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33rd Year

November

— No. 70

19, 2001

WTN awards

We’re

in

money

the

internship to

college By Mary Simmons

“For the past five years we have seen a number of excellent schools

WTN

For the first time, the Foundation Inc. has chosen Conestoga College to be one of six Canadian colleges to be the reeipiof

ent

Women’s TechNical

a

Internship.

The foundation is fully funded by women’s television network. The internship will be awarded to

the

an outstanding graduating female student in the broadcasting

-

radio

and television program.

The

program places top from across

intern

female

graduates

Canada

in technical apprenticeships

in the broadcasting

field.

It

also

pays 50 per cent of the salary of the intern’s first job for six months. This a great incentive for potential

is

employees

The

intern is also provided with is

included in a two-

day cross-cultural workshop in Winnipeg. According to the WTN Web site, in the second year of the program 100 per cent of the apprentices were hired on by their sponsoring employers at the end of the session. TTie award was created in 1996 to encourage in

women to pursue careers

more

the

technical

broadcasting. This

aspects

of

includes elec-

camera oper-

tronic

news

ators,

videotape editors,

gathering,

Web

page

designers, lighting and audio technicians, graphics animators

WTN

dent diversity.”

Miehael Thumell, co-ordinator of the broadcasting program at Conestoga, said he first got word

and char-

was announced

to female students

in their final year that this

He

said there are currently three

who have express^

interest in applying for the ship.

The deadline

scheduled for Jan.

Students

is

tentativi

who

apply

assessed by a jjury

will

mad9^ up

industry professionals

whd

journalism 10,

almost

sjtills

l^^lf

who

attended a

workshop, Nov.

said they

would not

apply to thy college because

it

does

not offer yegrees.

Twent/six senior high school

Wade

is

From now

of

on, if there is an acaappeal at Conestoga Collegethe decision panel will include a student. The change

demic

was implemented

after a working group consisting of students, faculty and administrators conducted a review of the procedure last

the industry.

Thumell said the jury has not been officially chosen yet, but three female broadcasters and a

fall.

Janeen Hoover, associate registrar for the college Said this change affects the way panels will be set

former teacher in the broadcasting program at Conestoga have been

up from here on in. “The process has been revised so when a review

approached.

Dave Haskell

Tannis

tif

Juiimra Kerr)

is now a who is part of the decision-

sent to the panel there

student

They will select an intern based on academic achievements, general attitude and her desire to work in

making team.”

Trover said

it is really important ^ students have of the appeal prSeaS;:::;:;^^ not that It necessarily'^.^^l^ but the perception looking

the outside could be deceiving,” she said. “Not having students rep-

resented on the panel might lead you to believe that it wasn’t set up

be

to

you have

to

get

your name out

is

However, the appeal

specifically intended for

students, to help students.

Continued on Page 2

program

prefer degree

said he

fair.”

process

during

es

which students wrote

found the workshop evaluation

there in the community,” he said.

leads based on real-life scenarios

results disturbing.

“We wanted

He said one student approached him and mentioned that, even though she thought Conestoga offered a great program, she would rather attend an inferior program and learn fewer skills if it meant

to

and read copy aloud to learn proper pace, pitch and tone. In the Nov. 2 issue of Spoke, Pat

she would obtain a degree. that?” he asked.

ope/ to introduce students to some of Ae skills they would learn in a p/st-secondary coufse in journal-

well known.

with

high school students

know about

it

the journalism

because they are students of the

Applications for the workshop

were sent to the English department heads at area high schools, who were asked to send up to four students who they felt were the strongest journalism candidates.

Haskell developed the workshop

The workshop, which

1

John,

St.

future.”

“How do you compete

student/ from Kitchener, Waterloo, Camb/dge and Guelph attended the workshop, which was devel-

ism.

\ By

directly connected to the college.

Professor

Although Conestoga’s journalism print and broadcast program received rave reviews from high studenfs

be

are not

Workshop students school

an

int(

7.

final-

$^,0W Qoal l6r- the Uhite'd (Ptwm

Continued on Page 2

Kirsten Fifield

Monica Himmelman celebrates

Appeal panel needs student rep

would

be an option for them.

acter generator operators.

By

office!

;^assff^, th6

of the honour at the beginning of this school year, at which time it

students

to hire the student.

a mentor and

that have proven their ability to produce highly skilled television technicians,” Shirley Muir, executive director of the Foundation Inc., said in a press release. “We’re working with Conestoga College because it gets top marks for cutting edge technology, training excellence and stu-

ran from

a

vice-president

at

Conestoga College and head of applied arts, said one of his visions the future includes putting together a four-year applied arts for

degree program called integrated

communications. This degree would include existing programs as well as two

new

Christina Jonas, as part of a long-

9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., included lectures on writing a strong print lead,

programs the college hopes

add

term plan to make

interviewing techniques and vocal

to

delivery for television and radio.

next two years.

with

Program

Co-ordinator the

“If you’re going to be

program

famous

It

also included practical exercis-

its

to

school of applied arts over the

Continued on Page 2


Page 2

— SPOKE, Nov.

19,

2001

New department By Dwight

Irwin

become

gets courses online

Students

want degree

a "natural environment" for

because they will know what course material will be online students

The new edueational leehnology departnienl at Conestoga College gi\ ing faeulty to put

and

members

is

the ehanee

information about themselves

their eourses

Elizabeth

on the

Internet.

Bowman,

edueation

teehnology eo-ordinator,

said

the

and take advantage of it. Bowman does all the administraw'ork

tive

for

support for the department, while

information about their course, post

Sharon Marley

sits

instructor

figure

mem-

Bev Siebel

pages.

to

advertising, which could .start as early as next year, and public

which could follow September 2003, relations,

the technical

is

down

out

"This makes

better for people

it

researching about

Bowman

coming

will focus a lot

what

the college’s school of

More

"Faculty can

put information for the potential stu-

dents on the

lege about

said.

‘The goal (of the workshop)

than a year ago, the Ontario

Ministry of Agriculture, Foods and Rural Affairs approached the col-

lege,"

commu-

nication.

online.

to the col-

in

Haskell said these changes of attention on

with the

aspects of their course should go

bers.

1

The new programs include

while two other educational technology workers focus on other aspects of developing the Web

new depaitment was ereated to support any programs that w'ant to offer grades and introduce faculty

Continued from Page

department,

the

get students thinking about

is to

journalism

in general,”

he

said.

Though many students showed a strong preference '

them

which might help

site,

to decide to

come

to this col-

In addition to a regular faculty

and which is linked to Conestoga’s homepage, a WebCT program is used, which gives the college a secured server, which can

Web

site,

only be accessed with a password. Faculty can use this tool to post their

available

curriculum online, while put-

ting their lecture notes

and grades

for students there as well,

Bowman

said.

said

takes at least one

it

semester, sometimes two, to train an

WebCT well enough to make a quality Web page. She hopes faculty Web pages will instructor to use the

order to

file

step

first

It’s

rare for a college to

which

server,

sourced, said

pick up

required paperwork.

In

are

own

usually

shop its

out-

Bowman,

Elizabeth

department for three years. She’s excited about the prospects of getting all faculty members on

Conestoga College, has been working to get faculty and staff Web pages online. Faculty and staff can use these pages to post marks and schedules. (Photo by Dwight Irwin)

is

the best job I’ve ever

it’s

a

new program and

had

Web site,

the tools are

progress.

many

Faculty

so powerful, they can do so things for classes.”

Bowman,

some pages on

because

at the college. It’s exciting

said there are already

the education technology co-ordinator at

the faculty and staff

web pages can be found at

www.conestogac.on.ca/faculty/fsW

sions for faculty and staff will be advertised on the new department’s

ebpages while the educational tech-

site,

Bowman

the

there to

a

is

where

of direction as going to go from

little bit it

is

is

for their benefit. If something happens at the college regarding a

Need some volunteer work add

structure for the filing process.

construct a panel

hear the

tributed

A

cdlege.

ple

“The review panel who made this decision last fall wanted stu-

To be eligible to sit on a panel you must be a second or third year,

dents to feel that the appeal process was something that was

the

all

It

the necessary informa-

faculty

tion is included.

The appeal forms

are available

from the

at the registrar’s office,

Conestoga Students Inc. office and at the student services offi^inforThe form requests mation

abo..;,-'-

professor

Hpiind

incident in ques-

the grade

times

students

copies of their

s

achieved. forget

name

“Often

keep information and to

track the incidents prqperly so the

form provides a good structure to base an appeal,” Hoover said.

to

specifics of that individual case.

member, administrator and

student will be selected

no

who have

direct involvement in the situa-

tion or the students’

have

set

it

up specifically

so that the student

“We that way

program.

knows

there

is

no bias,” Hoover said. The appeal panel will hear the case and must make a final decision based on the facts. All of the people involved must have good and sound decision-making skills, as the choices could be difficult.

What

students need to under-

his or her rights.

the Student Procedures

upon

Guide

to

dis-

registration at the

fit

the

student

grading

to

volunteer as a student panel member contact Janeen Hoover at 7485220 ext. 3705 or e-mail her at

He

said this

is

a

1

sit

on the

much

sought-

big deal,” he said.

1

is

Life is short,

to

accommodate

If

you are interested contact

Janeen Hoover directly at 7485220 ext. 3705 or e-mail her at jhoover@conestogac.on.ca to let her know your availability. “I

am

willing to schedule ses-

being

convenient

9 starting a 6 p.m.

Hoover

for

if

the

it

more

is

students,”

said.

internships

Canada

gave us an edge,” he

The is

internship will enhance what

already achieved through suc-

cessful completion of the program.

awarded through the

rience throughout their three years.

schools.

They are required to do lab work on CJIQ FM, a community radio

Southern Alberta Institute of Technology, New Brunswick

and

evaluating

it

in the future to better

sions during the day

orientation session

make

be other ones

Within the broadcasting program, students get hands-on expe-

Thurnell said he thinks this factor

when

can’t

students’ needs.

your name could be

“I think that

teer

WTN

who

this session there will

the college’s application.

Conestoga’s broadcasting prois made up of more than 50 per cent female students and

gram

impressed

evaluation process

said.

award among broadcasting programs in Canadian colleges.

if

For those

the

to colleges in

after

“It’s

to ensure

to help.

WTN

Continued from Page Thurnell will also pane! as a moderator.

is

familiar with

criteria,

held on Nov.

awarded

you are not sure if the job you the orientation session will help you to decide. “The orientation session will basically be a question-answer period,” Hoover said. “What do I have to do, what is expected of me, what is the time commitment and what do I need to know.”

bill.

is

availability,

An

six

Even

pulled from the pool of volunteers

Guide.

Only

oiii

is for

and policies at the college. If you do decide to take part, it does not mean you will be called upon for every appeal that happens. Based on the situation and your

said.

jhoover@conestogac.on.ca or consult your Student Procedures

who

full-time student. This

working in their best interest and was being applied fairly,” Hoover For additional information or

through

slip

for all interested volunteers. It can he found in Room 128 in the Student Client Services building.

to

standard form has proved a better

know

woithwhfle

ii

itteona

your resume? Student volunteers are needed to sit on a panel in the event of academic appeals at the college. Janeen Hoover, associate registrar at Conestoga, is on the hunt for peo-

dent has to

ensures

would

to

Once completed the form is then passed on to the registrar’s office. From there, an administrator will

For further information refer

anrf

“But one can’t help but be bothered that certain keen stu-

there

course, professor or grade the stu-

explaining the situation, but the

their'

said.

there.”

past students could write a letter

so

Conestoga

Panel needs volunteers

at registrar’s office the appeal process

pmnram

lent

site address www.conestogac.on.ca/edtech. Information about training ses-

is

is

that

"It’s fantastic that all of them recognize Conestoga College’s journalism program as an excel-

nology department W’eb

while others are a work in

stand

it

^Ilegerwoulji now be nnmber I choice.

for the online continuing education

the Internet.

were

they

said

impressed by

Bowman, who worked

“The form provides dates and

1

an academic is to

WebCT

By Tannis Wade

Continued from Page In

towards a university degree, about 25 per cent of the students who attended the work-

server.

Appeal forms appeal, the

students.

to the college,

which was spent on the

“This

Bowman

the

rural

to

Money was donated

lege."

staff

tion

making course informa-

station based at the college, volun-

a

Rogers Communications their last semester they have

at

in

work placement.

^etaw

The

internship

will

The other

only

six

be

partner

five

are:

Community College, CEGEP de Jonqui^re, Algonquin College and the Centre for Digital Imaging and Sound.

extension -

Live longer with daily physical activity, healthy eating aitd fttllowit^ your doctor’s advice.


SPOKE, Nov.

Council By Bv Laurie Vandenhoff Vandenhnff

^ McClemments l-'V^

announcement at a Toronto wood show by Human recent

Resources Minister Jane Stewart means big changes for the woodworking industry.

A

sector council

being created

is

and funded through the federal government to raise Canada’s rank

among the world leaders in the wood industry. Mike McClemments, dean of engineering

technology

Conestoga College,

a

is

member of

the council that

was revealed Woodworking Machinery Supply Expo on Oct. 28.

at the

r*

opportunities.

“In

this

McClemments.

fully developed, the sector

council

will

consist of a large

no university

there are

To achieve

their

level engi-

increasing

This

heads together and

the

in

demand Right

industry,

said

McClemments, adding, “in the recent past this has meant not enough skilled workers.” Countrywide,

companies

the

included in this sector cannot find enough people to do the job.

In

was announced

that the

college has approximately

half a

it

million dollars revenue in surplus.

After hearing

comes

to

mind,

why

increased every year

has so

much

one question

this,

is

tuition

if the

college

surplus revenue?

Post-secondary education tuition fees

are

by

controlled

directives

from the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities. The ministry guidelines allow for a two per

furniture-making programs, “If

we produce

all

get hired as

There are always orders to fill. is finding the people to complete them.

The problem

“Really at the end of the day, the economic growth of a company is

amount of

workers,”

skilled

explained

low? There

isn’t

cation

infrastructure

.

a very complete edu-

these careers, said McClemments. This for

means students

especially, do not understand the elements of obtaining a job in woodworking.

and support services. Having a surplus not only means protection from the economy, but it also

provides

money

for

the

2002/03 school year

The

.7

is

uncertain.

surplus the college has

was

and

money for improving the curriculum. The surplus provides us with the money to keep a more up-to-date curriculum for stuJohn Tibbits, president of Conestoga College.

below

to allow reserves to fall

five

set aside to protect the college

“It

is

in order to

and the students,”

said Tibbits. “In the case of a loss in

the

surplus

assist the college

is

there

to

with expenses no

longer available through the govern-

reserve. Reserves are built

up over a

ment.”

revenue on an ongoing basis.

Maintaining

an

image

that’s created

labour,

one

that

the metal industry, have a greater array of graduates from

to visit, utter

whom

surprise at

“They

look like automotive factories,” he

By Julianna Kerr Due

to

the

recent

of

cases

sible biological

weapons has

sur-

The highly contagious

virus

is

characterized by a skin rash and carries with

it

a high death

rate.

of the

illness,

died.

World

Health Organization declared that smallpox was officially eradicated, and was therefore no longer a legitimate health concern.

fatigue,

fever,

have any layoffs or downsizing.

officials

say

rash follows in

indication of

and how

it is

are in

it.”

years.

A single revaccination effectively

boosts immunity, and a prior

infection with the disease

means

immunity is assured. Medical Officials say they

aren’t

expecting a smallpox attack, but

admit awareness of the possibility has increased.

to

increased.

infected patient

Suspected cases of smallpox should be immediately reported a

local

during the cant

first week of the illness, when the most signifi-

amount of the

The in

is

CDC

immune

to

is

present

arc

not

necessarily

an outbreak of small-

pox.

The

People

of immunity among

who may have come

in

smallpox patients should be immediately vaccinated and watched for sympclose

contact

with

toms.

The

CDC

says

some comfort

taken in the fact that an

aerosol release of smallpox would dissipate within

one or two days,

therefore buildings exposed to the virus

level

stop the spread of

the virus.

may be

says those vaccinated

past

the

virus

where an would be placed

hospital,

in isolation to

most cases, smallpox is spread from one person to another by infected saliva droplets. People In

headaches and backaches.

the patient.

students.

it

;

a smallpox attack, but admit awareness of the possibility has

A

for

or even prevent

with the virus are mo.st infectious

The incubation period ranges

big

those

30

they aren’t expecting

colleges to downsize, resulting in

opportunities

to

altogether.

in the saliva.

less

up

in

within four days after exposure to the virus, it can lessen the severity

symptoms include high

1995 for

many machines

per cent of cases.

virus from laboratory exposure a year later in Britain. Both patients

Because of the revenue Conestoga

in

may occur

Medical

the

some

how

be susceptible to the virus. It is not known how long immunity to smallpox lasts. Most estimates suggest it lasts only three to five

acquired case

December 1979,

McClemments who come

it,”

“Half of the people

anthrax scare

to

example. Education costs were cut by 5 per cent forcing many Ontario

loss in

said.

who were vaccinated before 1972 is uncertain, therefore these people are assumed to

of smallpox was in 1 977 in Africa, followed by an instance of the

In

far

The Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the U.S, says the majority of

in 1972.

last naturally

the

weapon awareness

Routine vaccination against the

vims ended

handle the influx of

generating publicity. “After 12 years^ People don’t

know about

If the smallpox vaccine is given

One notable disease is smallpox.

has in surplus, the college did not

program curriculum and investing

hire.

faced.

The

is

employers can choose to Often these are university

due

rise

most highly edu-

tries, like

as that

Take the economy

to

The^nly problem

explained while these do exist, the majority of woodworking institu-

new programs, upgrading

existing

woodworking centre has had so

students.

cated woodworking people,” McClemments said. Other indus-

important to allow for investment in

is

train students. “In Ontario, this col-

be able

will

McClemments

two or three days, and tends to be most prominent on the face, arms and legs of

amount of money on reserve

council does create an increase in graduates, the college

ronment.”

are very high-tech.

are

industry.

lege graduates the

tions

members

of companies

If the

includes a dusty, dangerous envi-

However,

in

the

he

on an academic

“But nobody knows that.” Another reason there is such a low number of skilled workers is the lack of education facilities to said.

from seven to 17 days following exposure to the virus. Initial

1

appropriate

manual

is

important for a college to

money on

expenditures are slightly less than

ing, often the

college board has a policy not

the college has the surplus

period of years by ensuring that

“When you mention woodwork-

dents,” said

The

(Photo by Laurie Vandenhoff)

from the not perceived as an attractive career destination,” he said. “It is

the college with

economy

Like any well-organized business,

senior executives

industry.

patients with smallpox recover,

protect the college

studies

Canada’s woodworking

working

Most of

setting.”

but death

have money on reserve

international

the board

increased awareness of other pos-

porate training programs, adult edu-

apprenticeship programs.

Mike McClemments, dean of engineering technology, is a member of a sector council being set up to solve problems within

new equipment, and an

improved curriculum for students. “The government does not provide

my background,” am the only one

on

said, adding, “I

anthrax in the United States, an

generated through revenue from corcation,

are based

with

college

in the sector council to gener-

“Because I have experience both in industry and education, the opinions I offer

on

from any educational cutbacks from the government.

1

ment

ate results in education.

Biological

year the increase in tuition was

tuition increase for the

advanced wood manufacturing.” McClemments wants his involve-

well.”

per cent of annual revenue. This was

The

high school and hear a student say they are looking forward to a career in

said

cent tuition increase each year. Last

per cent.

“I’m looking forward to the day that I visit a public school or

40 and 60 graduates per year from

instructional

a recent board of governors

meeting,

“One of the things I hope to see, the image of the industry improved,” said McClemments. is

exists for this trade.

College reports revenue surplus By Michelle Timmerman

he said. However, that has

capital,

now we produce between

McClemments. If the demand is so great, then why is the number of graduates so

issues,”

The woodworking industry needs have comparative knowledge

to

said

other countries.

resource

McClemments. “Those people

not been implemented.

limited by the

“In the majority of cases, the sector council is dealing with human

no

exist.”

implement several

developing projects, members will is seen by

change the way Canada

said

mean more people

will

techis

are not available because they don’t

primary goal of

training programs.

working

woodworking

engineering level, masters or PhD,”

They will begin by the number of college

projects.

200, they would

their

technician or

nology graduates. “There

increasing skilled workers, the sector council will

pay a fee to belong and who each benefit from the efforts of the

By putting

degree recipients. For the woodworking industry, the choice is either woodworking

educated are our three-year technology graduates.”

McClemments.

The primary goal is to solve the problems growing within the woodworking industry in Canada.

industry

The most highly

particular sector.

— Page 3

M

I

neering programs to supply this

number of companies who each

council.”

industry,

reaching 100 per cent over the last several years, it is apparent that the

said

~

I

sees the root of

being provided approximately $600,000 is

over the next two years to set up a

.

^

McClemments. With placement rates for woodworking programs

council,

“Once

n

and

The board with,

at

j-i

~

problem as a lack of education

the

A

4-j-i

wood

irnprov©

will

2001

19,

would not need

taminated.

to be

decon-


Page 4

— SPOKE, Nov.

19,

Conunentary

2001

ALL RIGHT, TIBBITS YOUR PLAN FOR WORLD DOMINATION IS OVER!

Local gang problem needs better solution Eveiyone

By

is

now

motto, but one.

YOU’LL NEVER STOP

ME ONCE WE’RE A

used to the no shirt, no shoes, no service Kitchener- Waterloo has come up with a new

POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE! HAHAHA!!!

end of November, Waterloo regional police would like to see signs in the windows or on the doors of local bars and restaurants that say no gang clothing, no gang colours. The sign will also include the Waterloo region^ police logo. The voluntary signs are part of a new police program called the

No Gang

Clothing,

Barrie and South

No Gang

Colours.

Simcoe County implemented a similar

gang ban a couple of years ago, and even though not all estabhshments are complying with the voluntary program, it has been successful. Waterloo regional pohce are looking-for three local youth gangs in particular the Bloods, the Crips and the Slingers. The Hells Angels are also being targeted, but the program’s main focus is on members of local youth gangs. It’s great that police recognize there is a gang problem in Kitchener- Waterloo, and they are trying to ma^e the city a safer and more enjoyable place to live and visit. But the No Gang Clothmg, No Gang Colours program is not the right solution to get rid of the problem of youth gang influence.

The major that

CONESTOGA COLLEGE PRESIDENT JOHN

program is the bars and restaurants put up the sign at their location will not

hitch in the

choose not

to

IS

face any consequences.

What

is

the point in starting a

youth gang

program

that

activity,

That would be an extreme scenario, but it could happen. The establishment also becomes an easy target for vandalism.

More

two months have

than

passed since

terrorists hijacked air-

World Trade Center York City.

in

many

people have tried to

So

often, a blind-eye is turned

program because larger scuffles could arise from an aggravated gang member than what comes from an irritated smoker.

What needs

be done is for the city to improve its youth programs, and run more of them, to keep troubled teenagers from roaming the streets. Parents must also step up to the plate. If a youngster is raised in a good home, there would be no need for the youth to join a gang in the first place, and without new to

members joining a gang, the new police program would not be needed. The song Signs, a 1971 hit by Five Man Electrical Band, was not meant solely for Kitchener- Waterloo, but it is appropriate, as signs, signs everywhere a sign will be popping up all over the city.

fire

when more

than

not one of these

show our support

times.

own

but this

crisis,

5,000 innocent people lost their lives,

we’ve seen American forces

pound

chance

Afghanistan’s ruler, the Taliban, in

part

search

ter

terrorist

ringleader

Osama bin Laden.

to the Sept.

United

1 1

States

bution

around

the

When I’m College,

I

not

at

world.

people called Ripley.

more importantly, there has been overwhelming support for

knit

But,

families and fighters

comrades of the

and police

York who gave

officers in

fire-

New

their lives trying to

save thousands trapped in the

Twin Towers before they collapsed. The

Lake

of

near

cause.

knows each

city block.

America.

The support has been coming from everybody - young and old, rich and poor. Whether it be a 10year-old girl making ribbons after school, an eight-year-old boy collecting

from the piggy banks of

his

An

in Ripley,

It’s

one

(where you go to pick up your mail), two “mom and pop’’ grocery stores, two gas stations, two locally owned

my hockey

families of

New York

won’t be the

and

fire

team,

is

city

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Kirsten Fifield; Online Flditor: Michelle Goring

who were

SPOKE’s Phone: 748-5220,

ext.

address

3691

Web

is

299 Doon Valley

site:

Dr.,

Room 4BI4,

Kitchener, Ontario,

It’s

we can

the least

mainly runded I'rom September to Inc.

do.

May by

The views and opinions newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or die CSI. Advertisers in SPOKE tain the

in

this

CSI

logo.

by the CSI unless

SPOKE

shall not

arising out ol errors in advertising

lile

www.concstogac.on.ca/spokc Fax: 748-35.34 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

a pay-

(CSI) in exchange for the

9:.1()

their advertisements con-

be

liable for

beyond

the

any damages

amount paid

must be sent

for

to the editor

a.m, Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance

or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a

N2G 4M4.

ter-

rorists.

insertion ot advertising in the paper.

expressed

by

Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

but

New York

ripped apart by the

the space. Unsolicited submissions

Circulation and Advertising Manager: Derek Lester Photo Editor and Production Manager: Dwight Irwin

last,

does as much as they can

to support the families in

firefighters.

are not endorsed is

first

isn’t the

community,

the best we, as a

ment trom Conestoga Students

SPOKE

it

it

could do.

for the

SPOKE

Keeping Conestoga College connected

the

isn’t

biggest and it’s

the Ripley Wolves, to play the fire-

telethons to raise millions of dol-

It

New York,

Hopefully every village, town

couple of weeks ago, the

game

of.

it’s

can

in Ripley

fundraiser for

station.

fighters in a charity

a drop in the bucket, but

be proud

restaurants, a volunteer fire depart-

classmates or movie stars holding

Not

that’s smaller than a

something everybody

a post office

department asked

estimated $3,000 was raised

bad for a town

actually

A

open

to

for the firefighters’ families.

other.

ment and no police

way

wallets and donate to the

their

It’s one of those places where you wave to every car you meet on the road and say hello to everyone on the streets. Everybody

bank,

and across North

have suf-

vest season because of this sum-

mer’s drought, found a

Kincardine.

There are no stoplights

who

fered through another terrible har-

a tightly

vived that horrible day, are heroes

New York City

cheering. Farmers,

of 600

just a four-way stop. There’s

in

was amazing to see the crowd game. Children, barely old enough to comprehend what happened in New York, were there It

at the

Conestoga

men and women in these professions who died and those who sur-

every two or

call

New York.

contri-

Huron,

for, not only our volunteer firefighters, who

might average one

farming community on the

shores

it

three weeks, but also for those in

is, it’s still

It’s

felt

my

insignifi-

live in a village

looked for-

the

and no mat-

my

we

them on the ice. But, was a good chance to

to facing

we also

is

something.

attacks, in both the

and

do

to

how

cant

support of the American response

had

I’ve

on

mercilessly

for

department and

during times of

ward

the

at

We have friends on the

New

Since that day,

we jumped

course

opportunity.

There has been overwhelming

Also, enforcing the program within the bars and restaurants is just another nuisance for the employees to deal with besides the non-smoking bylaw. If the police want this program to work, they are going to have to help the establishments make it work. The police do a good job of patrolling bars right now enforcing the non-smoking bylaw, but they will have to make more appearances in order to enforce the new gang

Of

help out.

planes and sent them crashing into the

so

lars,

TRUE MASTER PLAN

New Yorkers

Everybody helping

condemns

but does not have to be carried out by all pertinent establishments? It will be hard for some owners to put up the sign because it may suggest that they have had gang-related problems, even if they never have, which might turn some customers away. In extreme cases, owners’ and employees’ lives could be at risk. If a patron is told to take an article of clothing off because of the ban, but doesn’t and is told to leave, what is stopping the patron and his gang from targeting the employee after the establishment closes?

TIBBITS’

REVEALED.

would be

helpful. Submi.ssions

lous statements and

may be accompanied by an

(such as a photograph).

MS Word

must not contain any

libel-

illustration


1

SPOKE,

CNN.com By Marc Hulet

thefts

This column appears weekly and focuses on fun and informative Web

to

'

trust

includes links to various tools useful

CNN.com

to

during the events of Sept. 1 1 and I have been a loyal surfer there ever

news, entertainment, sports and travel can be found here.

since.

But again, they do cover a lot — including books - which a lot of

For news junkies or others who simply like to know the latest news,

y from

r b n

.

CNN.com

states that they have a newsgathering team of almost 4,000 news professionals.”

s I

find

it

and

appalling to Ihinl people are

money

from

poppy

~

boxes intended to help our vet-

^

erans.

A

recent

Kitchener

CNN.com

article

in $i.The

Record

Unfortunately for us Canadians the site

is

American so

if

you’re

looking for local or national news you best look elsewhere. The main page for CNN.com is a

news

alerts.

sports section is quite

as well.

It is a Joint venture with the Sports Illustrated division.

section offers the latest

and information

MLB, NBA They

and

in areas

news

such as

the,

NHL.

ical at times

a

which

section

I

feel

should be

more tongue-in-cheek.

little

entertainment sources do not consider entertainment.

As we

all

CNN.com

know people are busy so come up with this

has

section that

news, sports

most important scores and stock inforthe

lists

mation.

also cover college football

section

is

worth a

and men’s and women’s college bas-

look too. This area includes photo galleries

CNN.com also offers live sports chats and instant polls so readers can give their opinions.

such as the

The Web

site

an indepth

offers

entertainment section but

I

am not as

quoted

and timelines.

Photo galleries include subjects

new

Survivors

snapshots timeline

TV show,

and “America’s

New War interactive The

igator

library.”

section

currently

surfers.

window

I

link to

nine languages.”

There

is

CNN.com it

even more so take

acftiiration

and honour for

for yourself.

it

most ofteif Thouglit of as petire^^oMiers^and n^ing^ are

yekjon Nov,

a

about tht; rest

If you

ing

Web

days a

‘'year?

As

/ tte'

.passing years coxhe

and go^espectlfor veteran^

'Is

disappearing^ Veterans arerpeopie whq^<left' tiieir., famiHe^

behind to figh| a Wilr for freb ^ dom, and altl^hgh it happened many years ago theyjhould still receive die respect

desj^iti^f

their sacrifices.

In ^ most, cases the. tampered

TIME:

1:00 to

3:00pm

Thursday November 29 2001

poppy boxes were, on shop and^

counters

relatively

left

unattended, which makes

easy

targets

for

them

individuaks

wanting to make a quick buck, according to Waterloo regional

WHERE: Terrace on the Square, Theatre Rm

police.

Poppies are meant to unite a nation and represent the universal

remembrance of those brave

individuals

who

fought for our

country’s freedom. I believe that

ever, to

we

now more

than

as a united nation need

show our support to those sob

and dead, who fought for freedom many years ago and diers, alive

for those

now

who are fighting abroad

in the

war on

terrorism.

PARKING:

Confused about Power of Attorney?

Waterloo Towne Square

/

Making? Competency?

Substitute Decision

Kuntz Lane (front) Caroline St. Terrace Lot (Fullerton)

Attend

this session 1

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Seniors

Family of caregivers Health care professionals

confi-

a try you

interest-

you can e-mail me at king_koala@yahoo.ca and it may appear in a future column. sites

Informative session that will be of interest to seniors and their caregivers who anticipate a loss of decision making capacity or who have assumed responsibility for making health care decisions on behalf of another person

WHEN:

am

know of any fun or

IJ, buf'what

bf%b .'?64

it

age.

PUBLIC INFORMATION SESSION

used TO be. Ndyvadays, veterans

I

will go back again and again for your world news and Sept. 1 1 cover-

ADVANCED CARE PLANNING

vet-

erans and soldiei?^s;i’r what

to discover at

some time and

dent that once you give

proof

of today’s tailing society;v^v, They, sendNlie message -ifiat

you

to

completely .agree.

thefts are definitely

gives

Babylon.com will allow download a program that can “provide you with translations, definitions and conversions - in any of

you

campaign, 'as saying the tliefts were a “slap in the face to .pur veterans.”

“a small nav-

ically every five minutes.”

Genny Stewartrco-chairwornati of the Galt legion’s poppy

The

is

(that)

today’s top stories, updated automat-

explore

The multimedia

travel

CNN.com

Desktop Headlines

A

Another neat feature of CNN.com is the “Quick News” area.

ketball with great depth.

cluttered but

it has links to every possible area on the Web site.

little

offers e-mail

CNN.com’s good

The

“global

disheartening

taking

~ cover

ries outlined at the

it.

throughout Cambridge,. rather*’^

simple

depth and the quickest reporting of

various locat

is

everything. If something of importance happened anywhere in the world, they will have the most in-

P'o p p y money was stolen

stumbled upon

Their formula

ety*^

recent]

first

in

today’s soci-

evolution, cloning

ment

I

happened

IBM’s

deals with

and Timothy McVeigh. You can also access CNN Radio and video clips. This section

and their coverage is almost too “newsy” for the entertain-

of interest to the students and staff at Conestoga College.

has

surrounding the terrorism attacks but is always other important sto-

there

enamored with this area quite as much as some of the others. The articles seem to be a little cyn-

bottom of the screen page. The most important happenings in areas such as world

sites

What

news

offers latest

Since Sept. 11 the main page has been devoted mostly to the events

,

— Page 5

Nov, 19, 2001

who work with individuals in future planning


— SPOKE. Nov.

Page 6

19.

2001

Breaking the stereotvpe.s

Female saws through the norm By Denis Langlois

the

ing,

This series

is the second article in a on students in non-tradition-

al roles. It is

for people to associ-

programs with one par-

ate certain

Sometimes

ticular gender.

is diffi-

it

cult to get that vision out of

minds and

to deal

not

fair,

people do

it’s

Picard

bother

the best effort into their projects

because they pay more attention to

way

the

the stereotypes

way you is

also important.

has always gotten along with

it.

second-year

woodworking student, is one of only three females in her program, which has more than 80 people. Picard, who is originally from Montreal, chose woodworking not break stereotypes but because

to

she has always wanted a career

where she can use her hands. “It is something I enjoy doing, which is a bonus when choosing a career," she said. “I have always

my work

liked seeing

develop into

finished projects.”

Although there are some stereo-

Picard said her wardrobe had to change after she began her program, but said it is neither an advantage nor a disadvantage. “You have to dress down when you go into the shop,” she said. “You have to look like a bum.” One of the difficulties of the woodworking program, however, is the tightening of machinery when

deal with

stereotypes associated with

a

details.”

is.”

She said

men

and feels comfortable around them. Some of the stereotypes Picard has received have been said by people from her hometown. “People from back home ask me

why

have talked to a man in the and he said most females put

always going to be

“You have to ignore the bad things and prove you can do the job just as good as everyone else,” she said. Another reason Picard said she took woodworking is because she

Picard,

field

but no matter what

who have chosen caieers in non-traditional roles. One program usually dominated by men is woodworking. There are. however, some women who take this program despite the Natalie

“I

you.

there,” she said. “It’s just the

society

there are both advantages and disadvantages to being a female.

said

with them without

them

letting

our

realize there are people

18-year-old

you have “It's

common

woodwork-

types associated with

the paits “It

loose, she said.

male or female because there are

weak guys

have chosen the woodworking program,” she said. “They taunt me by saying it’s a guy thing.” I

too.”

Overall, Picard said she enjoys

Picard said she deals with them by turning the negative stereotypes into positive learning experiences.

makes me stronger when I don’t let the comments get to me.” Even though woodworking is a “It

woodworking and has no regrets about taking a male-dominated program. “Doing something you really enjoy is a plus,” she said. “It’s almost like a hobby and a job at the

ishing panel

same

gram usually dominated by

time.”

Although some people

male-dominated program, she said

Government

come

has nothing to do with being

discouraged

when

may

get

entering a pro-

raises price

Julie

Picard

is

woodworking student, holds the finshe created to determine the correct stain for a project. one of only three females in the woodworking program. (Photo by Denis Langlois)

the

“Don’t

let

people turn you down,

opposite sex, Picard said you have to

you have

do

believe in,” she said.

for yourself

it

and not for

others,

to

stick

what you

to

Program helps students succeed

on cigarettes once again By

Natalie Picard, a second-year

Graham

Smokers

academically

t

are digging deeper into

and bank accounts due to recent tax increases on cigarettes by both the federal and provincial governments. their wallets

Rock

calls part

of the overall

strate-

to reduce the use of tobacco, the

combined federal-provincial increases amounts to

$T20

per car-

ton in Ontario. In effect since Nov.

smokers are paying $40 to $50 for a carton and $6 to $7 for a single pack of smokes. For Ontario and many other

April

is

the

The

first

this

increase in 2001.

when

investing

$480

hoping

to

is

reduce the number of

smokers by 20 per cent and the number of cigarettes sold by 30 per cent. Almost half of that money is being used ing,

in

anti-smoking advertis-

and nearly $15 million

is

target-

ed to fight cigarette smuggling, a

problem

that

may

escalate with tax

the increases.

Smokers at Conestoga College mixed reactions regarding

have

whether the increases ple from smoking.

will sto[) peo-

Lisa Doerner, a first-year computer

programmer

analyst,

said

the

will discourage people from smoking. “I’m already think-

general arts and sciences students

science courses give students a

come from

more than half of the

the technology field.

skills to

prepare them for the career of

“Many students

their choice.

leave a program arts

and sciences

variety of different

because it wasn’t what they expected.” Frances Painter

Program Co-ordinator Frances Painter said this is one of the reaFor the second time this year, the government has raised taxes on cigarettes. A carton now costs $40 to $50 and a pack of

smokes

will

set you back

$6

to $7.

(Photo by Julie Graham)

She added those with 75 per

sons students switch to general arts and sciences after they have

cent averages in the program are

dropped or

gram they chose later. Those with an 80 per cent average are guar-

failed a program.

“Often students

guaranteed acceptance in the pro-

anteed acceptance into the harder

lound that consumption decreased

ple, or

5-and-

aren’t prepared for

robotics program.

24 per cent

over population, reported they had quit smoking.

the rigour of a pro-

Other branches of general arts and science include a health

in 1994, after five provinces did not reduce tobacco

taxes. that

On

the other hand, provinces

did reduce the price of ciga-

found only an eight per cent deci'case in tobacco usage. rettes

Regardless of the recent increases,

and .science student Damion Mlynski said people will keep smoking. “If people have jobs

general

they

arts

will

Then

the

keep buying cigarettes. increase

will

probably

26 per cent of the

Statistics

cigarette

with

Canada

lower,

also found that

consumption

higher with

in

cigarette a

1

rate

provinces prices

of about

is

18

smokes per day. The lax increases on cigarettes arc especially aimed at reducing smoking among teenagers and young adults, who have the highest smoking rales of any age group al

gram and come one

to

study

work on

skills or

Frances Painter, general arts and sciences

program co-ordinator

ing about quitting myself,” she said.

According to the latest information from Statistics Canada, 5.9

science student, harl sliong opinions

for the rigour

million people aged 15 and okicr.

regarding the governments’ increas-

come

or

about

24

he said.

per

cent

25 per cent.

of

the

(’hris

McCurdy,

es. “If the

a general arts and

government

is

concerned

C’anadian population, are smokers.

about getting people to stop smok-

smok-

ing they should ban cigarettes alto-

’I’wcnty-six pci' cent oftho.sc ers are

men

atui

women. However,

take a

couple of electives.”

have no

crfcct,”

to

us after semester

increases

“Not many people have enough money to pay $6 a pack.” Doerner could be right. According to a recent article from Maclean's, price matters. The Canadian Cancer Society’s studies on tobacco usage

Painter said

est

in

a carton in Ontario.

Health Canada,

unprepared for the new challenges at hand. General arts and

courses in different fields of inter-

taxes were raised by $4

million in anti-smoking measures,

'Wateriooi-Wellington

the

Flight School.

The general program has a

second

came

with

the post- secondai'y level, they are

chance to bmsh up on

2,

provinces,

ma, tliree-semester format. The program is run in conjunction

Sometimes when students reach

what Health Minister Allan

In

gy

By Sarah McGoidrick

23 per cent arc

gether,”

six million peo-

going

to

he

“Taxing is not accomplish anything.” saitl.

“Often students aren’t prepared

of a program and semester one to

to us after

work on study

skills

or take a

option for those interested in the

medical dents to

This allows stu-

field.

make up missing

credits

and improve academic standing.

“Many

students

gram because

it

leave

a pro-

wasn't what they

expected or they weren't prepared.” Painter said. “If a student

knows what they want

to do and marks weren’t high enough, it helps them make that bridge.” Painter said most programs have about 30 students per section and for the 2(X)1 fall .semester there were approximately 140 their

couple of electives,” Painter said. The program offers such cours-

students in the program.

es as aviation in a two-year diplo-

tend to rise in the winter.

She added

that these

numbers


SPOKE,

According

Olinski,

was

it

Dusick was a programs adminisM.E.L Defense Systems Ltd., a company that produces electronic equipment for national defence in Ottawa.

Dusick began on Oct. 29 and is in charge of the CSFs human

Dusick also

and marketing, programming and customer service sales

worked

for

“We feel very fortunate to have Judy on board,” said CSI President Jon Olinski.

auditor general, Privy Council and the office of the deputy prime

nice to have

“It’s

minister.

someone who

to run a business.

the

as

Dusick sums up her Ottawa experiences in one word, “awesome.”

“Hopefully by next semester have everything running

“It

was one of those opportunities was so great, that you could go

we’ll

that

smoothly.”

into a situation like that

According to Olinski, more than 50 people applied for the position that was advertised in a local newsjraper.

and learn tons of things, find out the workings of the federal government and the workings of Parliament Hill. It

Judy Dusick is the new growth and development manager for the CSI. Her job started Oct. 29.

(Photo by Michelle Goring)

when he held

a cabinet post in the

currently working on

is

“That way physically

everything

travels

Orbex Computers. Dusick said that what attracted her to the position at Conestoga College was the opportunity to return to work in the education field. Dusick worked in private

ing sure the CSI

schools as a trainer, director, and manager.

hke working with the stuDusick said. “I think it’s very

“I really

dents,”

exciting, what’s

happening with

we know

where we are supposed to be and when we’re supposed to be there so process.”

vocational

was really a fantastic opportunity.” While employed there from 1978-1982 Dusick met former prime minister Pierre Trudeau and Prime Minister Jean Chretien

Dusick

organizing the physical and paperwork layout for the CSI office.

Business in Sudbury and recently left a corporate training position at

'

government offices

the

From 1994-1997 Dusick was the director of the Toronto School of

the

eral

to

tomer service manager at Sudbury Telephone Company.

Harrington Personnel Agency in Ottawa, which included such fed-

departments.

7

ment. That’s what attracted me.”

be an instructor at the Ontario Business College in Sudbury and then a cus-

trator at

executive.

knows how

Trudeau government. She then moved on

Dusick’s extensive business experience that made her stand out.

Conestoga Students Inc. has hired Judy Dusick as the new growth and development manager to assist and support the student

resources,

to

2001— Page

new manager

CSI employs By Michelle Goring

Nov. 19,

Also, Dusick

is in

proper

the

charge of mak-

aware of the proper procedures and is using

them

is

appropriately.

Dusick’s personal goal includes getting a larger pool of volunteers for the CSI.

“What we need

who

people

is

number of

a

are willing to donate

an hour of time here and there so we can ensure that we don't stretch the

members of executive

school, and I like to be connected

so thin that

we

with the excitement of accomplish-

lar

this

can’t get our regu-

jobs done.”

Plan ahead for a good credit rating By Shannon McBride

versity or an ap'prenticeship, there

are

Thinking about buying a new car? Planning to buy a house in the future?

Most college

students are enrolled in for those very, reasons.

They want

be able to afford the finer things later on in life. to

Whether you

are in college, uni-

things

you must do

if

you

want those things later. According to Doug Hoyes, a Kitchener credit counsellor, students should try to build a good credit rating while they are young. “Credit is like fire,” Hoyes said. “It’s great

but

it’s

when it works for you^ when it doesn’t.”

deadly

As

a credit counsellor,

sees this

1990

to

first

hand.

He

Hoyes

says from

2000, the amount of

money people owed

Canada increased by 82 per cent. The number of bankruptcies increased by 82 per cent as well. In order to avoid becoming one of these statistics, Hoyes said it is in

important for students to learn

how

use credit to their advantage

to

rather than getting burned

by

it.

To get a loan from a bank, a car company, or just about anyone else, you must have a good credit

balance each month, they end up paying a monthly minimum. This

may seem good

Because most students have never done any major borrowing, their credit reports are virtually

that they

report.

empty. In order to build up

Hoyes

report,

as a substitute for cash that you have, not as a

steps students should be follow-

Hoyes

to save

money.

much

it

Doug Hoyes Hoyes

later

on

will

easier to obtain car

The bigger the down payment you have, the more willing the bank is to give you money. loans antf mortgages.

money

It’s

great

works it’s

is like fire.

when

credit card remains steady at

said credit cards are a great

build

to

“Use

credit counsellor

many

students because they are already

debt just trying to pay their

tuition.

The second

way

to build

iKsed

step can be an easy

up a

recklessly,

credit rating, but if

can create more

credit trouble. This

Play

more

893-2464

38S RURWAY Ra S. (CANADIAN TIRE PIAZA)

beatgoeson.com

KirawNBt

‘^'*'

744-1011

370 HIGHLAND RD. W. (FOOD RASICS PLAZA)

CAnmacE

622-7774

415 HESPELER RD (ACROSS FROM McDONALDS)

WATtRLOO 402 KING

ST. N.

884-7376

(BESIDE BURGER KING

your

Credit

rating

companies

will

you've had a bad history with bill paying. If you can’t save money, try to pay the bills. If you find you can't pay the bills, then you have to cut back. "Live within your means,” if

Hoyes said, adding that students today tend to be more optimistic than earlier generations.

many depressions and

dents.

as their parents for this

dents need the

KITCHEHBR

the credit card.

all

keep

to

Most credit card companies are happy to give credit cards to stu-

The reason

less

is

is

bills paid.

know

in

is

that stu-

money now and

are

job

and

fairly likely to get a

later

They haven’t been through

that students

may

be paying off

the card a lot longer than they had

imagined.

The average

about their expectations,” he said.

on a credit card is 18 per cent. This is often higher for department store cards. If a

Three steps to

good

a 1

.

2.

interest rate

full

credit rating

Save money. Get a credit card, but

as a .substitute for

have, not as a

Keep

u.se

it

money you

means of borrow-

ing. 3.

student can't pay the

as

recessions

and grandparents. "Students need to be realistic

be able to pay off the card. The problem with this scenario is

if

you have, not as a means of borrowing," he said. The third step in building a good

it

Hoyes,

often difficult for

but only

credit,

credit cards as a substitute

credit rating

is

18

per cent and shows no signs of ever dropping.

for cash that

doesn’t.”

This

a lot of

you're using them for that reason.

for you, but

Doug

make

While the prime rate is dropping below four per cent, the mighty

way

it

deadly when

said banks

off credit cards.

Hoyes

“Credit

of borrowing.”

said students have

Having money

make

credit cards

means

The first is a simple concept, but not always easy for students to follow.

borrowed.

“Use

this credit

said there are three

ing to get ahead.

toi*

at the time,

but that student may end up paying a monthly minimum for four years, only to find out that they have only been able to pay off the interest and they still owe the original amount

all bills

paid.


Page 8

— SPOKE, Nov.

19,

2001

Save time

News with

a basic workout By Stacey McCarthy While you may stairs at it

school

doesn’t

fulfill

is

climbing

and yard work. According to the President’s Council on Physical Fitness, a

quite a workout,

U.S. -based fitness research compa-

feel that

the

minimum

exer-

cise requirements for a day.

Exercise does not mean a few pushups or sit-ups every other day. It means working the entire body from the heart and lungs to the

You should

get

at least

30 min-

utes of exercise almost every day or

You can practise a complete, safe workout at home with only a pair of running shoes and a weight. (Photo by Stacey McCarthy)

warm-up and down, there are four basic components to a workout: The basic workout

includes calisthenics, pushups,

Cardio respiratory (three 20minute aerobic sessions) - This

ny, in addition to a

includes

swimming,

Warm-up (5-10 minutes) - This can include walking, slow jogging, lifts,

arm

circles or truck rota-

tions.

brisk

walking,' jogging,

cycling, rope jumping,

rowing and cross-country skiing. Flexibility (10-12 minutes daily). - This can include slow, stretching exercises

includeck. either

the

in

workout or cool down. Cool Down (5- 0 minutes) - This includes slow walking, combined 1

Muscular Strength

every other day

if possible. If you do your usual regime, practise moderate physical activity. This

(two 20minute sessions per week) - The

can’t

most effective way

can include brisk walking, cycling, swimming or doing home repairs

Muscular Endurance (three 30minute sessions each week) - This

strength

sit-

ups, pull-ups and weight training.

cool

knee

muscles.

home

at

is

to

increase

weightlifting.

with stretching.

When to exercise The Council on Physical Fitness says most people exercise just before their evening meal. Others use late afternoon workouts for a

change of pace during the school or workday. Another popular time to

work out is early in the morning. Morning advocates claim earlymorning sessions help them wake up and give them more energy during the day.

Workout schedule It’s

sions

when

there is little chance have to cancel or reschedule because of interruptions and sudden demands.

you

DO YOU NEED A PEER TUTOR?

advisable to schedule ses-

will

Never exercise heavily during humid or hot weather, or within two hours of a meal. Both digestion and heat create heavy demands -upon the circulatory system and when combined with exercise they can overload the body.

Wardrobe

THE LAST DAY TO APPLY FOR A PEER TUTOR IS:

In addition to a proper exercise

program,

should

pay

attention to the clothing they

work

out

MONDAY DECEMBER

3*® 2001

in.

students

Garments should be loose

to

allow free, comfortable movement. Instructors

recommend you wear

lighter clothes than indicated

by the

temperature. If you are exercising in strong sunlight,

DON’T DELAY

APPLY NOWI

wear

light cloth-

ing to repel the sun’s rays and dark clothing in the winter to absorb heat. If the

TUTORS

Wia NOT

BE ASSIGNED AFTER THE DEADLINE DATE.

weather

is

extremely cold,

be sure to wear several instead of one or

Layers will trap

light layers

two heavy ones. heat and as your

body generates extra heat during it’s easy to shed one or two of the layers.

exercise,

to determine your and develop a proper workout. As you begin, it’s essenIt’s

difficult

initial limits

tial to

remember

that exercise is

an

individual activity that varies based

on age, sex, heredity, personal habits and eating practices. Therefore, it is up to you to develop a program that is comfortable but challenging.

STUDENT SERVICES (ROOM 2B02) FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO APPLY

VISIT

Plysicaij^tivil:^

How much?

How often?


SPOKE, Nov.

2001

19,

— Page 9

Winter driving can be demanding By

Tori Sutton

way

brake

to

in

snow

the

by

is

threshold braking, which involves This

the

is

second

in

a three-part

series on winter car safety.

Winter can be a challenging season for students who commute.

Snow,

and unpredictable road conditions can put extra demand on drivers and their vehicles. However, by practising safe winter

ice

and other

accidents

driving,

mishaps can be avoided.

According Ministry

of Transportation,

the

most important things

three

to

remember when driving in the snow are to stay alert, slow down and stay in control. Posted speed limits do not always reflect the road conditions, therefore motorists should be cautious

snow and

driving in

when

ice.

There should always be a safe distance between vehicles to allow The. most efficient

cars to brake.

locking the

tires

into a skid,

which

can force the car is especially dan-

gerous on slippery roads.

your car does skid, it is recomthat you take your foot off the brake and shift to neutral, then If

mended

you want the vehicle to go. Once the wheels regain grip, shift to drive and gently accelerate. Being familiar with road condisteer the car in the direction

Ontario

the

to

applying firm, steady pressure to brakes to avoid locking the wheels. Pumping 'the brakes or the

tions

also

is

crucial

safely in winter.

driving

to

Remember

that

roads packed with snow are just as

dangerous as ice covered ones, and that slushy or rain covered roads can quickly ice over. Roads that have been closed should never be driven on. Listening to the radio for road reports can be

Crowded parking

can sometimes be dangerous icy pavement.

lots

useful in case you cannot take your chosen route. Although brushing off a car in the

lion students over the years.

The ISIC card has many Most people love to travel, but not everyone feels like they can afford

Paying for vacations can a huge expense, especial-

to.

count on

students.

also

One of

these

whose main

is

Travel

objective

is

Cuts,

to help

students through the entire travel-

They’ve been around

ling process.

It

supplies discounts on travel, accommodation, museums and cultural attractions and is the only

seem like when you’re a student. But there are a few companies willing to help, some designed especially for ly

perks.

identification card that is recog-

nized

all

over the world. In Canada, you a 40 per cent dis-

the card gets all

get

VIA Rail trips. You can ISIC World Travel

the

Handbook

free. This book provides discount information for ISIC cardholders in more than 90 countries

more than 30 years and are owned by the Canadian Federation of Students. Travel Cuts will book

around the world. With the ISIC card you can also use the services provided with a package called ISIConnect. These

your

train,

services

bus or plane, at the cheapest rate

rates in

for

whether they are

tickets,

possible

your desired

for

travel

They supply students with travel ideas, packages and important destination information. They time.

even offer a special student travel card called the International Student Identity Card (ISIC).

As

include discount phone

80 countries, free e-mail and worldwide voice mail. Plus ISIConnect provides a service

may

cold

not be a favourite pastime, drivers should make sure all

and windows are completely

lights

clear of snow.

As

well,

it is

impor-

make sure you do not have snow and slush built up in your wheel wells as it can make the uncomfortable in the show are encouraged to sign up feel

for driving classes

trip for

you.

It is

Travel Cuts, along with the ISIC

ISIC card for free. The ISIC card has been around since 1968. It was created by the International Student Travel Confederation and its benefits have been reaped by more than 30 mil-

trip safer

you a

lot

of money,

make your and more enjoyable. They

time and can actually

have offices

Waterloo and can also be found at www.travelcuts.com. If

in

you’d rather stay closer

home and you want

to

to travel with

great rates

for

University of Waterloo and

the

Teams

will

University of Guelph.

How

would you

tunity

to

like the oppor-

and work

travel

in

Brazil?

Global Youth Network, a nonprofit organization

Youth

With

Kitchener,

is

based out of

Mission in sending a team of a

students to Brazil for the

May. The cost but

the

is

money

month of

around $2,500, can be raised

go to countries such as Brazil. Kenya, Honduras and Venezuela. Each year a different location is chosen for each participating Students who join the team study their destination counPete Musselman, organizer of the event at Conestoga College,

which tax receipts can be issued. There will be several teams made up of 10 to 15 students from

said students can join a team at the beginning of the school year, which meets once or twice a week. It is an opportunity to meet other members, interact and get infor-

local post-secondary institutions,

mation.

including Conestoga College, Wilfrid Lauder University, the

While

through extensive fundraising, for

in Brazil, participants will

woric alongside people

and organ-

times.

staying alert and aware and

taking

a

few precautions, com-

muters can make it through yet another winter on Ontario’s roads.

the

company books entire hotels for a week or weekend and works together with the hotel to serve students needs.

Breakaway Tours great

provides

student atmosphere.

a

They

give you a wristband at the begin-

ning of the

trip that gets you into and bars and provides other

parties

discounts.

Conestoga students are being offered several packages this year.

spring break. Contracts are avail-

Students Inc. office.

summer. Breakaway Tours group trips to the

In the offers

several

Rouge River ing. If

for white water raft-

none of the offered packages

appeal to you, the

company

customize a North American for

you

if

you can

fill

will

Second-year

civil engineering students Jordan Wheal, left, Kyle Denouden and Mike Orth were hard at work during class on Nov. 9. (Photo by Dwight Irwin)

trip

a bus with 45

friends.

Spoke can now be read online!

projects.

The projects are diverse. Musselman said they can include

World

playing with kids in orphanages,

Vision, Habitat for Humanity, as

working with street kids, building and maintenance work and clean-

izations there, assisting in su.stain-

development

able

Organizations well

as

include

non-government

other

organizations.

ing.

school.

try in preparation for their trip.

training

These

students.

are possible because

rates

Travel with the Global Youth Network By Mary Simmons

driver

America and expects to serve more than 25,000 students this year. Breakaway Tours offers

able at the college in the Conestoga

card, can save

or refresher

Most

North

in

Students are basically extra

hands “All

the trips are for

to try

and

assist the organi-

zations already established in the area.

students, led by

“All the trips are for students, led

students.” Pete Musselman,

organizer for Conestoga College

by students,” Musselman said. “I went to Peru last year and it was amazing. We worked in several orphanages, built

mud

brick build-

ings, painted, planted grass, taught

-

“You connect with whatever

English

organizations are available in your

learned

country or region,” Musselman

the real

said.

lifetime of school.”

whatever’s needed.

more

For the latest college, entertainment and sports

news, as well as games, puzzles, weather and

I

month about world than anyone can in a in that

a

schools offer classes at a variety of

the largest stu-

company

dent trajel

world" via the Internet.

long as you have proof that you are a full-time student, you can get an

courses.

By

vehicle hard to steer.

Those who

of cars in

(Photo by Tori Sutton)

your friends or meet new ones. Breakaway Tours may have the

These include Montreal for New Year’s Eve and Daytona Beach for

mailbox that can be accessed anywhere around the

amount

Surveying the campus

deposit

called Travel Safe, a virtual safety

the winter because of the

tant to

Travel firms assist students By Shannon McBride

in

concentrated area combined with

reference

links, visit

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke


— SPOKE, Nov.

Page 10

19,

2001

News

Clairvoyance both blessing, curse knowing the unknown can be

Living with the gift of By Daniel Roth you’ve read your horoscopes,

If

and

hope you have, you may have I have been studying

1

noticed that

clairvoyance and other paranormal activities for at least three years

phenomenon and

psychic

wasn’t serious about in

now.

have always had an interest in

I

my

last

was

year of high school.

The Ontario Academic Credit (OAC) art course I took consists of 50 per cent art history and 50 per cent hands-on work. The only catch was

the students designed

what the

hands-on work was going to be.

We

had

pieces of

to research

work

and create

six

for the year.

decided to design six large tarot

I

which depicted experience and personal traits from my life. I did some on my experiences with psychic people, some on paranormal and some on my sign, which is Gemini. cards,

I

did very well in the course, fin-

with 90 per cent. I was this mark. I was even

ishing

happy with

happier with what

of my family also.

were

As

really

until I

it

Every time I went to see her she would mention that I would be having strange dreams and would notice strange things happening around me. She said this for other members

I

visited a friend of the family’s,

had

visited her before for read-

ings with

She

is

my

cousin.

by

far the best reader I

have ever met.

And

is

the only

clairvoyant (she hates the term psychic)

who

reading

turns out she

my

has been successful at future.

Day

my

Both least

Canada

but

All of my ancestors immigrated from Germany, but we don’t know much else about them as records

various

organizations from Guelph

came

together to oppose the Tory govern-

ment under Premier Mike Harris, and those local businesses that support it. Included in the group were representatives from CUPE Ontario, the Guelph Action Network, the Guelph District Labour Council and the University of Guelph Central Student This “day of economic disruption” as the protesters

named

it,

was based on similar events in past weeks in Toronto, Hamilton and Kitchener. They spent the day marching around the city, attempting to disrupt traffic and business, and

splitting into

groups to attend

both downtown and

offer her

wisdom along with

a few

I

have' been honing the clairvoy-

ant ability since then.

my

members of

the only

am

I

one of

family to

and really enhance it. And so far I have been successful. What you might not expect is that

it’s I

not

all it’s

am

cut out to be.

and a quartz

crystal ball are tools clairvoyant

to help others for fun or in

concerns

were for nothing. Just before 2 p.m., a diminished

people

need. Most people don’t realize

some people who read cards may not need them and can read you just by looking at you. This ability can cause emotional

turmoil

and can have draining

effects.

my own

feelings this

On is

top of

often too

to handle.

(Photo by Daniel Roth)

I

can

tell if

people are honest,

trust-

worthy, sincere, arrogant, etc.

My

they see

someone they

really like

they are not impressed

when

I

some of his negative traits. always leave the decision up to the individual. No one has to listen to anything I say. I

don’t need any tarot cards, crys-

tals

out guys. If

or tea leaves to answer ques-

But

tions.

use.

female friends often ask for

when checking

are

takes

what I

think they are fun to

I

And I can tell that people enjoy I

have to

am happy

still

am able

to help

struggling to learn

is

how

to block the personalities, traits and emotions of others. I mentioned that I was sensitive to the thought of others. When I say thought I don’t know what you’re literally thinking. Only the type of emotion your thought is directed. I can tell if someone is having

trouble at

say.

that I

am

home or is struggling in a

relationship.

I

can also

what

tell

Guelph

in

marched

these people are ray peers, they just

I

want someone to listen to what they have to say. At first, I felt sorry for them because no one seemed to pay them any mind.

was wasted. They didn’t do anything that seemed effective to me,

behind.

The

marchers

The

angry.

business own-

The

interrupted the flow of traffic.

noise brought ers

many

And

and employees out of

their

“They’ve been wandering around downtown all day, not doing much of anything,” Terry Leahey said. The downtown merchant said he was not concerned activities would

I

started to get a

little

seemed incredibly

The planned

rally

amounted to little more than chanting and milling around. I started to wonder why they hadn’t come up with a more street festival

way to have their voices Or, more accurately, I guess

know

they’re just

to get

through each

am tired often. I look forward

naptime and going to bed. But since my dreams are vividly don’t really get the rest

realistic I

I’m

telling

I

my mind doesn’t sleep. you

this to advise

that there are people out there

you

who

are very sensitive to your moods and feelings. Everyone is entitled to their own thoughts and opinions, however I would like to recommend that people treat each other fairly, and don’t judge others. Not everyone can tell what other people have to go through each day.

falls flat way I

to get

think

any point across. age group is lacking

my

short of annoying a handful of peo-

an important piece of information you have to respect others if you

ple by making

want them

it

difficult for

to enter their place of

work

them

in the

early morning. protesters

disorganized.

and

stores.

then

started thinking all their planning

if I

to

to

and entertain people. But one thing I

down Guelph’s main street, Wyndham, with police following

protesters

I

need because

I

When I am walking down the hall

and strength day.

that

describe

extra sensitive to other’s

And

then

It seems pack of protesters wasted what could have been a

to

me

to respect you.

that this

heard about the razor

great opportunity to voice legiti-

blades and the glue. Several pro-

mate concerns on some of our

testers

I

poured glue into locks and

then stuffed razor blades inside, disabling ing.

them

in the early

morn-

This inconvenience for local

effective

businesses didn’t strike

heard.

particularly

useful

me

as a

or intelligent

province’s issues.

As far as I’m concerned, they were completely ineffective. All you had to do to figure that out was look at the mocking faces of people around them.

turn to violence. His daily business

was not affected in any way. I walked along on the sidewalk beside the protesters, watching police and local merchants respond to the marching.

rolling

their eyes. It

was disappointing and almost

sad to see a group of young people

dedicated to being heard and making a peaceful statement being

laughed

at

by those they were

try-

me

that

ing to reach.

It

seemed

to

the only people taking the protest-

were thcm.sclves.

pen. Nothing did.

my

it

use a great amount of energy

I

Tarot cards

try

before.

turned out,

feelings

increased and

Especially

use

warnings.

after 2 p.m., the marehers met once more in St. George’s Square. Police were

it

my pwn

stand that intensely

to

Sometime

As

feel better,

mean them.

She was more than happy

had some reservations about heading into the middle of actions that had turned violent in Toronto a few weeks 1

make me

hard to make them under-

family reader for advice.

ers seriously

University of Guelph.

it’s

saying nice things and don’t really

at the

rallies

in a miser-

So not knowing how to work this abandoned gift I asked our trusted

They were laughing and

Association.

me

for the rest of the day.

more than some nice words make me feel better.

chanted and yelled unintelligible phrases and statements as they

Front,

put

dur-

are sketchy.

light.” We all need to stand up for what we believe in, and that’s just what a group of about 150 protesters attempted to do in Guelph on Nov. 6. Under the umbrella of the

Common

this will

mood

assistance to

200 years.

closely

of the

is relived.

My friends will always offer their

for at

best.

Ontario

Often

mother’s and father’s

families have been in

number of

Perhaps Dylan Thomas said it “Rage, rage against the dying

see them every

able

economic disruption

By Julianna Kerr

I

genealogy.

help

of

way when

Either

was describing

I felt

much

she

we

Vividly.

it

thought and emotions.

research. I

just thought

kooky.

ing a situation

do some

clairvoyant, to

is

I

There are some people in the who I know from my recent past who have not been too pleasant to me. Either there was conflict between us or they have just been immature about a situation. school

a suppressed clairvoyant gift that runs Jhrough my mother’s family

about myself.

who

little

people really think of me.

thought and emotion that

found out

I

a

all

frustrating

standing by should anything hap-

I

stood

smoking apples,

there

watching them and eating

cigarettes

and thinking to myself.

Protesters from the Ontario Common Front march down Quebec Street in Guelph on Nov. 5. Marchers were protesting the Tory government under Mike Harris on a day of economic disruption. (Photo by Julianna Kerr)


'

SPOKE,

News juice on Viva Cafe

The By Daniel Roth

watched Lovas carefully blend

I

the juices and herbs to

was overwhelmed.

I

knew a trendy

I

Waterloo.

was drinking was actually good

Viva Juice Cafe has only been open in Waterloo since the spring

for me.

only

is

word “Wow!”

one

to

couldn’t believe that what

apart because

walls and trendy ftimiture set the

for lunch.

When

entered the cafe

I

felt

I

such a want} reaction, it was like being hugged by the room. Earth

atmosphere and local invited to display their

was

thrilled to see

The black-and-white glossy

world.

It

added class to the room.

only took a few

moments

before the owner, Carolyn Lovas, eagerly offered to help me.

The juice menu amazed me. It more than 90 combinations of drinks, all of which are made from fresh, organic, fairly traded, (which means the producer

consisted of

is

and paid a

ethnically treated

wage

for the product) fruits

tonics

“Fairly traded

gets a fair

opposed

ails

of the drinks are formulat-

your energy,

to help increase

ordered

memory. Others help to symptoms such as chest

mayonnaise,

salsa

and havarti

opted out of the spiced carrot stew or jambalaya they offered that day. It looked amazing but I I

didn’t feel like soup.

The drink I ordered was equally good as the one I had the

as

relieve

evening before. This time

Caroyin Lovas, owner of Viva Juice Cafe, holds a bucket of large organic carrots that will be turned into juice. She uses roughly 50

pounds

of carrots everyday.

(Photo by Daniel Roth)

my

worked in a deh for years and was by far the most exotic sandwich I had ever tasted. The flavours burst in my mouth and left

may

I

a nice

aftertaste.

The chicken

breast

was marinated

orange juice and was seasoned with many herbs and Spices. It was in

like nothing I I

Viva

the health tonics. I

got a Boy’s Brew.

pears,

It’s

a

bananas and Ontario panax

ginseng.

taste in

my

mouth, making

it

very

The sandwich was enough

wpr^

fill

me up. Both times I finished visiting I felt

happy and energized. juices were fresh

The meals and and

refreshing.

to

tasty.

which teaches children how to read and soundfout words; Hasbro^s Tonka reading

electronic

toy,

Tliirty-five days until Christmas and the malls are filled with peo "^Dusty My Talkin’Electronic Tool pie hustling and bustling to find Bench, incorporates all tlie

According to HayDate Inc., a private marketing group, this year’.s hot buys include wholesome toys and highly awaited computer and Video games. Since dte Sept. 11 terrorist

been a sharp

attacks, there has

increase in non-violent, tradition-

amazing

Finally, there’s a local cafe that

business.

this year’s top picks list

Jam

‘n

Glam

Barbie,

Nutcracker Barbie and Polly Pocket dolls; last year’s hot educational toy,

LeapFrog’s LeapPad

I

am

be a huge success in this area. I can hardly wait to return.

But there are ways of juice to help preserve

storing the benefits.

its

Lovas recommends three different ways to store fresh juice. The first is to keep it in the refrigerator in a dark pre-chilled bottle. Or keep the fresh juice

The

your juice

juice

is

is still

you buy

This expense

last

in a pre-chilled

way

to store

it

to preserve in the freez-

better than bottled juice

in the store.”

According to Environment Canada we have something called the Canadian Environmental

hydro and wind turbine technolo-

Environmental Protection Act is to allow officials to regulate emissions, set levels and issue penal-

gy-

ties.

Protection Act.

use this

is

occurring year

after year despite introduction of

I

had never heard of the

quite possibly because

used to help Canadian citizens. rarely

it

act,

is

so

protect

Companies initial it

far

are choosing not to

expenses for implementing exceed those for keeping

ally high to appease companies and penalties are like expensive

coal burners running.

parking tickets.

Toronto Area.

with

all

proceeds donated to

New York fire departments. For video-game lovers,

electronics

retailers

to take the top

spot.

Also

for

PlayStation 2, the expected top

pick video 2:

game Metal Gear

Sons of Liberty, a is

Percentages and actual emission

companies are unavailas is information on follow-

up investigations

2 game console will beat out GameCube and Nintendo’s

Xbox

records of violations are

stealth

a sure thing to be

seen on Christmas lists this season. But also included on the list

games such as Super Mario Advance, Jimmy are older .non-violent

Neutron: Boy Genius, Luigi’s Mansion, and Madden 2002.

of polluting,

companies. In

any information that

fact,

might indicate positive progress of the Environmental Protection Act is almost nonexistent. It is a lot easier to locate bad press about environmental

limits

are flexible, levels are set habitu-

able,

er,

Any

However, the emission

new technology because

totals for

shooter game,

Also on

perishable.

“The process of freezing and thawing your juice will destroy some fragile vitamins and enzymes,” she said. “But frozen

Waterloo is not a new sure it is going to to

Blazes, the action figure firefight-

Solid

are Mattel’s

interested in ensuring

er.

plete.

acters before they

them.

you are

food and beverages. Viva Cafe moved from Stratford, so it

hard to find and largely incom-

allows children to build the char-

can play with

If

puts a lot of effort into healthy

from the current top movie in the U.S., Monsters Inc.; and Billy

Microsoft

line

no chemicals or

your body is getting all of the nutrients it needs it is best to drink the juices right away, since it is highly

thermos.

included safety glasses; charac-

PlayDate’s top toy pick for the season is Lego’s Bionicle, a line of traditional old-school action

The new Lego

20 people about how it is.

ters

are estimating Sony’s PlayStation

figures.

least

According to the OCAA, Lakeview Power is one of the best examples of inadequate implementation. Lakeview is the largest source of nitrogen and greenhouse gases in the Greater

sounds of workbench tools and even reminds children to wear the

and toy retailers believe the Christmas season won’t be any different.

al toys

is

Environment Act needs shaping up

popular this Christmas

the perfect gifis.

more.

my visit to Viva I have told

Since at

By Stacey McCarthy

By Marcy Cabral /

little

those of similar restaurants in Toronto, they are by far less expensive.

Viva.

tempting.

think they are a

But when you consider that all the produce is fresh, organic and fairly traded it is well worth it. If you compare the prices to

had ever tasted before.

noticed the various types of food

flavours fought to be the dominant

PMS or a decided to try one of

didn’t have I

the prices to

other restaurants in the area you

smooth

I

When comparing

order to me.

thick drink consisting of oranges,

Since

you know there

preservatives entering your body.

The different meals were all freshly made and looked equally as

the

is an excellent way to your body. Since all of the fruits and vegetables used at Viva are pesticide-free

Fresh juice

Grand Bend Sunset. It was a mix of strawberries, oranges, cantaloupe and ice. The flavours were not as subtle in this drink. The different fruit

I

whenever possi-

refuel

being served to other patrons in

hangover

middleman,” she

ble.

chose

PMS.

for his labour as

the

All the products are organic and

this

libido, or

colds, hangovers or

an international

wage

to

are bought locally

The cook promptly brought

with Dijon mustard,

it

You have the option of getting a bowl of soup with the sandwich

you.

is

said.

dried tomatoes.

but

prides her-

to serve products

traded coffee.

was seated and provided with a

unique “build your own sandwich” menu. It was a list of all the available ingredients for your sandwich and you just checked off what you wanted. I chose marinated chicken breast on toasted sourdough bread with leaf lettuce, black olives and sunI

on being able

have been organically grown and purchased from farmers who have been paid fairly for their work. Such products include the fairly

I

and

smooth-

fruit

and drinks for w'hat

Some ed

when

cheese.

shakes, veggie juices, health

ies,

the door

at

fair

vegetables.

The menu offered

I

customers.

that

was greeted with the same

I

uses in the

it

its

organization that ensures the grower

enthusiasm

some amaz-

ing photography from around the

prints

self

returned.

walls. I

It

are

artists

work on the

serves to

it

virtual-

takes pride in the

it

quality of ingredient

products

is

also stands

It

Owner Carolyn Lovas

tones contrasted by lime green

has already raised the stan-

no competition.

ly

I

was too good. The texture was smooth as silk and the banana flavour put me in a good mood. I was unaware Viva also served a variety of meals. Since I was not hungry the evening I went I decided to go back the next day

dards of restaurants in the area.

unique to the

is

area in the sense that there

describe the flavour,

it

By Daniel Roth

finally got to take a sip.

opened in University Shops Plaza. But I was not expecting to patronize such a high level cafe in

but

body

refuels Viva Juice Cafe

Then I There I

Fresh juice

make my

drink.

juice bar had

— Page 11

Nov. 19, 2001

On March

Another problem

hidden There are many repetitions of the words, “reasonable,” “serious,” and “dan-

within the act

lies

itself.

gerous.”

These words are subject siderable interpretation.

26, the Ontario envi-

ronment minister said Lakeview was to stop burning coal and implement natural gas efficiently by 2005. On July 3, the minister dropped the efficiency requirement, allow-

to con-

What

is

considered reasonable or dangerous varies from one provincial inspector to another.

The that

OCAA

states

it

is

on good

relying

obvious faith

to

reduce emissions isn’t working. Enforced regulation is required,

ing Lakeview to burn gas in their

as well as clearly stated limits

boilers forever.

emissions that are binding and

The Ontario Clean Air Alliance issued numerous

As well, in 2000 the Ontario Power Generation’s gas emissions

punishable.

through Queen’s Park regarding the Environmental Protection Act. According to the

knowingly exceeded their provincially set limit by more than 49

effort into the

per cent.

right place.

progress.

(OCAA), has press

releases

OCAA,

industrial

smog

kills

1,900 Ontarians a year and costs the provincial lion a year.

economy $9.9

bil-

That

is

million

equivalent to driving two

more

cars

on Ontario

highways.

The

Those who put the time and Environmental Act

obviously had their hearts in the

The

full

ly strict,

proper

purpose

of

the

on

niques.

law

is

detailed and fair-

needs work on implementation techbut

still


Page 12

— SPOKE, Nov.

19,

2001

Fashions changing with season By Laurie Vandenhoff As

the temperature continues to

drop, the sights and sounds of winter are

Maranda Howie, Aldo in Kitchener.

toes are in,” said

an employee This

at

a very feminine look for

is

beginning to appear around

Students

have a pair,” said Sara Mitchell, a second-year police foundations student. “But I only

Fairview Park Mall.

like to

array of styles and trends are

available in shoe stores throughout the Kitchener mall.

knee-high lengths are

you have you wear them. said

“I love

them,

but a lot

in,

to be careful

how

I

wear them under my pants.” Jen Neeb, a second-year nursing

are especially unpractical for nurs-

have

labs.

this year.

“This Sally

is

a broad season,” said

Lowens, manager of Transit

in Kitchener.

However, styles varies

ing students

from store

among

to store.

Transit, a lot of people are

At

going

chunky wedge in a tall boot,” said Lowens. At Lemire ’s store, Feet First, for the “heavy,

only several people have purchased the knee-length style. “A lot of

who have

While women’s greater

attract

styles cannot

popularity

“Men

styles

seem to men’s

are not big boot people,”

employees have noticed a drop in men’s sales. This is blamed on the recent development of mad cow disease, said Lowens. This has created higher prices and lead to synthetic styles,

which are not popular among men. However, synthetics are accept-

“People are realizing they don’t have to go high to look

able for

boots.

dressy.”

are

to

son

is

this sea-

the shape of the toe. “Pointy

women’s more willing

Lowens. They also work

“Women

wear them,”

said

women

with

said

their greatest attribute

association

with

war.

Jen Santos, a first-year law and security student, wears one of the most popular styles

Throughout history, boots were the most practical form of footwear for soldiers. This was their ultimate purpose until they were viewed as a growing trend of

of boots this season.

the social

The

wedged boot is espepopular for dressy looks.

chunky, cially

(Photo by Laurie Vandenhoft)

elite.

small calves, said Howie. Leather can be a problem because it is too loose and uncomfortable.

and

The

syn-

materials provide comfort

flexibility for

unusually shaped

in

the

women’s

’60s,

legs

were more exposed and fashion designers created ankle- and kneelength boots to accentuate the new look. Thigh high boots enjoyed a

degree of popularity Kippen.

too,”

said

“The youth of the decade’s preoccupation with promiscuity meant instant success for these go-go boots,” he added.

Changes in the world economy have also had an effect on boot styles. One example of this is the U.S. oil recession of the ’70s “Expensive boots fell from fashKippen said. “ Doc Marten meantime became popular with both sexes and were associated with the alternative punk moveion,”

boots

ment.”

Also popular during

this

decade

was the infamous platfprm shoe worn by glam rockers of the

“ABBA

decade.

took the new

plat-

form boots to knee and thigh extremes,” Kippen said.” Made in

Since then they have become a fashion statement. According to

fashion passed with the death of

Kippen, examples of

disco.”

this date back Middle Ages. While there have been a number

as far as the

thetic

for

their

is

people have been going with the

Another popular element

However,

be ignored.

Transit,

Syria,”

boots.

said

At

ancient

in

Kippen, of Curtin University of Technology, in his research on the history of boots, adding, cave paintings in Spain dated between 12,000 and 15,000 BC, show men and women wearing

attention,

Lemire, adding, “all men’s styles are ankle height.”

boot styles this year

Cameron

classes in

three-quarter or ankle-length,” she said.

nating

student, agreed. “They are too dressy for school,” she said. They

Ankle heights, knee-highs, synthetics and leathers are a few of the choices shoppers

in

have only added to the growing number of looks that have emerged over the years. A glance at the history of the boot shows how they have surfaced from practical clothing element to status symbol. “The oldest boots in the world come from a clay impression origi-

college agree that

at the

mini

Changes

boots.

Conestoga College. Boots, being one of them, can be seen on students on campus. "Boots are a big fashion statement this year," said Lisa Lemire, an employee at Feet First in

An

calves.

sorts

all

of material synthetic, the

Fortunately the boot did not die

with

and

it

will continue to

domi-

of styles throughout history, the last 50 years have seen the most radical

nate for years to come. Lowens said shoppers can look forward to

changes, especially the ’60s.

more colours and a

“With the introduction of the

lot

more weave

styles next year.

Welding students win cash awards from Praxair By Nicole Childs Two welding

won

the award for the achievements he made during his first

students

Guelph campus

at

the

Conestoga

of

College are the first-ever recipients of $500 awards for academic excellence, sponsored by Praxair. Bill Gates, the

(Photo by Tannis Wade)

Construction continues

Kitchener-based

manager

territory

for

presented the awards

Praxair, to

Jason

Wagg and

Chris Kuntz on Oct. 25 at a special gathering of welding students, faculty, college^

and industry representa-

officials

Praxair

a multinational

is

pany

that

with

atmospheric,

supplies

the

com-

industry

process

and

specialty gases, high-performance

coatings, and related services and technologies.

Wagg and Kuntz were chosen primarily

because they had the highest academic standing over a full year of program studies.

Wagg

his third year of the

is in

welding engineering technology program but earned his award for his performance in his second year of study. plans

Workers continue construction on the Superbuild project Conestoga College’s Doon campus. Construction is expected be completed by September 2002.

put

$500

his

education

at

“It was an honour to receive the award and was certainly one of

many

at

the

to

career,” said

Kuntz (Photo by Sarah McGoldrick)

engineering technology program were in attendance as well as

many

industry representatives including ESAB Welding and

Cutting Factory

Products.

Panasonic Lincoln Canada and

Automation,

Electric,

Budd

Praxair Products Inc.

According

to

Karsten Madsen,

highlights of

is

co-ordinator for the welding engineering technology program, five industrial partners

were thanked for the nearly $300,000 worth of new welding technology and robotic systems they have provided for the col-

my

college

Wagg.

currently in his second

year of the same program, and

Guelph campus shops and

lege.’s

labs.

“This

is

particularly noteworthy,

coming only

a

month

after our

for

CAMl

reception

last

Automotive who have donated two robotic systems to our welding technology labs. “In

to

towards his Conestoga. (Photo by Sarah McGoldrick)

Members of the program advisory committee for the welding

program

tives.

He

year of study.

all,

industry

has

more than $400,000 over year

invested the last

welding and robotic technology at the Guelph campus, a significant investment indeed,” said Madsen. in

Presentations were made to each of the c unpary reps by John Tibbits,

College.

president

of Conestoga


SPOKE, Nov.

Grass always greener By Janine Toms brands of toothpaste and

more harmful than

hairspray are pesticides used

by the college said

Barry Gurski, a certified horticulturist and physical resources work-

Conestoga College.

er at

use makes us better stewards and neighbours.” Barry Milner,

manager of physical resources Gurski, along with Pete Schlei,

hand of recreation and a

groundskeeper

at the college, regu-

attend information

larly

Conestoga

at

Many

of the sprays used are the

same kind purchased

at

a local

nursery.

Conestoga College has integrated management program for pesticide use on its property. The plan, designed and implemented by physical resources, combines the

.

sessions

current

trends

and costs in respect to pesticide use. Ten years ago, the school allocated $10,000 of its annual budget to the maintenance of campus grounds. In the year 2001 only $200 was spent to maintain the

same amount of land. “Reducing pesticide use makes us better stewards and neighbours...

we

are doing

organizations.

like a

Pesticide use at the college has

maintaining

addressing health

concerns with environmental issues

said Milner.

last resort in

manager of

physical resources at the college.

on legislation and on studies conducted by the government and local

become a

— Page 13

a pest

“Reducing pesticide

lead

2001

the appearance of the school property said Bairy Milner,

Some

19,

many

Physical resources

product

deter squires

great things,”

use herbals

made from pepper to

-

from destroying the

Barry Gurski, a physical resources worker at Conestoga College, pulls an aerator behind a tractor reducing weed growth and enhancing grass development by giving oxygen to the soil.

school’s flowerbeds. (Photo by Janine Toms)

HEALTH CARE TIP

THE best STUDY TIPS Successful students use a variety of techniques for identifying important and committing it to memory.

information 1

.

WEIGHT CONTROL Need

to lose some weight? Follow Canada's Food Guide and try cutting

down

the overall

number of calories

in

your diet,

particularly those that are high in

Find a plac0 that helps you focus. If you are the kind of student who can’t sEidy in complete silence, go to the local coffee shop to study. Yes, it’s busy and noisy, but some people can accomplish more in that environment than being in their room. If you find these areas to be teaming with distractions, and you are really serious about absorbing and retaining information, find the most remote, quiet place around.

Remember to exercise and weigh yourself regularly and above all give youself a pat on the back for each pound that you lose. fat.

2

.

if

you

find yourself getting frustrated.

Whether it’s Math or French, push your books out of the way and relax. If you’re at home, go to your room and lie down. Don’t sit in front of the TV. otherwise you

SL John Ambulance

will find

Rewriting notes

yourself too distracted.

OR typing notes.

remember information. Slowly you can compact your semester’s worth of notes'f writing/ typing, re-writing them again Really helps to

Healthy eating...

until

r^vlar physical

you have a compact group of the most

important ideas covered.

o

By the time you are done, you are ready for the 4.

www.pofttdpoctm.com

f

C,C.W

final.

Try this trick. Wherever you are, even in the middle of a test, if you feel yourself getting uptight and nervous. Close your eyes and consciously control your breathing. Slow yourself and your breathing down, use visual imagery to take you to a relaxing place.

One

or two minutes of this

will

calm you down enough

to finish

what you are

doing with a fresh mind. 5.

Give your eyes a

rest.

When

reading through text material, set your watch alarm for 45 minutes and take a break, making sure to focus far-off in the distance.

Your eyes are muscles and you need

to give

them a chance

to look

somewhere other than 18 inches away.

l-888434-9%> www.paguide.com Phi

\i( f//

.

//< (t

i

( sifitft'

For more information on this technique and other learning and study strategies, contact Student Services, 2B02, for an appointment.


Examining the sacred balance David Suzuki’s

new book

By Sarah McGoldrick

and how

As

world continues

the

to face

an uncertain political future, the

grim environmental future tends be forgotten.

to

The Sacred Balance by David Suzuki looks at the world and its environment from the dawn of time and looks at how man has had an adverse affect. Most of us know Suzuki as the host of the news-niagazine TV

show The Nature of Things and

as

to protect

its

looks at man’s adverse effect on the environment

fragile exis-

colleagues have

made

their con-

tence.

clusions.

Each chapter opens with a quote from a prominent biologist, environmentalist or philosopher which

Written like the layers of the rainforest, Suzuki brings to the readers’ attention the different

continue throughout the chapters.

ways

Each one

to the rest of the

offers shared views

and

perspective on the global environ-

mental condition.

in

which we are connected world and in fact

Suzuki begins his book with an appearance on Earth, surfacing from the sea and transforming into who we are today. With this step we begin to

connection to the land, the and each other.

Perhaps one of his greatest exam-

a reoccurring ecological educator

alter the

on Sesame Street. In The Sacred Balance he continues to share his knowledge of the environment

tional beliefs allows the reader to

says for

a'

make sense of how Suzuki and

particles

UVe

environment.

Mixing

ples

scientific fact with tradi-

air, fire

is

hpw we

are connected by

which we breathe. He

the particles

making

it

environmental as

a

earth.

to his original

message

the final chapter on repairing

is

damage which has already been done.

He

offers simple day-to-day

into

the future.

Through the examples of present and past man-made ecological disasters, he makes the reader aware

ecological mishaps. These things

of their role in the world. The Sacred Balance is a modern day prophecy of what is to come,

he admits to practising, adding to the book’s personal approach of

future can be altered.

solutions to preventing and fixing

finding a solution.

The Sacred Balance

is

a well-

written and poignant study of the

with the added offering that the

The Sacred Balance is available through Greystone Books or at your local bookstore.

Hypnotist entertains with X-rated show By Tannis Wade

Though Lee Hypnosis is defined by Oxford Dictionary as a sleep-like state produced

who

person

in a

is

then

very susceptible to suggestion and acts only if told to do so. That is exactly what happened Nov. 7 at

Stages night club for the Tony Lee show.

A

full

school bus

left

Conestoga

student residence at about 9:30

head to downtown Kitchen'er. During the ride people discussed whether they were going to go on stage or not. After arriving there was about a 30minute wait before Lee took over p.m.

.

to

the floor. “It

was

like

I

what

I

was

for being

an X-rated hypnotist, he started off

He

tame.

did the typical tempera-

change to a beach setting and the subjects started fanning themselves and wiping away imaginary sweat. A few minutes later tHey were shivering and cuddling their neighbour for warmth as Lee took their minds to a cold place. ture

Once

was

it

but

fully hypnotized,

little

more

racy.

me

Lee got a

my

girl-

hypnotist volunteer

The show started with an intrimix of lights and .sounds as he made his entrance onto the stage.

cate

the

HAVE

crowd every time

• Business Administration • ComjDuter

Programming & Maintenance

crowd shouted “Stages.” “It was like I was watching myself on television,” said Mike

Murphy who

• Hospitality

readily volunteered to

take part in the show. “I could see

Technology

• Health Sciences

&

Child Studies

& Tourism

New Media & Communications

“package the size of a moose,”

And

When

loved taking part in the event.

Our complete program

black jeans and

asked for volunteers about 15 people rushed up to fill the empty chairs on the stage. Lee asked for the crowd to be quiet

during the

relaxation.

The

regression

lights

to

dimmed and

By

I

end of the nearly two-hour show people were walking around with underwear on their heads thinking they were hats. the

order to get out of the hypnothe volunteers had to come up

on stage and shake hands with the

started to

event

ultimate relaxation.

It was obvious which participants were alfected more by their posture and body language.

For a while Lee’s voice could be hearti but he was nowheie to be seen. Finally he

was spotted

ing at least three

full

and handing them out

members. He

carry-

shot glasses to aiuliencc

sis

cameraman who was filming the for television. Once they did that they would remember

everything they fall to

luul just

done and

The

the floor with laughter.

sltangc part was the people

Buses

left

Stages right after the

again

and gulped the shot down. Wiping

dents the i)pportunity to stay

at

nightclub atul enjoy the

of the

proceeded up

to the stage

and con-

line up -of more than 80 full-time and diploma programs, including post-graduate

options -starts in the

fall.

Can't start in January? Can't wait until fall?

Our more than 1,000 part-time studies courses are the way to go!

For

more information,

Act now!

call

416-289-5325.

Classes start January

7,

at at

evening.

about

12:20 a.m..

and

about 2 a.m. This gave sturest

the

2002. 1

-

888 -334-9769

www.paguide.com

hats.

he clinked glasses with the group slightly, he

certificate

were wearing the underwear on their heatls still thought they were

show,

mouth and cringing

that's just our winter-start programs!

who

didn't miss a beat as

his

Most programs offer co-op, internship or piacement options.

In

ocean sounds filled the room. Their heads began to fall against their chests as the keen volunteers i'cel

& Operations

the

stereotype of a typical hypnotist.

in

was

-starting

as sexy stunts

definitely not the

Dressed casually

skills

this January -essential for your future in:

was doing but I couldn’t stop myself from doing it.” Murphy, who claimed to have a

a T-shirt, he

ALL

Enjoy unlimited career options with our comprehensive

programs. YouTl gain real-world, practical

• Engineering

what

IT

so.”

The crowd roared

mooned

Mike Murphy,

NEW YEAR'S RESOLUTIONS

The mostly male

were pulled including one man who pullecl. down his pants and

it.”

On Your

group of volunteers had to stand in a line and answer truthfully the ultimate question, does size really matter. They were forced to pro-

friend told I

HEAD-START

clear the subjects

were

doesn’t matter because

couldn’t stop myself

from doing

known

Answers ranged from, “It’s how you use it that matters,” to “It

could see

was doing

I

is

vide a valid reason for their decision before they could sit down.

watching myself on television.

GET A

tinued with the regression.

^

window

for decades.

non-specific time these in the air,

current

and fears to bring home the message of protecting the environment, which he has tried to do ties

Adding

begin as little blobs in the ocean, carrying this water with us today. He then defines our

world’s

condition as well

Suzuki presents his findings in both scientific and layman terms, never straying from the premise of the book, save the

the galaxy.

Humans

man making

same breath as someone a thousand years ago. Suzuki uses man’s own curiosipossible to take the

Cfntfnnial COLLirT www.centennialcollege.ca


1

SPOKE, Nov.

New

horror film a must-see

I

19,

— Page 15

2001

HOROSCOPE By Daniel Roth

November

Luckiest day: 19.

By Michelle Goring

The most impressive film

One of I

years, 13

A

idow SMts '

and

Ghosts

is a

masterpiece

remake of the William Castle movie, the level of goriness and unpre-

state-of-the-art

classic film’s

froiB

dictable fright scenes are

J llie

compare.

dis-

»are

beyond Cyrus joins the family and warns

The movie

iseni

about the Kriticos family who experiences sudden tragedy with the death of Jean (Kathryn Anderson), wife of is

Men

Arthur (Tony Shalhoub, deni

»e, lie

and mother to young Bobby (Alec Roberts) and Kathy (Shannon Elizabeth, American She perishes

2).

in a fire that

leaves the family in financial ruin,

The family soon learns

al

Arthur

is

that

the sole beneficiary of

estranged uncle Cyrus

his Ti

in

Black)

Pie sHe

(F.

Murray

Abraham,

Finding

Forrester),

who Arthur

has not

seen or heard from for years.

The inheritance includes the uncle’s large house, which is made entirely of glass. The Kriticos family, along with their nanny Maggie (Rah Digga), eager to take ownership of the

is

house and begin a new life. However, they soon find out the house is much more than meets the eye.

/

)

gruesome

of a horror film,

A psychic ghost hunter (Matthew Lillard, Scream) who had worked with the late uncle

to

open the gates

hell.

The basement is a large containment unit that harbours 12 deadly entities needed to power the houses transformation.

When

family realizes the

the

site

inside.

ate the

suddenly caught in a frantic race to stop the house and defend themselves against the 12 crazed entities that will stop at nothing to kill them. The beginning of the movie sets the perfect mood for the rest of

birthday.

The

special effects used to cre-

movement of

the ghosts

Your family may be help-

pected

evening

television.

“I’ll

Then

Upon

newest video and

at

clerk scans the

A holding

information from

ing with people,

it

movie

that has

within 24 hours

a

little

for

will guide

you

Luckiest day:

November

25. Sagittarius:

O

Taurus: April 20

-

May

20

If

You will be a mediator week as you will be able to also find yourself negoti-

November

stores

in

offer better deals.

the

A sudden change in your everyday

dark.

throughout the film.

in

Luckiest day:

Gemini:

Your

ror fans.

is

a

must see for hor-

Those who are easily

spooked should probably wait to see the moVie on video so the lighting can be nice and bright.

May

you by

take

Luckiest day:

«

21

-

attitude

money and

life will

This movie

20.

June 21 towards

surprise.

November

- July 22 Your mood swings may

week. If at all possible avoid blowing off steam at people who are close to this

November

24.

-

August 22

are approaching the

end of a long

made you

tired

battle,

which

emotionally

and physically. Focus your energy on something new. Luckiest day:

November

24.

Virgo: August 23 September 22 All of your hard work

has paid

more copies

like

Steve’s

new

of

TV (shown

like

Blockbuster and Rogers

releases, smaller independent stores

here), offer lower prices with

a good

{Photo by JuHe Graham)

selection of videos.

Regina

on

located

Even worse are Rogers and Jumbo video stores. Jumbo Video

Waterloo, offers

night movie rentals for $4.

Gen-X

offers a

specializes in carrying every

movie

and Rogers Video wants a whopping $5.98 to rent a

new

On

Street

of

their

in

one-

of a

new

A one-

release

is

53.99.

Their regular releases, which are to six

months old, are $2.99 for and $3.99 for three

nights

lights.

Steve’s also offers a great

of five

DVDs for five nights for

Generation-X Video and Media,

receive positive

from customers.

A

feedback

disadvantage

bigger

video

an

may

A

we

manager

from

number

of new releases like Blockbuster or

smaller selection, the cost for the

rental

can react faster to the marketplace because we don’t have to deal with a head office,” said Green. store,

the

stores.

Green also said Steve’s plays off when competing with

their strengths

“Because we’re

do not carry

independent

store at Steve’s

the

that they

thousands of VHS and movies for sale, and the unavailable movie will usually be available upon returning to the store. There are also a lot of convenience and variety stores to rent videos from. Although they may also have a

TV, said she receives positive feedback from customers regarding their low prices.

rental

usually

Rogers. However, stores like Steve’s

TV, located beside Frederick Mall in night

did not want her

zines.

store also offers

Marg Green, manager of the video

Kitchener, offers super deals.

who

released, said the staff doesn’t

be

The

Steve’s

stores.

name

with independent video stores

the other hand, there are the

independent video

Blockbuster,

movie memorabilia, posters and maga-

films.

night.

all

genre, including rarities and foreign

one

release for

off.

You

will feel fulfilled

and have a great sense of achievement this week.

offer

a

Kitchener

TV

offer

DVD

video

is

usually $3 to $5.

The next time you rent

a video, try

one of the smaller video stores change and save some money.

for a

are

happy and successful. Luckiest day:

November

.

Cancer: June 22

You

Although large video rental stores

.

Capricorn: December 22 January 19

22

be intensified

has

-

22

24.

you.

At Blockbuster locations, a oner

one-night rental for $5.28

November

and immediate which sets the pace for the rest of the film. The level of gore is unmatched as mutilated bodies and waves of are seen frequently blood

night rental of the latest release is $4.99.

w

Luckiest day:

A true friend will be helping you

checking

Kitchener- Waterloo that

it will be Things will be better towards the end of the week.

restored.

through tough times. They will do everything they can to ensure you

video stores like Blockbuster

also

lost a belief or a trust in a per-

son rest assured that

material posses-

like a

However, there are smaller, independent video

you are feeling as though you

have

sions will be heightened this week.

or

releases.

November 22

December 2

-

door-

hanging from frames or bats looming

Sure, there are the bigger corpo-

new

ed in the next little while. Luckiest day: November 20.

cobwebs

total

who offer two or three shelves full of

needs to go in. The foundations your future are being construct-

Cast in a dark and eerie junkyard, the gore scenes are shocking

the film.

less.

rate

is

K

be back

to

wise and supportive friend

technology can provide. The house itself is impressive as its futuristic look' is unlike any other created for a horror film. It is pristine and clean with no

you could be paying much

around,

leal

life

in the right direction.

in.

VHS

may seem

great deal, but with

Wo wo

you. deal-

ating financialmatters.

HOW MUCH?”

DVD

;

when

Listen to your intuition

You may

the counter,

Paying over $5 to rent a

-

guiding you in the direction your

terrifying

appears on the cash register. “That’ll

be

October 23

with-

A may be

friend

the latest

arriving

movie and the

November

November 21

your membership card. The

flash

Luckiest day:

19

this

trustworthy,

is

April

membered bodies and movements that only

video store, you pick out the

at the

-

balance both sides of any situation.

the idea hits you,

go rent a movie.”

who

Scorpio:

Nothing to do and nothing to watch

on

colleague

IHr“

March 21

Leo: July 23 boring

-

you out of a slump. This person will help you see the bright side of things using humour and energy.

it.

Graham

Another

September 23

money does come your way,

Luckiest day:

Julie

be in

will

create a horrifying display of dis-

Smaller stores have better movie deals By

A

ing you out financially. If unex-

names

contains the

Born Son, The Torso, The Bound Woman, The Withered Lover, The Torn Prince, The Angry Princess, The Pilgrimess, The Great Child and The Dire Mother, The Hammer, The Jackal, and The Juggernaut,

is

and family

Aries:

danger they are in, the machine house is activated, trapping them

The family

friends

look into investing

The Web

Libra:

innovative and energetic will help

Sagittarius!

before the physical appearances of the ghosts were even consid-

and description of each of the ghosts which include: The First

of

19-25, 2001

close contact with you on your

not a house at

machine created

November

Happy Birthday Scorpio and Your

death.

ered.

but a gigantic

of

According to the official movie Web site, www.LSghosts.wamerbros.com, the personalities of each of the ghosts was created

them of the dangers of the house. The family learns the house is all,

Week

October 22

'Each ghost has its own background and description of its

to grace the big screen for

movies “ntal

most frightening

the

part of the

the ghosts themselves.

is

Aquarius: January 20 February 18 Conflicts and competitions are likely this week. If you are unsure about the direction you’re headed don’t panic, things will be clearer

M

later on.

Luckiest day:

Pisces: February 19

An goals

November

24.

-

March 20

your week. But don’t

uphill battle to achieve is

likely this

burn yourself out trying to reach for goals that are unobtainable Luckiest day: November 19.

Daniel Roth

is

a second-year

journalism student who has studied astrology

and other clairvoyant

issues for three years.


— SPOKE, Nov.

Page 16

19,

Ss’back

2001

Entertainment Michael still King of Pop?

Is

By Kathleen Deschamps

By Denis Langlois

musical family. At the age of five

he began to

Michael Jackson. Fifteen years

take part in a journey of a lifetime.

ago people would think of the hits and the moonwalk, but today many

your bags and get ready

Pack,

is you will have to you apparently love

The only catch leave the pereon

and spend time with

1

3 sexy singles.

Sound simple enough? Welcome

to

just think of the scandals.

With the release of his latest album of new music in more than Jackson

now

the second instalment of Temptation

six years,

Island.

prove his status as one of today’s

,

The newest Island

Temptation

series.

place

takes

2,

Playa

in

Tambor, Costa Rica and involves four unmairied couples being separated

from

their partners in

an

effort

to discover if their love is true or if

there

is

someone

The couples

is

trying to

best artists.

Many

though can’t

listen to the

with

singing

older brothers

in the

Jackson

was

1

looks.

with the biggest album of

1958 into a

The

1

more than 51 million The video for Billie Jean

sold

records.'

number hits, including ABC and I’ll Be There. His first solo album was Off The Wall, which came out in 1979. This was the first album ever to have four number hit songs. To many people, this would be enough career success for a lifetime.

in

5.

It

four

family became national stars with

music without thinking about his personal problems and physical Jackson was born

his

the

first

video played on

Throughout

his hit-making career

all

time.

Thriller.

sales than anticipated.

This year Jackson

He

was speculat-

ed that Jackson had affairs with received millions to keep quiet.

His plastic surgery also made It is

1

1

He

still

Pop, but it

speculated that

he has had more than

is

ones

time around

It is is still

During the

first

1

single

male they find

men one the

each person gets to

this,

who

block one single

be unable

be the most

The women do

threatening.

same. After

to

will therefore

to date their partner.

Throughout the show, the couples go on dates with some of the

get to

singles to see if there

greater than the

>iiestoga Coll

a connection

is

one they have with

presents the

their partner.

At the end of many

of the

episodes, the couples get to find out

what happened

to their partners dur-

ing their dates with the singles.

During the

last

episode, each per-

Employe^ Winter Qala

^itnvial

son will get to go on a hot date with a single of their choice.

After the steamy dates the couples

then get to decide

This show

is

they want to

if

stay together or call

quits.

it

and

certainly unique

many viewers

Friday/ December 7th, 2001

tune into the series

every Thursday at 9 p.m. on Citytv to see what the couples are doing to betray their partners this time.

This show seems to be aimed at

^j/The Berkley

Room

at

Bingemans Park

anyone who enjoys looking into other people’s lives and seeing what It may who want to see

trouble they get into next. also appeal to those

own relationship is tme or who just want to look at the

if their

those

sexy singles on the show.

Temptation Island 2 ing because

is

it

worth see-

is

trash television at

you just want to relax and mind off the stresses of your day than this show is for you. its best. If

pm Cash Bar 7:00 pm Dinner 8:30 pm Dancing d;30

take your

It is

not reality as the genre sug-

from the

gests but an escape

world, an escape

many of

real

us crave

and need. The newest Temptation

Island

promises to be better than the

last

becau.se the couples this time are

more dedicated right for

to finding out

is

it

is

your partner

Willi

Buy Your Ticket Today

exper-

Is

way

a relalit)nship the best if

(Limitcti Tickets Available)

steamy and

morally right?

imenting with other people while out

Tickets $25.00pp

them.

Temptation Island 2 hot, but

who is

t

all

is

questions

about it

Door

Prizes! I

you?

righl for

show’s principles aside,

in

lo find

is

the defi-

Any Questions??

nitely popular. In last year’s Nielsen ratings.

11.5

Temptation Island had about

million

Although the

viewers

tuning

in.

of

this

official results

year’s ratings are not yet available.

Temptation Island 2 popular show.

is

Cilylv’s most

Contact Shirley E)onc2yk (519) 748-5220 ext.3756

artist.

himself the King of

many have anointed new years away from the to the fans to see if

performers of our time.

are:

in relationships get to vote off

calls

I

he

one of the greatest musical

0 months.

episode, the

also celebrating his 30th

now up

Edmundo and Catherine; Genevieve and Tony; Thomas and Nikkole, who have all been together for three years; and John and Shannon, who have been together for

releasing his

iu his

else for them.

this

is

titled Invincible.

spotlight.

nose jobs,

and has dyed his skin white. The rumours about Jackson have

album

anniversary as a solo

young boys. One sued Jackson and

into the news.

Jackson followed that up though

it

album

1995 Jackson released which had much lower

In

sixth solo

the curtains.

In the early ’90s,

his

History,

many remember what went

on behind

affected

sales.

MTV

that featured a black artist.

though,

significantly


SPOKE,

Nov. 19, 2001

— Page 17

Experience Utopia at Nov. 29 event ^

3y Nicole Childs Business

Conestoga ^"^Association

is

at

Students

again

it

with

Conestoga Business Students Association (CBSA), hopes that Utopia will be an event that all can

not feature a

enjoy.

it

Utopia,

another student event.

especially in social, political "

ino

,

rtf

inew

we

the Sanctuary.

anybody.”

According

John Beechy,

first

Utopia organizer

from school.

and provide the music for Utopia. Each disc jockey brings his

Utopia is a chance for students of all ages to get out and have the same kind of fun. Like the Biz Bash, the aim of Utopia is to help

iar

Dave Newman focuses

the musical styles for Utopia.

Newman, Shepherd and Mcleod have a radio show Thursday nights from 7

to

9 p.m. where you can

hear their unique mix.

John

Beechy,

,

president

Heist By

of

is

people have a good time and meet

new

Beechy hopes to have and possibly foos ball. He also plans to hold tournaments and hand out prizes for the top winners. people.

free pool

Daniel Roth, a second-year journalism student will be performing tarot card readings at the event.

Beechy has a surprise in store but would only say, “The fish are coming.”

a

many so

is

because

students and an escape

it is

It is

small and famil-

also a bit

Beechy also hopes first

has to pay his part-

the

seen as a safe haven

more

intimate.

have another have L’eau go

to

with plans to

from the Sanctuary. Because it is well before exams and not too close to the end of the semester Beechy thinks Nov. 29 is a good date for Utopia and expects a good turnout. “It lifts the spirit of the soul,” he said. Admission prices for Conestoga students will be $1 or a non-perishable food item for the food bank. Visitors will pay either $2 or two non-perishable food items. live to air

Gays

thriller

Now Moore

Lisa Hiller

Sanctuary

well with the

It fits

theme

for

sound:

said.

this is the

event that has ever been held in

Utopian

attend.

Beechy

to

the Sanctuary.

student population was unable to

own

I

we can’t alienate anybody,” he

Last month’s Biz Bash was good, but unfortunately the under-aged

on euro-electronic, Dave Shepherd focuses on ambient and Wes Mcleod brings the underground. Euro-electronic music, ambient music and underground music blend to create L’eau, which will be

that idea.

“If we’re going to have a Utopia,

programming analyst students. Dave Newman, Dave Shepherd and Wes Mcleod come together to create L’eau

is

contests or activities

all

promote

will

can’t alienate

Utopia is presented by Man, Myth, Legend Productions and wilt feature music from three computer

tk

alienates people.

unity and

have a Utopia,

and

moral aspects, will be the theme for the new event being ^ held Nov. 29 in

Unlike the Biz Bash, Utopia will Bump ‘n’ Grind contest or any contest like that because

The main idea behind Utopia

we’re going to

“If

defined as an ideally perfect place !

n

»

'

Students involved

winner and Oscar nominee David Mamet writes and I • directs a mastermind of a thriller Ithat I thought moved slow at times, interesting to follow

I but

was

and I

intelligently written.

still

Heist will attract

many middle-

Bergman’s young

lieutenant,

who

trying to double-cross him. This well-done movie also stars Delroy Lindo (The Cider House

face stereotypes

still

By Kathleen Deschamps

Hie

Rules) and Ricky Jay as Moore’s partners. Sam Rockwell plays the

young

lieutenant trying to outsmart

the veteran thieves.

|ligent movies.

wife possibly seeking greener pas-

Rebecca Pidgeon plays Moore’s

Gene Hackman (Heartbreakers) plays Joe Moore, a thief whose life j becomes difficult after he is videoI taped on a secret camera during a I

tures.

[jewelry store robbery.

smart

Bergman (Danny DeVito) refuses to give Moore and j

ing minds, not guns.

do one last job for him. Moore and his two I broke and are now I partners having been forced to 5 betrayed,

away with

I

his

fence

gang

their cut until they

complete

this last

job of robbing a

liisl

|0(,1 JV4«)Sl ,x

ipU

\\ lit

dtmn

iht

ill

(Photo by Nicole Childs)

it

voinan

i

pjil ol

VNiieM.'!

who

is

liie^lilirj bej'irii

Kedgrmi' SUITS us ‘’wkiow^J” when

is

laged and older viewers as well as 1 those who enjoy serious and intel-

His

left,

Students Association.

ners to do the job and deal with Pulitzer Prize

the planning of Utopia are, clockwise from

in

Dave Shepherd, John Beechy, Wes Mcleod and Dave Newman. Shepherd, Newman and Mcleod will be providing music for the event, which is being held by the Conestoga Business front

What happens when you know you are being played? You play that person back. Heist

smart

down

typically

is

a

game of cat and mouse involv-

whom to

Who

and who

the gold?

all

It

which pieces of

penseful puzzle

fit

will out-

will

come comes

this sus-

together the best.

an excellent and smart,

Heist is although sometimes deliberate and

siiL

du.ssv.s

The

and

last pail

2000

Ills like .>f

a man

die uuyjiG

i- in

Ellen

TBaWr^vorviTuiig that they could

some loiiples

sue sidl miiai ized loi

out, because they as.sumc she is

iheir publis displ.j\iol dlfer Mori.

Over soLielv

tlie

liiii

past several decades.

has i.ime

loii"

.i

wav

.1

no one protected her. She e»)ul(l not even tell anyone tJic inilh. and she was forced lo Irnic

ol the tunes,

m

the negative stereotypes towards gays and lesbians However, as

each decade passes the issues tlonT go away, they just change

.til

lheevideni.e of hei lelalionshij'

with her liwei. She

V

all nolfiiiig in ilie

is Icll

Could

alone <uid

takes place in 1972, in

house. 1 his time college co-eds aie living in the house. All of the resi-

ent times.

dents are feminist lesbians

HBO.

ll

IS

was made in 2000 for about one house and

the diffeicnl pa>plc tliroughoiit

who lived

different

times

in

tt

The

house takes on a dilleront look, based on the diffeicnt occupants

proud lo

lx: oiil.

who are

Michelle Williams

plays one of the girls

who

falls in

love with Chlexf Sevigny’s charac-

However,

vv.mt,

iheir iliev

a house, accept[leers

and love.

desperately want a

Be e.uisc they cannot do it on own, thay no through other methods such .ii sperm donation* and ailiiici.d insenination.

bal)Y.

their

The girls in the house torment and shun her hcciiuse Michelle’s

(he problcirts that lesbians have

had to face tn each of the decades, and it teaches acceptance^ Each part of the video was written and dirtxted by a different woman. Anne Hcche, DeGeneres’ former lover, directed the 20fX) segment. It is

ter.

new

bs

’fhe m-)vie deals harshly? with

movie the same

the-

Talk 2, deals with the issues of being a lesbian throughout diflei'Hie video

possibly atiee

end

Ihe second part of

with die rimes. Tlie video, If These W.iHs

Beiausc

living ifJiriprmioM

lover is not the aorra because

a good rent for anyone

who

wants lo sec how lesbians are txeat*^ by society.

j I

Swiss cargo plane.

slow-moving

thriller.

You’ve got

mail...

coming soon

booklet on Government of Canada services. Look for information on:

A

For more information on government services:

canada.gc.ca •

Career, job and business planning

Protecting the environment

Safe surfing on the Internet

Helping kids do their

Retirement planning

Making choices

Service

Access Centres

homework

for healthy living

1 (1

800 0-Canada 800 622 - 6232 )

TTY / TDD For you, your family and your community. It’s coming to your mailbox soon!

Canada

1

800 465-7735

Canada


Page 18

— SPOKE, Nov.

19,

2001

Sports

Out with Expos, in with Canadian Baseball League By Marc Hulet

expansion

include

Calgary,

London and Hamilton. teams will be owned by the

Toronto,

With Major League Baseball in shambles because of problems with contraction and contract negotiation

All

league so they will hopefully avoid some of the mess Major League

there couldn't be a better

Baseball

new Canadian

Teams

time to unveil the Baseball League.

to hold

Details were revealed at recent news conferences. The league will begin play in May 2002 and it will be equivalent to the MLB’s AA minor league baseball. The league’s founders are comparing it to the CFL Major League Baseball Hall of Famer and Canadian Ferguson Jenkins will act as league commis-

spectators.

.

facing.

is

will play in

stadiums able

between 2,400 and 5,000

The 2002 season

will

see the

eight teams

compete against each other in a 72-game schedule. The games will be played on Friday nights, a double header on Saturdays and a matinee on Sunday afternoons.

The rest of the week will be left open for the team to provide instruction and training. The league hopes to provide exposure for Canadians players and allow Major League Baseball

Soccer teams evenly matched

to take notice.

By Vanessa Laye

The four other initial teams will be located in Saskatoon, Regina, Lethbridge and the county of Red

“There are a lot of youngsters who want exposure,” Jenkins told Canadian Press. “Right here in Canada is the best

The Condor men’s indoor soccer team and the Exsonics went head

place to do

plays, to

Deer.

have

sioner.

The Jenkins Cup to the

champions

will

at the

be awarded conclusion

of each season.

The field

initial season will see teams players in four B.C. cities:

Abbotsford, Nanaimo, Kelowna and Kamloops.

The league hopes

to add more by 2003 if all goes well. Cities being discussed for the

Each team

be required to Canadians on the

fill

each other’s on Nov. 7.

in a 5-5 tie

It

the

rosters.

A draft will take place on Dec. 4 to

end

was a fight to the end between Condors and the Exsonics, which consists mostly of former Conestoga soccer players. Having

will

at least five

25-man

to headj anticipating

it.”

the current teams.

played together throughout their college career, the two teams read each other like books, knowing how and when to block the other’s moves. “They should be called the

Conestoga Alumni team,” said Jeff Johnstone, coach of the Condors. In the

first

half of the

game

the

Condors took control and showed the “old guys” their new moves. .

“In the first half we played very well defensively,” said Johnstone.

“They moved the ball up the court, man to man.” Condor Bojan Djokovic scored the first goal of the game on former Conestoga goalie Levent Sherifali. “Bojan waited for Lev to go down for the ball and then put it in the roof of the

net,” said Johnstone. Dino Vukmanovic added another goal to

make

it

2-1 at the end of the

first

half.

Right from the kickoff of the second half Condor Mokaidi “Chico” Maikano put the game

But the Exsonics Condors that they hadtheir touch by making a

lost

the

four-goal

game

their

goal.

showed n’t

when he scored

gear

into

third

comeback

to

lead

the

5-3.

ing

llias

Tsatsas brings the ball up the court during an indoor against the Exsonics on Nov. 7. The two teams tied

game

(Photo by Vanessa Laye)

hard kick just over the halfway

But

line.

Maikano came through

in the last

minute of the game to

score Conestoga’s cross from

fifth

Gen Hidaka,

goal off a to tie

it

5-

5.

Condor Vukmanovic scored second goal of the night off a

had incredible

who

“We

got sloppy in the second half,” said Johnstone. “Defensively

we were

out of position, but

we

were still moving the ball well and had first touch control.” Johnstone, having coached players from the Exsonics, said, “They are

team

the

against. If

them,

we

1

we can

measure

mine

play well against

can play against any col-

Three players who excelled at the game were goalie Ivica Ambramovic. who Johnstone said

Got something Spoke wants

to

reflexes,

played a major role

game by

Hidaka in

t

Maikano, who he

»

usually a playmaker, not a

«

the attack, and is

shooter.

Maikano scored two

goals

:

for the Condors, with his second

j

goal tying the game.

“The Condors are team.”

said

a very strong

believes they will

make

I

provincials

;

this year.

The

varsity

*5

men’s indoor soccer

tryouts will be held in January. Johnstone said he is looking to

carry 17 players this season. Tryout dates will be posted at the recreation centre sometime in

December.

to

printed.

j

who

Johnstone,

say?

hear from you.

be

j

the

taking charge on defence,

Write a letter to the editor. must be received by Tuesday at noon for the following issue. They can be e-mailed to spoke@conestogac.on.ca, dropped off at the Spoke newsroom at 4B14, or mailed (see address at bottom of page 4). Please include your full name, address and phone number. letters will not

c

»i

Letters

Anonymous

[

j

creating a goal and jumping into said

lege.”

With only two minutes remainhis

Condor soccer

h

'


!

»

SPOKE,

Nov. 19, 2001

— Page 19

S Intramural volleyball fun, exciting By Mike Sperling ‘With

Third-year

woodworking

added the sport is

organizes the

games and makes

the

gets

loser’s bracket.

Dietz said the best part about running intramural volleyball is it gives

Dietz is also awarding medals

everyone the opportunity to meet

teams.

show up for scheduled g^es. He removed that didn’t

Seneca By Vanessa Laye rough hockey game between Conestoga and Seneca College lead to the Condors 6-4 downfall at Seneca’s home game opener on Nov. 10.

was a unique game,” said Greg Rickwood, coach of the Condors. “The referee could have been the sixth player on both teams. You never knew which way he was going to call it.” In the first period the Condors were down 4-0. “It was a 5 on 3 situation, with two of our men in the penalty box,” said Rickwood. With Conestoga short-handed for most of the period, Seneca took advantage of the situation and used their power plays to accumulate some “It

goals.

The Condors crushed Seneca 6-2 at their home game on Oct. 31, but weren’t so lucky playing on Seneca’s short rink. “Seneca is guard when they scored their first goat from a bounce off the off

boards,” said

Rickwood. “They can

really play their rink well.”

Penalties

le,

Rickwood

said

the

team dug themselves a hole by getting so

many

“If

penalties in the first

you take away the

first

team enjoy a game Nov. 7

at the recreation centre at

leyball action for this session. Dietz also had a problem with two pairs

would be a

totally differ-

ent game,” he said, adding that staying away from penalties would

give the team a.chance to win. In the second period the Condors started to

up any confusion with the

to clear

communicate and domi-

nated the play, scoring three goals to make it 5-3. Condor Ryan Baird had the best goal of the game when he fought off a couple of checks,

schedule.

dous

The most valuable player (MVP) game went to Bums, who Rickwood said was all over the ice,

game by being

lot

same

College on Nov. 4. Condor goalie Jason Lafortune got his first league

and by playing a

of ice time.

win and was named MVP. “He was major part of the win,” said Rickwood, who added that it was even more special for LafOrtUnC, with Sudbury being his hometown. The Condors play their next a

next 10 games are crucial to make to provincials. “I’m excited about this year’s team. Even after a loss, they are upbeat,” said Rickwood. it

Conestoga won

game

6-3

home game

second

their

against St. College Nov. 23 at 8 p.m.

Cambrian

against

came

out from behind Seneca’s net and jammed the puck between the post and the goalkeeper’s skate. In the third period Conestoga was trailing by one goal. The Condors had the chance to tie the game 5-5 when Daryl Bums got a breakaway, but Seneca’s six-foot-four goalie made an incredible save,

Conestoga pulled its goalie for two minutes of the game but Seneca scored to win 6-4. Seneca’s goalie was their key

“He made some

"I don't

want

be here!"

to

Clair

Quitting

Many students, exhausted by workload and weather and discouraged by many students who want out and hope

borderline marks, consider leaving college. Counsellor see to return later.

the course

leaving the score at 5-4.

player.

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

which

to get running.

rematch

in

With the Condors 2-2 record, the

most con-

the

he hopes

effort every shift

hustled hard, finished checksj scored and overall made the best plays. Andrew McDermott also scored for Conestoga and as Rickwood put it, “stepped up his game.” Tyler Smith also played a

ing that for the intramural volleyball session after Christmas,

athletes.

sistent defender, giving the

of the

great

to separate the competitive players

from the recreational players. He is thinking about implement-

Dietz said there is a large turnout for the sport because participants don’t have to be tremen-

by Conestoga

slips it

of teams that wanted the same team name. He changed the team names

contemplating to the top three

He has been getting good feedback from the players so far. One recommendation he received was

(Photo by Mike Sperling)

team from the standings and eliminated it from intramural volthat

But

"out there" any better? Quitting does not solve a financial shortfall or make

is

work any easier the next time.

Leaving causes other problems. Contact

is lost

A sudden void is created in the student's

with school fiiends

seems a monumental

life.

Jobs are elusive.

who form a natural community of support.

Returning to school

task.

incredible

saves and got his glove or pad on

almost every shot,” said Rickwood. “They didn’t have that goalie at our

home game.” Despite

Rickwood

were given out every

minute, but

half.

Conestoga College.

the last

very predictable, but they caught us

JaiiiiJiI’

volleyball

period

A

ffSOC®

fun which

many peo-

constructed in a double elimination format with a winner’s and a

its

Biviiicials

so

playoff session will be held before Christmas. The tournament will be

He has more freedom and to run it the way he wants to.

was a team

wli

why

the work.

new people and enjoy themselves. “^Tien they are having a good time usually I am having a good time,” he said. “And that makes running it that much more enjoyable.” One complication he encountered

lissecoil-

itself is

came out for it. The intramural volleyball season will run into December when a

Despite being the only person running the event, he doesn’t mind all

tpijt

another reason

ple

tech-

schedules.

ItllfW

This

is

not a "carry on at

carefully.

all costs"

message. Rather,

know the

Drop a course which is not salvageable and pick it up Conestoga’s

said there

is

loss

always a

“We outshot them said. “ I like that we

positive outlook.

52 to 43,” he had a lot of chances to score and that this year’s team is offensively creative.”

costs and consider all alternatives

Consider options other than withdrawal fi-om a program; later.

Consult your instructor before

conceding defeat. Pick up a failed course through Continuing Education evening or Negotiate with the

Apply

pro^am chair for partial

for Peer Tutoring.

The

load. Better to save a

cost to the student

is

minimal and

it

summer classes. few than

lose

all.

works.

Considering transferring to another program within your school

Communicate with a peer or faculty with whom you are having difficulty. Request a leave of absence (Health Sciences).

e recre-

ne

in

Problems with math?

Ask

for help

from faculty or classmates.

Seek temporary

shelter if home has

become

untenable.

Community

resources are listed in

Student Services.

See your doctor,

Soluliofi:

www.MafhInstractor.com e.

oti the

- line tutorials

A sudden decline in energy may indicate treatable illness.

Take off a day or two to deal with grief or personal absence now and then.

loss.

Everyone

is entitled to

a "personal"

These and many other solutions have been explored by students with a counsellor. We are here to listen and help when you have run out of ideas. Most find they can get through with a little support or leave with a plan for completing their education.

A Message s'!)-

you

turnout is based on the amount of fun the players can have and that they are able to joke around. He

nology co-op student Robert Dietz

dltiii!

sports

College’s recreation centre to play intramural volleyball.

There ace 12 teams that partici-

Sjl®.

other

have to be in some kind of shape to have fun,” he said. He feels the

pate with an average of eight to nine players per team.

nil

many

Every Wednesday night about a hundred people pile into Conestoga

from Student Services

(Room 2B02)


Come check us

out

online! 1

SPOKE

is

now

online at

www.conestoqac.on.ca/spoke '

Updated every Monday, come

visit

us

'

for the latest college,

entertainment and

sports news, as well as

games,

puzzles, weather and reference links.

I


Digital Edition - November 19, 2001