Issuu on Google+

34th Year

Firefighter students By Sanja

Conestoga College students the

pre-service

gram

were

firefighter

saddened

by

in

pro-

the

United States, but said it made them even more determined to finish the program. According to CNN, more than 200 firefighters and about 80 police officers are dead or missing recent

tragedy

in

the

after the terrorist attacks in

We

have

persevere

that

-sadness they felt after they heard

sense of honour to put someone else’s life above our own,” said

about the deaths of the firefighters in New York. “Though I’m not a real firefighter yet, I feel like a part of my family died,” Sim said, breaking

what

Giibota

takes.

it

Tony Swanburg, in the

all

a student

also

program.

But silence enveloped the class-

room

as the students recalled the

“It is

a great honour to die in the

of duty,” added Swanburg.

line

He

also expressed the

more people would have appreciation

hope

that

a greater

firefighters

for

after the tragedy.

Continued on Page 2

the silence.

A day

— No. 61

of silence

and tears

New

York and Washington Sept. 1 1 “What happened in New York didn’t discourage me from becoming a firefighter,” said Christopher

Sim, a first-year pre-service

fire-

fighter student.

Students win a $1,00&

schotarsMpeacit-^ A

“It actually gave me more determination to become a firefighter. I will be proud to say one day that I am a firefighter.” Other students in the program shared similar feelings. Sim’s classmate, Joel Bromley, said he was not discouraged.

“The incident

in

New York

actu-

me,” he said. “I’m very proud to be in this profession and there is no doubt all my ally inspired

Danny Marceau, a business dent, lower their

classmates are going to push themselves to prove that they have

.

administration student, and Tammy Boegel, an engineering stuof silence for the victims of terrorism Sept. 14.

heads during a moment "

(Photo by Denis Langlois)

'f

26

Ratification vote Sept. Professors at universities receive

By Reni Nicholson

as

Faculty salaries at Ontario’s college remain slightly above high school teachers’ pay, but dramati-

below university professors’ income after the Ontario Public Service Employees Union and the Ontario Council of Regents signed a tentative agreement on Sept. 1.

cally

A ratification vote will be held Sept. 26. If the contract is approved, about 6,500 faculty members at all 25 of Ontario’s community colleges will receive increases of up to seven per cent. Teacher’s salaries during the

much as $102,100, and universi-

1 ,

2003.

been hoping for a four per cent increase per year and new steps on the pay scale, which would move college faculty closer to the pay scale of their university counterparts.

Walter Boettger, president and faculty representative for local

237

(Conestoga College) and a teacher in the trades and apprenticeship program at the college, said pay raises within the

academic year are

have been on the top step of the 20-step income scale for at least

offering

bonus $700 This additional benefit affects about one-third of the members. will receive a

“recognition

allowance.”

Increases for high school teachers for 2000/2001 were, on aver-

age, 4.3 per cent and for

2001/2002

they have been 3.4 per cent, with

many boards

still

to settle.

been

reached

said the mediator who was hired to intervene in negotiations helped this round of bargaining.

school and university teachers. “Now that the college will be

one year

ha^

Working since mid-August, the faculty’s union bargaining team had

dle of the pay scale between high

Those faculty members who

time in the histo-

on time.

should be appropriately paid, putting them somewhere in the mid-

per cent April

first

tlement

tive to Sept. 1 and by another two per cent Sept. 1, 2002 and by one ,

the

of negotiations.

increase by three per cent retroac-

two-year

is

OPSEU bargaining that a set-

ty faculty unions are in the process

similauto the methods of pay raises within the high schools. He also said college faculty

contract, if ratified, will

This ry of

CSI

teachers

applied degrees, those

may

have

different

salaries.”

Negotiations for a differentiated salary

scale within

faculty will be

the college’s

made

in the next

round of bargaining. Boettger said he is ecstatic about the speed in which the bargaining and agreement took place. •

He

“He helped

to understand

activities

cancelled By Tannis Wade

each

and helped to build a working relationship between the two sides.” “There will be an overwhelming

The last thing that the Conestoga Students Incorporated (CSI) was

acceptance,” Boettger predicted.

of

other’s views

thinking about last

week was sumo

wrestling and a hair show. In light

Boettger said he is grateful an agreement was received on time

current world CSI scheduled were cancelled.

because strikes are instances in which nobody wins. The last

crashed

OPSEU faculty strike was “A

strike

is

in 1989.

a situation where

each side is staring each other down, digging in their heels to see

who

will flinch first.”

On

Sept.

1 1

into

events

two

activities

two hijacked planes the World Trade

Center in New York. Shortly after another plane hit the Pentagon in Washington, all part of a planned terrorist attack.

That same day

at

Conestoga

Benefits for the contract will take affect Oct. 1. The existing contract

College a show of stuntman events

will cover benefits until then.

place over the lunch hour. Instead the Sanctuary was filled with hun-

Benefits for dental and hearing

have been improved for faculty. Orthodontic dental care will go from $2,500 from $2,000 per lifetime. Crowns and bridges have a

$2,000 annual maximum, apart from other dental work, and hearing aid coverage will go from $300 every five years to $3,000 every three years.

such as sumo wrestling was to take

dreds of students watching live coverage of the attacks on the

United States. A Salon Selectives hair show scheduled for the following day was also cancelled, but this time had nothing to do with it terrorism.

Continued on Page 2


— SPOKE, Sept.

Page 2

24, 2001

Continuing education participates By Stacey McCarthy Doon's college council met on Sept.

10

the

for

time this

first

semester to discuss issues of concern on campus, and to raise new issues for the

2001-2002 agenda.

Under discussion was student satisfaction within Conestoga College’s

continuing education programs and which areas need improvement.

10,000 continuing education students from the Doon, Waterloo, Guelph and Stratford college

campuses.

was conducted on-campus,

It

involving only those students

were enrolled

in

courses that exceeded eight hours in total. didn’t

from

want any backlash

Dave who presented the KPI

students,”

Stewart, results

tion are the results of last September’s third annual Key Performance Indicator (KPI) con-

and it takes about 45 minutes to complete the survey. We were concerned that if these

tinuing education survey.

council.

“There are

some who only had three-hour courses,

shorter courses participated they

The survey included more than

would have

lost a great deal

of

large one.

survey, funded entirely

“In fact

by the continuing education program, was conducted by a third

who compiled

party

“The

the data.

directors of continuing

continuing

registrations,” said Stewart.

Conestoga’s distance education courses are done outside the normal classroom. Learning can be

Continued from Page lot

of people think that

1 fire-

fighters are just sitting around and waiting. But when the fire comes and when people are at their lowest point, we’re calm and we put our lives on the line to

save someone else’s

life,”

be even more scared for my father,” said Francis. “But as time goes on, I try to

accept

that

he

is

what he

He said that if anyhim I should know

going to die happy doing

likes to do.”

“It is

hard to express

your

grief

were aware of the risks present on the job and admitted to be somewhat afraid. However, they said the

sometimes when you see so much bad at work. It

risk is

is

The

students

said they

a small price for doing

what will make them complete and happy. “Obviously there of fear also

in

it,”

is

hard to take

it

home.” Paul Martin, police foundations teacher

an element

Sgt.

said Scott Williams,

a student in the program.

“There

is

no

firefighter

who can

edu

The KPI survey questions ranged from what students thought of cafe-

done

survey,

which

teria services

available.

is

ed only every two years,” said

the students in the pre-

service firefighter

calculated and you just

they have full

you can.” a civic duty to try our best to help people no matter what we’re “It is

facing.

I

just feel

it

is

the inost

noble thing to do to try to help others,” said Bromley.

Lindsay

Francis,

a

first-year

police foundations student, said her decision to become a police officer

did not change after she heard about the attacks in the United

However, she admitted she was always afraid for her father, States.

who is a firefighter. “When I was younger,

used to

program said support from their

families in the choice of their profession. “My family understands

how

about the civic duty and they think it is a good thing to be able to sacrifice myself trying to help others,” said Williams. I feel

However, Bromley admitted his girlfriend was upset after the recent events.

“When my

course contents.

Stewart.

More

than

around April for presentation. As a result of more than 10,000

Conestoga ranked first in several categories including the price of

students participating in the sur-

books, cafeteria hours, overall ease of registration and cleanliness and

ext.

safety of the school.

questions

KPI survey was con-

the

last

the information

fall,

was not made available

vey

Conestoga College was upgraded from a mediumsized survey college to a last

fall,

what

want behind me.” I

Sgt. Paul Martin

new

also a

is

from Guelph, who I

very difficult for the family,”

Martin said. “It

and kids all

and

to

like

comput-

accounting, financial manage-

ers,

ment and

taxation.

Interested students can call the information centre at 748-5220,

the council

You can

3656.

also e-mail

geninfo@conesto-

to

gac.on.ca.

teacher in the police

foundations program, said his career always had a great impact on his fam“It is

available for online at Conestoga.

These include courses

Everyone focused on terrorist attack

do and they stand

to

at

are

ing

1 1

Also discussed

tutors

Currently more than 100 continueducation courses are now

until

Though ducted

home, but

at

6,000 surveys were sent out in Ontario and 80,000 returned. Province-wide, 22 colleges took part in the survey, and

hard for the wife

is

watch

TV

and see

that

those rescuing police officers firefighters

were

killed.”

After the recent tragedy in the

United States, he

Continued from Page 1 was arranged three months ago,confinncdonemonthagoandl was fully expecting them to come,” said John Olinski, CSI president. “I “It

contacted them and tliey said that the promotion was no longer running and they had contacted me to let

me know tliat,”

coL

Instead of the hair show, Olinski

leagues at work were also concerned about what would follow as a result of the attack on the U.S. Martin encouraged the students to

smd that Salon Selectives might provide the CSI with sample prodiycts to make up for die inconvenience.

said,

his

‘People were very dis^pptmted

was

cancelled. I’here

expressed for

interest

even

was going

I

shaved

was a

off,”

he

this

to get

my

lot

it

of

event,

beard

said,

However, the wrestling event will be rescheduled. Sumo, suits were rented from Checkm definitely

Fun Factoiy, who let tire CSI have them on another day with no extra charges. “They could have just stuck us witfi the h’l,'”

bill, -

Sarcroiinski.

but they did-

-

.

.

girlfriend

a firefighter. But said.

It

is

“My

too.

“I think,

comes

when something

like this

up, people should talk about

and share

that stuff hap-

a part of the job,” he family understands this is

it

their experiences.

“As I mentioned today after the memorial service, the students are coming into a career that might be facing a lot of changes and challenges.

entered a

The whole society just new phase in terms of how

Search for housing a maior headache By Michelle Timmerman

the registry

the world functions.”

Martin also advised students

saw it she cried for a long time and said that she wouldn’t like me to be pens.

I

to their grading of

share their concerns and feelings

Most of

say he’s fearless, but the risks are

do the best

a

contribute

ily.

said

Sim.

it.

thing happens to

“It’s

courses

offered online.

big upgrade.”

money for the why it is complet-

interest in

only a couple of registrations short of having 12,000

Families worried but supportive “A

meeting was increasing education

we were

cation

said

At the heart of council’s recommendations for continuing educa-

to

The KPI

who

continuing educa-

tion

“We

their training time.”

KPI survey

in

to deal

with the problems as they arise and to

communicate with “It

is

their families.

hard to express your grief

sometimes when you see so much bad at work. It is hard to take it home.”

With the decrease of apartments in

ing

the

between $300 and room and cook-

is

$400 a month

for a

facility.

Kitchener-Waterloo area, finding housing has become a nightmare for students looking for

the Conestoga College

somewhere

Friday.

to stay while attending

college or university.

The

listings

can also be found on

home page

where they are updated every

College’s student services provides a bulletin board

Anyone interested should go to and click on services, student services, housing, and housing

for students in

registry.

Conestoga

where

students

need of housing, can post ads

“The biggest problem for stuis many want apartments for the privacy, and the Kitchener-

for free.

dents

People not attending the college can come in and post ads at a $25

Waterloo area

charge.

A

16-page housing registry is also provided by student services

which contains approximately 200 listings, complete with the landlords’ names and phone numbers.

“We

don’t screen the landlords

before

listing

istry,”

said

ordinator

them

in

the

The

receptionist

Carol Gregory, coof student services.

housing farther away. The average rent for a place in

lot

services,

of rooms

Students who will be looking for a place to live for the 2(X)2/2()03 school year should start looking early.

Student

recommends

services

starting in July or August, rather

than waiting until the school starts.

week

before

“Go with your gut feeling when looking for a place,” said Gregory. “If

it

take

it.”

Other

divided into two sections, the first being housing close to the school and the second is

student

for rent.”

list.”

registry

for

“although there are a

reg-

“However, we do provide the students with a sample landlord agreement, and if a student has a legitimate complaint on the landlord, they will be taken off of the

is lacking apartments,” said Marcella Giansante,

doesn’t feel right, don’t tips to

keep

in

mind when

looking for that perfect place to live are, try and find the housing environment you want, and be

patient, looking for a place to live is

not an easy process.

i

|


SPOKE, Sept

News Adventure By Jody Andruszkiewicz

A new territory that is growing by and bounds has enticed Conestoga’s friendliest security leaps

official to leave his

job

at the col-

Cliff Laurin, the site supervisor

Wackenhut security services, heading to Nunavut Territory

become

a

Wackenhut

company

the

cian drenched in chocolate milk,”

over that time.

he

site supervisor, said

“Cliff’s always been an excellent guy to work with,” Tribe said. Hunter concurred with Tribe, noting that despite Laurin’s normal day starting at 7 a.m. and finishing

miss the

at 3 p.m.,

said.

who worked

Laurin,

for

three

years as a college security staff

before being promoted to staff

he is going to and students.

A normal day for Laurin was spent doing a variety of things including

provided

to the

many

always took the time to help people and put on a lot of Band- Aids. He said 90 per cent of Laurin’s day was spent providing services ranging from opening locked doors

who cars. He

for faculty to helping students

locked their keys in their

estimated Laurin has helped hun-

on Sept. 14, his day at the college, Laurin said his memories of Conestoga College will be good ones. His favourite

cars over his five years here.

In an interview

last

Day

inci-

Hunter even joked about

how

Laurin has helped students get into their lockers with security’s “master key” that, oddly enough, looks

ment

It

will be structured like other

programs,

university

preparing for the

change-over of the nursing program from a diploma to a degree by offering them both in the same year. The change-over comes after the province passed legislation making a bachelor degree the minimum

requirement to practise as a registered nurse.

adding; “It

is

she said, the same curriculum

that is being offered to students at ”

McMaster

Security services staff (from

Sharpe

whose

say farewell

(far right)

last

day

left)

at

John

Tribe, Al Hunter

“Cliff

was

mom

and dad to a

lot

of students,” he said. Even though Laurin had a pater-

ments for entry and an increase tuition costs.

ongoing operational

will

costs.

In order to assist with the change-

‘The students

may

get

frustrated at times

because they expect us to have answers and sometimes we don’t because the

will assist with

“The tuition that students pay be the same as a university,”

Even though nurses

will

process

is

so new.” Lois Caspar, chair of nursing

The change-over in

changes to the

will also result

minimum require-

be

nursing program has already begun, Caspar said there are many wrinkles that still need to be

worked out. “The students may get at

frustrated

times because they expect us to

required to have a bachelor degree after January 2005, Caspar said nurses who are registered before then will not be required to

have answers and sometimes we don’t because the process is so new right now, ” she said. Caspar is, however, optimistic

get one.

that everything will

“Nursing requires

its

a profession that members to constantly is

maintain their competency,”

up funds from the government. costs related to infrastructure, reno-

in

she said.

over, the college will receive start-

Some of the funds

challenge.

Conestoga

at

Also, the college will receive a grant from the government for

will be presented with a problem, ” she said, “and

sion would benefit from the province’s new legislation, which comes into effect January 2005. The new program brings many changes, Caspar said.

“We’re certainly going to miss here,” he said. He added that Laurin’s new job will be a tough one because of the physical size of the^ community but that he thinks Laurin’s up to the

him

enjoyed working with him. John Tribe, a security representative for Conestoga College, worked

vations and transportation.

“The students

the problem using the resources ” available to them.

as helping students start their cars.

4.

1

nal demeanour, his co-workers also

exactly like a bolt cutter.

will act as a facilitator.

Lois Caspar, chair of the nursing programs, said the nursing profes-

tained the parking machines as well

to Cliff Laurin (holding plaque)

Conestoga was on Sept.

Hunter said Laurin main-

college.

and Roger

(Photo by Jody Andruszkiewicz)

Caspar said the degree program will take a problem-based approach and the teacher will not lecture but

diploma program for nursing.

on campus,

of offences

Laurin was also handy around the

University.

then they will have to identify what they need to learn in order to solve

This will be the final year of the

officers. In addition to taking

reports

Change-over of nursing program begins By Denis Langlois

night

at

short-staffed.

scheduling uniformed staff at Conestoga and providing directions around campus to bylaw enforce-

kindnesses.”

He added that Laurin

dreds of students get into locked

is

when

“one of those guys that

said Laurin is

island.

Conestoga

wasn’t unusual to find

of security services at the college,

move

the Stockwell

it

him working Wackenhut was

that has

town of Iqaluit. Not wanting to go unprepared, Laurin said he compiled a folder of information on Nunavut. Iqaluit is a community of 5,000 located on Baffin Island, Canada’s largest

is

two him

miss him as well. AI Hunter, director

an adventure while I’m still young enough to have one,” Laurin

memory

years, sharing an office with

officer.

“It’s

describing his

closely with Laurin for the past

a politi-

Laurin’s co-workers are going to

services at the college.

said,

we have

to

corrections is

is

contract to provide security

the

not often

member

lege.

for

the great white north

in

dent that happened last year. “It’s

— Page 3

24, 2001

she

said.

work out

fine

in the end.

“There is a strong commitment three institutions by all and Mohawk (McMaster,

gram to ensure nurses have the competency necessary for current

Conestoga) that this be a success,” she said. “So, whatever kinds of problems

levels of practice.

or wrinkles

There

is

a quality assurance pro-

Although the change-over of the

is

come

up,

I

think there

a real will to resolve them.”

Delay of computers doesn’t hinder graphic design students have been working on generating ideas and are completing activities that do not require Miller. Students

By Laurie Vandenhoff At ic

this

time of the year, the graph-

a computer.

design wing of Conestoga College

a third-year graphic design student. “1 just want

their first projects.

However,

to get things started.”

year the third-year

this

The department is waiting to hear from Apple before they make any

classroom remains quiet and empty. Students and faculty have been

decisions about the semester.

waiting for weeks for their comput-

“In ers to arrive.

no one’s

“It’s

fault,”

said

teacher.

“We’ve ordered the

and the

latest

has been delayed.”

“Then Apple announced the

Sasha Drummond, a

classroom. Students and faculty

where a computer should be in her have been waiting since Aug. 31 for computers to arrive.

by second-year students.

“In our industry a huge majority

use

the

Miller.

Macintosh,”

“When

the

explained

we’ll use

a pain in the just want to get

“It’s I

being used

butt.

majority use

department the Generally changes computer systems every

it.”

things started.” Sasha Drummond, third-year graphics student

three years, said Miller. Prior to the upgrade, the third-year

unique to graphic

now

computer, which are

the computers in other labs around the school because they use Apples.

ment decided to take a chance on the newer systems, hoping they will last longer and be more funcis

ects going at

workload

IBM,

The problem

times with as

(Photo by Laurie Vandenhoff)

design because students cannot use

students

were using a 250

MHz

“We

have to react to the industry. You can’t send people out there

with hardware that’s three or four years behind,” he said.

These computer packages are introduced as the latest and the all

speed, someas three proj-

one time. The heavy be possible with-

will not

out computers.

“I’m not cutting any projects. We have a very good course. We don’t

want

to

change anything,” said

Miller.

greatest, said Miller.

Then

full

many

dents are up to

third-year graphic design student, sits

700s,” said Miller, so the depart-

tional.

to

Usually by early October stu-

The graphic design department ordered new 700 MHz iMacs, which were originally scheduled to arrive on Aug. 3 1 Initially they had ordered 600 MHz iMacs that would have arrived in July, most likely with no delay.

two weeks we’ll have

extend the semester,” said Miller.

Matt

Miller, a graphic design

latest

Drumond.

Sasha

sounds of computers as students complete

a pain in the butt,” said

“It’s

would usually be humming with the

of a sudden the latest is having trouble

Students have been really under-

and the greatest

standing, he said.

running programs. One concern of students and faculty is that the delay will affect the

we’re ready. We’ve got everything

the computers are in here,

in place,” said Miller.

“If they’re

semester.

“We’re not behind

“Once

yet,”

said

good.”

on the desk,

life

is


Page 4

— SPOKE, Sept. 24, 2001

Cmnmeitiury

WAN'fED:

Everyone wins

new

with A

contract

signed teachers’ contract will ease the concerns of everyone

in the

college sector, including the province, students, parents and the faculty themselves.

On Sept. 26 the estimated 6,500 faculty of Ontario’s 25 community colleges will vote on whether or not to accept the province’s contract offer, already agreed to in principle. It is

important this contract be ratified because students and their par-

ents will have a sense of security in the college sector.

It

will also

mean

the level of excellent teaching at these institutions will continue with-

out a sense of impending

doom

often associated with contract negotia-

tions.

Over

the course of the two-year contract, salaries will increase

by two per cent Sept. 1, 2002, and per cent April 1, 2003. On Sept. 1, 2002, any faculty who have been at the top of the pay scale for a full year will get a further $700 “recognition allowance” added to their pay. three per cent Sept.

1

,

1

In addition to the pay. raises, the faculty will receive benefits in other areas.

some job

Faculty gained layoffs, a

security if colleges

merge or

in the

case of

wider definition of “experience.”

Health services from audiologists, occupational therapists and optometrists have been added to extended health coverage. Faculty are

now allowed

to

claim up to $1,500 for any combination of the covered

services.

In addition to unspecified gains in dental coverage, faculty gained the

following in existing benefits: hearing aids go to $3,000 every three years from $300 every five years in recognition of technological

improvements

in the field; vision care is increased to

Use precious time wisely

$300 every two

After the recent tragedy in the

years from $200, and can be used for refractive surgery as well as eye-

United States, one thought kept echoing in my mind: we have to

glasses.

Also, there

which

is

a

more expedient grievance process

will deal with

to

be installed

workplace complaints quicker and be

less cost-

ly.

Contract negotiations can often take months and even years to until both parties are satisfied.

One look

at

sional sports,

how acrimonious and

contract negotiations are in profes-

easy to understand negotiating on behalf of about 6,500 individuals can be a very long and drawn out process. it

The faculty’s old contract expired on Aug. was hammered out Sept. 1.

31,

and the new contract

tract satisfying

both parties.

These contract negotiations could have been disastrous as the its MPPs a 37 per cent raise in late August. OPSEU offi-

would be used against the province

cials said these raises

in bargaining

new contract. Had there been a strike

for a

or slow contract negotiations, the college seccould have been irreparably harmed. Students and parents would have been left wondering if there could

tor

be an impending strike or if there would be a work-to-rule situation within the classrooms, which would have brought down a lot of heat

on the province, the colleges and

The province would raise

it

gave

its

MPPs

receive a

OPSEU.

more severe backlash because of

the

during contract negotiations.

them phoned

tele-

rebuilt.

their

ness of each

The time we spend with our fami-

families for the

and friends should be on the

top of everyone’s

We

tion.

careers,

26

is

lives pur-

an important day for everyone involved in the college

sector.

new contract will be a winning continued success of Ontario’s community colleges.

Spoke SPOKE

move

for the

is

ext.

Web

who

are

died in the attack. in Bosnia,

I

met

often not

think about what went through the

army with her husband. She was

enough time to stop and think about what is really important until

minds of those who found themselves in the deadly danger after they spent the morning arguing

waiting for the right

they

with their families.

together.

tragedy strikes our it hits, it is

is

lives.

usually sudden

and without warning. And only then do we put our priorities in the right order.

The

thought that

first

when

I

behind

the panic and fear for their lives

familiar places and everything I had ever known. Thirteen years of my life had disappeared overnight when the war in Bosnia started in

is

but family and friends.

Many New

Yorkers will never

know what went through the minds of their loved ones who died after the terrorists

put their deadly signatures

What

started as a casual

morn-

ing for most of the people in

who

New

got ready for their Jobs

and gave their children and partinto the hectic streets of the

ening

city,

turned into

awakchaos only

my

all

years,

how

sadness in she stood

watched

my

be sealed

in

Although

Despite

action

died in her arms and she

all

the terrors of the war,

She now realizes every day she and her husband spent together was precious and special.

However, the

Just like her,

many New

Yorkers

never got a chance to express their

of the road and

feelings, thoughts or secrets to their

loved ones.

my memory.

We

terrifying

last

into a mine-

waiting for the perfect moment.

best friend’s eyes as

was

He

They ran

she said her biggest regret was

leave town will always

it

to

baby.

remember exactly

at the side

me

moment

She never got a chance to tell her husband they were going to have a

looking back almost 10

can’t

I

in the

lost a leg.

friends, relatives,

the city looked.

went into the

field.

April 1992.

And now,

woman who was

him she was pregnant when

tell

the tragic events on reminded me of the day had to, within hours, leave

1 1

goes through everyone’s mind in not cars, houses, mortgages or Jobs,

one young

The day of Sept.

to

live

watch the twin towers collapse and the Pentagon in flames, the build-

only get one

it

time

life

and

we must

to the fullest, while at the

we must

same

stop taking our loved

ones for granted.

SPOKE

Keeping Conestoga College connected

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Rcni Nicholson; Online Editor: Jody Andrus/, kicwicz

3691

the people

who

During the war

almost

Ls mainly (untied Irom September to May by a payment Irom Conestoga Students Inc. (CSl) 'in exehange for the

insertion ol advertising in the paper.

The views and opinions newspaper do not neeessarily refleet the views of Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers in SPOKE expressed

in

this

are not endorsed is

names of

unbearable to

Production and Advertising Manager: Paul Kostal Photo Editor and Circulation Manager: Sanja Glibota Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas SPOKE’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener. Ontario,

Phone: 748-5220,

the

missing or

material

ners a quick kiss before they dove

Ratification of the

a chance to say

It

fine unique-

human being can

It saddens me that while almost everyone knows that the twin towers each had no floors, few know

goodbye.

expensive cars or houses. Our lives

much around

However, the

never be replaced.

time after

some never got

high-profile

Jobs,

and material goods such as

revolve so

York,

Sept.

better

big and important, can be

old,

the attack, but

spend most of our

suing

last

list.

on the World Trade Center towers.

But these scenarios hopefully won’t play out this year as the union’s bargaining team has recommended this contract for ratifica-

no matter how impressive,

prioritize our lives without delay.

When

province gave

ings,

of

possession that there

Both the Council of Regents, which bargains on behalf of the province, and the Ontario Public Service Employees Union (OPSEU) must be commended for their diligent work in putting together a con-

later.

Some

lies

complete

hours

site:

N2G 4M4.

www.conestogac.on.c;i/spoke Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoketaA'onestogac.on.ca

tain the

CSI

logo.

by the CSI unless

SPOKE shall

their advertisements con-

damages beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by 9:.^0 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejeetion and should be clearly written or typed; a arising out ot

cnors

not be liable for any

in advertising

WordPerleet or MS Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not contain any libellous statements and may be accompanied by an illustration (sueb as a photograph).


SPOKE, Sept.

Students with kids should have By Marcy Cabral Picture this: you’re at school and

you get word from your

child’s

day-care centre that your child

You begin

is

worry and desperately want to get to your child. You drive the 20 minutes to the day-care facility and wrap your child in your arms in relief. Now imagine the same scenario, but with your child only a few feet ill.

away

to

Doon campus

at the

day-care

centre.

For student parents

Doon campus

the

at the college

facility

seems

to

be the logical choice, that is of course if you can find a spot. With the day care being open to the community, working parents vie with

Currently,

waiting

when

tee

the day care has a and there is no guaran-

or

become

spots will

if

available.

A

students for spaces.

list

second-year student

at the col-

lege completed the necessary forms

Conestoga College students take absolutely no precedence over any-

in

one.

spot at the facility this September,

who

March,

in the

hope of getting a

They’re paying tuition to attend the college and in my view that should entitle them to a spot at the day

and was told that there should be no problem. However, in August the student called the day care and was informed that all the placements were taken. The student was forced to find a

care as well.

spot at another facility 25 minutes

Student parents the initiative to

are taking

work hard and

get

an education should be top priority at their own school day care.

24, 2001

day care

priority at

away from the college. An employee at the day care blamed the situation on students

child

who

with the child, and perhaps most importantly, if anything should

graduated

last year,

but chose

to leave their children at the facility,

which limited the

availability.

This entire situation is unacceptable. If the day care’s priority was to meet the needs of student parents these circumstances could be avoided. An on-campus day care is not only convenient, but also beneficial for both parent and child. First of all, the parent doesn’t have to drop-off and pick up their

another facility across

at

town. Parents can

happen the day care Student parents

enough

to attend

who

at the very least should have the option to use the

facility if

The

they so choose.

college

day-care

should take a serious look policy,

and

try to address the

This column will appear weekly and feature interesting or unique Web sites of interest to students and/or faculty at Conestoga

laugh.”

school year

is

When

parents.

will

grow up

I

I

often wonder?

Of

course

23 years

I

College.

have grown up,

old. I

make my own

Fm

deci-

my

intended for college kids?” If so,

games/party

transporta-

you .may' want to check out CoilcgeHumor.com. People who

and

tion

per-

are not in college

needs.

sonal

But that’s where it ends. I have been

this site, but rial

past the age of years,

five

since

was

I

18.

me, does

my

me

and

places,

My mom still feeds laundry and drives live at

I

home

rent-

free.

money from

I’ve also received

government

to attend post-sec-

was

15,

I

didn’t

pay for school,

to

earn

Conestoga, some younger than I, who have cars and even homes. They do their own laundry and

own

their

meals. In

others.

In

my

where

mind, they have achieved already. That’s

should be. I’m not even

I

close.

Knowing thing I’ll

somewonder if

that they’ve got

me

want makes

I

I

career

what scares me.

that’s

know

also

yet,

that

I’m

I

don’t have a

only

working

don’t

own

a car or have one to

many

similarities in their experi-

ences on campus. ’Hiey decided to

site,

Web As

the goal

site

by students, for on the Web

I

at

one of these hope to be inde-

least

can’t

Commercials are also a

Trivia.

favourite topic.

The drinking games/party

tips

'

section lists

is

very popular.

It

not only

games but

favourite drinking

some of which go

to “establish a

refuge for not only students of

much

into far too

detail.

e-mail forwards,

Live

offensive material.

skits.

can also be downloaded. Many rude noises are available at the touch of your mouse, as well as sounds from South Park and the Simpsons. clips

CollegeHumor.com

also

includes an electronic store where you can purchase relatedTnerchandise.

mentioned

Items

for

sale

include T-shirts, outerwear and decals.

However, this area of the site was down for revamping when I visited

The

it.

site

also has a section called

- The Chronicles of a College Career, a type of diary

Ruminations

done by a college student named Aaron Karo. It includes 27 entries from his four years at college (1997-2001). Many of Karo’s thoughts and comments in this section have found their way into

friends.

The only problem I had with this was some of the possibly

site

Because college students run the one must expect a certain level of immaturity and crassness. However, this site could be equal-

site,

ly enjoyable without the extensive

swearing.

don’t have a problem with at times it seems that people on this site are cursing simply because they can. As well, I feel that the nudity in some of the video clips should I

some swearing but

perhaps be omitted or edited. There are plenty of funny and enjoyable clips that do not include naked men and women. Regardless, everyone should be able to find something of interest on CollegeHumor.com, If you know of an interesting or unique Web site, e-mail me at

king_koala@yahoo.ca and that site may be featured in an upcoming column.

School newspaper launches new By Marc Hulet On

Spoke launched an online version of the weekly newspaper. The Web site can be found at www.conestogac .on .ca/spoke. The site was created by 17

Sept.

pendent for awhile. Being on my own doesn’t scare me. It’s the when will it happen and how will I do it that does.

news online.” The Web site

is designed to give journalism students added exposure and practise, while offering all students and faculty more-accessi-

ble coverage of school activities.

very important for

Journalism Co-ordinator Christina

“I think

Jonas and third-year computer programming student Rafa Abdul.

students to

other newspaper Web were looked at to get a good sense of what worked and what

“The journalism students do a good job covering the college and student and employee issues, so we

didn’t work.

feel the site is

sites

“I

Web

probably 50 other dailies and weeklies -

looked sites

at

-

across North

America and took

the

most interesting aspects of those,”

was a natu-

progression of the program.

“Most newspapers was time

their

Web

in the industry

sites

and we felt it one as well.”

for us to have

news

online.

“Students are computer savvy,

more so than any other generation has ever been. They have embraced the technology and therefore they

it’s

know

what’s going on

here,” Jonas said.

of worth to the col-

lege.”

Having the newspaper online number of advan-

offers readers a

tages they didn’t have before. “It

Putting Spoke online

have online

Web site

are very comfortable with reading

Jonas also said that students around the college should enjoy having the chance to catch up with

can’t afford to rent an apart-

either.

Without

Simpson

was

And

things,

in

also students’ best puking stories,

ral

I

ball.

stated

which makes it awfully hard not to rely on others. I don’t have enough money to purchase one because I’m still going to school.

drive,

ment

National

the

Blind Date or partake

Jonas said.

towards one. 1

Major

with

over a: year ago. Despite the fact that they were at different colleges, they discovered

Numerous

ever get there.

know I am capable of being on my own and depending on myself. I know I have to do it eventually. What I don’t know is when, and I

how, and

dealing Baseball,

League

'

some

cases, they’re even taking care of

more independence

The sports area currently has sections

some of which you may have received from your

Aside from the bulletin boards, you can also download video clips from the movie section. These include humorous home videos, commercials and Saturday Night

Sound

con-

rent, or

even food. I look ‘at the lives of some of the made here at I’ve friends

cook

tions.

In the television area, you can discuss things such as the show

years.

I

devoted to dating-related ques-

when they went away to college, created CollegeHumor.corti just

students.

since

'Hie advice sections are mostly

does contain matefind

drinking

Football League and college foot-

create a

enough

also enjoy

and tips.

I’wo former Baltimore high school friends, who separated

ondary institutions the past three

Although I’ve had part-time jobs

it

may

some people may

tliat

offensive.

dependence for

the

topics include advice, sports, tel-

evision,

pay for

own

of the more interesting areas of the site is the bulletin boards, I'his area allows you to interact: with other people regarding various topics. Some of the

“Why

sions. I

Have you ever asked yourself, don’t they make a Web site

One

centre at their

cerns of student parents.

academic levels, but a place for people across the world to go lor a

new

are fortunate

a day-care centre,

ByMarcHufet

that the

only a few

an institution with

grow up? Now

is

feet away.

CQllegeHumor.com brings laughs

under way, I am again reminded of how dependent I still am on my

spend breaks

also

When do get my chance to I

— Page 5

makes Spoke more

accessible.

If students can’t get to the

campus

one up. or there aren’t enough copies to go around, there’s always enough copies online.”

available in the paper version.

Jonas said.

larly

to

pick

The Web every carry

site

will

be updated

Monday morning and all

it

will

the stories that were in the

paper edition. However, not all the photos will find their way to the

what I’m particu-

excited about is that there’s an archive,” Jonas said. “It’s going to be operating off a keyword search. Any time you research online there’s a time-saving factor.”

As

online version.

Spoke Online will number of interesting

“Part of

well, there are a

number of

other sites that students

also have a

links

features not

should find useful or interesting.

to

Students

access

can

CNN/Sports

Illustrated

Roget’s Thesaurus,

among

TSN. and others.

Jonas chose the links based on student suggestions. “I

talked to students and asked

them what they were interested in and I took the ones that they felt they would view. “We wanted Spoke to not just be a serious site with news.”


Page 6

— SPOKE, Sept.

Car

24, 2001

News

a

theft

reality No 7:30 a.m. classes By

car stolen from the college this year

First

Julie

Graham

Students

By Jody Andruszkiewicz

form of

Conestoga College has had its first theft of a vehicle from a cam-

al

pus parking

are in class and the lots are

patrols or cameras.

The

lot this

semester.

Between noon and 2:30 p.m. on 1 2 a 1 988 blue Ford Mustang was stolen from Lot 4. There were no signs of broken glass, which is not unusual, accordSept.

ing to A1 Hunter, director of security services at the college.

He

said

obvious a tool was used to pull on the lock assembly, v^ich is how it’s

most vehicles are

Much

to

stolen.

the

of

relief

Sept. 1 2 theft was not unusuaccording to Hunter, because

most

thefts

happen when students

Stryker, 21, said he felt sick to his

stomach as he looked parking

When

lot for his

all

missing

over the car.

was found he was upset

it

to learn that a

couple of teenagers

and drove the heck out of it. “That’s not what my car is intended for.” took

it

The first-year construction engineering student said with the parking lots being so big and so close to the 401 thieves can take

they want

most them bad enough.

cars if

Stryker said there should be better security in the parking lots in the

said

Monte Carlos and attractive

to

darkness,” he said, adding 99 per cent happen during the day.

3357 before the police because security knows the exact location of the lots and can

“Most students believe these thefts happen under the cover of darkness.” Al Hunter, director of security services

The last car theft occurred on Aug. 8 during the day in Lot 6. Hunter said Lot 10 and the parking lots at the east end of the campus down by the woodworking building get hit the hardest though there is no set pattern. However, Hunter noted that even though cars are stolen on a variety of days, more cars are taken on Wednesdays and Thursdays. This doe^ot mean Conestoga is a hotbed of car thefts. Last year was a busy year according to Hunter with 10 cars reported stolen over the course of the year with

CMC

your

security

at

use 9 1

1

attending the college in fall 2001. Due to this overload of

to

but also call security so

extra students, the

security services staff can get to the

many

front of the school to direct emer-

until

gency services

to the scene

may

classes

by Conestoga College administration to all program heads notifying them there would be approximately 500 new students

get there faster.

Hunter said

students

is that their

could have been scheduled until 5:.30 p.m. Last Apuil, a memo was sent

ext.

In emergencies.

What many

not realize

thieves.

said he’d prefer students to first call

believe

Stryker,

other side of Brantford.

p.m.

also

these

students

Mike

owner of the stolen car, the Mustang was recovered on or around Sept. 13 in a bush on the

He

happen under the cover of

“Most thefts

with

attending classes that end at 4:30

While stolen cars are reported to Waterloo regional police. Hunter

full.

may be unhappy

pickups being the model of choice.

Mustangs are more

classes

memo

would have

said

to run

5:30 p.m.

Aware that 5:30 p.m. schedulwould not be gladly accept-

of the

incident.

ing

He also advised students to inform security immediately if they see loiterers or people looldng like

ed by many students, Conestoga Students Inc. (CSl) took an unprecedented move and

they are trying to break into a car.

became involved with timetable

He

said

his

would

staff

rather

respond to a dozen false alarms than miss a theft.

Even though there have been car on campus, not all attempts are successful. In two separate incidents, one on Sept. 4 in Lot 12 and one on Sept. 12 in Lot 1, car alarms prevented potential thieves from taking two cars. Reiterating his message from orithefts

entation week. Hunter said

it’s

make recommendations One

to

college administration.

term.

“Seven-hundred and fifty of our students signed a petition

want to be here until 5:30,” said Olinski. “Seven of our 10 recommendthat said they didn’t

ed classes got moved,” said Andruszkiewicz,

was not

it

who

just the

noted that

work of

the

CSI; college administration played a major role in the changes as well.

some

Unfortunately,

classes

could not be moved due to resources.

“There are classes that go until 5:30 simply because

Jon Olinski, president of CSI,, and Jody Andruszkiewicz, CSI

have enough lab space,” said Andruszkiewicz.

vice-president

timetable for every progrant on campus,” said Andruszkiewicz.

Manager of College Academic and Administration Services, Donna Runion said students were pleased to see that there were not any 7:30 a.m. classes,, another change this year. Olinski and Andruszkiewicz are happy with the result and are

From what they saw, Olinski and ,'^druszkiewicz were able

thankfttl that administration tened to their concerns.

of

academics, 2001,

in April

along with college administrachanges could be

tion, to see if

made

to timetables.

“We

sim-

recommendations was that with two or three hour breaks, be pushed together. Olinski and Andruszkiewicz also petitioned students over two mornings during exam week last their

clas.ses,

scheduling.

became involved

ple devices like alarms that help

to

of

went

through

every

we

don’t

lis-

prevent car thefts.

Retailers urge students to apply for

holiday season jobs at Fairview Park By

on tho bus

Tori Sutton

“We’re not getting enough resumes,” said Halima Mcharam,

Students thinking about working

Waterloo Region over the Christmas break should be out pounding the pavement soon. With only 14 weeks till in the

Go homo

for

Thanksgl¥in9

Christmas,

Student friendly return fares from

KITCHENER Guelph Peterborough

Ottawa

^11 ^51

^114 GST

Plus

to:

^25

Belleville

*61

U

of

Life

more hours when

dents’ schedules permit.

stu-

Many of you destinations

hunting.

“We

haven’t noticed an increase people applying,” said Smart Set manager Michelle Efthimiou, notin

is

that

of three

the

store

time.

What

Curfew

-

are here from out

year.

The Mall,

store, also in

hires

only

Fairview Park students

what’s a curfew? There

would you

15 Charles St W. 585-2370

GREYHOUND CANAOAO

like to

is

also

no one

have dinner?” and to say

Many

stores will be starting their

Christmas hours

October, and

in

the rush will lead to

more

full-time

and part-time positions. Larger stores like Toys ‘R Us, Wal-Mart and Zellers take on many temporary employees over the season, often hiring them to start by the end of this month.

first

what you are doing and when.

“How was your day?” “What time

“I love you.”

The excitement of new freedom and opportunity may be tempered by homesickness missing your family, friends and community. Slowly, you’ll get to classmates, faculty, activities at the

-

know some of your

roommates and other peers. Perhaps you’ll get involved

in intramural

Recreation Centre and clubs and events through the student government.

Read Spoke, your school newspaper,

now on the web @

to ask,

You can meet with a counsellor in

to familiarize yourself with

happenings on campus.

Student Services to talk about adjusting to your

environment and to do some problem solving about getting involved in your college and

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

your new community.

A Message from

Student Services (Room 2B02)

said

Efthimou.

of town; some are living away from home for the

a change! There’s no one to report to about

is

typical for this time of

Loneliness

call:

Centre

us

receiving

receives

resumes a day at this The store, which employs many students, is starting to look for Christmas help now said Mcharam. However, some stores are receiving the expected number of resumes from students out job

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

W 888-4434

Visit

about 10 time of year.

average

the

*114

www.greyhound.ca Student

offering

store usually

that

not included

many more discounted

For Information

stores in the

before the semester ends, providing part-time hours, and sometimes

Toronto

Sudbury

many retail

Conestoga College area are already accepting resumes for Christmas job openings. Usually stores take on students

manager of Le Chateau in the Fairview Park Mall. The clothing

ing

resumes a day


SPOKE,

Sexual assaults

express shuttle buses

By Paul Kostal

mitted by strangers in dark alleys.”

any indication, than the coming school .year should students at prove safe for Conestoga’s five campuses.

Assault Treatment Centre’s pam-

According If history is

According

to

A1 Hunter, security

supervisor for

all

of Conestoga’s

campuses, there hasn’t been a

a

to

K-W

Sexual

not being able to drive are that

can range from a friend

early as high school, are important to help

at

dence, before the college

the resi-

owned

it.

Hunter did admit that there are

more “common

assaults” like

He

mean

“Just because

have been made. These include: increased Ughting has been placed around the campus; the Walk Safe program has been implemented; a closed-circuit television system has

main

building, the

recreation centre and the residence

Doon campus; the bush trails have been cut back; the security team has a patrol vehicle; and security visits the residence “a couple at the

times a week.” Hunter said

when-

you spent a

of

lot

women

warned young be wary at parties. also

mandatory information session with all incoming students at the

numbers warrant it, they may be prepared to add

Every morning Grand River

(GRT)

Andruszkiewicz suggested

Barry Milner,

Barry Milner,

with a 9:30 a.m. start time, taking the shuttle is inconvenient as

“It’s like

a can of sardines some-

said

Andruszkiewicz,

describing the

number of students

times,”

packed on a bus

someone who is unconscious or not aware of what they are doing is

In order to alleviate the usually

still

rape.

“Just because they didn’t say no,

doesn’t

mean

that they said yes.”

She also said that just because there may not be a report of sexual assault

mean

doesn’t necessarily

there hasn’t been one. “It is

a choice, whether or not to

“A

arrives at the school almost an

full bus,

and allow more students service, there has been a

to use

tlie

push

at

the

Grand

college for

River Transit to add a second

because

on

summer. “We would always like to think we could use more transit,” Milner

in the

Charles

said.

Grand River Transit

Street,

is

current-

ly in the .stage of evaluating the

not labeled as going

it is

need for an extra bus, and look-

to the college. “If you don’t

know where you’re

going, you’re going to get lost,”

Andius/kiewicz

ing into ridership “If the

said.

at

different

times.

numbers warrant

it,

may be prepared to add extra servGrand River Transit has budg-

Grand River Transit passenger,

school could be avoided, especially between 8:45 and 9 a.m. when many students

eting limitations, he said, but in order for ridership to increase,

of an

are arriving and trying to find

the service has to be offered.

started discussing the idea

He the

thinks bus,

problems

if

at the

ices,’’

Milner

said.

never reported.” Kraler cited the high level of that

some women

for not -reporting

feel

it.

feel guilty

are

partly

What Do You

Do...

responsible for the attack, she said,

adding there needs to be a shift in attitude regarding acquaintance rape in both men and women; Kraler also said the

many

at

the

college

campus.

Catching

...if

you are away from home for the first time and feeling lonely?

...if

you are experiencing personal problems?

...if

you are anticipating academic problems?

...if

you are worried about tests, presentations or your placement?

...if

you are not sure your previous study habits

safety

might have helped reduce the potential number of “stranger assaults” on initiatives

air

Don’t wait, don't hesitate.

See a Counsellor

in

FREE

Drop

in

to

We

will

work for you

at your campus

AND CONFIDENHAL!

Room 2B02 Student Services call

us at

748-5220

Ext.

3360

Student Services Office/Waterloo Campus, Ext. 224

Student Services Office/Guelph Campus, 824-9390

(Photo by Stacey McCarthy)

in

College?

are here to help you succeed.

Student Services

Doon Campus or

Josh Brenneman, a first-year graphic design student, practises his moves between classes on Sept. 13.

they

more students took some of the parking

moniing shuttle. Jody Andruszkiewicz, vicefor president of academics Conestoga Students Inc. and a

lot are

shame

in

College and deals with Grand River Transit, said he has been discussing the idea of extra buses in the morning and afternoon with GRT since the end of the

physical resources

airives at the college at 8:05 a.m.

students

who works

physical resources at Conestoga

shuttle bus that departs from the bus terminal in downtown Kitchener at 7:30 a.m. and

it

ple using the service.

extra service.”

offers an express

some

that

making bus passes more affordable, and making the transit system more student friendly could also increase the number of peo-

the

“If

for students so far this year.

Transit

crowded

terminal

Some women might that somehow they

because most sexual attacks on women are committed by men they know. “There is a misconception,” she said, “that most attacks are com-

ship.”

to less

buses.

classes start.

dangers that are associated with

and walking alone. Counsellor Barb Kraler of student services, said information sessions like these help change attitudes, which is important,

and would lead

hour and a half before their

because of the assault as a reason

late nights

rea-

look after each other,” she said. And she said that having sex with

of every school year during registration to inform them of the start

all

students

Andruszkiewicz thinks that a second shuttle would make it eas-

morning. As well, some students have a hard time finding the bus at the

to

report sexual assault,” she said.

he also holds a

some Conestoga

Unfortunately, for

“They should go together and

A number of safety improvements

in the

it

money on dinner doesn’t mean you have a right to expect anything,” Kraler

up

you’re entitled to

ever you want.

credits increased security

the outstanding reeord.

set

n’t

ier for students to get to school,

parking spots. “Taking the bus is a way of life,” said Andruszkiewicz. “If we can get more people making that decision, there will be more rider-

However, overcrowded buses, class start times and confusion over exactly which bus gets to the school have been obstacles

sex in a relationship already, does-

she said.

measures on the main campus for

been

change prevalent attitudes about sex and relationships. “Just because you may have had

on cam-

fights than sexual assaults

pus.

fist-

sons

take public transit to school

to a husband, Kraler said.

been here. There has, however, fieen one case of sexual harassment reported. He said the harassment com-

campus, but instead

Problems with on-campus parkand

tance.

gle reported case of sexual assault

on a college

8:30 a.m. shuttle with the school September.

in

ing, rising prices of gasoline,

Educational seminars, starting as

plaint didn’t take place

Tori Sutton

victims are attacked by an acquain-

sin-

in the three years he’s

By

phlet, eight out of 10 sexual assault

And

2001— Page 7

College pushes for extra

on campus

rare

Sept. 24,


Page 8

— SPOKE, Sept.

24, 2001

Cafeteria hikes prices for fresh food By Shannon McBride

cafeterias,

is

primarily responsible

expensive because

for the increases.

The hole

in

going to get a

your pocketbook

bit

bigger

if you

some prices,

that operates

the

more

to

said.

On the other hand, many processed items have remained the same or increased by small margins

For example, the price of the plate has increased from $2.71

because they are cheaper to keep and last significantly longer than

company

both of Conestoga’s

ness. fruit

last

year to $2.80 this year and the

price of wraps has climbed

fresh foods.

Though prices have increased, Chartwells’ increases can be considered positive.

from

$3.30 to $3.49. “Items with a higher spoilage factor are most likely to be more

“It is

“We have a policy that forces any excess profit from the cafeterias

the increase at the college this year

than the

less

is

Mullan said the major factor

the college has

Chartwells,

costs

determining the price increases this year is the products’ specific fresh-

over the cafeteria

control

it

Mullan

is

buy lunch at the college this year. Finance Administrator Kevin Mullan said prices in the cafeteria have been raised by three per cent

Though

in,’’

intend

to

this year.

bring them

Consumer

Price

Index for the rest of the country,”

back

Mullan said According to Statistics Canada and the Consumer Price Index, the national food increase from July 2000 to July 2001 is 4.6 per cent. That is 1.6 per cent more than

“We’ve never had this policy

Mullan said. implement

to

though.”

With such franchises as Pizza Pizza, Harvey’s and Mr. Sub in operation, mofe price control is lost. “Those companies are obviously going to use the same standard

Conestoga’s cafeterias’ price raise. College administration has some control over price increases.

important to remember that

to the college,”

prices

every

at

Mullan

franchise,”

said.

Excellence awards encourage students By Marcy Cabral

tions over the years have

made

the

ECE

Two

program here at Conestoga College the incredible success that it is today ... I think I can speak on behalf of all ECE students in thanking (McKenna) for developing a program where dreams can come true upon

early childhood education

students were both nervous and

honoured 12,

at a social

event on Sept.

when

they were presented with awards.

ECE

Audrey Tang,

recipient of the

Early Childhood Education Award of Excellence, is currently in her second year and the first student to receive the

The

college recreation centre’s fitness room became crowded after arrived Sept. 1 1 A new fitness room is currently being constructed.

new

and

Nautilus equip-

ment were delivered on Sept. 11. The facelift, which will be p^ of Director of Athletics' Tony Martin’s continuing mandate, includes the sports bar O.T.’s (Over Time), a

new fitness centre and a new soccer

Martin

said

donations

sponsors are responsible for the

which have names like the duo hip and back, tricep extension and side and leg

room

for the time being, but, it be moved to the old sports bar, “the Roost” on the second floor once renovations on it

have yet

will

States,

are complete.

Martin said most of the old equipment will be discarded once the new fitness room is established, and the new equip-

curl, students

using the fitness centre will be able to do a complete “circuit” of exercise machines.

Two more

arrived

iron

seems

to

have

pieces of equipment

Ifom the United

According

who

state.

recreation

ECE

to the

named

He

its

also said the

centre’s

Web

“People talk to each other.”

program

after the

which

ECE

and go, and

this

somebody

at

Conestoga will be second to none, Martin said adding the expansion and upgrade was necessaiy.

McKenna

hopefully will help

in

the

The award, presented year

program,”

said.

ECE

to second-

student Shelley Secrett,

ing worse than going in to exercise

dent must also be working

Those pieces are a recumbant bike and an elliptical machine,

and finding that the machine you want to exercise on is broken.”

academic potential and possess the qualities and characteristics needed

that will exercise the arms, legs

Unfortunately, he said, there is still a problem with inconsid-

for

erate users.

Secrett said:

shipping

times because of the terrorist attacks in

New York and Washin^on.

ankles and knees at the same time.

The new equipment

that has

Tang believes the awards recogwork and determination, and give students the incentive to continue working hard. nize hard

was

founder of the

A

to delayed

requires an individual to receive an in field

age

B

placement and a

in all other courses.

aver-

The

stu-

Shelly Secrett

at their

of the

recipient

and Audrey Tang, recipient of ECE Award of Excellence, were honoured at an ECE social on Sept. 12.

ECE.

the

her

In

(left),

Donna McKenna award,

acceptance

speech,

“(McKenna’s) many contribu-

1

great to acknowledge

achieve their goals,” Secrett said.

profession.

“Have you seen the fitness room?” he asked. “It was just terrible. There’s noth-

to arrive

due

it’s

ment gift she chose to establish a $500 award for students. “It seemed like a better use of money than presents which come

site

number of hits. fitness

“I think

students that have really strived to

program. Upon McKenna’s retirement funds were collected in her name. Rather than receive a retire-

current

(www.conestogac.on.ca/rec^centre) has received an increasing

The

is

McKenna Award, to

ness room, even in

said.

presented to a stustrong academically

is

Also presented was the Donna

the

Martin, more students are now using the fit-

cramped

of nervous,” she

placement, has sound interpersonal skills, a positive attitude, and has displayed a commit-

desired effect.

and

new equipment, also citing that money from students has helped pay for the new equipment With the 15 new pieces of equipment,

where the tennis courts once stood. The new fitness equipment has been placed in the old fitness field

the col-

$200 award.

in field

ment

ment is being supplied to lege at virtually no cost.

ongoing facelift of the Kenneth E. Hunter recreation centre, more than a dozen

new

pumping

steel for

part of the

pieces of

sort

Both recipients agree that the awards can be equally beneficial and encouraging to students in the program.

surprised, really excited

The award dent

By Paul Kostai As

and

{Photo by Paul Kostai)

.

New

was

“I

Nautilus equipment

graduation.”

(Photo by Marcy Cabral)

800 0-Canada.Talk to us Do you have questions about

child safety,

government services:

jobs, parental benefits, passports or

pensions? Our information

officers

can

For more information on

help.

Canada. gc.ca Find out about the hundreds of services available from the

Government

of

Canada.

800 0-Canada during regular business hours and a real person will answer your call. Call

Canada Access Centres

Service

1

Canada

1

(1

800 O-Canada 800 622-6232)

TTY / TDD

1

800 465-7735


SPOKE,

Sept. 24, 2001

— Page 9

Mental health Important at Conestoga By Julianna Kerr

There

of change involved

is lots

when people go Does your life feel balanced? One Conestoga counsellor thinks

to

she

college,

even more of a challenge to start out not knowing anyone.” Students need to realize that they will get to know people eventually.

said.

Making a connection with

ly to

might be the key to a student’s mental health. Co-ordinator and part-time counsellor Carol Gregory can usually be

Gregory and her

found in student services offering one-on-one counselling, dealing with systems issues and academic complaints, and organizing groups and workshops. Along with her energetic coworkers, Gregory is focused on the job at hand. “We must meet the needs of the students,” she said.

adjustment it can be

has

she said, “and

and people respond differentchange. There is no standard response. “Change is always stressful, whether it’s good or bad,” she said,

that

“Everyone issues,”

students

staff try to

more

feel

at

make

home by

others

is

essential for all people, she said,

and getting involved

is

crucial for

The

most

common

it depends somewhat on the month, Gregory said. In September, students are responding to adjustment and academic issues. By October, there is more stress on students, and they’re beginning

students.

they’re feeling.

One-on-one counselling is voluntary and confidential at student

student, they can

services, as well as free of charge.

talk to

important to help them real-

“It’s

make

staff tries to

The

the office a place

where students want to go. It’s difficult for anyone to adjust to a

new

to get tired.

up to the students to come Gregory said, “but staff does

“It’s

in,”

make

enter first-year classes to

sure

is

bothering a

come

in to just

someone objective who Gregory

directly involved,” “I

8:30-4:30,

able

Monday

through

Friday on 'an appointment basis. They see students within two or '

whenever possible.

three days

Gregory said there are also times available daily

if

a student really

needs to see someone.

Making choices is difficult, espewhen people are responding

cially

stress from daily workloads, Gregory said. The key is to find some balance between academic and social relato

“If anything at all

hope students

sooner rather than

will

isn’t

tionships.

said.

come

in

later.”

Gregory and her

students are aware of services.”

setting.-

is

depression, but

allowing them to talk about what

ize they aren’t alone,” she said.

problem

counsellors help students face

staff are avail-

“Students have overcome so much,” she said, “they have tremendous strengths.”

Buy a Tim Hortons cookie* and feed a schoolchild By Stacey McCarthy

Operating

out- of

Waterloo,

Nutrition for Learning works

in

Conestoga students visiting Tim Hortons over the next two weeks will have the opportunity to give something back to the community while buying coffee. Local Tim Hortons will be selling

partnership with schools, parents,

specialty cookies in their stores as

Learning. “We’re very excited to be

part of the second annual Smile

working with them.” “We help wherever a need in the community has been identified,”,

faith groups, corporations,

ceeds

will

per cent of the pro-

go

for

Nutrition

to

Learning, a local non-profit organization that distributes funds to nutrition

program.

parental committees to develop a

dents from the college could volunteer.”

more than 1,400 children

program specific for that The committee tells us what they have in mind and what they would like to do. No two programs are alike.” Programs consist, of nutritional education, food allergy programs,

school communities.

safety issues or hot breakfast pro-

with children from kindergarten to high school are eligible for the nutritional programs. “It’s nice to watch the program grow,” said Nagel. “In 1995 when

grams.

executive director of Nutrition for

exciting.”

Hortons,”

said Nagel.

“They

invite

us

to

come and

help design a program that meets their needs. We don’t just go in and say here’s the

money, go buy some food.

work

in partnerships.”

We

apply for

Nutrition

for

Learning which in turn works with these committees to develop the programs.

X™

very

“It’s

programs in the community.

three programs in place at schools. Today we service over 40. “We work with school and

money from

and volunteers. generous of said Heather Nagel,

nity agencies

Cookie Campaign. The cookies, which are made only for the campaign, will cost 75 cents plus tax.

One hundred

commu-

Parental committees grant

It’s

nutrition

really a hand-in-hand part-

said Nagel.

nership,”

“It’s

very

Nutrition for Learning provides nutrition educational

programs for in over 40

Schools

we were

just starting out

we had

Nagel said

“We

introduce In

new types of food some schools a

“It

Most of

school.

to children.

that they are

always

looking^ for volunteers to join the

would be

great if stu-

the breakfast

programs

begin and end before college coursVolunteers can sit es even start. with the kids, talk to them and help them prepare and cut their food said Nagel. “It’s a great opportunity. Not only do volunteers help with food preparation, but they can also spend time with the children.”

snack bin goes to every class. We provide apples, granola bars,

can

muffins, bagels, things like that.”

5745 or e-mail nfl2@on.aibn.com.

Students interested in volunteering call for

information at 519-579-

Employees & Students are invited to our

Broadcasting Open House Tuesday, October

BRT

Studios

4:00

/

pm

2,

2001

CJIQ FM Studios to 5:30

pm

We are thanking CKCO-TV for their

generous donation

to the

Broadcasting Program

and

inviting

you

to

see the new * -'V

equipment and tour the studios. Refreshments will be served.

RSVP

by email before

September

27, 2001

doneil(gconestogac.on.ca

Play

mofc

fa**

beatgoeson.com CAMBRIDCB

'=”'

893-2464

KITCHENER

385 FAIRWAY RD. S. (CANADIAN TIRE PLAZA)

622-7774

415 HESPELER RD (ACROSS FROM McOONALDS)

KITCHENER

'=”'

744-1011

370 HIGHLAND RD. W. (FOOD BASICS PLAZA)

WATERLOO 402 KING

ST. N.

884-7376

(BESIDE BURGER KING


— SPOKE, Sept. 24, 2001

Page 10

Talented students reap reward Five third-year graphic design students each receive $1 ,000 By Daniel Roth

was open to all of Ontario she thought the odds of winning were

Five talented graphic design stu-

slim.

dents from Conestoga College each

“I wasn’t sure

received a $1,000 scholarship from the Registered Graphic Designers of

Ontario on Sept.

Sixty-one

layout, similar to an ad campaign,

graphic

an Oktoberfest lOK run T-shirt design and a corporate identity lay-

design students from a total of nine training institutions across the province submitted work to the Registered Graphic Designers of Ontario (RGD) at the end of May

2001

out.

Starla Wick, 21, of Seaforth, was excited and surprised to win the Philip Sung Design award.

.

“I

was overwhelmed

“I

that

I

to

student

body

as

Ontario.

jury of three senior registered

graphic designers chose the winners of scholarships. scholarships,

were awarded

student

She submitted self-promotions, a Web site and CD, illustrations of King Tut and a corporate identity

scholarships were sponsored

by various business or corporations in the graphic design field.

Five of the 10 scholarships were presented to students in Conestoga’s

graphic

design

program

the

at

Third-year Conestoga College graphic design students: (starting at top and going clockwise) Kathryn Grant, Colleen McDermott, Sasha Drumond, Starla Wick and Mike Bzowski each received

a scholarship

for $1 ,000

RGD’s monthly

associates meeting Toronto on Sept. 5. Third-year graphic design students who received scholarships were: in

;

was overwhelmed that I got recognized by the association,” he said, adding he is veiy proud and views winning as a payoff for aU of the

that there

hard work.

other people in

“I

“I

Advertising, hiring

;

was surprised and

I

was

really

happy,” she said.

my

that if I

to

won

be some

class that obvi-

and scheduling

new ways.

initiatives

introduced

to get the

who worked

year have been going into the continuing education classes to

it.

Plastic

Safe extension have also been given out to promote the program.

“When your

it’s

key

right in

ring,

your face on

it’s

sort

of

a

still

Jeff

the

Vongkhamphou, a second-year

new Walk Safe

advertising ideas to

make

is

to

come up

on

the

school their

I

or

Door 5

they

main no one

in the

(Photo by Lisa

regular

of

in case

emergency with

the

staff.

Jeff Vongkhamphou, the

new Walk

Safe co-ordinator, applied for the

is

The

entire

Walk Safe

staff also carries

radios linked to security

at

all

times.

are

The second-year

police

founda-

tions student applied to the staff also car-

become involved

limes so ext. 3357 can be dialed to anange an escort if no Walk Safe

because

a gotxl experience and Itecause

personnel are available

paid position.

at

the sta-

Walk

Safe program because he wanted to

ries radios linked to security at all

it

in

relates to his

the

college,

program,

it's

it's

a

As co-ordinator, he takes care of the lot

of

Hiller)

only six positions available. Hunter also said Walk Safe keeps a couple

students aware of the program.

illness or other

the last co-ordinator graduated.

anyone

or

with

is

of extra students trained

position this year after hearing that

golf course. If a stu-

year have remained with the program. The Walk Safe program uses 12 students, and with six students reluming from last year there were

police foundations student,

co-ordinator. Part of his job

out

lots close to the

applicants for the six positions available this ycai‘. Six students from last

p.m. According to Hunter,

and many full-time students are around in the computer labs.

the

Walk Safe do escorts from the

Hunter said he has received a

Walk Safe is a campus safety program in effect four days a week (Monday to Thursday), from 6:45 to these are the most popular hours because con-ed students arc arriving

patrol

tions.

reminder,” Hunter said.

10:45

groups, consisting of a male

someone else. The entire Walk Safe

number and Walk

over the course of the

school year.

co-ordinator’s job

probably just patrolling the grounds or escorting

rings in the shape of feet with the

of ads for sprinkles. On average the students spend 12 hours a day in their class working on

recreation centre to the far parking

there,

key

was really surprised,” she said. She submitted her award-winning entry, which consisted of a billboard and magazine ads for Swatch, a corporate identity manual and a series

projects

teaching building. If there

short presentations, telling stu-

in

“I

message

new

by Door

dents about the program and encour-

aging them to use

of

that since the contest

grounds feels unsafe walking to

Walk

for

sort

car or from their car, they can usually find a team of students at a station

last

college phone

was ready happy, and

She added

dent

word out

about Walk Safe.

make

“I

surprised,” she said.

Two

A1 Hunter, director of security

students

Colleen McDermott, of 27, Guelph won the Kbskie Minsky

and female per group, Doon campus each night operates. The two pairs and patrol the campus

services at the college, said there

The

logo for the Far Sidd.

part of

This year Conestoga College’s Walk Safe program has been reach-

by the program

Swatch

designs along with pac^ging for the Swatch, a jazz festiyal.^ster and a

td get the

Lisa Hiller

have been new

checked her emiail while wait Amsterdam.

ously would win as well.” Drumond submitted

award.

She added, “I knew was going

Kathiyn Grant, 26, of Waterloo, won a RGD Ontario award. She found out that she had won when she also

(Photo by Daniel Roth)

Mike Bzowski, Katliryn Grant, Bzowski submitted a corporate Sasha Drumond, Colleen identity manual as well as Swatch McDermott and Starla Wick. packing. v Mike Bzowski, 21, of Brantford, tx^BSsha EiromOTd, 21, of Kitchener, was the recipient of the RGD received the Soos Communications Ontario award. Ltd. Award

Walk Safe wants ing students in

manual.

from the Registered Graphic Designers of Ontario.

in

total.

Safe

well.”

establishes, pro-

It

ethics for all graphic designers in

By

class that

Sash Drumond,

motes and regulates uniform standards of knowledge, skills and

The

my

third-year graphic design

for graphic design-

ers in Ontario.

won

I

was going

RGD is a self-regulating pro-

fessional

if

obviously would win

third-year graphic design

Ten

that

be some other peo-

ple in

Mike Bzowski,

The

knew

that there

got recognized

by the association.”

A

chances

McDermott submitted a Swatch

5.

second-year

my

what

were,” she said.

hiring, interviewing, scheduling

arranging team outings.

He

and

also

is

responsible for advertising the pro-

gram and purchasing new equipment. Vongkhamphou said most nights are fairly quiet for escorts.

take that as a

not too

good sign

much

college).”

“We

that there’s

trouble (around the


7

SPOKE,

Sept. 24,

2001— Page

11

Addicted to body modification’

By Denis Langlois

called tapers,

which she pushed make them larger.

through her ears to

You

who

them everyday: people do anything to look differ-

see

will

Another reason Sutton pierces her body

There are some people who have every part of their body tattooed and others who have pierced whatever they could get a needle ent.

was

way

she

toos.

“I just always knew that I wanted to look like them, ” she said.

According to Tori Sutton, a second-year journalism student and fan of body modification, everyone

own

because of the

“My dad was a biker, so I was always around guys who were outside of the norm and covered in tat-

through. But why do people go to such lengths to stand out in a crowd?

has their

is

raised, she said.

Although Sutton

is

coihfortable

way she looks, some people

with the

motivations for alter-

are not as open-minded, she said. “I don’t wear my septum ring to

“There could be thousands of reawhy other people do it, ” she said. “I do it because I like the way

w'ork,” she said, “because according to them (her employers) it

ing their look.

sons

it

looks.

Sutton,

body

offends too

at

Also,

who began age

piercing her

stare at her

has her ears

12,

“I get

stretched nearly one inch across, a

10-gauge ring in her septum, a navel ririg and a stud in her chin. “I have been stretching my ears for just over two years, ” she said. “It

shows patience.

Sutton slowly stretched her ears

and devices

Focus young

many people because of her piercings.

bad looks

all

the time,” she

Ton Sutton, a second-year journalism student, has been piercing her body since she was 12 years ^

said.

old.

Finding a job

is

“A

(Photo by Denis Langlois)

not an easy task

either.

not plan to stop altering her body lot

of places have policies

against facial piercings altogether,”

Despite the negative feedback that Sutton has received, she does

for

By Bv Mary Marv Simmons is

people.

she said.

using medical tape

Sally

many

Sutton said

anytime soon. “I have the rest of my fife to pierce and tattoo my body, ” she said, “so I

am

no

in

hurry.

Sutton does, however, plan to stop L

Change a focus — ,

a single mother of two

She is collecting and feels that her life is going nowhere. She desperately wants to improve her own life and those of her children. Sally found the help she needed through Focus for Change, a free program for woman on social assistance who are 19 years of age or older and want to obtain more sat-

employment

who

situations.

although a fictitious per-

son, represents the

many women

enroll in the program.

and a potential career, according to Jackie Woodcock, program facilitator at Conestoga College’s Waterloo campus. training,

“The students must learn think of themselves first

and

Woodcock

then

as

as

to

women

mothers,”

“They must think about where they want to go and what they want to achieve.” Students in the program bk-ome said.

and would not do anything to change She does, ilWVV-VWX, however. O it.

facilitator of

Conestoga’s Waterloo campus, assists

Focus

women

their lives.

one another. Woodcock said. “I’m the facilitator. They do

all

the work.”*

Woodcock acknowledged

for

Change

trying to

at

improve

(Photo by Mary Simmons)

a very close-knit group and support

be a difficult thing to do. By the time women take the step to inquire about this program and go through

program is not an easy one. It is all about making changes and this can

each

move

for-

By Shannon McBride

to positive language.

Cambridge

zone

change

last

two weeks of the pro-

job shadow, where the women can observe and participate in jobs of

own choosing. them to make further their

and beverage program

there.

Frank Mensink, dean of business at Conestoga, said an agree-

College’s food and beverage pro-

ment in principle has been reached, but negotiations are not

the Waterloo

campus

to the golf club.

An

ties for

gram

at the

effort to create better facili-

the food and beverage pro-

point where he could dis-

began last fall between the college and the golf

Saraiva.

club.

would be positive the

manager

at

said the club decided

expand from its 18 holes to a course of 36 holes. With this expansion, he said, the club would also improve its kitchen facilities and clubhouse. Conestoga could then form a

interested in applying to

program

for the next session in

January can contact the Conestoga College Information Centre at 519-

748-5220,

ext.

3656.

golf club more opportunity for students to work for a consumer. “The club does a lot of catering and Christmas

parties,” Hastings

said.

“With the expanded facilities, could double the amount and

we

also get involved with other proj-

The golf club will also benefit. During the summer months,

declined

Gary Hastings,

Anyone this

Beth Esenbergs, the food and beverage program co-ordinator,

chef of the

Doon Valley,

Similar programs are also offered other satellite campuses of

ects such as weddings.”

ters.

Negotiations

fying careers.

cuss them.

Waterloo campus has been under way for several semesat

have gone on to further education and training programs which have enabled them to take on more satis-

Conestoga College.

Doon

to

has been very of the students

it

Many

decisions as

offered three

is

adding that

at

to

The program

said,

This allows

Doon Valley Golf Club may finally move Conestoga gram from

and child-care subsidy if they meet which most do. The program has been available

successful.

gram places the women in an employment situation, much like a

the food

A

provincial funding, as well as private sponsorship. Women can also receive a transportation allowance

to women throughout the area for approximately 15 years, Woodcock

com-

partnership with the club to run

involving the

it by social services. There is no cost for the student. The program receives regional and

are referred to

Friday. Discussions include

set for themselves.

to

which Woodcock meets with

woman on an individual basis. Most of the women in the program

the qualifications,

where they are ready

ward. They are also prepared to

after

cation and math. Classes run from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Monday to

Food and beverage program may move

Gary Hastings, manager of Doon Valley Golf Club, says he wants to form a partnership with Conestoga College’s food and beverege program. (Photo by shannon McBride)

said. duJU.

“Knowledge is power,” Woodcock said. “The more you know about eveiy'thing, the more you can empower yourself.” The 12- week program is divided into two phases. The first 10 weeks includes courses on career building, employment strategies'; personal management, communi-

are usually at a point in their lives

to

me, ” she ItlW)

times a year. Students are required to attend an information session,

what kind of upgrading or further education they will need in order to fulfill the goals they have

the steps to enroll, however, they that the

when I was in high school when people used to say negative things to

make the decisions about where they want their lives to go and how they want to improve themselves.

guage The Jackie Woodcock, program

up against criticism in the past. “I wish I defended myself more

improvement

municating assertively and changing from the use of negative lan-

Students must be committed to focus on themselves, their education

and

end of the day, Sutton said happy with the way she looks

the

is

for

children.

Sally,

At she

regret not standing

,

social assistance

isfying

stretching her ears once the diameter of the hole reaches one inch.

comment along with program,

the

Phillipe

involved.

at the

the stu-

club as

In mid-October, a Cambridge zone change, if approved, will

allow the club to begin renova-

“Everybody seems

to

like

the

idea,” Hastings said.

lent

many of

staff.

Hastings said the partnership for everyone

“It will

Hastings said,

dents would remain

give students an excel-

opportunity

for

hands-on

experience.”

Using Doon Valley golf club as a working classroom would create

tions.

Once the course has been expanded, the kitchen facilities can be renovated. If all goes as planned, Hastings said the program could be under way by the fall of 2004.


Page 12

— SPOKE, Sept.

24, 2001

News

Detecting disabilities Special needs helps students By Laurie Vandenhoff

overcome

However, by the time they reach

learning problems overcome

becomes harder to cope and keep up with the demands of a college workload. “Usually we see them after the first round of midterms,” says

assignments,

passing a

test

of their disability.

and

being able to read a textbook hap-

pens with relative ease.

But imagine for a second, having to achieve those things while bat-

Mainland. Students

tling a learning disability.

While about

five per cent

population

student

ever realize that

lives

with

it’s

the person

a

selor

sit-

ting next to you.

“Part of the huge barrier these stu-

dents face

is

who approach the special

lack of understanding,”

from student

services.

However, “It’s

that is not the case at

not their

IQ

that’s the

the

prob-

as

ADD

disorder),”

says

come back

deficit

actual-

special

it

is

evident

that students with a learning disabil-

who

not involved with the

officer

The

26-year-old

Brantford

work in the student employment office Sept. 6. One of her first assignments was flipping hotdogs at the pond native started

party.

Conestoga College

is

one of

“I

was able

a sense of

to get

many

After completing a three-year journalism program at Humber

throughout the college.

College, Free did freelance

have average or above average IQs

student

put on a waiting

to fully

list

is

for an

assessment.

“Last year

is

project.

employment

at Conestoga.

Funding from the province helps provide a number of computer programs, specialized courses, peer support groups and the help of staff

meet with the student

is

attend Conestoga College

big,” said Sara Free, the

student

needs office becomes

the counsellor determines there

we

did approximately

90 assessments,” says Mainland. “Fifty students are on the list this year.” If a learning disability is suspected or confirmed there are a number of services in place to help students

learned to cope,” she says.

year

new

Free said. “1 was surprised at

evidence of a learning disability, the

and have

in its final

day here.

“It’s

are here

dents with a learning disability often

really bright

dents with learning disabilities.

Now

first

beneficial for stu-

were chosen for the project by the

review the student’s information. If

“They are

would be most

the

province’s Ministry of Education.

is

According to information provided by the special needs office, stu-

says Mainland.

of

detected,

a learning disability

A counsellor from that department

not reflected in their aca-

Ministry

how many

will

it’s

the

determine what servic-

eight colleges in the province that

involved.

demic performance. Sometimes students can get all the way to college without anyone realizing they have a learning disability,

by

to

Conestoga

at

Doon campus weren’t only ones who felt lost their

College’s

anxi-

it is

the brain don’t function properly.”

but

Education

college that

If

lem,” explains Mainland. “Parts of

ago

years

By Mike Metzger Students

was implemented four

project

student.

it is

ety or depression.”

all.

The

receive more support and services compared to a student attending a

if

Mainland, “or sometimes is

Opportunities Project.

ly a learning disability affecting the

“Often they’ll

slow learners.

services

Learning

the

checklist to determine

of the special needs office.

misunderstanding

significant

is

ity

(attention

A common

job at the college

counsellor goes through a screening

says Marian Mainland, co-ordinator

that these students are

This

the

available

es

needs office are referred to a coun-

of the

you might not

learning disability,

It

“It

has

made a

significant differ-

ence in students’ lives,” says Mainland. Without the project these students wouldn’t have made it through college.

students there actually

and the great

different

diversity,”

how

programs there

are here.”

work for the Brantford Expositor. She also worked as a receptionist at

the Fairview Drive Pet Hospital in

Brantford for two years.

moved to Waterloo with her husband and started a threeFree

They would be employed at lowincome jobs and bored with what they are doing, says Mainland. “We’re helping these people reach

half-credit to earn her degree.

their potential.”

worked

year program in communications studies

Wilfrid

at

University where she

still

Laurier needs a

She

career services and

in

public affairs at Laurier, which she said gave her excellent expe-

rience

for

her

position

at

Conestoga. Free’s job as student employ-

ment

STUDY SKILLS WORKSHOPS FALL SEMESTER 2001

officer includes providing

is

your personai

invitation:

Room

Time

Time Management

Mon., Sept. 24

12:30 -1:30

Wed., Sept. 26

11:30-12:30

3B14 2018

Wed., Oct. 10

11:30 -12:30

2D18

Listening and

6.

(Photo

By Mike Metzger)

Free said. “I’m really excited to be here.” dents,”

When

not working at the colFree enjoys music, con-

lege,

and snowboarding. She and try to go to Quebec to snowboard every year. Free also likes to cook for people, loves to read, and is trying to find time to do freelance writing. She has already written an opinion piece for the K-W Record on smog, Dming the first few weeks of certs,

her husband

the semester, Free has tried to set-

She

as quickly as possible.

tle in

job searching techniques, and tips for being interviewed. She will be holding

has

workshops and one-on-one meethelping with co-op placements

jumped right in,” she adding she wants students to not be afraid of coming to talk to

and projects such as the upcom-

her or ask for help.

letters,

students,

as

well

as

fair.

“This position is great because it’s totally w'orking with stu-

Date

on Sept.

and cover

ing career

Workshop

Student employment officer Sara Free joined the college

assistance with writing resumes

ings widi

This

gets'

their disability.

One of

college, they begin to feel the affects

For im>st studonls. doing well on

Job hunter

begun

already

critiquing

resumes and meeting with

stU'^

dents. “I just

said,

welcome

“Students are totally to

come

in

and

talk about

resumes

any time.”

1

Note-Taking don’t pay In full until

30 days

Textbook Reading

Wed., Oct. 17

3A405

12:30 -1:30

prior to

departure.

OonlkMwnBr GHmstbetMe?

Wed., Oct. 24 Wed., Nov. 14

Multiple Choice

Tests

iMaiiraMeii.

12:30 -1:30 3A405 11:30 -12:30 2D18

Get

ren

spate

btwketl eaalif-

kone and badiandTraieltUTS

WllgiKIMl

Mon., Dec. 3 Wed., Dec. 5

Preparing for Final

Exams

3B14 12:30-1:30 11:30-12:30 2D18

free date thange.*

*

AooAm •Mirti

Is Sluclml Omu*** M4*<l to mi#*

o<iIk

flVMlsbNRy

mw

MfMl rM# MttUMmMtL

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

niRAVELOUIS C»fi»d#>i tlwlscrt tr#v#l •xp#rt»t

If

you are interested

in

attending a workshop, please sign up

Student Services Offices, 2B02.

in

the

Unhrsrsity

Shop* Phil,

Waterloo

886-0400

IM’ nityCantr, Ur ratty of .ioe^

Kl-i660 www.travcteuts.coni


Page 13

Protect yourself during By Nicole Childs You

be the flu. Checking your temperature

is stuffed,

your head

hurts.

your

throat,

you’re tired and

We all know

what

With the means, or do we. weather changing and the constant contact with other people at school, that

catching a cold or the flu

is

almost

is

and deciding which you as hard as warding them both

off.

what

So

is

exactly

it

that

While

plagues us each year?

many

very

does get sick he said, “I let my mom take care of me.” One of the most important things to remember is that though it may Just be a cold or the flu you have to know when to see the doctor. If you begin having chest

have

pains, difficulty breathing, severe

is

another way of distinguishing between a cold and the flu. If it is normal or only slightly higher than

body temperature of 98.6 F

the usual

then

it

probably a cold. If it

is

elevated then the

you most

is

likely

flu.

throat pain or your

Body

inevitable

have

aches, the level of energy

colds and flu, colds tend to be caused by rhinoviruses while the flu is caused by the influenza The cold and flu season virus.

go to the bathroom is you know the culprit is the flu. Colds do not prevent you from doing simple tasks.

from November

but either infection

getting

up

They

are a nuisance but usually

don’t

mean

a day off

work or from

easily be gotten at any time.

school, unlike the flu.

There are many ways to make your illness a little easier but first you have to know what it is that

Once you have made the diagnoyou have to know what to do about it. As we all know, unfortunately there is no cure for the com-

aits

One way

you.

to tell is to

mon

Scientists and doctors have been trying for years to find a cure but with no success. Although you may not be able to

symptoms

cure

stuffy or

runny nose, fatigue, sore headache and

coughs.

There are

many

other

ways

to

flu.

Pay attention

how

to

fast

your symptoms progress. If they come slowly and gradually get worse then it is likely a cold. If your symptoms seem to p^gress within hours then it is more likely

definitely help your-

run

as our temperatures

and our heads for

that

start to hurt

little

cle

we

bottle

of

The American Lung

painkillers.

symptoms because

it is

and joint aches.

It’s

also a

good idea to refrain from smoking or stay away from people that do because it will irritate your throat. Any cough syrup you can get at a pharmacy will likely help to relieve symptoms but if you are not the cough syrup type you can turn to tablet form painkillers like Tylenol Cold and Flu.

Association actually prefers acetaminophen for relieving cold less likely

your stomach than aspirin. The acetaminophen will help reduce fever and relieve mus-

to

upset

an object an

of fluids to prevent dehydration and

computer keyboard or mouse. When you do have a cold or thfe flu it is good to be kind to others by covering your mouth when you cough so you won’t pass the virus

get plenty of rest.

onto others.

It is

also important to drink plenty

Rob Mayberry,

The

18, a first-year

flu vaccination is

one of the

we have Luckily the school provides flu vaccinations around October and you can always get one from your family

business student at Conestoga College, says that he maintains a healthy lifestyle to prevent illness. Mayberry exercises regularly, tries to eat properly and on the occasions when he general

best defences so far that

against flu viruses.

doctor.

GROUPS AND WORKSHOP SCHEDULE FALL, 2001

Schedule of Dates

REGISTER IN STUDENT SERVICES (Room 2B02; extension 3360) GROUP/

#

WORKSHOP

OF SESSIONS REGISTER BEFORE

Multicultural

To Be

Support Group

Determined

Gay/Lesbian/Bi

To Be

Wed., Sept. 26

START DATE

FACILITATOR

Week of Oct.

Shawna Bernard

2001-2002 2001

1

September 3

Labour Day (no classes) Fall

September 4

Semester Classes Start

Thanksgiving Day {no classes)

Tues., Oct. 9

Week

of Oct. 15

Barb Kraler

October 8

Exam Week

December 17

-

21

Christmas Holidays (no classes)

December 24

-

January 6

Winter Semester Classes Start

January 7

Rnal

Determined

sexual/Trans-

2002

gendered Group Test Anxiety

4

Fri.,

Oct. 19

Week of Oct. 29

Joan Magazine

4

Fri.,

Oct. 19

Week

Shawna Bernard

3

Tues., Oct. 9

Study

Week

February 25

-

March

1

Group Public Speaking

of Oct. 29

Anxiety Group Relaxation

Semestered Programs

Carol Gregory

Week of Oct.

15

Group 1

.

Prevention

No

Oct. (day

TBA)

Barb Kraler

date, time,

Busters/Walk

it

5

X per week for

Fri., Sept.

28

Fri.,

Nov. 9

Conflict

1

Barb Kraler Carol Gregory

Week of Nov.

Judy Bates

12

TBA

TBA

Keith Martin

Aug. 23

Jan. 15

May 14

Sept 24

N/A

N/A

24

Jan.

*

1

25

May 24

Sept. 17

Jan. 18

May 17

Nov.

April

July

Sept. *

When signing up for a group, please leave a copy of yonr timetable, highlighted with times when you are free. Every attempt is made to accommodate the timetables of the majority of registrants. The more times yon are free, the more likely it is that we can accommodate you. Once a time and pbice have been established, we will contact you or yon can check in with if yon prefer.

Some workshops have established times and rooms. Check when yon

register.

1

1

19

Deadline dates are not applicable to work terms

and End Dates Winter

Fall

'

Nursing

-

Diploma Semester VI

- start

Nursing

-

Diploma Semester VI

-

date....J\ug.

end date

20

Dec. 14

-

end date

Spring

Jan. 7

May 10

Health Office Administration (Spring)

April

(Spring)

.July

29

-

May 24

26

1

April

29

-

May 24

Microcomputer Administration Year 2

Jtpril

29

-

June 14

Systems Analyst (semester

starts)

Teaching English as a Second Language

Resolution

ns

May 6

26

Sept.

Microcomputer Administration Year

TBA

April

*

OTA/PTA

Management Workshop

Dec. 21

Spring

7

*

Irregular Start

Week of Oct.

weeks

1

Jan.

One-semester course add deadline

without academic penalty *

Offl!

Stress

Winter

Sept. 4

Two-semester course add deadline

* Note:

ent Services

2

Fall

Program withdrawal deadline

place in Stud-

Stress

Semestered Programs

Refund deadline (program withdrawal)

check for

req.;

-

Semestered Programs

Course drop deadline

registration

Workshop

-

Start date

Lynn Robbins

End date

Suicide

try

infected person has touched like a off

(Photo by Nicole Childs)

As soon rise

distinguish between a cold and the

tact or contact with

Rob Mayberry, a first-year general business student, shows how he protects himself during cold and flu season.

self cope.

throat, fever, chills,

differ-

touching your face. Many times cold or flu viruses are spread through hand-to-hand con-

cold.

you can

you know the

to avoid

alike

it,

that

good preventative measure and

sis,

examine the symptoms you have. While a cold affects mainly the nose and throat, the flu attacks the whole respiratory system. Other typical of both are a

Now

to

to

cough wors-

a good idea to go to your

ences between a cold and the flu and how to cope while you have them you might want to learn some of the ways that you can prevent them both. Being a student in school, it is hard to avoid contact with other people but if you can it is best to avoid people who are sneezing or coughing. Washing your hands frequently throughout the day is another

a strain then

can

it’s

doctor.

your energy

erally tends to drain

for use in the healing process so if

typically runs

ens,

you have and your appetite are other surefire ways of determining what you have. The flu gen-

different viruses cause both

March

season

flu

to

feel a tickle in

your nose

— SPOKE, Sept. 24, 2001

Sept 10

Jan. 7

10

Jan. 7

Sept.

Conestoga College


— SPOKE, Sept.

Page 14

24, 2001

The answer man

deep

Diggin’

By Daniel Roth U's hard to believe that Dan Valkos was onee one of the biggest skepties of people with a psyehie

Espeeially since he has been doing readings for 32 years.

ability.

teaches workshops on psy-

"^He

chic development and reincarna-

workshops under continuing

tion

education

at

colleges across the

province, including at Conestoga

College.

Valkos has also has been a guest on more than 120 radio stations in North America.

On

came

Sept. 10 Valkos

to the

Conestoga College to help students with any questions or Sanctuary

at

concerns they had. “Primarily they’re going to ask about their love life, education, whether or not they’re on the right track, questions that are important

them,” he said.

to

A

of the questions are repetihe said, and most of the stu-

lot

tive,

know about

Lisa Giuliani, 20, a second-year broadcasting student from

Dan Valkos on Sept. 10. Valkos makes an appearance in the Sanctuary twice a year at Conestoga College. Students are allowed to ask him three questions on anything they like. Waterloo, seeks advice from psychic

(Photo by Daniel Roth) I wouldn’t be anymore,” he said. He describes himself as a clairvoyant, meaning he doesn’t need

“If

it

doing

wasn’t fun

it

He

cards or crystals to do readings.

ing,

some of

me, but

it’s

the answers he gave

kind of

made me

happy.” Teri

year

Lynn Zeeman,

same

can read people, in essence, just by looking at them.

with Valkos mini reading.

“Sometimes the questions can be

Valkos said he believes in -himself even if someone else may not.

helped

dents want to

the

fssues.

identical, but just the

answers will

be different for different students,”

sometimes

he said.

Over

somebody

“If

course of two hours

the

Valkos figured he would answer three questions each for

roughly

is

their trick questions are

easier to figure out logically than intuitively.”

He

said

it is

not a concern as he

draws a universal energy to keep him from becoming drained. Valkos said he thoroughly enjoys going to different schools and helping out the students.

Lexie Rowbotham, 20, a secondyear law and security administra-

(LASA)

tion

student,

was happy

with her reading.

me

funny,” she said. clear up an issue

n’t exactly

I

100 per cent sure

(Photo by Sanja GHbota)

“He

of.”

Lisa Giuliani, 20, a first-year broadcasting student, wished, that

An

old artist

the reading could have been

done under different circumstances.

“You only

she said.

she said. “I would prefer to have more of a quiet, relaxing (reading) just you and him without the whole sanctuary being there with

still

Valkos

is

off

style

Babyface and Snoop combine

make

to

hit

By Reni Nicholson So

looking forward to

returning to the college on Jan. 16.

rare

a

is

man who

is

a true

artist.

of multi-tasking and

endeavours is an For rhythm and Babyface it all comes

extraordinary

a popular place

.

shows

new

his great

get three questions,”

A man

Market

_

was-

you.”

was what I wanted to hear,” “It was kind of surpris-

“It

“He was

hard to do a detailed

reading based on three questions.

125 students. Fatigue

me,

tries to trick

Carlos DeMelo, a construction worker, is preparing the ground outside Door 5 at the college for the installation of hydro and telephone lines.

33, a second-

LASA student, was impressed

exceptional find. blues

artist

naturally.

By Kathleen Deschamps

The second

section

has a vast

and vegetables, many assortments of flowers and plants, and other items such as homemade honey and sauerkraut. “We serve a huge selection of food,” said Stephanie Massel, marselection of fruits

Kitchener

famous

is

Oktoberfest, but

it

for

also has

other attractions to keep

including

visiting

its

its

many people

Farmers

Market.

The market, which serves up a

ket manager. “Everything

is

made

and the prices are competi-

wonderful selection of food, flowand cultural diversity, has been

fresh,

ers

tive

around for quite some time. The first market opened its doors in

The market attracts mainly the downtown community, but is a

1839,

popular stop for college and uni-

as

when Kitchener was known Berlin. The market moved ven-

versity students looking for a bar-

jies

until

it

reached

its

current

home in 974 at the Market Square in downtown Kitchener. 1

The market has

tvt^o

main

areas;

one section has meat vendors, a bar, baked goods, and of

juice

course, the delicious fudge table.

with the grocery stores.”

Also, since the middleman

out, prices are lower, is

are

in

direct

competition

with stores such as Zehrs.

They

offer convenience, but

here

a unique shopping experience,”

Unlike

at

grocery stores,

at

the

cut

and the food

A popular site at the market is the information stand.

away

Besides giving

free balloons to children, the

away a

free bus ticket 225 people who show they purchased a product. “The tickets usually run out by 9 or The mar10 a.m.” Massel said.

home

to the first

hours are Saturday 6 a.m. to 2

p.m.

The Farmers Market plans to open a new location in the ycai 2003 tnat will be even larger than the current one.

Mas.sel said.

is

fresher.

ket’s

“We

it’s

it.

centre gives

gain.

may

market you get the chance to interact with the people who make the food, therefore learning more about

downtown

It

will

core, on

still

King

be

Kenneth “Babyface” Edmonds has grown out of that baby-faced look, added

facial hair

and

R&B. Singer/songwriter/producer, Babyface released his 12th album Face2Face on Sept. 11. Having worked with and produced big hits for Boyz II Men, Madonna, Whitney Houston,

worth of records since his debut with the group Manchild in the late ’70s.

Babyface’s talents and experiences have won him 10 Grammy Awards, including producer of the

Billboard’s No.

year for three consecutive years in 1995, ’96 and '97.

Beginning

solo career

iiis

1987, he has had 51 hits

and 16 No.

I

in

Top 10 pop

hits.

Babyface

has sold more than $100 million

WOOLEY

Babyface

TLC, Usher, Toni Braxton, Pink, Mary J. Blige and many more,

in the

Street.

some

ventured into a new decade of

by Marc Hulet

In

1994, Babyface

I

Be Bcarded-This

Magazine's yearly edition. Three latc’;, he was honouied in Gentlemen s Ouarlerly as one of years

“Men of the Year.” Face2Face, the much-anticipated 12th solo release from Babyfaee. continues to tell stories of heartbreak and relationship the

from

He

doesn't detour too far

his usual soothing

romantic

ballads. This albutn features a

new

style of groove-to,

upbeat songs

Mama

featuring rap

like artist

isthe

was named

producer of the

year and “One of the 50 Most Beautiful People" in People

troubles.

attention uiWnHoRizED Zorflak/ CRAFT /TORN OFF YouR can t LEtTHEMi engine and prepare to Itake me back./

1

Baby's

Snoop Dogg.

Stressed Out. Work It Out and Lover and Friend show a more contemporary Babyface with defined chords and a soulful feel. Love and Friend joins the group of jazzy, R&B songs that new artists are bringing to the forefront.

This 13-track release from Babyface will not disappoint fans and should also pleasantly surprise

new

listeners.


SPOKE, Sept.

— Page 15

24, 2001

How much TV are you watching? Canada

Stats

By Julianna Kerr

How much TV

viewing do you

squeeze into your busy schedule every week? So many programs, so

TV

time. Is

little

lives?

taking over our

(Not to mention draining our

bank accounts...)

Canada

Statistics

report

this

habits

in

released

a

year about viewing

Ontario.

about you, but

was surprised

I

what they found

know

don’t

I

at

primarily the ter-

-

rible accusations that

women

in

my

age group watch more TV than men! I don’t believe it. In any case, here’s

what they discovered. women aged 18-24

Ontario

shows young Canadians watching

report

watched 17.6 hours of TV every week, while men in the same age group watched only 13.8 hours. Curious. Men over 25 watched five

cantly less

group.

TV

And

was next

in line

man

The Toronto

native

drew more

Bond W. in

than 100 people to the Jane

Caf6

at

5 Princess

St.

Waterloo. The doors opened at 9 p.m. and people piled into the caf6 until it

was at capacity, at which time the employee running the door had to turn people away.

Hayden

is

currently touring to

promote his new album, skyscraper national park, which will be available in stores Oct. 16. There are 1,500 special edition albums available at shows before

hours in front of the

TV bn

cable

we’ve been presented with altogether too many viewing options.

And

should attempt to

much TV you watch every week. As for me. I’ll never tell. I will try

Canada assures us good news. We’re actu-

very hard not to be sucked in by the

watching

ally

less

ing

those options are increasthe time!

all

What chance do

TV

Jane Bond show was just

him, his guitar, and his harmonica. Former lead singer for Poledo and now a member of Hayden’s band. Kid Lunch opened die show.

of the ’90s, or so

also had albums available for

sale. It has been about three years since Hayden performed in Kitchener- Waterloo, the last time

being at the now deftinct Mrs. Robinson’s, It has also been about 2 fi years since he has done any touring. Early in the show he commented

he had to keep referring to a piece of paper to see what key that

he

because

Despite

didn’t

Hamilton

and

a

influence.

specific

“Everything influences me,” said Weston. “I get influenced by my

CD

series taking a look at musical tal-

own

two

ent in K-W.

seeing tears or emotion.”

This

is

second

the

in

a five-part

voyages, walking in the

He

city,

not

only credits what he hears, but also

When was

the last time

you heard The

Someone

;

1

A

close

downside

competition.

area for the past seven years,

Weston has been performing in the and living off his music for the past five. He

millions,” said Weston.

see

former.

also toured out west three times.

However, he is optimistic he’ll have greater success in the future because, “I want it more than

Internet taping.

Weston,

who

mostly plays the

they do.”

Holding onto his dreams with perseverance Weston said, “There are two types of artist. Those that talk about it a lot, and those that do it.”

Now

March 21

&

is set

don’t

setbacks discourage you

for the next

little

whatever he wants, but

Weston.

lacks

the support of a full-piece

intense,

Playing solo, he finds himself,

and personable.” According to Weston, he enjoys real music, yet he finds it hard to

He

“Good songsaid

storytellers,”

describes his music as

and describes

his

own

frus-

trations with the world.

He

said his music

heartfelt,

is,

“Honest,

and good enough

to sell

With

in

two

albums

already

October 23

November 21 Keep your pants ally!

close friend

ed surprise

-

you

think.

for

someone

liter-

may have in

an unexpectabout nine months.

Sagittarius: November 22 December 2 You may feel as though

you are a

bit

of an outcast. Don’t

worry, things are not as they seem. All will be cleared up soon.

May

21

-

-

Luckiest day: September 29.

June

You may discover that someone is not as special as

special

on,

-

Otherwise, either you or a

Capricorn: -

Don’t hesitate

to strive

make you

that will

happy.

Luckiest day: September 26.

Cancer: June 22

You may want

“Only musicians know

like to

more

be a musician.”

personal

tells

“Many

it is

a

don’t

for the per-

music

is

a requirement, and

is

sim-

ply about necessity.

He

is

ple will

adamant

the

December 22

January 19 If your friends are under

weather use your sense of

humour to help them feel better. You are a good friend, and they will remember your efforts. Luckiest day: September 26.

-

your intuition a little bit week. Whether it be

this

friends, family or finance,

pay off

in

your favour

if

it

will

you do.

Luckiest day: September 30.

Leo: July 23

You may uncertain issues in your

life.

-

still

Aquarius: January 20

July 22

Don’t be frustrated

if

you~

are having relationship trouble.

sudden change

in store.

is

A

Expect

the unexpected.

Luckiest day: September 30.

August 22 be a

-

February 18

to listen to

Pisces:

about some Take the time to

all your options before you make a decision. Luckiest day: September 28.

February

March 20 Your natural

little

consider

one day peotake notice, and like most that

19

ability

-

to

care for others will be an asset this

week. Be prepared or a friend that

is

to help the sick

feeling

down.

Luckiest day: September 27.

musicians attempting to make an

music scene, he “Not much support local music in

in the local

finds there

is,

behind

family

Kitchener- Waterloo.”

The songwriter never wants quit because he believes he

is

to

ished being a songwriter.

Weston performs every Sunday Waterloo.

St.

Virgo: August 23 September 22 If you notice a friend or

Daniel Roth is a second-year journalism student wlw has studied

member

astrology

struggling over an

issue be sure to offer

some

advice.

and other clairvoyant

issues for three years.

here

and play music. And he said he is not anywhere near finto write

night at Falte pub, 85 King

itself.”

your friends are nearby.

Luckiest day: September 29.

May 20

-

while.

Gemini:

Not every performer sees it that way, unless they take it seriously,” said Weston. But he adds that

put

are

that

light in

is

feel lonely

Luckiest day: September 24.

Don’t be foolish with your money. You may find yourself being financially tied up

new The new

of what he does,

how

song melodies, his music stays with the audience.

know

April

-

that school is in full

Taurus: April 20

to a career in music,

story about himself.

impact

dom

“right upfront

it’s

Written with thought-provoking lyrics and intertwined with simple

s

band.

loneliness.

what

Much

“I’m writing for me, one of the

f

to play

talerfts

for great

you

the near future. If

going to

is

Libra September 23 October 22 If you feel lost in the

of six songs.

for you.

makes

more knowledgeable than

are

think.

19.

according to Weston, would be the

There are many musical

writers

s

sist

out there, which

Toronto-based Internet program called The Lofters, videotaped the competition and played it on their half-hour television program. Weston was also asked to perform by The Lofters and appeared for an

studio.

outside!

dark, rest assured there

from achieving success. Luckiest day: September 27.

months, is called Casual Sparing of Thought and will con-

Smith’s? If it’s been awhile Mark Weston may be the local musician

acoustic guitar, said he has the free-

n

a huge

is

home

life

Libra!

swing, and your routine

recording his

is

cheesy horror flicks just about makes me cave. Fight the power. Go on an adventure. There’s tion of old

Scorpio: Aries:

let little

in

album, which should be done

influence.”

won $1,000 in the Songwriters showdown competition in Toronto. Members of the

I

what he doesn’t. “Silence

at his

a good rendition of the band.

Recently, he

I

released, he

icated completely to the presenta-

y—x

Local musician holds onto dreams name

that the

Happy Birthday

Luckiest day: September 25.

By Janine Toms

must admit, however,

possibility of having a channel ded-

Luckiest day: September 30.

X

Casbah Sept. 30.

at the

my

have good news for you.

ence entertained with his relaxed nature, and honest humour that included embarrassing or bia^arre stories from the road. One story was about a woman who stood in front of Hayden at a show and continuously spit on the stage beside his shoe as he played, Hayden will be performing in Peterborough at the Gordon Best Theatre Sept. 25, in London at the 27,

avail-

Week of September 24-30,

lem.

shortcomings,

Sept.

new channels

viewing pleasure.

You

Your dreams are going to be very this week. Write them down and the interpretation may help you figure out a current prob-

Hayden managed to keep his audi-

Embassy

Daniel Roth

intense

to play them.

these

that

able at an outrageous price for

you

also couldn’t play certain

remember how

multitude of

I

Nielsen Media Research is singing a different tune. The Toronto company tracks TV viewing in Canadian homes. A report released in January of this year said that Statistics Canada was wrong.

finds

more TV all the time. So who’s right? Who knows? I would imagine that you know how-

they’d have us believe.

By

songs were in and what harmonica he should use. requests

did

research

Canadians are actually watching

HOROSCOPE

hosts concert He

we

than

'

Although Hayden is usually accompanied by backup perform-

He

Canada

specialty services. In recent years,

I

ers, the

an outrageous time commitment on our parts. In spite of these numbers, Statistics

Canada blames these

Statistics

who

then for $20.

block on Sept. 14 to see the

Nielsen’s

in the first half

- adolescents aged

we

half of

Statistics

Our youths are watching at least two hours less every week than we Perhaps

first

we have to break free from the big bad boob tube when there’s so much to be learned? Read it in a book? Forget about it! That idea requires way too much effort and

that this is

12-17.

are!

the

in

we

than

the ’90s.

than any other age

you’ll never guess

intimate they simply call Hayden.

did

TV

signifi-

Toronto

People were lined up around the

ing less

Our

ing kids under 12 years of age.

often

We’re actual l>t watch-

Possibly what surprises me the most were the numbers surround-

young Canadians watch

away every so

and actually venture outside!

hours less every week than women of the saine age group! Astounding!

'

By Mike Metzger

tear ourselves

less television

N. in

Spoke can now be read online! www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke


— SPOKE, Sept.

Page 16

24, 2001

Sports

Condors By Vanessa Laye

Seneca then put the pressure on

Colleges

of the seventh, with the

(OCAA)

in the top

The Condors women's fastball team squeaked out an 8-7 win over the Seneea Sting on Sept. 14. Conestoga got off to a good start the

rti

bases loaded. Seneca

Hexamer hitting a triple and bringing in two runs for the team. Seneca was sitting at zero after the first inning, while the Condors ended up with four runs and four hits to put them in the lead. Conestoga and Seneca battled it out in the second and third innings, but no one could get to home plate. Seneca made their comeback in the top of the fourth, with Sarah Deter hitting a triple, getting two runs battled in (RBI) and then scorwithin one of ing to come the

In

Knudson

fifth,

hit

Angie

Seneca’s

a triple, bringing in

one RBI. Both teams scored two

RBIs making

a close

it

game

at

6-5

to get

He

first

effort.

little

things

expects the team to finish

or second in the league.

Ricky Finlay, coach of the Seneca Sting, said

Freiburger, pitcher for Conestoga’s of the

seventh

The Sting

in

women’s a

game

lost their

team,

Seneca

(Photo by Vanessa Laye)

teammate on

momentum

in

Condor

the top of the sixth, but

fastball

against

Ruth Yzerman sacrificed a run in the bottom of the inning to put a

a run.

The

third

base in hopes of

deal went through with

Karla Seelen crossing

home

game some

it

at the

was

the

women’s

first

college level and that

were

nervous.

“They

(Seneca) need to be more aggres-

he said, adding, “But they’ll they’ll improve.”

sive,”

get

it,

Conestoga

is

one of

six

teams

in

plate,

the league. Normally the top four

and putting Conestoga ahead by two runs.

teams would continue on to the provincials, but the Ontario

By Vanessa Laye Sperling

who

students

are interested

controlling these games,

Conestoga College kicked off its intramural sports for the fall term

er, if

on

athletic

Sept. 19 with co-ed flag foot-

ball

and slo-pitch teams. Both

will

run for about the next six weeks.

There are four teams competing against each other this year for football ^d 10 teams for slo-pitch said Marlene Ford, the athletics co-ordinator for the college.'

Each team was required to pay a $30 bond, which is rettimable at the end of the season unless the team forfeits or does not show up for a game. This bond covers the booking of the diamonds and field time, as well as the use of referees and umpires she said.

The

games

officials for the

are

not

enough

in

howev-

students

come

out to referee or umpire, student

committee members assume these positions.

will

Ford said she does not know if will be playoffs for both sports because it depends on the outcome of each of them. “In -the last couple of years it’s gotten too cold or one team was so far out in the standings that you tlidn’t need a playoff,” she said. According to Ford, it is raos^ikely that football will have a playoff there

but slo-pitch

is still

teams for each game while the

Conestoga’s

will be allowed to wear any type of clothing they want. Intramural slo-pitch teams will play on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 4:30 until 6:30 p.m. While these two sports are up and running, four other sports will

There are no uniforms required any of the teams because there will be a pinny, a coloured vest, available for one of the playing

for

at home on head coach Stephanie Den Haan said Conestoga will take a lot of teams by surprise. “This team has the talent to win every game. It will be up to the

Oct. 3, registration for intra-

it a reality, for 90 minutes of every game,” said Den Haan, who expects the team to place in the middle Of the pack. Both teams started off strong during the first half of the game,

players to rriake

will jbegin while registration for co ed volleyball will begin on Oct. 9.

Registration for these four sports

but

Fanshawe

ojithustled

the

Condors and were first to the ball. “We have a few things to iron out, but that will come in time, and in practice,” said Rebecca Miller, assistant coach and former varsity

Oct. 17 tliere will be a meeting for the four

4:30 p.m. to discuss game play and teams. sports

varsity

Sept. 11, but

mural ball hockey, non-contact hockey and co-ed indoor soccer

Then on

women’s

Fanshawe Falcons

begin their registration.

captain’s

be going to

provincials,” said Marlene Ford,

co-ordinator

•athletics

the

at

20

at Canadore College North Bay. The best performances of the game came from Sarah Deter from Seneca who was 3 for 4 (three hits at four at bats) with five RBIs, and Lindsey Campbell of Conestoga was 2 for 4, scored two runs, and drove in two RBIs. Conestoga also played on Sept. in

Durham

13 against

The

best plays of the

but lost 9-5.

game went

to

Jessica Jenkins, Ruth Yzerman, and

Alicia Wilson,

who were

The women’s next

3 for

fastball

Conestoga will Canadore Sept. 28.

be

at

3.

game

against

.

soccer team got off to a slow start this season, losing 4-0 to the

will run until Oct. 17,

questionable.

the first year

soccer player for Cohestoga This was the Condor’s first league

slo-

pitch players

On

will

Falcons crush Condors

Intramural sports start off strong By Mike

is

teams

provincials will be held Oct. 18-

ies.

a single in the bottom Sept. 1 4 at the college.

“This

that all six

“We moved the run-

team

needed to win the game,” he said: Scherer has 13 players on the team, five veterans and eight rook-

hits

this year.

Condors, said the ladies put forth a ners and everyone did the

Kristi

Association

Athletic

has changed the format

Conestoga College Recreation Centre. The women’s fastball

great

for Conestoga.

Conestoga.

managed

two RBIs to tie the game 7-7, but Condor Karla Seelen drove in the winning nin to beat Seneca 8-7. Brad Scherer, coach of the in

Leah

with

inning,

first

win

slide past Sting to

at

game of

the season and the

first

18 players were present. With 10 rookies and eight veterans on the team, it was hard for the players to get use to working with

time

all

one another, said Den Haan. Positions for each player are

still

due to the lack of time for tryouts and exhibition. “Being aggressive, communication, and teamwork are the keys of success when playing soccer,” said Miller. “There is no in progress,

T’ in team.”

Scoring

for

Fanshawe

were

Kelly Peak, Jen Astley and Susie

Moussa with two

goals.

Conestoga’s next

home game

be Oct. 4 when they play the Mohawk Mountaineers at 4:30 will

p.m.

Men’s soccer team loses a close one By Vanessa Laye

aggressive.

Slide

tackles

became

both teams’ defence tactic as the

The Conestoga Condors men’s varsity

soccer

aggressive

team

game

Fanshawe Falcons, short with a 2-

1

played

against

an the

came up

but

loss. Sept. 12.

Geoff Johnstone, coach of the Conestoga’s men’s varsity soccer team, said that Fanshawe is a team they should have beat. ers the Falcons

He

two goals

consid-

“stupid.”

and said the goals could have been avoided, but added that mistakes are made. The first goal was .scored by the Falcons in the first five minutes of

game. .F'anshawe’s Marco the Tamasi kicked the ball over the heads of Conestoga’s defencemen and into the net. With Fanshawe leading 1-0 at the end of the first half, the Condors decided to step-up their game. As thd'whistle .sounded the

second

half,

.start

of the

both teams became

dominance of

the

game

shifted

between the two. Many shots were taken during the second half, but Fanshawe’s Rob Pereira swallowed up a rebound and scored after Conestoga’s goalkeeper Ivica

Ambramovic was tion

after

left

out of posi-

blocking

the

initial shot.

With four minutes left in the game, Conestoga pushed the ball up the field. Condor’s hallbaek Mias I'satsas eros.sed a ground ball to Bojan Djokovic. who tapped it into the

The

back of the Falcons

Condors

lost

2-

1

to

net.

the

Falcons, but put up a good light.

Bojan Djokovic looks for someone to pass to as two unidentified Fanshawe players rush him during (Photo by Vanessa Laye) a Sept. 12 men’s varsity soccer team game at the college.

Paul Hollander, coach of Fanshawe’s men’s soccer team, was pleased with the result of the game. He said that both teams played well, but that fitness was an

still

issue near the end.

consists of

“The teams look

rusty, but

it

is

early in the season,” he said.

“Both teams

will improve.”

Conestiiga’s men’s soccer team 12 rookies and eight

veteran players this year.

“We

have some really good rook-

this said year,” Sanjeeve Dhanapala. assistant coach of the ies

Condors.

“But

more exhibition

games

are needed to get each play-

er into the right position.”

“The rookies have the are

a

“They

bit still

raw,”

said

ability, but

Johnstone.

have things to learn.”


SPOKE, Sept

News

^

Learn more about

FREE transportation

career opportunities

24, 2001

"

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Page 17

'

you to and from Career Fair to take

Network with over 220 North American employers from diverse sectors

Tap

into

new fields

that offer terrific prospects

FREE

admission with Student/Alumni ID from sponsoring institutions

Build confidence for interviews by meeting employers now

Wednesday, September 10:00 a.m.

-

26, 2001

3:30 p.m.

Kitchener Memorial Auditorium Complex Doon Campus - Student Employment (Rm.2B04) Waterloo Campus - Student Services < Guelph Campus - Main Visit

Office

or www.partners4employment.ca

Networking Opportunities What is Career Fair? An opportunity

for students

Career Fair

at

Preparation:

and alumni to network with

Visit our

-

potential employers

An opportunity to investigate and research career options An event that helps you to obtain information from Corporate Culture Job Requirements

Industry Growth

Industry Trends

Salary Expectations

Skills

and Qualifications

site at

www.partners4employment.ca for a

Pick up an Employer Guidebook

at

list

Student Employment or

Guelph Campus in advance of Career Fair (available day of the Fair as well)

employers on: Career Opportunities Educational Requirements

Web

of participating

organizations

at the

at the

Main Office

at

Auditorium on the

Research employer information available in Student Employment Update your resume and carry some at the Fair

A

Prepare a business card to give employers a snapshot of your qualifications Target potential employers

Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Prepare a

list

of questions

to ask

employers

Presentation: A

Dress and conduct yourself professionally Exude enthusiasm and self confidence

Be positive and

smile

How to get to Career Fair: FREE transportation will run throughout the day

Doon Campus

To

From

Career Fair

Career Fair

(see schedule for your

A

campus) Conestoga College Doon Campus buses will run four times during the day

Doon Campus buses will Door #2

^

pick up and drop off at

10:30 a.m. 1

1:30 a.m.

1:30 p.m.

Conestoga College Guelph Campus buses will run once in the morning and once in the afternoon

Guelph Campus buses will pick up and drop off Guelph Campus main entrance

at

ON N2H

1

1:00 a.m.

12:00 p.m.

2:00 p.m. 3:30 p.m.

Guelph Campus 9:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m.

1

1:30 a.m.

2:30 p.m.

Waterloo Campus Access to the bus is provided from either WLU or (See

UW

Kitchener Memorial Auditorium Complex

400 East Avenue, Kitchener,

9:30 a.m.

1Z6

on Flyers posted Waterloo Campus)

details

at


Page 18

— SPOKE, Sept, 24, 2001

Student Life Get your application in to be a peer host

By Mary Simmons

people of other cultures.

said,

off and then

you have a minimum of one hour a week, to spend with an inter-

The schedule for those involved in the program is very flexible. Turner said. The service was designed to be an on-campus expe-

If

national student, then the peer host

program

Conestoga

at

College

rience,

with hosts meeting with one hour

could be just the volunteer experi-

their international students

ence you’re looking for. Every year, the peer host program

per

25 volunteers

hires approximately to

work with

international students.

week

a time convenient to

at

No

preparation

or planning

required of the host.

role.

to

hire throughout the semester.

Turner said that hosts should pos-

good

communication and interpersonal skills. They should also be open to diversity and have a true desire and interest to work with sess

Turner

new

host so they

can make another friend. Turner

wannabe meets I

opportunity for stur

dis-

appointed.

After a quick meeting with

my

editor

have a great appreciation for clairvoyant activities and the para-

I

normal, so

on the morning of Sept. 10, found myself going down four flights of stairs, the same ones I had just climbed, to the Sanctuary.

was asked to do a story on what I was told was an X-rated hypnotist. Needless to say I was excited and quite curious. I headed to the Conestoga I

Student Inc. headquarters to ask

if

anyone had seen the talented

I

was

thrilled to

do

the

And what an

experience it was! Valkos is brimming with energy. He has a great sense of humour

and thoroughly enjoys his work. I

some questions about myself, and although personal and not of interest to anyone else, I can- assure you his answers I

were accurate. was more interested

one or two students. Each host must attend a

training

come up

Turner meets with each student

tional students.

individually.

more than

Both applications have questions on the students’ interests, backgrounds and preferences so the best match can be made.

with a reference for their resume.

Melissa Turner,

peer services administrator The majority of

the international

students involved in the program are in their

first

year at Conestoga

The language

difference can be a

session for facing the issues that

with regards to interna-

Anyone

The

office

is

also

willing to provide hosts interested can pick

up an

application at the student services office,

of the

2B02,

main building

in the

Doom campus.

Everybody wants to be a rock star By Kathleen Deschamps

was hoping he could give me a few free pointers on how to hone my intuitiveness. It would have been like in the Karate Kid when I

and enrol

his tapes

busi-

me some me in a few

sell

of of

his courses.

was impressed with look forward to interviewing him again when he returns Overall I

Valkos'and

it’s

on

Jan.

being a rock

lifestyle itself, what’s not to like?

In the movie Rock Star, Mark Wahlberg discovers what it is like to go from listening on the sidelines to becoming the lead singer in his

famous.

The

another shameless plug.)

movie

Pittsburgh

from

place

takes

in

mid-’ 80s.

the

in

Wahlberg plays Chris Cole, the lead

After receiving the oddest looks

learning about p.sychic develop-

advice you’ll be getting

ment than having him answer .some

your friends and

horoscopes,

character

of ray questions. As you may have noticed, 1 am writing tlie horoscopes for Spoke.

which are featured every week in Spoke. (I’m pretty good at this

favourite

is

downs of being

ing the ups and

16. (I

Until he returns the only free

my

star.

favourite band, all the while learn-

I

to the Sanctiaary

one point in dreamt of With adoration at

from millions of fans, more money than one can handle, and the actual

the master trains the grasshopper.

nessman, tried to

Everyone, at least

his or her lifetime, has

from the secretary she explained that the guest was not X-rated, nor a hypnotist. The students’ entertainment for that day was Dan

interna-

have the inclination and the time. Turner said that the majority of hosts match up with

experience.”

know, in

more than one

tional student if they

go through an application process. Once the application is completed,

Well, at least I tried.

took the opportunity to ask him

must also

International students

Peer hosts also have the option of taking on

dents looking for a flexible volunteer

Anyway, Valkos, being a

interview with Valkos.

Actually,

guest.

I

order to trans-

in

tional student.

(Shameless plug.)

was embarrassed, but not

as possible

mit that knowledge to the interna-

the real thing)

Valkos, a gifted psychic.

By Daniel Roth

to apply as long

much

about the college

a very good

Dan meets Dan (Psychic

that students in their first year arc

ness to learn as

but students can renew the match for a longer period of time.

students

Turner said

their studies as well.

experience.”

ter,

decide to get a

a

is

more than welcome

said.

international

more

“It

as they have the desire and willing-

The match is made for a minimum commitment of one semes-

Some

most of the students do very well at overcoming these barriers, finding creative ways to communicate with one another.

hosts can be in any year of

looking for a flexible volunteer

“It is

midst of taking applications and

challenge, Turner said, adding that

country. Turner said.

very good opportunity for students

an infor-

It is

are always looking for

is

mal service where hosts are expected to act in a support and friendship

and will continue

“We

College and arc very new to the

The

at a later date.

peer hosts,” Turner said.

both students.

Melissa Turner, the peer services administrator, said she is in the hiring hosts

gram

while others take a semester come back to the pro-

who

is

obsessed with his

band Steel Dragon. In his spare time. Cole is the lead singer in a tribute band to Steel Dragon called Blood Pollution. Cole is driven to perfection and stops at nothing to make sure the band honours Steel Dragon by playing the

shameless plug thing huh!)

songs without a flaw. By Cole’s side all the way

print

his

is

played by

is

Doyle, first-year journal-

and broadcast stube a rock star after watching the movie of the same name. ism

dent, pretends to

long-suffering girlfriend and band

manager Emily who

James

(Photo by Kathleen Deschamps)

Jennifer Aniston.

Everything comes crashing

Cole when

for

Cole’s

when

down

fires

him.

of

The movie without the stereolife was enjoyable to watch, and there were moments in the movie that were very humorous. A high point was during the credits when they played Mark's

York

to try out for the gig

man

left

Cole gets him and

the band.

has the typical rock star of

Automated Tooling Systems rode the 30-seat

bicycle

on Sept.

(Photo by Janine Toms)

Fundraiser features bike By Janine Toms What

has 30

was and

.seats,

60 pedals and

30 handlebars? The Big Bike

for

built

by a company

is in its

in Calgary,

The event

seventh year.

runs across the province from April

made

for

30

public image.

Each

rider

least $.50 in

had to contribute

K-W

at

pledges to participate in

the three-kilometre ride operated

to October.

life

for the

next several years. Without giving

12.

by

away the rest of the movie. Rock Star shows a stereotypical rock life. Parties are filled with drugs, sex,

and groupies. Cars drive fast and tempers in the band flare. The main dilemma in the movie is the obvious clichd. What is more important

in

life,

the gig or the

girl?

The Heart and Stroke Eoundation of Ontario. Those who participated

role, but that

participat-

received a bucket hat with an event

thing believable in the movie.

logo from the foundation for their

plot

Sept. 12.

ed for the second year. College President John Tibbits, who rode in the event, said the

Amy

fundraiser involved students and

Corporate and

community groups rode

the 30-seat

bike to raise funds for re.search and awareness. Conestoga College also participated in the annual event

on

Kaal, area co-ordinator for

corporate pledges, said the bicycle

Seventeen different nies event.

participated

in

the

Conestoga College

faculty

and raised the school’s

Wahlberg

is

enjoyable in his

was about

was enjoyable

contributions. Future events for the

with

and Stroke include the Mother Daughter Walk for Heart and Stroke.

clichds,

Heart

of women. types of rock star

Good Vibrations from when he was a rapper in the band Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch. The movie ended up being a feel

early ’90s hit

good

all

to

the only

The

watch, but

the typical rock and roll one couldn't help but be

was too convenient that Cole got the gig the same week he

cynical.

It

story.

Cole says,

“I

grew up

with their posters on the wall and

now I’m one of them ... dreams do come true.” Even if this is a little

compatwo-day

Stroke of course!

tribute band.

girlfriends wouldn't be

boyfriend wander off with gaggles

the gig. takes his girl with

Employees

from the

fired

And most

willing to stand by and watch their

better

lead singer because (heir previous lead

was

though

gets

Steel

spots his

New

band

Dragon manager work and invites him to

luck a

his

cheesy

it

is still

fun to believe.

was worth the and the musical sounds of the ’80s keep you bouncing in your seat. This is a great date movie, or one to see with a group of Overall the movie

price of admission,

friends.

My

overall rating

is

three

and a half popcorn kernels out of five.

Rock on!


SPOKE,

Sept. 24, 2001

College students

HEALTH CARE TIP

washed up

all

Car wash raises $295 By Michelle Timmerman Conestoga

College

car

students

reached out and showed the community that they too, can make a

when wash

difference in people’s lives,

for hospital

wash

sick

for

kids,”

said

Michael Packman, a second-year computer programming analyst student,

who

is

WEIGHT CONTROL

also a resident

adviser.

The approximately 15

Need

students

3 p.m. at the Conestoga Residence and Conference Centre, with the

proceeds going to the Sick Kid’s

advertisement in The Record.

Hospital in Toronto.

They also had an advertisement on the college’s radio station CJIQ

The event ran from 10 a.m.

“We were

until

brainstorming ideas

and get the college’s name

out into the community, and one of the other resident advisers

knows of someone

in the Sick Kids Hospital, so we thought it would be a good idea to host a

some weight?

try cutting down the overall number of calories in your diet,

in

Sept. 15.

to lose

Follow Canada's Food Guide and

who

helped suds up the cars pulled $295 for the hospital. Students helped promote the charity car wash through flyers, roadside signs and by placing an

they hosted a charity car

to try

— Page 19

particularly those that are high in

Remember to exercise and weigh yourself regularly and above all give youself a pat on the back for each pound that you lose. fat.

88.3.

Perryman,

Teresa

a

resident

adviser at the residence, did her

share in helping the hospital by

$132 in a wheelchair which took place Sept. 16.

raising

Heather Nagel, executive director of Nutrition for Learning in Waterloo, models the apron for this year’s Smile Cookie campaign being held in conjunction with 71m Hortons.

race,

St.

John Ambulance

(Photo by Stacey McCarthy)

-

Travel the World Teaching English! If you speak English, you can teach English. Thousands of new jobs every month. Pay off your student loan! Become a Certified TESOL Teacher A real opportunity for adventure! 5 day certification course in Kitchener, Evenings & Weekend, Oct. 17-21.

An

orientation meeting

will

be held

J0

Conestoga

Welcome fniri

to

College

MM

Jl rn

nJc

sSilMllM

I

at the Radisson,

Tuesday, Sept. 27th, 7:00 p.m. International College of Linguistics 1-888-246-6512

ll

Academic Upgrading

Employment Training Readiness Perth Career Counselling

www.intlcollegeoflinguistics.com

Job Connect Literacy/Numeracy Continuing Education

We Wish You Children’s International

Success

Summer Villages

Waterloo Regional Chapter

est.

1957 N2H 6S9

P.O. Box 43006, Eastwood Square, Kitchener, Ontario

A

volunteer non-profit organization promoting

Education

and

Cross Cultural

Peace

Understanding

through children.

Welcome

to

Peaces ChUdieii. ,<vFufi/ Culture. Travel. " CISV « Id^dng for adults aged 21 and over for traveling leaKteishfo posj^ons next summer Ccmmitment begins in Marcti aiKl cor^nueB until tte end of the program. Ymi

Academic Upgrading

Employment Training Readiness Come out to one

Information Night at

Grand River Collegiate Thursday October 18, or Friday October 19 2001at 7:30

PM

For more information e-mail info@cisvwatef1oo.orQ visit www.cisvwaterloo.orQ and www.cisv.ora or Call Joe at 742-0214 ,

Focus for Change

We Wish You

Success

J


Page 20

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; SPOKE, Sept. 24, 2001

Welcome

Conestoga College ri

to Conestoga's Trades

& Apprenticeship Centre

Dipioma

Apprenticeship Automotive Service Technician Apprentice Carpenter General Apprentice General Machinist/Tool & Die/Mould Maker Apprentice Plumber Apprentice

Machine Tool Builder and Welding Fitter Apprentice

Integrator

Certificate General Metal Machinist Industrial Maintenance Mechanic Welding Fitter

Women

in Skilled

Trades

-

Welding Engineering Technician Welding Engineering Technology

Access & Preparatory Studies Employment Training Readiness Academic Upgrading

Continuing Education Training

& Deveiopment

Metal Machining

Good Luck and Good Success!

Welcome

Conestoga

to Conestoga's Information Technology Centre

Academic Upgrading Employment Training Readiness English Language Studies Focus for Change Food and Beverage Management Health Office Administration

Microcomputer Software Personal Support Worker Software Engineering Technician

Systems Analyst Continuing Education Training

& Development

Good Luck and Good Success!

CoUege^l


Digital Edition - September 24, 2001