. I

le

told

the

students that

what up to

Students will “1

who

find school

hard

be shocked by the workplace.

was writing

six stories

ing eight photos a day,”

Switching jobs hasn’t made it any easier. Currently Dugaard, Mississauga, gets up

by writing down your

goals and dreams, they are more

anything.

to

sit

they can accomplish

at

1.3

3 a.m. to get to his job, which

done

things at once.”

if

technology. let

do what you want and don’t

anything stop you,” she said.

which can cause distractions. McIntosh added that students who

ing,

studying yet you’re already commit-

that explain

number 1 mistake students make when preparing for finals.

ect

success

courses

at

said students don’t appreciate

lar

concept should

he laughed. McIntosh said

He added

terms.

Once

information has been

the

gathered, he said the next step

is

for

students to focus their attention and

“It’s better to

down

layman’s

may

also be help-

ful.

Studying

in

groups can also he

when

dealing with more

technical subjects, such as math, for-

mulas

memory work,

and

But

he

groups

to

said

recommended keeping no more than three or four

people.

“This

eflective as long as they

is

leave the chit-chat and social

life

’until later."

Finally McIntosh

.study.

study for 13 minutes

in

asking a fiiend to

explain a concept

McIntosh.

information they missed.

helped him

this

break the concept

closer they scramble to in the

books

ject,”

beneficial

McIntosh said this causes students to panic, which causes more stress.

try to find

a different way.

was working on a history projone time and I went to the library and got a children’s book on the sub-

what they do in class is just preparation for what will be covered on an exam and as the exam draws

go back and

in

it

“I

cramming

effectively

utilize

time

is

to

to

rank

subjects in order of difficulty and

He

warned

against

the night before exams.

body

said this should only be an

illness

than have

“A

I’m not doing

of students spend time on

things they already know."

He about

said study periods should be

30 minutes

in

length

and

should not include eating or drink-

forces the leads

“You want to approach it (studyyou are in control, rather

most

lot

it

mode, which

to exhaustion.

is

trouble.

because

into sti'ess

ing) like

get anything

that

make an

is

you really want to do.” For now Oliveira said she enjoys her program and plans to continue setting examples for women in

then focus on those that give you the

their goals,

said

not

choose

a huge

if it’s

as something

such as

thrives under the pressure. “I don’t

students

it

anything.”

effort, they

If

as

Dugaard

will not succeed, but if they stick to

them.

it

option in exceptional circumstance

down and

I

they get out of the program

at

and get up and take a break, than study for three hours and not leani

be the prime minister.” Dugaard

1

Fifield

McIntosh said the best way

lives in

“Don’t look

stereotype, but see

and tak-

said.

who

advice.

exam success

use study time to actually

happen.

take programs dominated by the

are having difficulty with a particu-

fill

He wrote down his list of goals and is now two years ahead of his own schedule.

of 30.

Exams may still be three weeks away but if you Haven’t started

He

an hour away. His workday usually lasts about 12 hours, but he

I

to

that

likely to

a class

opposite sex, Oliveira has some

“Just

who want

Conestoga College, said preparation is important if students want to be successful during exams. “It’s not what you do now, it’s what you did then,” said McIntosh.

make their dreams happen. “When made my goals in first year, wrote down that wanted to to

enjoy,” she

John McIntosh, co-ordinator of the

excelled in his studies,

journalism.

studying to get a

I really

For those students

student

the

out for dedication in (he field of

is

ting the

that

and upon graduation received the Andy Dugan award, which is given

who

By Kirsten

After

was accepted into the journalism print program at Conestoga

her.

myself as being just anoth-

to

compa-

Dugaard

in

Preparation key

said.

life.

them bother

let

said.

Dugaard graduated from the journalism print program two years ago, and currently works with Janet Ecker the education minister and government house leader in Queens Park. “What you get in college is only what you make it,” he

and decided

technology-

in

based programs, Oliveira said she

has some strong areas in the program that men may not have.

plans for the future.

six years,

exist

career in an area

Brad Dugaard, a graduate of the journalism program, spoke to the first-year journalism print and broadcast students Nov. 12 about employment opportunities and

he wanted more out of

sometimes

semester, Oliveira said she already

dreams

his

Despite the stereotypes, which

“I see is

that.

ny for

females

of three

“I am very particular with my drawings and I am good at the mechanical aspects as well.”

am a very creative person,” she said. “I am also a hands-on person who likes creating and fixing things. I am the handy person at “I

Conestoga College students can look towards the future with hope and know they can succeed after a former Conestoga student came back to tell students that he did just

a towing

one

(Photo by Denis Langlois)

By Kathleen Deschamps

Dugaard owned

is

am

I

optimistic

She also said society has a reputation for not being opened minded when it comes to breaking old-

are not

as mechanical-minded as

she decided on engineering. “People ask me why I want to do it,” she said. “They say it’s a man’s job, but I don’t let it get to

way

more com-

when dealing with

sense

stereotypes.

Mechanical engineering technology design and analysis has more than 30 full-time students in year one but only three are female.

“It’s just the

to

to take

well."

engineering

women

grams,

want

really

it

be

in control

of you."

McIntosh said students need to build on their own success and realize that after

making

the semester there can’t

make

it

is

it

to the

end of

no reason they

through the exam.


SPOKE, Nov.

Tim Hortons has decided to open a stall here at Doon. Granted it is mostly due to the huge coffee-drinking numbers, but there

is

a large snacking pop-

ulation being targeted as well.

known

a widely

is

It

fact that

students are snackers.

Glance around while walking your next class.

There are

fries,

subs,

to

we’re anxious and angry, or are used as rewards. However, snacking during the day is not entirely bad. What you choose to snack on can actually be a healthy part of your diet. In most cases though, students head for snacks that are high in sugar and fat and don’t achieve their purpose - filling you.

who

some people it.”

feel the

Barbara Struempler, nutritionist

when we

that

for junk food?

more than 75 per cent of

men and women

eat at least

one

snack a day.

Whenever a midmorning ing,

crav-

afternoon energy slump or

nighttime munchfest

hits,

people

head for a vending machine or refrigerator.

According

Joan

dietitian

to

Blake, many people tend to eat even when they are not hungry. Snacks are commonly used to release stress, entertain us

we’re bored, comfort us

when when

If

you don’t get what you want calories - you’ll keep

snacking.”

Some more

wafers, low-fat popcorn, pretzels

why

all,

The

Extension

Nutritionist

System, a Internet research dataif you’re not hungry .just bored or stressed, try drinking water or a calorie-free beverage instead of snacking. You can also take a walk, call a base, says

work on a hobby to get your mind off food.

friend or

If

you find

hungry,

try

you

that

some

really are

long-lasting

nutritious snacks.

The American Heart Association recommends fresh fruit, raw carrots, celery

or dried

Are you really hungry or is it an emotional craving? If it’s emotional, try the solutions mentioned above, like get-

analyst

eating habits.

Do you

eat a proper, balanced

breakfast?

Do you skip lunch or just grab something quick? Do you eat dinner late at night? According to the Health Eating Expert, an Internet guide to proper eating, the average person should eat three meals a day containing foods they enjoy so they won’t have to grab “craving fillers” later in the day.

house

home

to

mom and dad’s

to get a decent

meal thanks

completion of the new kitchen at the Conestoga College

to

the

residence.

Renovations have been under

way

in the

new

part of the resi-

new

facilities. ‘T

fire regulations.

The new residence still

lacked stoves.

Now, with

kitchen, students can that

require the

cook things

use of a stove.

computer programming

First-year

is

hungry.

Try and eat three square meals a day, but if it’s necessary to snack, try

some

healthier choices

- snack

smart.

point In

sens®

wndar

me fall

n»st studenis are

settling InfiD

a

ssm®

of faroiliadly with their classes,

fcsufinrs

antd tj-eginning to

styOeots

may feet

If

microwave.”

students

who want

to kill time

by

if

yneasy, you are

sufficient

counter

space, a sink, and a small table

with several chairs for dining or chatting.

Students have been slo<v in taking advantage of the facilities so far. “It’s

a pain

ingredients

to-

down

carry

there,”

all

of the

a

because you

v/eren’l

sy re what else to do after

activities?

Faulkner

sometimes

lo college

fe gain gyaiificalions for

to the expedtalfens of parents, farrily or

What did you ihifik vAjuld he ihienestlng about Uhe program? Try lo identify what you were hoping to learn. Ho’'# do your courses differ from your expectations? Are they nol challeniing enough, or are you lacking some pferegursite skills or kno'wledge to be successful? What aspects of your courses are you interested in? Are ihese areas to be examined in greater deplli laier, or are they more closely rolated to a different program of study? Are feere other issues that may be interfdhng with your involvement with school? Do you spend more time thinking about your social lifef your family, sports or other

food cooks.

burner stoves,

Are you INng up

feends? Did yoy come high school?

The new kitchen is adjacent to games room, which is great for

the

said. “It’s just easier

the completion of the

from school. Everyone knows when he or she

tempted to snack in between. If you have breakfast at 9 a.m., you probably won’t be hungry for lunch until around noon. After lunch, you may not be hungry again until you get home

speciiic career goal?

Inside the kitchen are three four-

has larger refrigerators, but

enough together so you won’t be

Why did you decide to oome to college? Aft you tooking

their

and counter space. They are allowed to have microwaves or toaster ovens but not hot plates which are not permitted because of

More than 75 per cent of men and women one snack a day. (Photo by Stacey McCarthy)

for things like rice,” Faulkner

ing lounges, rooms for studying In the old part of the residence,

eat at least

“The food usually turns out better in the oven, as compared to a said.

playing ping-pong or pool while

students only have a mini-fridge

close

students choose quick, sugar-filled snacks instead of

they have chosen the ccMirse of.sludy hesl suilecl to Ihemi. havihi these Sheughls. try aslclf^ yourealf the folfmving quesllohs:

and

proba-

dence since September, incorporat-

and a kitchen.

feel a

bly use the kitchen about once a

week

mealtimes

Many

healthier alternatives.

COUNSELLOR'S CORNER: Unsure Abo wt Yoyr Program Choioe?

Nick Faulkner

student

enjoys the

and keeping busy. look at your

If it’s hunger, take a

Schedule

fruit.

says Struepler, find

you’re snacking.

A!, ttiis

Students in residence no longer

nutrient-dense foods

include graham crackers, vanilla

at student residence By Kathleen Deschamps

snacks have to be

higher

Kitchen complete

have to go

all

ting exercise

Nutritionist Barbara Struempler

says that

“And not low-fat.

Above

pang of hunger we reach

is it

says Struempler.

out

snack, a

like to

carrot won’t cut

dents.

Why

“But for some people who like won’t cut it,”

to snack, a carrot

or crackers.

“But for

chips,

chocolate bars and cookies clutched in the hands of many stu-

slightest

2001— Page 7

many reasons

Students choose snacks for By Stacey McCarthy

26,

Are you still unsure of what truly inleresls you, what you would find most rewarding?

to

in the throw a pizza-pop microwave.” The kitchen is open 24 hours a

Perhaps

day.

after

being exposed to college and the

another area of study. Perhaps you

just don't

you have chosen to be able to explore

all

many

feel able to

possibilfties,

have enough

do and what you

you are

conskJeriritg j

information about the path

the opportunities.

I

you are feeling unsure,: and this can certainly have an impact on your motivation to study, seek out information and help. Your faculty can be a rich source of information about their field and the variety of jobs,. The Student Employment Office has information about employers and the world of vvork after graduation. Counsellors in Student Services can also assist with career exploration, educational choices ami future ^als. Talking about these issues can help clarify you darify your goals. It

I

J

'

A Message

life

from Student Services {Room 2B02)

Is

short,

^etaw

extension ^

Live longer with daily physical activity, healthy eating and following your doctor’s advice.

computer programming analyst student Nick Faulkner in the new kitchen at the student residence on Nov. 15.

First-year stirs rice

(Photo by Kathleen Deschamps)

ww-^'.poriicipoclion.com

l


1

— SPOKE, Nov.

Page 8

Stress By Kirsten ir

you

26, 2001

common

Fifieid

IIikI

yourself wandering

around eanipus lately with higher than normal levels of stress and fatigue

don't

beside you

is

come

tion back,” said Kraler.

are in the

said is

another

potential

students discover they

wrong program.

doctor

are experiencing these feelings in

gets referred to us.”

into the office at this time of

order to point them in the right direction.

“There is so much (work) they are having to produce they feel they

you make the decision to enter the program?” She said she also asks students if they would enjoy what they are learning if they were doing better

do

“I

anymore,” said Kraler. She said one reason this can

can't

it

because some students may need help academically and this can be solved by assigning the occur

is

student a tutor

who can

She said some indications of include skipping class and sleeping in, but added there could also be physical symptoms, such as

stu-

ask questions like

how

did

thoughts,

and family seems angry

“Students need to look is

whether

at

Just today or

is

there

a pattern.”

Kraler

“Students may also have personal problems and once they get a han-

or friends

problem

students

said

could also damage other rela-

may push at

need

to

address these problems as they arise or serious consequences can

not healthy

and family away a time when the student needs

Students the

friends

who

By Stacey McCarthy

realize they are in

wrong program should attempt new area of study now,

before January classes are

negative

in

or depressed. the

“It

to enrol in a

notice the student

the fat

tionships because their behaviour

the

Other symptoms may include

may

such as depression leading

their support,” she said.

visits

said Kraler, “and then

poor marks, an increase

academically.

help them

“The student usually first,”

result,

Chewing

to suicide or failing courses.

stress

students

feeling

their motiva-

headaches and stomachaches.

overwhelmed by the \'olume of work expected of them.

yeiU"

on these they get

She said she talks with students to help them understand why they

Barb Kraler, a counsellor with

many

dle

“This helps them feel motivated again because they feel they can handle it.”

problem

same way. dent ser\ices, said

organize their wt)rkload.

Kraler

panie, the person probably feeling the

at this time of year

Kraler said this last

week

week

that students

is

full.

also the

The younger generation think

it

and

risks

lends to

invincible and that health

is

illnesses affect only older

individuals.

can apply

Things

like strokes, cancer, dia-

for a tutor through student services.

betes and heart attacks are consis-

But whatever the problem, Kraler it should not be kept a secret and counsellors are available if stu-

tently associated with the elderly

said

or infirm.

dents feel they cannot talk to their

effects

parents.

reach

“Take care of yourself and take care of the problem,” Kraler said.

While the symptoms and

many

of

dangerous levels

many

individuals,

lasting

may

illnesses

older

in

are rooted

in

youth.

Your

lifestyle

child or

young

and habits as a adult can directly

your health as you grow

affect older.

One health risk that is consistent-

ADVANCED CARE PLANNING PUBLIC INFORMATION SESSION

ly

ignored as being rooted in youth

is

a heart attack.

A heart attack is caused by the blockage of coronary arteries by deposits of fatty materials. According to the National Heart Foundation, one of the factors

known

is

which

is

capacity or

who have assumed responsibility for making on behalf of another person

health care decisions

raised blood choles-

caused by large and continuous intakes of fats and saturated animal fats. These can be found in abundance within foods like butter, fried meat, chocolate and deep-fried takeout terol

Informative session that will be of interest to seniors and their caregivers who anticipate a loss of decision making

to increase the risk of a

heart attack

food.

Therefore, the type of food and

how much

Of

you eat can con-

it

increased weight and blood pressure- and large fatty tribute

WHEN:

TIME:

1:00 to 3:00pm

Thursday November 29 2001

to

deposits in arteries.

The

‘Department

U.S.

Agriculture tested more than

of 1

,000

foods to measure their content

in

regards to calories; protein, fats

WHERE:

and saturated

The

Terrace oo the Square, Theatre Rm

most 1

.

fats

were

(four cookies)

Milk

1

chocolate cookies,

grams of

1

chocolate

peanuts, (one oz)

PARKING:

Confused about

Waterloo Towne Square

Power of Attorney? Making?

Substitute Decision

3.

4.

nut) 5. 1

Attend this session!!

Terrace Lot (Fullerton)

NO PARKING Edward IL Good

1

1

fat^

with

bar

grams of

fat

Salted butter, (one tbsp)

1

grams of fat

Competency?

(front)

grams):

(in

Homemade

2.

Kuntz Lane Caroline St

fats.

top 10 foods containing the

Plain doughnut, (one dough1

2 grams of

fat

Cooked hotdog. (one hotdog)

3 grams of fat

6. Bologna, (two slices) 16 grams of Int 7. Macaroni and cheese, (one cup) 22 grams of fat 8.

Rich vanilla

cup) 24 grams of 9.

ice cream, (one fat

Four oz cheeseburger

(one sandwich) 3 1 grams of 10. Pecan grams of fat

pie.

patty, fat

(one piece) 32

You’re probably wondering what

11970 ShouldAttencf?

good-tasting foods aie

Some

alternatives that

to contain

Seniors

Family of caregivers Health care professionals

no

left to eat.

were found

fat are;

I Italian salad dressing.

I Instant/brewed tea.

I Diet soda.

who work with individuals in future planning

I Instant/brewed coffee.

I Pickles. I Pretzel sticks.

Corn Flakes. Cooked macaioni.

I Kellogg’s I

I Regular beer. I

Cooked, white

rice.


SPOKE, Nov.

with aromatherapy skin in compresses ami by masof calming >ouv rnmil,

body and

he hohsiic therapy

uses the

I

essential

many

ol

oils

plants,

shrubs and tiees These oils can be

used

in

ways

various

to treat nied-

and |)sychologieal conditions. They can als<.) be used tot t\»srnet-

sage

ic

purposes

arornatltcrapy

is

out ihinknig

\sit!iout

feel a Lcitain

make us was Main people

choose bath

oils

about

Pleasant smells

It

dv.tordmg to

their scents. •\ron]atliei.i[)\

used

a.s

slu.-iild

lU'l

be

a replacement lor conven

-

it should be used to complement other fotins ol treatment lot tlie maximum benefit of die indivuiu.il I oi tiie diagnt'sis and trcaimeui

tional medicine. Instead,

ot senoiis

problems, a profession-

aromatherapist shciuid always

al

be consulted. to try

ami

It

can be dangerous Bet ore

treat yourself.

seriously eonsideiing a frcainient. learn as

about

much

V. li.u

you possibly can

as

you

will )>e

undeigo

work

in

arc

diree

ways

This

can

achicvLd through biihim: ssatcr to

which

oils

phone.

you do become stuck, the

Taking long trips in snowy weather sometimes cannot be avoided, but if you must travel the CAA suggests driving on main roads and major highways.

snow should be dug out from around the wheels and sand or cat litter, which can be kept as part of an winter emergency kit in the trunk, be spread around the

01 in.

mil

piactiscd without

tie

advice

ttic

of a qualified arornathenipist.

Many

essential

.stimulating the

in the cold.

work by

oils

inimune system,

Carrying a cellphone is

always a wise

a difference

is

essential oils crance.s.

ural

The

and

latter

contain unnat-

chemicals and do not provide

therapeutic benefits.

There are many products vvhic.h provide tlierapeiUic tclief. .Aroma lamp.s <ire .i eonibmauoii of light, shape, coloui and fiagranv.e You can aJst) buy lotions, massage oils, candles ami inhalcis

The Web

silt:

explains

how

of

oils

dif-

ferent

ctimbinatioiis

used lo

treat dillerenl ailments. I’oi

are,

chamomile, lavciidci and sandalwood is used to relieve instance,

stress.

Add

10 drops of

and soak for

l.'s

few dui[)s

a carrier

ii'

oil to

a

l»ath

minutes or add a oil aiicli

as

sweet aimoiid and massage jtound yinii neck, back and shoulders

it is

the car are

best to stay with

until help arrives, espe-

taking a few simple precauand by knowing how to react, a winter breakdown can be less dis-

you are in a rural area. This ensures you will not get lost, and you are able to use your car as shelter. Turn on your engine sporadically to keep your car heated

astrous.

but

Although classes can be taken on winter survival and drivers educa-

to avoid carbon

cially if

So what do you do?

By

tions

tion classes teach basics of driving in snow, there are

many

valuable

have essential tips on how to cope with being stuck in the snow. Ontario’s Ministry of Internet

sites

that

Transportation has tions

many

sugges-

on getting out of slippery sitif you end

uations and what to do

up stranded. Carrying a cellphone is always a wise decision. Cellphones enable

make

sure to crack a

In extremely

in

he-

e.ssentiai oils

The

riibbci glass toppers.

I

gum and

He awaie

tuned to local weather reports so

also suggests

you are aware of driving conditions and changing weather. By knowing what to do in an

(CAA)

be worn, as 60 per cent of body heat is lost through your head. Moving legs, feet and hands to keep blood circulating is

local

Carrying a winter emergency kit the trunk is important as it allows you access to blankets, food and possibly a change of in

Having a sign

to

Keep your radio

emergency, winter driving can be less stressful.

fortable

idea.

hotel.

If

you are uncom-

with the driving condi-

tions, stay off the road.

However,

with proper preparation and knowledge, you can face the challenge of driving through another Ontario winter.

alert

with

rufilnn

ruin the oil.

ol the safety issues

and always consult an

ai om.it he.i-

apisl wlicn unsure of practice. I

Me

-eleclive ol

wii.ii

you buy

since tho quality vanes, I

hoi

.Stoic

oils

a daik.

111

c«.)ol

have been

We Buy &:Sej! Brat Goes On USED CD DUTLET

Play more fof less

beatgoeson.com ^

f

When first beginning to do research and

practise aromatherapy,

find out .

what

will

work best

it

is

useful to

for you.

(PJTpio t>y

Maty Sknrmm)

CAMBRIDGE

is

Automobile

that a hat should

clothing.

it

best to turn back or seek shelter in

a

good

bad weather,

monoxide poison-

Canadian

Association

also a

sary.

window

ing.

The

is

cell-

Know the route you are taking and inform whoever you are visiting your expected arrival time so you can be searched for if neces-

Ivginncrs

tor

lips

move

If attempts to

you do not have a

Moving legs, feet and hands to keep blood circulating is also a good idea.

area.

your car

between

pei fnme.s or fra

gests that

unsuccessful

decision. niere

Inhalation.

.Absoiption

trips.

If

It could happen to anyone. Driving home from school for Christmas, your car suddenly dies on a rural road, leaving you alone

1

I Ingestion. This method is potcnually dangerous and should

will turn lo

This method allows the molecules to enlet the body thiough the capillaries sup plying the rcspiratoiy oigans I

road

luted

I Don’l buy use

lo

essential oils.

I

edition of a on winter car

the final

helpful if

two ways

jisychological and phy sical. There,

is

three-part series

other motorists to call police

Ministry of Transportation sug-

.Some F.ssenlial oils

This

do

you to call for help when needed, and to check in with family on long

safety.

Aecoiding to inibnnalion found on the Web site www.art)often used

be

never

thus enciHiragiiig the liody to heal

for pleasiiie.

maweb eoni.

Tori Sutton

applied to the skin in their undi-

K'.al

iii

should

Oils

— Page 9

slide off the road stay with vehicle

added, by applying the oils to the

a nuluiai \\a\

is

you

If

By

Arofiiathcrapv

2001

Tips teach you what to when you are stranded

Calm mind, body and spirit By Mary Simmons

26,

622-7774

415 HESPELER RD (ACROSS FROM McDONALDS)

KITCHENER

893-2464

385 FAIRWAY RD. S. (CANADIAN TIRE PLAZA)

KITCHENER

744-1 011

370 HIGHLAND RD. W. (FOOD BASICS PLAZA)

mTERLOO 402 KING

ST. N.

884-7376

(BESIDE BURGER KING


— SPOKE, Nov.

Page 10

26, 2001

time for students to ‘come out’

It’s By Daniel Roth

She looked around the room with disappointment.

not well attended because just one workshop is too generalized. "What we have decided is to sep-

Shelley Seerett, 28, a second-year early childhood education student,

bian,

bisexual

(GLBT)

She assumed at

and transgendered

students.

the meeting

"coming

the poor attendance

was due

said.

she said.

Seerett

meaning

there are around

who was

it

are

popular

is

that

inspired to

who want a coming because

think the people

held in the counselling office,”

she said.

“The people who want the supmay not be coming because we

have advertised

GLBT students

thing to help fellow

more comfortable coming

The

it

as a social event.”

solution Seerett

an online message board

out.

to get as

many people

remember how alone I felt when I first made this new discov-

involved in social events for

feel

‘T

“I

remembered

to tell

my

my

best

dkhector@yahoo.com

at

the

Web

Seerett started to

work with Barb

a counsellor for Student

Services, in hopes of designing an

awareness group for

GLBT

stu-

dents.

Seerett thinks the

ple that

stuff in

common

“Through meeting those people you can find out about what else is going oh in Kitchener.” Seerett explains

some of the perks

of the message board. think

"I

message board

the

is

going to be key.”

good support, one another around campus, if there are any issues that might come “I think it’s really

for

up.”

She

is

also excited about the con-

venience and accessibility of the to advertise

my e-mail

which is already on posters around the school, and then they can find out how to address,

become a member through me,” she said.

workshop was

you have

with,” she said.

to locate

site.

“I’m going

friends.”

Kraler,

GLBT

Students interested can e-mail her

feeling horrified

parents or even

as possible

students.

ery about myself,” she said.

they are not familiar with

“I think the college is a perfect

came up with

is to start

to

cities,”

ing other people.

port

do some-

of students here

lot

place to network and try to find peo-

“We it’s

to

what services are available for meet-

may

want.

500

GLBT.

was

wasn’t offering the social

social event aren’t

Conestoga’s student enrolment statistically

because

wasn’t

new

are

help as possible

have moved from other

“And

Seerett thinks another reason the

to a fear of

out.”

“There’s a

who

workshop

much

to feel comfortable.

social

aspect she thinks the students

just over 5,000 people

students

into a

who

people

the area as

group and a support group,” she

was one of only two students who attended a workshop for gay, les-

workshop

the

arate

GLBT

Seerett feels

it

important to offer

message board. “With everyone’s schedules being so busy it’s hard to go out. “But it’s so easy to post a message to see what’s going on and be able to let people know about events.

Second-year early childhood education student Shelley Seerett inspired to create an online message board for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered students at Conestoga College.

was

(Photo by Daniel Roth)

“My

goal

avenue

is

to give people

meeting

for

an

on

others

campus,” she said. “And to awareness of events.”

name

You’re Fired not just a clever By Laurie Vandenhoff

after

working together

pottery store.

They

at

started a

ceram-

Walking into 9 Douglas St. you might notice the unique pottery that is on display. Or maybe the flashy

program there, but became restless knowing that they could do better, said Callan. “So we left and

colours adorning the walls. Perhaps it’s the relaxing music that catches

here

your attention. Whatever entices you to enter, you immediately feel at home in this cozy ceramics shop, cleverly titled “You’re Fired.” Located in downtown Guelph, it has found its niche in the unique

While preparing to enter their busiest season the duo often prepares and fires 500 pieces

atmosphere bestowed on

ing,” said Callan.

this area

that boasts vegetarian cafes, classy

ics

we

are.”

two

friends.

of pottery each week.

The concept of ple.

“The business

the store is

is

sim-

pottery paint-

consignment shops and ethnic gro-

and choose a piece of pottery and decide how they would like to

cery stores.

paint

Nanci Pounder and Susan Callan started the business four years ago

When

finished, they leave

be fired and glazed and can pick it up several days later. it

the perfect item to give to

someone

special.

do are gifts,” said Callan, “because you can easily convince yourself that you need to have a gift for someone,” as opposed to-painting something for yourself.

Customers can choose from nearly 200 ready-made pottery pieces, with

to

much of it

seasonal.

“Flowerpots, thermometers, bird

and rocks are huge for the summer,” Callan said. However, as summer ends, differ-

hour adult parties for people who want to get together with friends. Refreshments and music are encouraged and patrons only pay

finished pieces so they can get

Customers can also generate form patterns, stencils, stamps and photos of pieces done by other people. Seeing other peoples’ work gives customers a real sense of what can be accomplished, opposed to an ideal sense, ideas

whqn

it’s

They also host birthday parties, which are huge, explained Callan. The pair also attends events outside the store. Generally, they

sort of is

a lot

they bring the pottery with them

something

visi-

is

and deliver the finished pieces

ent items are arriving to

accommo-

date the cold weather. Teapots, can-

warm and cozy

for the

is in

comes

it

to

Christmas

(is

popular),”

buy.”

customers

excited about

new

“Stock rotates

“Some

are

often

items coming

all

things

lime,”

the

we

in.

she

haven’t car-

and we try them because people might be interested in them again.” ried for a couple of years

Local suppliers create the pottery. “This

is

a full-time jt)b for about

four different companies,” Callan said.

The

pottery

arrives

looking

rough and edgy, but is sanded, sponge cleaned and fired to prepare it

for painting.

“Talent the

store also offer

is

store’s

optional.”

brochure.

proclaims

Still,

feel intimidated blank canvas stiuing back

many

by at

the

them.

Many elements are in place throughout the store to inspire the from within.

For some people

p()ttery painting

Guelph Lake’s

at

Music

“People do the painting there and we bring pieces back to fire and they

store,” said Callan.

expectations.

Hillside

Festival operating a booth.

also paint pieces to

Pounder will meet customer

to

Callan and Pounder can also be

painting. Callan and

come

to pick

them up

at the

All of these activities keep them

“Custom painting

for people

busy, sometimes working 80 hours

who don’t want to paint, don’t think they can paint or have. a very

a week. However, Callan said she enjoys working because there is so

idea of what they want

done,” said Callan.

much variety. “You’re painting one day, and then you’re glazing

However, most people find painting very relaxing and gratify-

that

is

ing. On any day you could walk in and find someone sitting alone, diligently working on an item. According to a ceramics article on the aggie-horticulture educa-

tional

Web

“archaeologists

site,

Then cleaning the pottery comes in and traveling out to school groups. So there is always the next.

something different

However, degree

talent is

done

response.”

two-month

limit

on

a

finishing

people have taken 20 hours to complete an item, most want gratification.

Pottery painting

opportunity

a

while Callan’s self-taught. “I’ve always

crafts

and taken courses

in

public and high schools,” she said,

“A lot is trial and error. We have a basement full of pieces that are not our best work.” Downstairs is also where they do adding,

is

pieces, but the average person finishes in one sitting. While some

immediate

Pound does have

in fine arts,

the beginning of pottery, and people seem to relate to it an emotional

to do.”

Their training came from their previous job in ceramics.

define the start of civilization with

Callan pointed out that there

people

creativity

workshops

teach the basics of pottery

specific

Regular

said.

The that

visit

school classes or university residences once a week. In these cases

said Callan, adding, “it

easier

for the pottery they paint.

seen

said Callan, adding, “we can never guess what people are going to

(Photo by Laurie Vandenhoff)

together. You’re Fired offers after-

For some customers it can take up to an hour to pick out a piece and create a design.

“When

Guelph.

said

customers.

absolutely anything

St.,

eoncept,

them some of the

ble.”

winter season, she said.

located at 9 Douglas

We show

feeders, patio lights

thing

Callan, co-owner of You’re Fired ceramics lounge and gift emporium, displays one of the larger pieces created at her store

a foreign

still

Callan.

learning by seeing, which

dleholders, candlesticks and any-

Susan

is

started.

“Three-quarters of the stuff peo-

Customers come

in

it.

individual thought and care goes into each piece makes it

that

ple

Business could not be better for the

The

another

raise

for

is

also a great

friends

to

relax

and glazing. After being each piece is given a glaze that must dry first. So far they have two kennels for firing. Pieces are stacked on shelves and the firing

painted,

heated inside for several hours.


SPOKE, Nov.

26, 2001

— Page

IJL

Resource centre helps parents By Marcy Cabral

Mullins is in her 12th year at the centre and attributes the longevity

Do you need a break from parenting?

Are you

of having no one to turn to for help? The ParentChild Resource Centre may be just tired

what you need. Salvation

Located

Army

in

the

building at 75

Tillsley Dr., the resource centre is

ready and willing to help, either through supervised childcare or specially focused parenting work-

shops.

The centre was established .

in

and overall success of the program teamwork, a dedicated staff and devoted volunteers. “We have one mom who came in

coffee break while their children are being supervised by the centre staff.

to old-fashioned

with her child as an infant, who is now 16 and she (the mom) still vol-

Mullins believes

this

program

is

beneficial for slowly detaching chil-

dren from mothers in preparation for the child’s school years.

Other Nobody’s

workshops

include

So we come complete circle with some families,” she said. The mission statement of the

Controlling the Volcano, directed by

Parent-Child Resource Centre is to strengthen families in the commu-

Nutritious Kitchen, a

unteers.

nity

by offering programs

that

meet

Perfect, sponsored

by the

Community Health Department,

K-W

Counselling

and workshop on

Services

on a budget.

eating healthy

1988 by Beverley Voisin, the cur-

the practical, emotional and spiritu-

rent

program director, who believed it was necessary for par-

needs of parents and their children. The centre strives to achieve

Playschool Program for children up

ents to receive essential life-long

this

goal by offering valuable pro-

run like a typical daycare where the

parenting skills while having their children supervised by qualified

grams such

She also deemed it appropriate to gear the program towards low-income single mothers, so the program itself had to be of little or no cost. Today, parents can participate in workshops for either $10 per month or $2 per sesindividuals.

sion.

Since the centre’s inception thousands of children and families have

passed through to

its

doors, according

Pamela Mullins, child-care co-

women

as the

“We started out with one lady and one child in 1988 and now we servand 30

to

40 moms

per year,” she said.

support

group.

age of

to the

moms

the centre

at

The

six.

the

is

playschool. is

children have free playtime, circle time,

“It offers

structured

special

activities

an opportunity to have a safe environment for their

such as painting and they receive a nutritious snack supplied by the cen-

children and to get out and meet

tre.

other parents and

know

they’re not

alone,” Mullins said.

This

program allows meet other parents experiencing the same frustrations and successes, participate in crafts and share resources and information through workshop and discussion

women

The programs offered by the resource centre are intended to assist

specific

and benefit

to

outside help.

groups.

in today’s

parents looking for'

all

Mullins believes that

society of single-parent

families, divorced families, etc.,

Tots Drop-In program

Moms and lets moms

play with their children and partic-

it is

perfectly acceptable for parents to

home for help.

look outside the

“Generation wise our

The Friday morning

ordinator.

ice 125 children

al

Also offered

moms

never

ipate in crafts, but then allows the

lems.

how

on

building

time on Nov.

OK

it’s

went out to work because people were able to get by on one income and you didn’t talk about your prob-

mothers to step away and have a

Children at the Parent-Child Resource Centre

Army

to

1

was honoured

“I

award, but

Conestoga College faculty

mem-

ber Geoff Johnstone was presented

with the Student Life

Award

at the

cheat,” said Johnstone. “It’s almost

have made 2,000 of awards and given them

ask for outside help

instead of always asking

out to

In order to receive the Student

years.

all

I

the students and soccer

feel

I

have had over the it

is

way

the other

Life Award, one of the college’s

around.

Employee Recognition Awards,

dents) have enriched

one must demonstrate a significant contribution above and beyond the normal requirements of their posi-

love being involved with them.”

I

feel that they

my

(the stulife,

and

1

dad,” she said.

looked upon as a

is

leader both on and off the field.

“The

integral part of today’s

is

greatest thing about coach-

not just the athletic aspect,” said

as minor, Johnstone attends union

Johnstone.

meetings monthly to discuss problems faculty in his department have with the contract. On top of that, Johnstone is also an education facilitator. He takes on 14 new teachers every three years, where they participate in three faculty development sessions. “We do this to improve the teaching level at the school,” he

said he

always available to

is

work with students outside whether

classroom,

the

involves

it

schoolwork or just the need to talk to someone. Serving as a mentor,

ber of student athletes, as well as

the reasons Johnstone received this

his

division.

As

counsellor,

friend;

the

award. But these are just

the

his

head indoor and outdoor soccer coach at Conestoga for 30 years and the first varsity women’s soc-

many

coach,

some of

contributions

to

the

school and students at Conestoga.

He

also

security

at the school,

executive

ment an individual has given to the college and its students. John Tibbits, president of Conestoga College, presented the award to Johnstone.

Academic Support

become an community.

said.

coaching

what most people think of when his name is mentioned. If you career

is

can’t find

him in his olfice, you’re him hanging somewhere

sure to find

around the recreation centre. Johnstone always remembers his hero and former Liverpool soccer coach Bill Shankly saying, “Some people think soccer

is

a matter of life

and death. I’m very disappointed their

attitude.

important than

by

1

think

that.”

it’s

Johnstone

faculty

lives

which to him means that soccer and coaching is an ingrained part of your lifestyle. “1 this quote,

love to see players develop, not just

But despite

all

of Johnstone’s con-

as players but as people,” he said.

liaison

committee, which lets the students have input on their program in order to enhance facilitator for the

it.

He

is

also a

student assess-

ment committee, where he helps

to

l®’'"

design the forms that students are given

to

evaluate

performance.

“It’s

their

teacher’s

very important.

It has always been a great feedback mechanism,” said Johnstone. “It’s a way to improve or make changes to

Su, Buds

THIS ENTITLES THE

STUDENT BEARER TO 10% OFF THE PURCHASE OF ANY REGULAR PRICED MERCHANDISE

10 % Off

our programs.”

One of

on your

Johnstone’s most impor-

accomplishments and contributions to Conestoga is the introduction to sociology textbook he co-wrote with Kathryn Bauer. The book is titled. Sociology in Canadian Society and is used in many courses at Conestoga and throughout colleges in Ontario. “My aim was to make it readable,”

Grad

Suit,

Prom

Suit, Interview Suit,

<3

whatever the occasion

tant

Geoff Johnstone, teacher and soccer coach at Conestoga College, received the Outstanding Contribution to Student Life Award at the annual Guild Reception in the blueroom on Nov. 7. (Photo by Vanessa Laye)

said Johnstone.

are

beyond the

“Some

level

textbooks

of the reader.”

The book was published

three

years ago, and he has already writ-

in

more

law and

the

initiated

student

Award tributions, his outstanding

development process and

total

outstanding service and commit-

years of teaching in

ten a shorter version of the book.

In addition to helping students

teacher and academic adviser were

31

Life

he also devotes his time to his co-workers. Although he sees his role as a union steward

father,

order to allow them to

independence as individuals, and

cer coach, he

He

raising the self-esteem of children in

and they didn’t know

also recognizes the

The award

and

Back then people didn’t know

to parent

According to Tibbits, Johnstone was chosen primarily for his tremendous effect on a large num-

tion.

mom

For more information on pro-

of a

players that

(Photo by Marcy Cabral)

grams, volunteer information or the centre itself, call 745-4241.

these

on Nov.

the Salvation

a not-for-profit organization working to give parents freedom and

ing at the college isfhat you’re part

little

in

as part of free play

crafts

The Parent-Child Resource Centre

like I should

college’s annual Guild Reception 7.

to receive the

feels like a bit of a

it

make

3.

Soccer coach receives Student By Vanessa Laye

Tillsley Drive,

Conestoga Mall 747-1290

sims

Fairview Mall

894-0770

MEN'S SHOPS

213 King

St.

W., 744-5271

NOT VALID ON SALK MLRCHANDISE. NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER PROMOTION.

ONE VOUCHER PER COMBINATION

OEEER VALID AT THE ABOVE LOCATIONS


Page 12

— SPOKE, Nov.

26, 2001

News Medicine used wisely

By Marcy Cabral The purpose of ty is to

when know

Lauckner, a

a tiay-care facili-

take care of children, and

children

are

involved you

medicine

that

isn’t

far

behind.

Conestoga's six child-care

'At

Doon

day-care staff

member. Also on the forms for staff

members

to

scription

and

non-prescription

However, for each day medicabe dispensed parents are required to fill out a new form

a location

keep track of

dose, and a reason for the medication,

according

to

Evelyn

receiving

fact

the

Any medication day-care facility

brought into the

is

to

and

be

in its orig-

They are to include the date, time and amount of dosage as well as

safely out of reach of children.

who

a locked cupboard and for refriger-

administered the medication.

is

close eye on them.” Evelyn Lauckner, day-care staff

and

staff

members

to

communicate

with one another and ensure chil-

watches the children,

By Julianna Kerr

Lauckner said. “We keep a really close eye on

effects,

As

the publication deadline for

main kitchen

Although the day care allows the administration of non-prescription

drugs they also reserve the right to

zine editor

members

are also instruct-

decide not to administer

in full

a lock box

said.

Staff

ed to watch If

staff

room,” Lauckner

is

for

possible

them.”

However, the

side

made

effects.

This safety precaution allows

The

in the infant

in the fridge in the

really

scribed medication.

connects alumni Conestoga’s alumni magazine Connections fast approaches, alumni services officer and maga-

ated medication there

“We keep a

the administration of the non-pre-

constantly looking for possible side

room we have

“In each activities

and will inform parents before changing doses or ceasing ification

then placed

inal container

name of medication,

amount per dosage, time of each

in

doses.

tion is to

specifying the

are

required dosages. is

centres staff administer both pre-

drugs.

dren

Magazine

any are detected, the child-care

staff will contact the

Community

Health Department for further clar-

in

child-care

final

decision

consultation staff,

it.

with

is

the

and the Community Health Department.

is

sources,” she said.

Connections borrows from col-

the day-care super-

visor,

Monica Himmelman

swing preparing the edition. “The articles come from various

guest writers and

lege alumni,

sometimes

pub-

already

articles

lished in other local magazines or

newspapers.

“There is quite a bit of interest around the college,” she said, “and often various departments or people will ask to have an article published regarding their areas.”

The mission of Connections is to Conestoga graduates

keep

DO you NEED A PEER TUTOR?

informed. a non-political information

“It is

magazine,”

Himmelman

attempt. to

let

graduates

F4U. SEMESTER DEADLINE

THE LAST DAY TO APPLY FOR A PEER TUTOR

^

know what

is

open

IS:

to graduates r

“It is also

keep

a vehicle for alumni to

in touch with us

'f

us

let

she said.

Connections provides an oppor-

2001

tunity for alumni to offer feedback

on issues of

interest or concern.

Himmelman is

preparing an

said

a big investment of time.

“It is really

^

and

in their lives,”

an ongoing process,”

she said. “As soon as $ S' ^ ^ ^

happening

She said Connections also helps alumni keep in touch with each other and increases awareness about events, services and benefits

issue

DON’T DELAY

“We

currently at Conestoga.”

know about changes

MONDAY DECEM&ER

said.

of our 33,000

all

APPLY

we

get an

idea or suggestion for the maga-

we

zine,

put

it

it

er

one issue put

is

and

in a file folder

save

No

for a future issue. to

soon-

bed then

we

are planning for the next one, or

TUTORS WILL NOT BE ASSIGNED AFTER

DEADUNE DATt.

maybe even have to do

the one after that.”

Himmelman

Luckily,

all

the

doesn’t

work on her own.

“I get all kinds of help with the magazine,” she said. “Informally, I

get help from the readers and contributors.”

Other helpers include an editoriboard made up of volunteer alumni who work in the media, and a strong group of volunteers around the college. al

Himmelman

said the entire cost

Connections has been funded by alumni services in the

to publish

changing.

past, but times are

“Recently

we have had

amount of income

to help

these costs by selling tising

to

external

a small

reduce

some adver-

partners

who

offer services or benefits to our

alumni.”

VISIT STUDENT SERVICES (ROOM 2B02)

INFORMATION AND TO APPLY

FOR MORE

Connections

is

published every

year in January and June. The

magazine’s

first

issue

was pub-

lished in June 1989.

Himmleman

has been the editor

since she joined alumni services in 1998.

Her debut issue was pub-

lished in January 1999.

Although the magazine

is

written

primarily for Conestoga’s alumni, it

is

circulated to

all

and students as well.

current staff


4

SPOKE, Nov.

Students By Denis Langlois

ing

of security

when After the terrorist attacks on Sept.

and the crash of Flight 587 in Queens, N.Y., many travellers are taking alternate forms of trans1 1

said flying

“Flying has always been the

way

portation or cancelling their trips altogether.

States

Because

of

more attacks occur. “I would fly if I had to,” she said. “My only concern would be getting if

travel

change

he

engineering

never have been.

automated man-

is

to

Second-year law and security student Clayton South said he trusts

Conestoga

the security at airports to stop ter-

before

College

rorists before they

they

still

flying

is

The

better

than

it

safe.

Canadians when flying,” he said, adding that planes are the safest method of travel.

student

number of deaths

split.

Luc Matheson,

show

resulting

the

from

a first-year gener-

car accidents are higher than those

business student, said the recent

caused by airplanes.” Tracy Drohan, a fourth-year busi-

attacks have

no impact on

his feel-

Women

in

ufacturing

was

dent

Craig

Gabriel

Orantes questions the safety of

self,”

planes.

adding

he

said

security

and

it

the

mechanics

problems with flying before. “I haven’t had any troubles and I think Canadians are fairly safe

are not very reli-

when

it

comes

to flying,”

he

said.

ward

to similar get-togethers.

Participants

What do women do when

they

get together for an informal lunch? If

a brown bag lunch held for

women

their

shared

experiences in

she

stories their

of

male-

dominated programs.

Two students shared their experiences at their co-op terms in the

technology programs at Conestoga College on Nov. 14 is any indication, they laugh, talk and

summer. While Diane Lama said her work term was an awesome,

share stories about their lives.

although stressful,

Although the turnout was low only six students were in attendance out of the approximately 100 female

Lisa Miller said

in

work experience, her placement was

a disappointment. Fortunately, she

the

was the only person she knew of in her section who had a bad experience at her workplace.

did attend said they

Margaret Banman, a first-year

enjoyed themselves and looked for-

electrical engineering student, said

students enrolled in the school of

technology

women who

at

the

college

-

related she

is

attempting to

is

on

air-

government

make them more

secure.

“The are

Orantes

still

security

better but they

is

not as safe as they should

be.”

make

college

to

the

She said she lunch because she

less stressful By Derek Lester

Just sit back. Breathe, fake a sip

interest.

ot Siruwberry

The lunch was held reason according Biederman, a faculty

Being

for just that to

Julia

member who

ran be stress-

in colloae

sional break,

with larger turnouts. She also discussed plans to bring in women

over worked and become imuc ol an enemy instead of a liiend.

who are in the industry to speak with female students about their experiences in the workforce.

thing that will

your brain

Fveryone needs an

out.

some

your mind

fiee

also helps that

selection

iiy

whatever

don't

1

mind

usually depicted

is

mood

am

1

in

on a

certain day.

Between Me and You, hip-hop would be my last choice to listen

Fm

to because

not really into

Way I Am. am also not too big on listening

thaL but that’s just The

pop music, but It Doesn’t Really if

When

it is

on

I listen

my Play to

it,

I

list.

wish

did

I

A Bottle to come me from my homework, am never that Lucky.

have a Genie In rescue but

Diane Lama, Lisa Miller, Margaret Banman, Julia Biederman and Karen attended the women in technology brown bag lunch on Nov. 1 (Photo by Mary Simmons)

I

However, taking a break from it all makes me Stronger, and I can complete the task at hand. The music that I usually listen to is rock, punk and to really change things up, 1 listen to country.

Listening to rock music helps

me

stay

getting frustrated,

am Amazed

1

at

how

relaxing

music can be, and I Could Not .Ask I or More, Listening to music gives me No F'eai and A Little Gasoline so I can I'irive on and get ray work done baldly ever see my roommates

1

doing their homework, which

me think I am in the Minority and it turns me into a

makes

relax.

rny

to

you arc Helplessly, Hopelessly

if

will get

long enough for you to lecupeiale and lelieve your suess. 'Foi rne, listening to music has ill ways been a good way to help

Matter

listen to

You Can’t Fight The Moonlight

You know you h.isc to get your work done, but without an occa-

I

Wine and

youi

ful at limes.

helped organize the event. She said she would like to see more events

.

financial backing

Despite D’Antonio’s dislike for

listening to any typeol music, but

Rittinger

not

enough

the only female in her sec-

wanted to find othet- women who were taking courses of similar

left,

that

Let music

It

Dusome,

said,

planes, she admits the

Orantes is hopeful things

me

Jaclyn

she

is

able either.”

tion of her program.

came

planes

planes.

appears

technology

and

there

bad

is

he would travel by air because he has not experienced any personal

share experiences at lunch By Mary Simmons

“The

said.

a fourth-year

not

are

now

“I think

know anymore,” Drohan

airports

were created by the devil him-

stu-

“I really don’t

security

Newman

first-

now

First-year law

and

“Statistics continue to

got there.”

attacks.

ing measures to ensure the safety of

survey,

I

the

think

conducted on Nov. 14, indicates people’s opinions of flying are

al

tak-

planes

security

Spoke

is

nation,

their

she thinks

events,

“The federal government

co-op student, agreed that

to

safe

airport

dents to ask if

ing

favourite desti-

after

Deanna D’ Antonio,

year mechanical

said.

board airplanes.

business administration accounting

better

their security.

also

recent

stu-

planes and fly-

get

improve

after

these

went

will

Drohan said

South

.

Although some people are not concerned about boarding air-

back home

doesn’t that,”

also

safe but worries about

getting trapped in another country

to

and what happened in the

is

— Page 13

airline safety

ness administration student,

flying.

safest

on

split

26, 2001

Awake and

fee!

less

Jaded.

Basket Case. lh.ii

I

am

starting to

Bad Habit and

Self Esteem.

control

end

my

keep the Faith that alter ray break I will be One Step Closer to completing ray work. Why Don’t You Get A Job is not the question I want to answer Right Now because college is suppose to be the Time Of Your Life, and 1 guess homework is all a part of going to college. 1 think 1 have Got The Life as of now, but I can’t be Blind to the fact that I need to get my schoolI

just

work done. I am certainly not a Leader Of Men for My Generation, but 1 like

to

do things

No

My

Way.

It

Makes

me how

you spend your spare time, but if It’s Been Awhile since you’ve Difference to

achieved a good mmlt on a paper.

You Never Know, this method might work for you as well. Listening to music gives me the

Doing school work can Drag You Down, and if you have to do more when you get home, it can make for A Hard Day’s Night as

Eye Of The Tiger to Raise A Little Hell on my keyboard, and it seems to take me less time In The

well.

End.

If you find yourself Hanging

A

Moment

with your

By

homework

and you feel like you want to Break Stuff, throw on some music, and make things less Complicated.

would like to take a break any time during your homework sessions, maybe some of the songs 1 have mentioned in this column could help you Free your mind like they do for me. If you

at


Xbox competes against GameCube By

Tori Sutton

when

the system

This

in use.

is

is

not a system you can stick on top of

The month of November has been exeitin^ for hardeore gamers with the laimeh of two new gaming and Mi''n«oft's Xbox. So which systeni should students be hoping ‘to see under the tree this year? It is hard to

hype

alter the massive

tell

both systems iiave received.

which

that

commands

The GameCube smaller

of

GameCube

definitely the

is

two

the

systems.

only 5.9 inches wide

is

and 6.3 inches deep, allowing

for

cramped room or

easier storage in a

apartment. This system also offers

System Specs The Xbox,

one

stereo, but

wall unit.

GameCube

Nintendo’s

systems;

your

control of an entire shelf in your

consumers

more

when

choice

for

selecting the colour of the system,

approximately $450, is a multimedia device which runs off an Intel

offering black and purple versions.

i^331VIHz processor

and

is

equipped

also

It

it

The Xbox

DVD play-

is

also a

is

equipped with a

a built-in carry-

Control

Xbox

umt.

Playstation?,

comes with

ing strap.

NVIDIA graphics processMuch like the

with a ing

er.

retails

offers controllers in only

one colour, black with small coloured highlights on the buttons.

allows gamers to save directly to

Because the Xbox is a multimedia device, a DVD remote is offered

the system without having to pur-

(retailing at

hard

internal

large

drive,

which

memory cards. However. GameCube ($299)

approximately $52).

However, the GameCube has a

chase additional

is

selection of controller colours to

gaming device equipped with a 485 MHz processor. Unlike the Xbox. it contains no internal

controller of an orange colour they

strictly a

memory so the player must, save game information on separate memory cards which retail for $30. Both systems have four controller

more players

ports to allow ticipate in

games.

Appearance systems sum up

Both

appearance

their

in

Xbox GameCube is a Microsoft fairly

to par-

large

as

well as a

call “Spice”. I

honestly found the orange con-

be hard on the eyes and

troller to

not very esthetically appealing.

The GameCube has what

I found be a superior controller to the Xbox for one simple reason; size. I

to

that the

system

players,

I

Game Boy

and

a

heavy with ridges and a giant lime green logo on top. There is also an LED screen that glows bright green

troller was uncomfortable for me, even in the short time I was playing the machine. Although Microsoft has made it

clear in

its

marketing campaign

starring one of biggest characters,

in the works.

reach the buttons on the upper right-hand side of the Xbox con-

is

to appeal to their target mar-

2002, Dead or Alive

sure

As an added

names. The

Xbox

games

trollers.

is

black

at older

Games range from sports to combat. Titles like NFL Frenzy

vring around the dual joysticks to

cube.

geared

with smaller hands will have a hard time with the size of the con-

am

their

system,

is

Nintendo’s and a Star Wars game. Plans to develop more maturely themed games are

and manoeu-

have, small hands,

a box, and the

is

match the system,

young children

GameCube Nintendo’s new

feature,

compatible with

Advance, a handheld

gaming unit. The Game Boy Advance can be hooked up to the

GameCube and used

as a controller.

Games made

Microsoft

sure the

Xbox

had an adequate amount of mature

ket for the system’s release.

3, Halo and Shrek were released with the sys-

tem.

On the other hand, Nintendo pushed back many of the titles that were supposed to be released on the same day as the system. However, Nintendo did release some games which are sure to be a hit such as Luigi’s Mansion,

Certainly both these systems pack a punch of brilliant graphics and sound. However, it may be too early to tell which system is superior. Over time the strengths and weaknesses of both systems will surface, which may help in deciding which system to take home.

Utopia event attracts sponsors galore By Nicole Childs

Gran Caribe

foosball but found that the tables

ing the fish that will be featured

at

and Wes Mcleod. who come togeth-

el

agency, has provided promotion-

would have

the event.

er to create L'eau, will be providing

al

items such as pens and briefcas-

make

able to

Beechy hopes he will be give the fish away but is

music for Utopia. Other sponsors include the Conestoga Food Bank, Mike’s Hard Lemonade. United Way. The Brick and Conestoga Health. CBSA will be at the event selling chocolate-covered almonds for $2 and Walksafe members will be on hand to help out.

Plans for Utopia are underway and more and more sponsors are

es.

lending a hand.

know

Utopia,

which

is

a

Conestoga

Students Inc. event, will be held

Nov. 29

in the

Sanctuary.

hotels group, a trav-

The agency wants that

it

the world to

supports freedom and

the principles of Utopia.

Tim Hortons celebration of

will be involved in

grand opening

its

at

it

to be tilted in order to

free.

Beechy hopes to see members from the Canadian Armed Forces at

unsure at this time.

the event in traditional

radio

The Cambridge forms.

kilt

uni-

recruiting office out of is

providing a surprise

CJIQ FM. Conestoga College's has provided free and many other stu-

station,

advertising

dents have supported the event by

John Beechy, communications officer for the Computer and Business Students Association (CBSA), is working with

Conestoga College and Beechy hopes to give away a free trip from Breakaway Tours. The event will feature free pool,

donation for the event.

they have provided pencil cases,

nalism student

Cone.stoga Students Inc. (CSI) for

prizes including Buffalo Bills items

information pamphlets and high-

providing free tarot card readings

and snacks such as They had hoped

lighters.

Utopia

this

event and

is

finding a

lot

of

support.

pretzels. to provide free

Canada Trust

TD

volunteering their time and helping

Waterhouse

is

another supporter of the event;

Aquarium Services

will be provid-

out.

Daniel Roth, a second-year jourat

Conestoga, will be

in the quiet

at

room.

the

If

you are planning

event, security

is

ple to park in the

Dave Newman. Dave Shepherd

to attend the

encouraging peo-

Green

lot

beside

the recreation centre.

Locals flock to see Santa Claus parades By Tannis Wade

glimpse of Santa. The sun was shining brightly all morn-

to catch a

Santa Claus came to town a early

this

year.

He was

in

little

the

ing, but the crisp feeling

come was

to

Kitchener- Waterloo area twice over

Christmas

weekend. His first stop was the Santa Claus Parade in Kitchener, which halted traffic along King Street, it started in Waterloo at about 10 a.m. and fin-

the

the Nov. 17

ished in Kitchener

at

arouiul noon.

For the

Jaycccs.

dren ran about the streets waiting

definitely in

is

floats.

made

Sesame

women aged 18-40. in commu-

Wilma

an active lole

can be useful to them

in their

lives.

organize

“Fveryonc involveil

in

the the

Burck

Steve

parade.

chapter

with the event to

is

some

marching band. Even an version

rap

Children got to

of

a

with

visit

Street characters, Fred F'lintstone, all

screamed are

member

.laycee

a

and of the seven

dwarfs and even the Grinch. They degree or another.” he said, "'fhere

some people who look

floats that

and special entries

look

aftei'

characters.”

lavourite

as

after

Some even just to give

costumed

saw

they

characters

aiul others

bands and someone

solely responsible for the

smiled and waved Christmas."

and

Christmas song was heard. A wide assortment of cartoon characters walked the streets alongside the

nity projects in order to learn skills that

with a wide

formed, as well as traditional carol-

occasional

years residents

41

service group

up of men and

helps

toil-

aiul chil-

last

The

Parents carried their infants,

danced and wavctl

was

filled the air

offering

ers,

have enjoyed attending the annual Saiita Claus Paratle put on by the

'I'hey take

dlers

The

air.

second appearance was in Cambridge for their annual parade, which started at 6 p.m. King Street was flooded with viewers from young to old. His

spirit

of winter

evident.

still

Music

range of tunes. Steel bands per-

ran out into the street

them a hug.

appearance

in

the.

the

at

a

crowd "Merry

Local high schools, sports teams

and businesses entered Boats

in the

Groups ineluded Factory

parade.

Shoe, the

YMCA

of Kitehener, the

Red Cross, and Canada Post. The energy level was through

the

roof as high school cheerleaders

performed stunts and Hips along the parade route.

Burek said the same groups usucome back each year with

ally

or general

floats

entries

for

the

parade.

Kitchener mayor Carl Zehr an

their

approaching.

everyone

made

parade

as

well. Rilling in a Jaycees Jeej) he

Some began

preparation for the parade

right after last year's parade,

but really got going in August.


.

SPOKE, Nov.

flick Cinema

Farrely brothers

not worth the

doctors recommerid a daily intake of

Picture Show on Halloween night. The audience dresses up as their favourite characters from the movie and sings and

culture?

dances along.

Did you know

Irwin

Shallow Hal had

it all.

Shallow characters, shallow shallow

plot,

script.

Here’s two words That’s what

shallow end.

-

wanted to dive into while I was watching it. Shallow Hal, starring Jack Black as Hal and Gwyneth Paltrow as Rosemary, is a comedy about a man

he

who

her appearance.

woman and

looks of a

immediately

per-

sonality.

While on

death bed, Hal’s

his

makes

nine-year-old

the

to never settle for an average woman. So, Hal always chased gorgeous women.

Tony

explains

how

he’s in a

women. Robbins his

problem

is

Robbins,

tells

looks.

He

“She’s

slump with what him he will

Hal

with

is

are

Shallow Hal was predictable, with maybe half a dozen funny parts, which were all in the commercials.

otherwise never be shown in our

He

screamed.

was made by

countries

the

and

hilarious

all

the

woman’s

way

to her

Funny?

I

didn’t really think so

Quite predictably, Hal loves

Hal begins having better luck with women, never knowing

loses girl

even

expected big things from the writers of my favourite comedies

viewed by a new audience. “It does take ingenuity and resourcefulness to keep a small art cinema happening, but we have been successful for

Dumb

and Dumber, Me, Myself and Irene, Kingpin and There’s Something About Mary. But, the funny boys were the exact opposite

it,

way.

not the only one to feel

My

after

roommate

In

either.

girl,

and tries to get girl back, he is snapped out of his

WHAT DO YOU MEAN

didn’t like

because of the $7 she spent on admission and there weren’t many

we

vacated

Deuce

laugh, I thought

Bigalow, Male Gigolo and Scary hilarious.

Shallow Hal

more

is

Adam

like

it’s

By

Daniel Roth

it is

ner.

2,

2001

spoil you.

March 21

April

-

A

come

to the best

small argument

Leo: July 23

You may

-

May

is

make

sure you

20

April

-

will

of attention

November

Virgo: August 23

Greyhound Bus

25%

week.

this

A

and Student Class™ Not to mention the hundreds of other discounts across Canada and 10,000 discounts worldwide that you get with the ISIC card. To get your ISIC, show your full-time student I.D. at Travel CUTS and start saving now! tickets,

They

S

You

vz

,

t

f

a V e

yniversity

i

c

u

t

s

May

21

-

are about to take

170 University Ave. West

886-0400

other movie-goers.

free of Waterloo Public non-metered parking

available

the

spots in the lower rear parking lot

from 6 p.m.

to

2:30 a.m. There are

also spaces available in the above-

Besides the rhonthly film guide, posting of eight

films for the next

all

weeks

is

displayed outside

which

the cinema,

is located at 6 Waterloo. Get 24-hour film information at 885-2950, or at

St.,

www.princess.sentex.net.

Libra:

you are uncertain about the direction you are headed in rely on your friends for guidance.

November

27.

Cancer: June 22

You^ will happy news regarding

member

-

July

receive

is

to

Be

now

pre-

the

pros and cons of a

sit-

uation to

September 23

Luckiest day:

at first.

29.

December

Capricorn:

22

-

January 19

M may

be hard

November

Things are moving quickly in

of your

all

life.

areas

-You

you have an abundance of energy this week. Use this find

productively.

Luckiest day:

November

30.

Aquarius: January 20

-

-

February

Gentle words are your best strength in

1

October

you are feeling and drained you

the next

little

while.

As

a result of

your kind-hearted nature your friends may be coming to you for advice.

Luckiest day:

November

28.

Pisces: February 19

26.

March 20 You are doing too many things at once. You must

23

decide what the most important

-

Luckiest day:

November

October

November

flW

may

your decision

projects or tasks. Better times are

If

make a calm

choice. Thinking logically about

.

22

Scorpio:

-

December 21 You must weigh

18

21

task or situation

you have unfin-

ished business to complete do so quickly. If you want new things to enter your life everything from your past must be taken care of.

a family

or a close friend.

Spoke

come

help or

If

November 22

Sagittarius:

in

life. If

.

Shops Plaza

all

is

will offer practi-

some way. Luckiest day: December

your aid

life.

coming soon.

a big step in your

IlTRAVELOnS com

your

must find the energy within yourself to complete any

26.

June 21

Luckiest day:

w w

November

Gemini:

September

-

gentile vibrant person will be

tired

off

airfares, you're missing out!

28.

22

subject of gossip.

six-packs,

price

is

members (annual membership fee of

be the centre

Depending on how you act will make you either popular or the Luckiest day:

take your

finances into consideration.

Wf*

2.

20

You

Rail

August 22 as though you

have denied yourself some of the luxuriesin life. If you have dis-

cal

Taurus:

VIA

movie The

feel

entering

Luckiest day: December

off

12,

The

tfre

the

$5 for children under seniors, and Princess cinema

Princess

annual highlight at the cinema

not worth stressing over.

50%

Princess

distributed

covered the urge to indulge your-

conclusion.

Rail tickets,

the

the showing of the

in from all directions, but flowing out in the same manIt’s time you let someone

of a situation to

VIA

multiplex chain. cinemas.

of admission

to

ground parking lot at the Marsland Centre on Dupont Street, as well as plenty of pn-road parking by the Uptown Waterloo theatre.

of

guide

pared to pay for some bills that sneak up out of nowhere. Luckiest day: November 26.

This week you will have to look at both sides

off

comparison

in

film

Luckiest day:

35%

reasonable

HOROSCOPE

Aries:

like

free

half.

Ticket prices at the Princess

copies

self

With discounts

more than an hour and a

38,000

coming

CARD YET?

a

link

Cinema

An

Happy Birthday Sagittarius! Financially you have money

HAVE YOUR

distributes

common

the only

is

Library’s

is

Week of Nov. 26-Dec.

YOU DON’T

theatre

chain-brand cinema.

that bad.

advertising

between the commercials, the film flows from one segment to the next, keeping the audience captivated for

monthly film guide to local bars, and coffee shops, which provides an in-depth look at the current movies being played. There are

Sandler’s stinker Little Nicky.

Yeah,

movie is comprised of the funniest, most effective, and serious commercials from around the world. Though

Parking charge at

monthly across Waterloo Region. There is an assortment of movies from around the world, including the lesser known and yet-to-be-discovered titles that you may never have had the privilege of seeing at your

There were too many punchlines with no punch. And it’s not hard to

Advertising Festival. The full-length

$8) and $8 for

restaurants,

angry

she’s

fact,

Another Princess feature favourite the yearly Cannes International

the past 17 years,” said John Tutt,

The

And I’m this

is

owner of the Princess Cinema.

this time.

Movie were

either.

“beautiful”

brings these films to Waterloo to be

make me

eliminating the ankles.

of origin. The Princess

I

the near-empty theatre.

calves continued

meets.

ISIC

earned recognition through prestigious awards and reviews from their

explained that a

community. These films have often

pointing was the fact the movie

other smiling faces as

when

feet,

he

later

that

considered to be outside the mainstream pop-culture and would

even more disap-

it

he once

got cankles,”

“cankles” were

will only see

the inner-beauty of every person

why

out

“sense” into his buddy.

never again base his opinion of a

woman on

with few attractive features.

he

figures out

and

her being a rather large

woman

Rosemary because of her appearance and he tries to talk some

a 30-something Hal gets

guru

despite

figure

stuck in an elevator with inspirational

love with her

falls in

His pal Mauricio, played by Jason Alexander, of Seinfeld fame, can’t

promise

When

woman, not

Then he meets Rosemary. He

not about

mind or

what’s inside, like her

father

gal.”

slightly insane Farrely brothers.

seeing inside the

of the film world at the Princess

Cinema in Uptown Waterloo. The Princess features films

What makes

is

that four out of five

Robbins-induced hypnosis by the phrase “Shallow Hal wants to get a

I

cares only about the physical

Rocky Horror

It’s true. If you’re concerned about the culture in your bones, may I humbly recommend a

taste

By Dwight

— Page 15

offers culture

By Janine Toms

money

2001

26,

trate

2.

and concenthat.

Luckiest day:

November

Daniel Roth

is

a second-year

journalism student

who has studied

astrology

Luckiest day: December

is

your energy on

26.

and other clairvoyant

issues for three years.

online! www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke


TV

series

now

makes Guelph appearance

Play

in

By Michelle Timmerman Touchmark Theatre

book form

senting Wingfield

By Sarah McGoldrick

Run Centre, Dec. 6 The play is the

Maurier Theatre

On

will

be pre-

Ice in the

du

Murder, She Wrote

In 1996,

tel-

goodbye

to

Jessica Fletcher and her friends of

Cabot Cove, Me. Fans were left to wonder what Jessica would do with

her spare time. Well, the

all

murder solving continues in the Murder, She Wrote book series. The novels began in 1994 as the TV series was beginning to wind down. The first novel, titled Manhattans and Murder, has Jessica

visiting

friends

Wingfield’s

latest

in

Dan

Walt Wingfield for more than 16During this time he has per-

formed across

the

made

at Stratford in

Ice.

years.

farmer.

Wingfield on Ice

Wingfield

Beattie has been performing as

to 8.

plays about a stockbroker-turned

debut

Folly,

Unbound and Wingfield On

Guelph's River

at

Needles' popular series of one-man evision viewers said

and performed by Rod Beattie. They include Letter From Wingfield Wingfield’s Farm, Progress,

its official

August, where

show was performed until midshow is in the

U.S.

in more than 2,500 shows Canada and in parts of the

He

has been acting profes-

sionally since the early ’70s. In addition to the thousands of

performances, the plays have also

middle of a three-week sold-out per-

been broadcast on CBC Radio and made into 20 half-hour television episodes, which will be broadcast

at

There are

Theatre Orangeville. five plays in the series

of

stage comedies written by Needles

on

CBC

plays follow the adventures misadventures of a Toronto stockbroker named Walt Wingfield,

welcome new

who

feuds that divide the neighbours

gives up urban

and buys a hundred-acre farm in mythical Persephone Township. His stories life

are told in a'series of letters-to-theeditor of the local weekly paper, partly in narrative formal ly in

and

part-

dramatic format. Beattie plays

the editor

who

takes the audience

and out of the world of Persephone Township, Wingfield and all of Wingfield’s neighbours and the various adversaries whom in

October. Cunently the

formance

The

and

he encounters. In Wingfield

On

Maggie Wingfield

later this season.

Ice,

are

Walt and all

set

to

but Walt

the killer

more than

8^

with a kaleidoscope of colourful tial

whom

are poten-

ee

suspects in the latest murder.

The novels

stay ever true to the

She Wrote con-

original Murder,

cept, of families killing over wills

Winter CJala

or international drug plots leading ‘

to assassination.

The books

are written in a light,

enjoyable manner,

full of twists and turns, keeping the reader turn-

ing the pages.

\ unique

feature to the series

is

they stay current with the times, finding Jessica meeting celebrities like

December 7th, 2001 iThe Berkley Room at Bingemans Park Friday,

Larry King, as well as learning

to fly.

Also added is

to the original story

the relationship

and

her

between Jessica

again/off

on.

again

boyfriend, Scotland Yard Inspector

George Sutherland. The pair occasionally solves a murder together, while

fitting

romance

Much

in

time

allow

to

blossom

to

like

the

Perry

pm Cash Bar 7:00 pm Dinner '8:30 pm Dancing 6:30

Mason

^[mystery series, the Murder, She

Wrote books allow the reader know what the main character

to is

thinking.

Written

in

the

first

person,

Jessica provides insight as to

how

murder happened and how potential suspects may have done the

the deed.

added

Cleverly

each novel

is

at

the

in

Murder,

Tickets $25.00pp (Limited Tickets Available)

Buy Your

Ticket Today!

end of

a taste of the next

one with a short synopsis. The Murder, She Wrote series provides an affordable escape from everyday trials and tribulations. Most of the books arc priced from ,$.5.99 to $8.99, in paperback. The books also allow readers to go back to a time when life was simpler and Jessica Fletcher could solve a

murder

t

Door

Prizes!!

Any Questions?? Contact Shirley Donezyk

an hour. ,She

Wrote

is

through Signet books or bookstores.

available at

most

(519) 748-5220 ext.3756

Run

1-877-520-

and Sheriff Mort Metzger along characters, all of

River

at

the latest adventure has taken her,

presents the

the

3000 or 2408.

-feiong with a skull hidden

story are friends Dr. Seth Hazlitt

call

(519) 763-

a

,estoga Collrv ^

alarmed about the old

at

dozen of these popular books, each with a picture of Jessica Fletcher set against a background of where

somewhere in the picture. The novels are authored by the fictional Jessica Fletcher and the real Donald Bain. Continuing to appear in each

is

For tickets

is.

are

farm.

Centre box office

mystery-writing sleuth to find out

Today there

the

nightly.

York where a murder takes place of course. As usual it is up to the

who

to

and disturb the tranquility of the community. His attempts to mend other people’s fences meet with resistance as stiff and cold as the weather itself. And the biggest challenge to them all is looming on the horizon in the form of The Great Persephone Ice Storm. Performances begin at 8 p.m.

New

in

life

She’s expecting and he’s nesting,

toll-free


,

SPOKE,

Handsome Devil

Show By

songs expressive

was

T

Graham

Juiie

ow

Kisses

aiiil

Untiergrouiid

is

I'lDtn

the

the dehiil

TD

from namisome pk'cc band from

a lour-

Oiangc

Coiiiitj'. ria.

Released

On a day where everything seemed well organized for visitors of Conestoga College’s VIP/CIP day, one event in the Sanctuary was

an interview before his

IXjmI has a popiilat lollowingin

Stade,

Orange

comic

w hieh has pro-

CViinty.

dui'cd bands The Offspring. Lit,

microphone, from students. Adding to the problem was the fact that none of the couches were turned towards the stage and there was little knowledge beforehand that a comedian was going to be perfonning.

it’s

(.xjunty eounteqrarts.

is

the

f'Yoin

Ulidcrground otfers up powersongs lull oi cxpie.ssiv£

wiUt an almost tliei;e k sound. But even stj*^

He

“When

I

go

would have listened, would have heard Stade’s satirical and cynical-humoured repertoire of jokes about his travels

around the world. Indeed. Stade has travelled and performed all over Canada, Europe and infamous clubs such as The Improv in New

said

to a place that

unprepared, there’s a chance of me embarrassing the (expletive) out

of

myself,’-’

he

Comedian Tom Stade, who has been performing

if

students on Nov. 14

tries to entertain

said.

Stade also said

Althous'li this

audience.

“I’ll

with,

more fun

for myself.

own

sound, the

(Photo by Julie Graham)

having With each

start

I’ll

try to

laugh a

me

kills

little

the

harder,

then do what any comedian does:

show

for himself.”

Later in the Sanctuary,

it

City.

Also, Stade almost had a televi-

CBS. “I signed a much money with CBS it would make you puke,” he said. “We almost had our own sitcom but sion deal with

deal for so

did not

take long for Stade to realize no one

debml

siiue this hast-

lienee

just

in

York

13 years, the Sanctuary, however for

spectators booed and jeered as he fought through his set.

things were to

be Lonsideaed a pnsiijvv

same

we

did the pilot and they (CBS)

just didn’t take to

li.sieMirijf!

becomes tircsui^'

the third oi fumtli sung to-

page

y

the band’s Ijk^'

w-ww-.h

at

ikcoih, the iX'vir.s sotiml

i

ciig.ig

\i.su*ial

ng.

While

and

An anctmt pm¥®rfy amm: is not tho sixa of ths tmo but tho ^opth o f its that mak^ it strong. Pfoomabna^on maaily has v&ry deap mots.

IX-vil tans

find a lack' of ccecnirieity

song

I'eienee ticnn IxuiiJ

to suite

also brags abnui

y f0 ileilver Kincicss

BiSr TIPS FOR PLANNING STUDY TIME

9

eins.wMt a classic punk

^ Rode j’’

aS

atitherns? lYiuk

Hardly. While their soutid

1*

Bad Kohgion

end

Si

iiid

each song rltones s.ime

tlie

choids

ti-mpu.

wi'uUl be

It

S

al.so

f»l

I

til isuip

.sumraiery

title,

detail.

Surveying

and

a reading

is

duiir^ the day

is

the

wmm.

figures before

skimoi/tf

reding

for

tetfirsique;

Study soon after tectures: refeAtioo and undersfondiig are aitfed by reviewing your rfotM immecPiateiy after ol^. 80%

3,

lacks

many bands StMTS

inirtuies of siuo-y

W

dlcr

like

Devil

Hie

insult

Handsome Oesil Bad Religicsi.

research shews

of 90 minptes of slydy st nig

Survey required readings before lectures:

2,

meloiiy .i/i

Use diyllght hdurs! fi(|ijiva^enE

h"hll> shadow suth bands

reforvlien vdlbi review,

at lain

20% retenlion v^thwt

nevfow.

ill

liahluig to sign onto a

1

Do tasks acoordi ng

4,

1

b.md was Mgiiid aim mqndis of fonnin fci ^and Kis'ses From* disphvs in obvi' need for more cspci leiu e.

fill

.

you 2

to priorities:

av^bie for Its ocmpietiGai.”

the time

hours, to

eomplete

this

If

refrtwmtser Parkinf0«’$ law lhat

you

allot

2 hwrs

to read

“work ejipamis- fo 10 pages, t1 will ptobsgily

SCNninuto ii^k.

5.

Start big

6.

Be real istic: don’t plsfi study periods durintg ihe week C^adually increase your commilmenl to study periods.

Jobs ahoad of time: avok^ oamofiaig and pock

quality.

i

J’-

p,

i mosic. krnktng ftu a

How'e

If

you won’t fofidw toroi^h

soltei,

should Kisses

7.

Discover hovr long to study: as a rough starting i^lde,

from

class,

for

you shouW plan

8.

eveiy hour

to $ludy for

(Mople of hours outside as necessary,

Jsonic Devil!

class,

in

a

Adjust

Pla n blocks of time: opUrtKim elfwtoncy

is

reached by pJi^nfog study blocks of 50 rrwutes followed by a lOHminute break. required for problem solving tasks and for writir^ pajjers.

Loriger periods

9.

Have an agenda

for

each study period; be specific aboui foe task that you wi^ to

accoimplish during that period.

For more information on this technique and other leamkig and study strategies^ contact Student Services* 2B02* for an appointment.

|.888^97» vvww.paguide.com

i

if

was onstage.

they

the toughest thing about the pro-

fession.

like stu-

If students

set,

has been a stand-up

bad show.

seemed

Jen'y Seinfeld himself

3 years, to a

it

dents wouldn’t have paid attention

dying stab the audience

the

r

would lead

the

Rather than give Stade a half-hour

go wrong during his set, he’d do the show more for himself then the

ics

\

1

into

of their attention,

knew the unpreparedness he saw in the Sanctuary

Sugar Ray and \o l')oubt. However, iheir success has not grown as fast as their Oiarige fttve and Kisses

who for

an effort to get stu-

resulting in booing

minute organization and set up problems by Conestoga -Students Inc. (CSI), no one paid attention to the comic. In

jokes

his

Comedian Tom Stade, from Quesnel, B.C., tried to entertain students on Nov. 14, but due to last-

Handsome

tins year.

listening. In

dents’ attention he started yelling

a bust.

By

— Page 17

Sanctuary a bust

in

Graham

Julie

Nov. 26, 2001

it.”


.

— SPOkK, Nov. 26, 2001

Pajio IS

Sports Dedicated, passionate athletes no longer present in basebali

Leafs battle

on

By Mike Sperling been a long lime since Major League Baseball lost so

sticking his nose

contract despite an off year) are

many

where

all

renowned

It's

star players to retirement in

belong.

Fans will no longer be able to iiKirvel at the skills of ruture Hall

gone as

Famers Tony Gwynn, Cal Ripken and Mark McGwire. The one most important thing

Marc

out about these players

Huiet

-

more than

far

-

their stats

is

their attitudes.

them knew how to treat fans’ and they never took them for granted. Gwynn, Ripken and McGwire were always willing to take extra time before and after games to sign autographs for All three of

The sad

clients.

He

told

Star players like Boston’s

I is

it

the fact

and

Nomar

Toronto’s all

gone

for rehab assignments with-

Boras’ reasoning for telling it

-

the

guess they aren’t Boras’ clients.

The other thing Boras

is

known

that those types of unselfish play-

for

ers are dwindling.

a player has signed a ridiculously

Whether players want

to

admit

is

getting the big contracts. If

large contract

you can bet he has

or not, the game is becoming more of a job (driven by monetary demands) than about passion or

Boras representing him. Players are now dropping

love for a sport that has been unit-

when

it

ing people for well over a century.

And

not just the player’s

it’s

fault.

Agents have become far too powerful - Scott Boras is

by

represented

agency comes up. Alex Rodriguez (a 10-year, $252-million contract last year), Barry free

(a free

and Andruw

agent this winter)

Jones

high

well.

He

these

cutthroat

These kids who never played pro ball but they’re receiving signing bonuses of around $5 first-round

a

for

And

players

(who

just

By Lisa

modern

Hiller

When Randy

Johnson of the

Diamondbacks was voted Cy Young award winner as Arizona

pitcher

best

League

in

Tom

Hicks

is

responsible for paying Rodriguez

$252 million and I can bet you were owners shaking their

this year,

it

that if the

end

own-

and put an

to insane contracts then they

could be charged with collusion.

There really isn’t an easy way out of the mess baseball has got-

And

like

Gwynn,

Ripken and McGwire are nearing the end of their careers.

Gwynn

played his entire 20year career for San Diego because he was happy. He freely admits he could have gotten more money

put him one

Ryan’s

Schilling, why the Arizona Diamondbacks won the World

Sandy

known because of

frame,

award

his

tall

was honoured with

the

for the third straight time

NL

and the fourth time overall receiving 30 of 32 firstplace and two second-place votes for a total of 156 from the panel of baseball writers on Nov. 13. in

the

Johnson won his first Cy Young award in 1 995 as a Seattle Mariner

in

the

American League. Johnson won his first C’y Young 965 as a Seattle award in Mariner in the Ameriean League. 1

2001, Johnson had a reeord of 21 wins and six losses. He ^j,also led both leagues with a 2.49 In

earned

run

average

and

372

strikeouts.

The only other out

totals

for

a

382 majors

in

He

the

also struck out 10 or

more

World Series since Detroit’s Miekey Lolich did it in 1968. Johnson’s career numbers speak well of him loo. He pitched a no-hilter on June 1990,

2,

'I’igers

He

is

pileher

defeating

the

Detroit

2-0.

probably the most feared in

the world because of

menacing stare anil presence on the mound. Johnson has had consistently good win-loss reeorils and high his

season

eareei'.

totals

Ihiinighoul

his

it

in St.

game

was a

including overtime.

With only 4.8 seconds

left,

8,500 people at the Corel Centre in Ottawa cheered as Karel 1

Colorado Rockies’ outfielder Larry Walker took a smaller payColorado arguing that there came a point where he could only spend so much money. What the heck is Rodriguez going to do with roughly $25 million a season? That money could feed millions of people in need of food and in

Rachunek tapped

in the

winning

goal.

Every now and then a team few seconds of a game, but the Leafs have to be loses in the last

careful to not

make

a habit out of

it.

Some relax

players and teams tend to

their

playing level once

will instead die) but

they’re ahead on the scoreboard.

our crazy world with messed-

This just provides an opportunity for the opposing team to come

shelter

up

seconds left. The Senators dominated the

priorities

Rodriguez will

live

high-on-the-hog for the rest of his life and probably well beyond.

For fun, try calculating how many people will die from starva-

back.

Although the Leafs remained at the top of their division after that

game, they won’t be there for

tion for the next 10 years while

long

Rodriguez makes his “living.”

luster effort.

Go

long

.

if

they continue their lack-

.

New

didn’t.

probably the

is

most feared pitcher in the world because of his menacing stare and presence on the mound.

batters

23 times for the third straight season. That matches the record Ryan set with the California Angels in 1973. Johnson akso became the first pitcher to win three games in a

strikeout

the

He

in

strikeouts for the eighth time.

led

year and the

this

York Yankees

1965.

Johnson

highest strikein

Series

Koufax’s

Johnson, or The Big Unit as he

city.

money

the way the score ended shows the Leafs are letting things slide by sometimes. The Leafs were up by one until the end of the second period when Todd White of the Senators scored the tying goal with only 36 it’s

one of the few reasons were a more successful team in the later part of the ’90s and the biggest reason, along with compatriot Curt

in

Nov. 17 they played against Ottawa Senators losing 2-1.

that

then encouraged other play-

(who

their little mistakes if

There’s nothing wrong with that

a large pay cut to

ers to play for less

up

is

1900s) are

of Fame. is

He

era (beyond and

loved the

in

players

the

the Seattle Mariners

383 1973

McGwire took

check to stay

is

are

the top of the

they want continued success.

but

itself into.

Rodriguez the money someone else would have (or at least close

baseball

step towards eventual admission into the Baseball Hall

gotten

He

at

On

There really isn’t an easy way out of the mess baseball has

great baseball city.

ers get together to try

to clean

it.

heads at how that contract alone may have ruined the game. But if he hadn’t given

The problem

21-year

entire

Louis because he said

Nolan

more

his

there

it).

looking sharp

northeast division but they need

spent

stay with the Cardinals because he

the

to

as

are

National

the

same boat

the

then there are the owners.

costing but they keep shelling out

his

.

worshipped him for

They whine and complain about

money. Texas owner

The Toronto Maple Leafs in the

career in Baltimore and the fans

draft

ten itself into. their

other agents to sign with Boijas

Bonds

of

pri-

orities.

now being

out

agents.

million

elsewhere but he had different

Ripken was

Johnson adds one more Cy Young to repertoire

=

-".i

drafted

how much money

minor league stadium in Florida was too rundown for Beltran to go there. The Royals train young, future major league players there but hey

dwindling.

Players

school and college are

rehab an injury. This is common practise for teams treating an injured player.

Garciaparra

$7,5-million

represented by Boras.

pick.

And

unselfish players are

six-year,

a

- Carlos Beltran of the Kansas City Royals - to refuse to go down to the minor leagues to

Beltran to refuse

those types of

thing about

one of

out complaint.

thing about

the fact that

The sad

use his

to

his clients

down

is

how

signed

has

the

Shannon Stewart have

eager fans.

it

He

far as to

management of a team

tell

of

that stands

doesn’t

it

one season.

for

The 38-year-old can always be counted on for a much-needed win or when the game is on the line. Like Schilling, he seems to have gotten belter and more consistent with age.

He may

not be as statistically

dominate as was Ryan or even Roger Clemens today, but he's certainly got enough checks in his

column

to

someday receive

an invite into the great After else

all,

and he's

six-foot- 10

hall.

he's not like everyone just

lanky

throw hard and

what

it

needs, a

guy who can

in the strike zone one of the few pitchers who opposing batters hale facing.

as well as

James Aikins, a first-year took some time to throw a

robotics football

and automation student, around on Nov. 13. (Photo by Dwight Irwin)


.

SPOKE,

Nov. 26, 2001

— Page 19

Condors hack on Humber, win 6-4 By Vanessa Laye

got the goal back one minute after the penalty

Conestoga’s men’s hockey team took Humber College by surprise on their home ice, winning 6-4 on Nov. 17. “We caught them off guard,” said Greg Rickwood, coach of the Condors. “We shocked them, and they didn’t

know how

to handle

it.”

“We shocked them and they didn’t know

how

handle

to

it.”

Condors coach Conestoga

losing

from Ryan Baird

to

Humber

“The

first

period of our

period was rough with

penalty box. first

ond

and out of the

Humber

scored the

goal during Conestoga’s secpenalty.

game

5-2.

Scoring in the second period were Adam Johnston, Craig Bannister, Scott Foster and

Bums.

going.”

the game. This

Conestoga currently has the most goals in the league. However, they have 21 goals against them, 9 of which Were scored in the first peri“Larry (assistant coach of the Condors) and I are trying to cut down on the goals against,” said Rickwood. “Through our own statistics our goals against are 4 to

But Daryl Burns in

is

to lead the

“Everyone

them.

Conestoga players

game

second period scoring three

the

more goals

our weakest,” said Rickwood. “If we survive it, we can get our game

like to

first

to tie the first

period 1-1.

in exhibition and Seneca week, Humber didn’t realize what the Condors had in store for last

The

off a pass

has the

a

is

But Brent MacDermid

keep

it

at

2 to

We

2.

would

3.”

a quick goal to lead

tied

it

up

after

in

team win

Conestoga dominated the

rest

Rickwood

it

2 - 1 .”

Humber

its first

few of

despite

their

loss

Humber came back game, and

of

players,

scoring their

minutes

left in

their fourth at the

With just minutes left in the game Rickwood called a timeout. “The

who played smart, when antagonized and

in

The Condors found out about this tournament through Condor Josh Dennis, who transferred from Life University to Conestoga.

The Condors will leave by bus on 6, which Conestoga’s recrefor.

For those times when you miss your Mom and Dad ...

And

...

their

soc-

loss of the

hammered 8-2

GO HOME FOR CHRISTMAS! Student friendly return feres from KITCHENER to:

Guelph Toronto Peterborough

“They weren’t defending well,” said. “They just got lucky.” At halftime Johnstone gave the team a quick pep talk to remind them that they need to stay on the inside and goal side of their oppohe

confused them,” was stunned as

Condor Miro Orasain deflects the ball off the outside of his foot at a game against the Kabana Boys on Nov. 15. The Condors lost 8-2.

blame for a good piece of the game,” said Johnstone. “I should have put my strongest five defendthe

to what happened when they went back on.”

straight rotation

it

5-1. “I take

*51 *61

GST

*114 *114 not included

(Photo by Vanessa Laye)

ers on, but instead

minutes of the

*25

Ottawa Sudbury

said Johnstone. “I

The Kabana Boys scored four

^11

Belleville

Condor coach

second half to make

hockey team

their players

getting kicked out of the game. But

just got lucky.”

first five

University

Marrietta, Ga., Dec. 6-9.

got physical in the third

Geojf Johnstone,

goals in the

defender

Life

ation centre has offered to pay

lost

Geoff Johnstone, coach of the Condors, said a couple of things went wrong in the first-half.

I

is

be playing an

didn’t fight

we

Kabana Boys until late in the half, when the opposition managed to slip one by the Condors goalie Dino Vukanovic.

think

said

will

Dec.

terms of periods,

now

exhibition tournament against the

Craig Banister,

in

Conestoga’s defenders held off the

“I

The Condors

the

game

by the -Kabana Boys, Nov. 15. Conestoga played an excellent first half with Bojan Djokovic scoring the first goal of the game.

nent.

who Rickwood

said

is

52-inch TV.

The Conestoga men’s indoor

“They

for

to first year player

also

focus.” Conestoga’s record

3-2 (wins and losses).

Tyler Smith played like a leader,

By Vanessa Laye

season, after being

the

most improved player and plays

Kabana Boys trample Condors cer team suffered

making

was consistent and kept the team composed, as well as forward

three-minute mark.

of

net,

said

“The third period was the worst,” said Rickwood. “If you look at the

the

where he put the puck through

Humber’s

game 6-4. Most valuable player

the system well.

Greg Rickwood

third goal with six

the goalie’s legs.

pulled their goalie to

have an extra attacker, but Baird took a shot from his end, which slid

the

every game.”

intercepting a pass and beating a

net,

“Everyone is a star in the game,” Rickwood. “This team has the talent, ability and creativity to win every game. All we need to do is

Humber

Condors went

talent, ability

creativity to

Humber

player one on one to the

scored a goal for the team.

said.

Scott Foster,

and

period, with a

Humber got the game 2- 1

In the second period

players were getting confused,” he

into

star

od.

Greg Rickwood,

With

was over

went with a of whose turn it I

was supposed to be.” Maikado “Chico” Mailkno came through for Conestoga to make it 5-2. But the Kabana Boys bombed

two more goals past Conestoga lead the

game

to

7-2.

The Condors worked hard to keep the ball out of their end, but the Kabana Boys ended the game with one more goal with less than a minute left in the game. The Condors record is now 1-1-1 (wins, ties and losses).

WOOLEY by

Pius

many more discounted

call:

824-3570 141 Macdonnell Street

GREYHOUND CANADAS

Marc Hulet

JUST^

J-nLOowfN THINKIBIS

destinations

www.greyhound.ca For Information


— SPOKE, Nov. 26, 2001

Pajio 20

News

Student Services offers workshops By Daniel Roth

visible in the sense that

Services

more

otYers

than just one-on-one counselling.

According

stu-

know we are working with we are accepting of hear-

dents to

Student

we want

them, and

ing what their needs are,” she said.

Judy Bates, a counStudent Services, work-

Student Services to accommodate

shops were created to benefit as

the students and address their prob-

sellor in

to

many students as may need support.

possible

who

accessible to students,” she said. the students can

access each other.”

Student Services offers different

workshops

to build scholarly skills

such as time management,

listen-

ing and note-taking and preparation for

exams.

They also offer workshops more personal situations such the

for

as

group for gay, lesbian, bisexual, available

to

to students as

they need.

“We

like

in as

it's

really important to

many ways

are based

on

as they can.

common

prob-

lems counsellors are helping

“We there

see people one-to-one, but

is

common

a

situation

help them on issues environment also,” she

in

if

we can

a group

said.

Student Services to be

When aske^ the

numbers

too

many

“When

we’re doing a group

be able to

According of students

many

who

facili-

workshops have co-ordinating packages of information taitate the

“If

it’s

something

speaking or

test

like

public

anxiety there might

be an inventory assessment that wilt help us to know what their levels of

to Bates the

who come

number

to the

work-

“We’ll block off time in your table

maximize

to

the groups

out the workshops to as

many

“We

tries to

we have an

exciting

Mosaic Group Inc, MGX Toronto

stock exchange acts as an extension of its and marketing departments, deveioping programs that enabie them to communicate with their target audiences and strengthen their brand ioyaity resuiting in enhanced sales. ciient's saies

We have

numerous immediate part-time Retail Sales Specialist positions and running through until December 30th, 2001.

The Retail Sales Specialists

will be selling a specific wireiess solution on behalf in key retaii outiets delivering key product messages and educating consumers on the features and benefits of ceiluiar phones.

of our client, a ieading National Telecom company,

We are seeking candidates with the following skills: •

Energetic and enthusiastic personality

Strong interpersonai and communication

Able to work any/or

space

accommodate

all

of

Mon

Fri,

skills

(afternoon and evenings) and Sat,

Sun (days)

and reach as

as possible,” she said.

Student Services also

“yes", then

availabie starting immediately

shops varies depending on the topic and scheduling. She added that Student Services tries and -Works around students

lems.

of counsellors

we

facilitate every-

one’s participation,” she said.

schedules.

lot

as high as possible, but

participants can reduce the

is

opportunity for youl

tike

usefulness of the sessions.

like to

If the answer

about the average size

of the workshops she said they

At a workshop students receive information packages, which help them to work through most prob-

“A

fl'O/AiC

anxiety might be,” Bates said.

stu-

dents with in one-on-one sessions.

lored to the needs of the group.

and transgendered students.

Workshops are offer as much help

lems

They

"The philosophy behind the workshops is we want to be more "Through groups

Bates said

YOU MAK& Av piFFep-eM^e?

Retail sales

If

you would

online at:

experience

like to

is

an asset

take advantage of this fabulous opportunity, please apply

www.mosaicjobs.com

or e-mail

jobs@mosaicgroupinc.com

students as possible.

don’t want to compete with

each other.

“We want to make them available many students as we can,” she said, “so we spread them out.” to as

Come check

SPOKE

Reduce the health

aWaisi-Hot. wawtJLOt "

'

jr

— nr

and bngcr '

us out online!

is

now

online at

www.conestoaac.on.ca/spoke Updated every Monday, come for the latest college,

visit

us

entertainment and

sports news, as well as games, puzzles, weather

and reference

links.

rbb

aswKiaied

with excess weight. Live better ...lighter.

f

.

I

www.pofhdpodion.Mm

Digital Edition - November 26, 2001  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you