Page 1

u.s. attacks felt at By Sanja Glibota

A

new page

home because they might jump to conclusions and blame someone just to

in the world’s histo-

resolve this quickly and to keep

was written on Sept. 1 1 when a tragedy beyond comprehension ry

everyone happy.”

struck the core of the financial dis-

New York,

Centre towers in

nation

is

psychosis..

er hit the Pentagon in

Washington a few hours later, and a fourth one went down in a field in

tragedy of our generation.”

Pennsylvania.

Alan Barenberg, a Chicago resident

Millions of people around the

CSI president gets dunked during orientation events.

-PAGE

one’s mind:

games

September 2003.

PAGES

people died

happening.”

flights

It is

widely believed that

all

the

crashes were actually carefully planned terrorist attacks.

few different possihave been speculated concerning who might have committed the attacks.

“We have

pointed their fingers without really

dinary chaos.

of our generation.

knowing what is going on,” he

added.

flights

nationwide

CSI

were

Chicago

resi-

in Stratford,

described the chaos that gripped the entire U.S. in his e-mail

speculating.

Ont.,

to

Marc

Hulet, a second-year jour-

to believe that

It is still

any of

so hard

this is really

Brant Dailey, a first-year comput-

programming analyst student

er

the college,

at

shared Barenberg’s

“It is devastating, but I also think

everyone

that

and

overreacted

said.

United States’ reaction

“I fear the

Continued on Page 2

happy fun

activities super,

of toiletry products.

after,

very important that the

first

outside the cafeteria at the

alongside

CSI

is

the associa-

tions vice-president of

communica-

and in charge of activities said, “We want everybody to have fun.” Taylor also emphasized the importance of having the students get out and get involved so they can feel tions

PAGE

like they are part of the college

4

com-

munity. Activities during the beginning of

the school year are an excellent

way

Pond

Party. Fink, a first-year general arts

and science student, ended up with a black eye after Andrews accidentally kneed him in the eye.

“He won needed a

who

first

week of events.

Jaime Taylor, who

and

blown-up Velcro obstacle course

ed.

organize the

Andrews

Tyler Fink took a few runs through

Fink’s eye

who worked

Penny

Students

executives and other volunteers to

home

it,”

Another year has begun at Conestoga College, and to make students feel welcome and comfortable, many activities were held the week of Sept. 4 in and around the college. According to Jon Olinski, president of Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI), the events were a success and student turnout was as expect-

Olinski,

close to

actually

end up being the defining tragedy

“It’s

hits

who

opinion.

^

who was bom

the

300 Tyler Fink, a first-year general arts

and science student, takes a run through a Velcro obstacle course at the Conestoga Students Inc. Pond Party Sept. 6. (Photo byJuUe Graham)

first

a first-year nursing student.

is

but

all

was swollen shut soon was forgiven. week, Olinski estimated

400

to

Fiddlers

with

meet other students. Those who wandered in and out of the Sanctuary were able to watch a

warm

comedian, participate in a casino, see Barney the Magician and enjoy a relaxing atmosphere. The annual Super Happy run Party

LUCky

'v^s

also

a

success.

many

students taking a break

from classes

than 30 .students participated in a bus trip to

Toronto to attend the

haven’t

yet, bul

we

of

raised

a

lot

in

order to

for

re.search,”

how

two huge buckets

think

money

Foodshare and cancer said Olinski, noting

I

students

change receive Good Stuff bags vvith

at the

Centre. Olinski hopes the

be able to offer a

2002

We

great time.

counted the money

I’lied

and

weather.

was a

“It

to enjoy food, beer

attended the

students

Gieen Pub Night. Also, more

SinackDown show of getting the students out and providing a chance for new students to

two times so I Andrews,

strategy,” said

Earlier in the

couple of weeks go well,” said

Attack on U.S. A.

to find

nalism student at the college. “It feels like a whole nation is under psychosis. It will probably

Alan Barenberg, dent

However, Barenberg said it is incredibly irresponsible that people are already pointing fingers and

did

the

COMMENTARY

his-

that there are a

full

...r

and

50,000 people worked inside the towers, 100 to 800 people were inside the Pehtagon and the airplanes carried -more than 160 people in passengers and crew. The officials expected the casualties to be in the thousands. Sept. 11 will be remembered as the day of fear, shock and extraor-

cancelled.

By Nicole Childs and Julie Graham

^

politics

bilities that

reported that about

how many

Michael Dale, a

tory teacher at the college, also said

he said. Dale added that the U.S. actions would depend on U.S. President George W. Bush. “Bush is walking on a tightrope,” Dale said. “Right now, he has to be tough, but if he is too tough that could spawn greater hatred on America. “On the other hand, if he is not tough enough, he can expect more terrorism in the future,” Dale

All

Digging our way to more students in

(Photo by Marc Hulet)

;nts?

were not immediately answer question on every-

Officials

able to

Journalism students react to the horrifying scenes unfolding on the television set up in the college’s TV studio on Sept. 11. stopped and all international were diverted to Canada. U.S. stock markets were closed, all the government buildings and schools evacuated and sports

collapsed.

2'

will

It

probably end up being the defining

anoth-

world watched on their television sets as both towers collapsed in a cloud of dust. About seven hours later, the 47-storey World Trade Centre building No. 7 also

whole under

feels like a

“It

and military power in the United States. Two hijacked commercial planes crashed into the World Trade trict

lot

to

CSI

will

similai' trip in

now

March

WrestlcMania since there are a

of wrestling fans

There

WWF’s

Air Canada

will

at tlie college.

be other new

and events offered

this

activities

year as well as

returning favourites such as Sex with

Sue on Feb. 2 and Survivor Night, v'hich was veiy successful last year. 1

Continued on ’age 2


— SPOKE, Sept.

Page 2

17,

2001

Conestoga students miss out on frosh fun By

Tori Sutton

due

versities

system During the

first

week of

students

first-year

school,

screamed

cheers, rocked to live music, prac-

rock climbing, particia tug of war and passed

tised their

pated

in

sponges to one another upside down. But that was at Wilfrid Laurier University.

At Conestoga College, the first week of school was filled with activities squeezed in between and after classes, while at the two local universities new and old students were treated to a week of activities from morning till night. Frosh week

is

run differently at

Conestoga College than

at the uni-

CSI events Continued from Page 1 Although a concert featuring Choclair was held last year, this year there are no plans to hold a similar event because most concerts

held

money due

at

to

the

college lose

poor attendance.

CSI has

to a 16- week

versus

semester

14- week semester.

However, activities for students were not lacking during the first week of school. Conestoga students were treated to a pond party

and not just the first few weel^. “We are going to have more of a focus on lunch time and day

to

have more

we were given more time, for we would have more activi-

a lot of fun and I think it good idea, but it’s not all it’s cracked up to be,” Wagner said. The week of activities included games of capture the flag, a trip to Bingeman’s Park, a night out at a local dance club, and group

“The activities the CSI planned were interesting but I didn’t know about most of them,” said Fusek,

“If

sure

ties,” said

dent

of

communications

for

Conestoga Students Inc. The universities have an advan.

tage in planning orientation

week

because more students right around the campus said

activities live

all

year long

events ” said Olinski. “And, we’ve

noticed that people really need a break, especially during exams.”

To help promote events, the CSI

“It is

Jon Olinski, president of Conestoga Students Inc., is sent into the dunk tank at the Super Happy Fun Party Lucky hosted by the CSI Sept. 6.

Continued from Page 1 While some Conestoga College students and faculty \vere shaking their

heads in disbelief after seeing

the attacks

on

televisions set

up

at a

others said that, although shocked by the magnitude of the incidents, they were not overly surprised. Emile McLean, a second-year marketing student, was shaken by

know

in the

on

sale today. Buffalo Bills foot-

ball tickets will

be sold tomorrow.

at the college,

the incident. “It

some

was

entertainers.

could happen, except for those peowho planned it,” said Leigh Ferguson, a first-semester student

come

out of

that after I

this. I started

saw all

New York pull

in

this

Art

“No one in this world would think something of this magnitude would happen.”

those people in

However, she said she was not

Leigh Ferguson,

terrorist threat to occur.”

prising,

from a

Dale also said that he wasn’t surprised with the attack.

“The atmosphere

different perspective.

certainly the first thing that

post-graduate student

Dale saw the situation and

Bush wasn’t

I

there.

that

was

thought

of,

tense,”

When

the

attack)

Wildlife^ Giant-Sized Posters

>>

Music

make

Dale

said. “I think this (the

has

understanding that

a statement.

Afterwards he flew to Nebraska.

Middle

given both us Canadians and Americans a new

was in Miami and then he flew from there to Louisiana to

in the

East was getting more and more

attack happened, he

place

after

said.

cannot be easily frightened.”

together yesterday.

“I heard criticism,

Fantasy

it had been “The fact is that Bush should’ve been in Washington or New York to project the image of a strong leader who

thinking

Although he shared Ferguson’s opinion that the attack wasn’t sur-

It

the world

London

bombed,” Dale

ment program at the college. “But, I’m still looking for a positive reaction. Maybe something good will

think something of this magnitude

“No one

is

ruins of

in a post-graduate career develop-

“There had to be a lot of Americans who were expecting some kind of

can happen.

think what

“Churchill wandered through the

ple

makes me coming to.” world would

that this

i

we

are not iso-

from the rest of the world and it can happen here too. think a lot of Americans

lated

He

that

go home until it was perfectly safe to do so. That is not a good image for the leader of the most

always believed that the terrorism is going to happen only somewhere

powerful country in the world.”

else in the world.

Dale explained his disappointment by comparison of Bush’s acts with some other great world lead-

day has shaken Americans’ beliefs that they are completely invulnerable and it made them realize how

ers in the past.

fragile their lives are too.”

didn’t

“I

The

attack yester-

day

9-5

Frames & Hangers <

^-Film

Photography NEED MORE THAN A BANDAID SOLUHON?

lOOOs OF Posters you CAN VISIT A NURSE OR MAKE AN APPOINTMENT TO SEE A DOCTOR AT THE DOON HEALTH SERVICES OFFICE (INSIDE DOOR #3) We can also

POSTER

SALE

to

Sanctuary featuring a variety of

overly surprised by the occurrences.

Fine

last

there

The CSI has more activities planned for the year, including movie nights and events in the

students said

very surprising

is

date

hours

how much

do around the school.

Tragedy beyond comprehension

make

posters.

Some Conestoga

activities.

attended the barbecue but did-

n’t realize

cheering said Wagner.

(Photo by Daniel Roth)

few locations

promotional

who

a

is

has hired graphic designers to Olinski wants students to

off-campus

for

activities

students.

Jaime Taylor, vice-presi-

There are events that take place Sanctuary almost every day and Oktoberfest tickets will be

to par-

nician

week

more students

be able

school.

Fusek, a first-year electronics techstudent, both agreed that they would be willing to pay to

First-year Wilfrid Laurier stu-

Wagner paid $95

week of

participate in her school’s frosh

the colourful posters should help.

will

charge a fee for first-year

dent Melissa

first

Jon Clark, a first-year police foundations student, and Rusty

students to sign up for activities.

a

what events are approaching, and

throughout the whole year

versities

ing the

bus trip to WWF’s Smackdown, a pub night, and a casino day in the Sanctuary. barbecue,

stag-

ticipate

While some of the funding for orientation week is taken from Conestoga students’ CSI fees, uni-

Waterloo’s and Willrid Laurier’s

gered events during the day so

Olinski said the

they would pay a separate fee to increase the amount of events dur-

Taylor.

of

University

help with:

y

allergy injections and immunizations

y

blood pressure monitoring

y

non-prescription medications

y

community referrals

y

prescriptions from a Doctor

y

birth control counselling

y

health resources and information

y

first aid

y

pregnancy testing

y

a place to rest

when you are

i


SPOKE,

New academic VP

Sept. 17, 2001

Drive Clean program kicks into gear

introduced to board

By Stacey McCarthy

but worry about the potential costs.

a good program,”

“It think it’s

By Jody Andruszkiewicz It

the

was a night of introductions Sept.

by the board. It was revealed that pending government and board at

approval, phase three of the resi-

6 board of governors

dence expansion could possibly begin in 2002. However, the cur-

meeting as the college’s academic vice-president and new support

were welcomed

staff representative

by the board of governors. During the meeting, which board chair Sandra Hanmer changed from a closed meeting to an open meeting prior to beginning, Conestoga College President John Tibbits introduced David Bums as the new academic vice-president for Conestoga College. Bums is

rent residence expansion is

However, colleges would still remain crown agencies, and it was reported there is no relief in sight for current funding issues.

touched on a variety of things. He noted CJIQ, the school’s

pleted and cost approximately $15

The Bank of Montreal

new

support

staff representative for the

board of

Lynn Knowles,

the

was

governors,

introduced.

Knowles, whose term started in September, works in the print shop and has been there for 13 years.

Committee notes The finance and auditing committee tabled

its

report for approval

said mechanic Matt Ellacott.

problems.

I passed the first time.” But Josh Gohl, an electrical stu-

dent, wasn’t as lucky. “I

had

repairs,”

to

he

pay for $2,500

said.

“Plus

I

want

the equipment.” Drive Clean techni-

The Drive Clean test costs $30. This includes the pre-test as well

back and in January, Conestoga had a 100 per cent pass rate and in May there was a 94 per

cian at Beverly Tire on Bleams

cent pass rate.

as well as exhaust emissions.

a computerized analysis of your car’s exhaust. The computer measures the concentration of hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxide in a car’s emis-

CJIQ, the school’s FM radio station, had its

for

renewed seven years.

licence

from Ontario Premier Mike Harris on Conestoga’s ranking

community

colleges, with legisla-

tion concerning this expected to be

tabled in October. In the ter,

the colleges

greater

ability

new

char-

would be given to

differentiate

themselves from each other while being flexible and more responsive to

the

needs of the community.

number

1

in

Key

the

Performance Indicator survey for third

straight

Key

year.

Performance Indicators are benchmarks of excellence used by the

report-

ed on a meeting of board chairs in Toronto on Aug. 21-22. It was reported the government is working on a new charter for Ontario’s

letter

colleges across the province.

ended his report saying Conestoga brought home five graphic design awards and noted the program has had 15 years with a 100 per cent job placement rate and a student designed the awardwinning patch worn by astronaut Tibbits

to

Road

in Kitchener, said that the

mitial test is for gas

The next board meeting

is

on

and fluid

le^

Students shouldn’t^ worry too

much about Ellacott.

failing though, said

“Only about one in 10

vehicles usually don’t pass the

According to Keith Rogers, a mechanic at Tireco on Fairway Road, “Most cars only need a new gas cap, an oxygen sensor or a tune-up. “It’s

and another $79 for

re-test.”

as

sions.

This

test takes

about 30

minutes to complete. Students driving even-yeared vehicles between 1982 and 1998

initial test.”

can expect a notice in the mail requiring

them

to get their cars

tested this year. Notices are usually

issued 30 days before an

individual’s birthday.

when you have an older car more serious prob-

Drivers

who

fail

to take their

that there are

vehicle in for testing will not be

lems

able to renew their registration.

like engine efficiency problems,” he said. “But as long as the car has been properly maintained it

usually does pretty well.”

Doon

Chris Hadfield.

damage

Ellacott, a

Tibbits mentioned a congratulatory

Tibbits,

The advocacy committee

practical nursing test results

first test

an engine

students

recogtiize

the

need for the Drive Clean program

“There’s not a huge waiting

list,”

said Ellacott.

“You might get in on the day that you show up or you might have to wait a day or so.”

Oct. 22.

33 Molsons^ Pub Night

itUm

22oz. Draft

Domestic Beer Bar Shots

.

Special Events

BAND

Saturdays

at

Pitchers 1/2 litre

LIVE

Wine

DJ Dancing

9pm

Imports 1/2 Price Pool

Bar Shots Coolers FREE POOLfor ladies DJ 10pm

100% CANADIAN

OWNED, OPERATED ANDTAXED!

in

paid for

The were

the

introduction,

it

the Drive Clean

Brown.

didn’t have any

I

tinues to improve.

will take over his role as

Bums’

test,

fails

and

“It’s fair

the mortgage will be a 6.7 per cent

from 1990-98.

to

If a car has visible emissions,

student Matt

fixed rate.

Conestoga president

Prior

clouds of smoke stand little chance of remaining on the road.

LASA

the

Waterloo’s Faculty of Engineering

2002.

FM

by

said

“We won’t even test the car if it has visible emissions. We don’t

Waterloo and was the dean of

January

that cars followed

automatically

radio

is

John

in

gram means

pro-

station, had its licence renewed for seven years and con-

engineering at the University of

academic vice-president

new Drive Clean

the mortgage holder and the rate on

million.

currently a professor of mechanical

Bums

Ontario’s

In the president’s report, Tibbits

com-

— Page 3

WESTMOUNT PLACE SHOPPING

CENTRE, 50

WESTMOUNT

RD.N.,

WATE RLOO

PH(519) 884-8558 FAX(519) 884-7733


Page 4

— SPOKE, Sept.

17,

2001

Comioeitairy

U.S. attacks

Just Love the FALL Oowryoo?

OH

1

I

impact the world

DEBT, W/lillNG IN

LINE FoR Hours and The SMELL OF fear ON

Tenorist attacks happen all the time in the world, but nothing has been as devastating as what happened in the United States last week.

!

I

On Sept. 11 four planes crashed in the U.S. taking out the twin towers of the World Trade Centre, damaging the Pentagon and leaving a path of destruction. Students and staff at Conestoga College gathered in and in the television studio to watch the breaking news on network TV. You could feel the tension in the air and all eyes were glued to the big screen watching the drama unfold like a Hollywood movie. But sadly it was not a movie; this was real-life drama, Some classes were cancelled or let out early, while in others teachers spent class time talking about the largest act of terrorism not only in the history of the United States but the entire world. Everywhere you looked faces showed great shock, but no one seemed to really believe that it was happening. Why has this incident had such a huge impact on everyone? It is because it hits so close to home. The horror of this catastrophe happened right in our backthe Sanctuary

!

I

j

!

yard.

With wars and attacks constantly going on in the Middle East, and the hatred those groups feel toward the U.S., we knew there was a possibility of this happening at some point. However most of us never thought that it would happen so close to home. There were Canadians who died in the attack, and many have family and friends in the affected areas. We assume that living in Canada means we are safe from terrorism. Nothing of this nature has ever happened in Canada so we hve with a false sense of security. For a lot of people this incident has forced them to realize that this can happen anywhere. If the U.S., one of the richest and most powerful countries in the world, was attacked on such a large scale, then it could happen to anyone. In Canada we felt some of the effects of this situation. International planes were diverted to Canadian airports in major cities including Vancouver, Calgary and New Brunswick. Some Canadian hospitals cancelled elective surgeries in case they were asked to

CN

Body image an obsession A day in the life of a girl

12-year-old

of diet

includes dealing with marks,

teachers,

peers and an

parents,

ics

pills, lax-

and

atives

used to

increasing desire to attain the ideal

and

body image,

desired

any

at

Overexposed

cost.

women

to

with

young

waistlines,

aren’t told the proper

methods used

Anorexia nervosa

At

and healthy

a disease

is

a

sustain

body age

12, girls

are playing softball

and talking on the phone

friends, others are locked in a

to

world

increasingly associated with girls

of fantasy with the potential to

aged 12

become deathly

to 14, says a study

lished in

the Canadian

pub-

Medical

Association Journal in August.

The study found

ates a cultural behaviour of

itiveness

ill

because of their

desire to be an unhealthy

body

weight for their age and frame.

At 12 years

that a disturbing

old, the

drives

that

female population to lessness

when

it

compet-

young

the

strive for flaw-

comes

to image.

This self-conscious and impres-

when many

girls

to attain such a look.

attain

influencing these girls which cre-

weight.

toned bodies and culturally preferred

diuret-

sionable age group

music

and voluptuous

stars

on

es seen

television,

and

actress-

in

movies

and magazines. the low-rise jeans and belly

It’s

women

chains seen on girls

hope

young

that

be able to wear and

to

look Just as good

female body

bombarded

is

with images of scantily dressed

in,

but

do

little

they realize that such clothes are not

take in victims of the U.S. catastrophe. Even the for safety reasons. Other terrorist attacks like the Oklahoma City bombing or the Columbine school shooting did not have this

number of teenage

girls in

Ontario

requires an excess of fat in order to

meant

for children

practise unhealthy

and occasional-

develop into a women’s form.

figure

on which

dieting.

These

Researchers found that 27 per

they are doing can ultimately hin-

and doctors need

to instil

kind of effect on Canadians. People are taking this attack more seriously and Canadians are feeling more fear than ever before. The range of emotions expressed by students and

cent of respondents had poor eating

der the natural process of being a

some techniques

for achieving a

behaviours or dieting regimes that

women. Because of

healthy body.

could put them

fat,

was phenomenal. Immense interest, combined with a shedding of tears and pure disgust filled the halls of the college. People everywhere were talking about the destruction and the huge number of lives that were lost. This event will be remembered by students, staff and

concluded that 20 per cent of the

people all over the world for the rest of their lives. And it is an event that will haunt them for a long time to

of their calorie intake. Poor behav-

come.

as described in the study, include

Tower was closed

staff

ly fatal

methods of

at risk

ing an eating disorder.

girls

aged 12

veyed

to 14

fell into

of develop-

The study

who were

sur-

the risk group.

their

body weight through control

girls

their period at a

losses

know

that

what

lack of body

do not develop

do not begin

normal time. These

Young

child-rearing years. girls

need

the

whole-

The meshing of childhood and

womanhood must be

discontinued

and thick

to define for

young

lines

girls

drawn

how and when

and how and when

girls

be taught

to

is

Hollywood, mothers, teachers

full

can be detrimental to a

woman’s

to

be

to

be

women.

healthy methods of weight loss and

This culture shouldn’t rush chil-

such as the benefits of

dren into becoming adults. Instead

control,

exercise and healthy eating.

The obsession with

iours attributed to eating disorders,

North America

self-induced vomiting and the use

Spoke

some

don’t

breasts or hips and

Anorexia nervosa causes people to obsessively maintain or reduce

girls

and neither

the clothes drape.

is

it

thinness in

unhealthy.

Hollywood plays a

should protect them from the

world

superficial

in

which image

large role in

their

innocence and childhood.

SPOKE

is mainly funded from September to May by ment from Conestoga Students Ine. (CSl). in exchange

Keeping Conestoga College connected

is

everything and help them return to

insertion of advertising in ibe |\iper.

exprcs.scd in this newspaper

a pay-

for

llie

The views and opinions

do not necessarily renect

die

views of Conestoga College or die CSl. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by die CS' unless dieir adverlisenients con-

SPOKI^

is

published and produced weekly by (be journalism students of Conestoga College.

Spoke Online Editor: .Fody Andrus/, kiewiez i’roduetion and Advertising Manager: Paul Koslal Photo Editor and Circulation Manager: Sanja Glibola Faculty Supervisor and Advi.ser: C’hiislina .lonas SPOKE's address is dU‘) Doon Valley Dr., Room 4H14. Kilehener. t)iUario. N2G 4M4. Editor: Rciii Nicholson;

Phone:

748-57'’(), exl. bdl.

(lU.V (4)4

Fax: 748-4.s.’G E-mail: spoke(<''eoneslogae.oH.ea

lain die ('SI logo.

SPOKE

.shall

not he liable for any

arising out of errors in ailverlisnig lieyond die

damages

amount paid

for

the space. Unsolicited submissions .tiust be sent to the editor

by

d:.t() ;\.m.

Monday. Submission., w

or rejection and should be eleatiy lile

would be

lotis

helpful.

statements and

tsueli as a

a’v subject to aeeeptanee '

iiti

n or typed; a

MS Word

Submissions must not contain any

may be aeeompanied

photograph).

b\

libel-

an illustration


—— News

SPOKE,

Sept, 17, 2001

— Page 5

Students juggle homework and kids By Denis Langlois

“I prefer to study at night,” said

who

La,

Balancing homework and raising an impossible task, but it requires planning, structure and a good supsystem, according to port a child doesn’t have to be

Conestoga’s learning skills adviser. Joy Tomasevic, who works in student services, said there are strategies parents can use to

homework and studying

many make

for two-and-a-half “People are more calm and quiet at night and they are usually occupied with something (TV).” La also places toys around the room so her son can remain occupied while she is doing her homework. years.

easier for

homework by

letting

combine

their

“He has

a sign-out system for

room

toys in his

so the toys are

always new to him,” she

family

also important, said La.

affair.

La, a general arts student

and a mother of a four-year-old boy, has her

comes

own

when it homework and

strategies

to balancing

La,

general arts student

homework times with their children’s homework times to make it a Quan

Tomasevic said the workshop, which takes place during orientation week, is an excellent opportunity for people to connect.

parents

only

know

ones

It lets

that they are not the

taking

on

the

succeeding at it,” she said. They can also find out what strategies worked for them. Also, Tomasevic said the coun-

takes over,

it

gives

Students offer advice on school and family

school.

my

him

to

raising children is difficult but not

husband

me a break,” she

said.

Conestoga

raising her child.

is

She said balancing school and

“If I get frustrated, I send

house or

College

good

people to talk to because some of them have personal experience with raising children while going to

said.

Having a good support system

my mom’s

duel

of raising children

sellors in student services are

Also, Tomasevic said parents of older children can

Quan

them

who are balancing homework while raising children. other people

while going to School. “Parents can ask questions with other people who are doing it and

can quickly become overwhelmed.”

schedules,”

mature student workshop, so parents can exchange strategies with

responsibility

“You definitely need support because you

“If parents have small kids, they can help them feel like they are a part of their studies and part of

colour -in their Tornasevic said.

attending

Conestoga

both themselves and their children.

their

been

has

hosts

a

impossible.

“You definitely need support because you can quickly become overwhelmed,” she said.

Quan

La, a 23-year-old general arts student, stands in front of the

early childhood education playground, which her four-year-old

attended

last year.

son La has been balancing school and a family for

two-and-a-half years. (Photo by Denis Langlois)

International education office helps

students blend into Canadian

lifestyle

By Denis Langlois

By Mary Simmons The mature

shop on Aug. 28 enabled ’students to connect with other people

who

students have a lengthier process to go through to get accepted at a Canadian college or university since they not only have to apply to the institution they wish to attend, but must also apply for a student visa once they are accepted. The visa comes from the Canadian embassy and can take anywhere from two weeks to four or five

one semester or continue

months, Rechsteiner said. To be accepted to the college the students must have the equivalent of

mended

Conestoga College and, on a broader basis, to Canadian cultures and traditions. According to Larry Rechsteiner, the director of planning and inter-

an Ontario secondary school diploma. They must also have English

family with

whom

attending

school.

national education at the college,

have math

student work-

are

successfully

Imagine travelling thousands of miles to study in a strange land, where the people speak another

“There was a lot of good questions asked and a lot of good tips that people gave,” the

language and the culture is vastly different from your own. For the approximately 185 international students at the Doon campus of Conestoga College, this is an

learning skills adviser said. ‘Tt

everyday

balancing family and school, said Joy Tomasevic.

was a good

The

session to attend.”

session,

which took

place during orientation week,

included

of three mature students in their second and third years of school. About 35 students attended the workshop, said Tomasevic. Although the session only happens once a year, she said a mature student group would be a

panel

The

reality.

education

international

office helps these students to adjust to life at

the

number of

dents

another good way to get people

from

together.

expects this

institution

has

more than 60 per cent

last year.

in

stu-

the

at

increased by

more

international

He

also said that he

number

the future.

to

go up even

International

skills that are at

a Grade 12 level,

and, depending on their program,

they

may need

Due to

to

skills at

show that they a Grade 12 level.

the fact that

many

of these

students do not possess the level of

English

skills required,

the English

most take

Language Studies pro-

gram. Depending on their level of English, they

may

take the required

their

studies into further semesters.

The

is

an application process so

that students will

education office provides a number of services to these students to help them international

be well matched

to their host families.

The

international education office

also offers free airport pickup to

international students arriving at the

instance, they will assist in arrang-

Pearson airport in Toronto. The students must provide the office with

to

life

in

ing housing for the students in the

residence or through the

program, which for

is

Homestay

their date

and

arrival time.

strongly recom-

International students also have

who have

access to an international student

students

never lived in North America.

It

provides the student with a host

who

adviser at the college, assist the students

will

with admission

they live while

concerns, health-care insurance,

includes

timetables, student visa extensions,

accommodation, meals, towels and bed linen and has a monthly fee of $550 to $600 Cdn. “We purposely do not put stu-

and any other concerns or ques-

It

tions the students

And

if

may

participate in the peer host program,

dents with families of their

own

ethnicity,” Rechsteiner said.

“The

tional students with

that they are here to learn

dents at the college,

point

is

English and it.as

much

we want them

to

speak

as possible.”

Within the Homestay program

have.

they want, students can

which partners

first-year

interna-

Canadian

who

the student around, take

will

stu-

show

them out

them

to college resources.

We have all watched with horror the recent attacks on the United States. In our own way, each one of us has been affected. Experts suggest no form of disaster is harder to deal with than terrorism. Although actual survivors will be the most traumatized, secondary trauma can also occur

as a result of witnessing horrible events fact,

according to Syed Arshad Husain,

tures of destruction

Common

on

television,

MD, “From

worrying about the families involved, or learning that someone you know has been affected.

In

our experience with the Oklahoma City bombing, the trauma as a result of viewing the gory pic-

caused more psychological damage to more people than the direct impact.”

reactions to traumatic events can include: trouble with concentrating or

remembering

things; hypervigilence or increased startle

response; recurrent visual images, nightmares, or flashbacks; difficulty sleeping or eating properly; feelings of helplessness, sadness, numbness, or depression; questioning of beliefs or meaning; bursts of anger or irritability; or any other atypical behaviour, emotion, or reaction.

What you are experiencing is a normal reaction to abnormal events. Helpful suggestions for coping with these reactions include: talk about what has happened; share your feelings and reactions to help you process and make sense of the events; find balance; try to maintain most of your personal routines (eg. attend classes, eat regularly, exercise, and consciously relax); talk to your children about what has happened (listen to their fears, monitor their television intake, and reassure them that they are safe); or do something productive eg. give blood, donate to relief funds, or engage in prayer vigils.

If you would like professional help, counsellors are available in Student Services,

Room

2B02.

to

events and activities and introduce

Counsellor’s Corner: Coping with a Traumatic Event that

all

For

adjust

Canada.

there


Page 6

— SPOKE, Sept.

New

17,

2001

News meet needs

building to

By Marcy Cabral

ties finding

parking.

First-year mechanical

With double the nuiuber of students expected

to

Doon Superbuild under constiaiction to better prepare for the elimination of the Ontario Academic is

ter.

“With the reduction of lots and the number of cars

Credits.

here

Located between the health sciences wing of the main building and the recreation centre, the new building will be used for generic classes and no particular programs, according to David Putt, director of physical resources. The expansion will allow for

which

is

However, some students who have purchased parking decals have had no choice but to park in meter spots because of the lack of parking. “It’s really

when you

With the provincial government removing the Ontario Academic Credits (OAC), known as Grade

all,”

Funding of more thaa$14 milwas received from the provincial Superbuild fund, which is being provided by the government in students in 2003.

order to meet the needs of the double cohort. Putt said.

difficul-

Peter Freer, a carpenter with Local 785, works on a footing for the new lot 12 on Sept. 6. (Photo by Marcy Cabral)

building in the former parking

Residence expansion accommodates 210 more new and returning students By Michelle Timmerman Conestoga Residence and Conference Centre now offers more beds for students living away from home, after being taken over by Conestoga College in the fall of 2000 and- going through some major renovations. .

“I can come home from work at six in

the morning and

know ally

that

I

am

225 shared room

amount

of shelf

space

expected.”

some

Erica Bailey,

full-size

some

new

September,” said John Kobylnik, the

Conestoga

Residence

Conference Centre’s assistant

and man-

ager.

The

building

year broadcasting

residence, which

is

a short

is

said

having

second-

student

Erica

Bailey.

home from work at morning and still know

can come

six in the

some

I

am

actually going

more

to

get

sleep.”

Other advantages returning residence students found included

more kitchen space, a bigger bathroom, windows that can be opened and most important of all.

The building will include 36 classrooms, faculty rooms and a staff lounge, meeting or small group rooms, food services, and 160- to 180-seat amphitheatre. The completion date is scheduled for the first week of August 2002.

Be a

is

valuable

grounds

tress.

are

all

cultural

back

1

matched with a

girl between the ages 417 yrs. Presently there is a large waiting list and in total over 60 children waiting for a friend. Can you share 3 hours a week for one year to enrich a child’s life? Next training dates are Sept. 22, 2001 or Nov. 10, 2001. Call 743-5206 to register.

We provide complete

training. Call today.

744-7645

who

8 years and older, have the opportunity to make a positive difference in a child’s life. Each Big Sister is

At the Distress Centre you

the

big sister

Female volunteers from

X 317.

www.cmhawrb.on.ca

privacy;

.

Althbugh there are many advan-

new

building, there are

Spoke can now

disadvantages.

“There

build-

is $4,300 or $3,900 for the old building. “One of the biggest advantages to

that

at

accounting student

tages to the

ing for the school year

Your time

Tamara Konigshofer,

building.

new

I

and

refrigerator

cost to stay in the

isn’t

a

microwave, three-piece bathroom, cable televtsion, and Internet access. Residence also plans to add a patio and a barbecue to the new

“I

“The expansion began in late October of last year, and is expected to be completed by the end of

pri-

double bed, a joint kitchenette with

separate bedrooms,”

broadcasting student

two

suites include

living in the

sleep.”

suites.

vate bedrooms, complete with

The still

actu-

going to get

“There

sink,

me

she said.

can volunteer providing confidential supportive listening to individuals in dis-

15-minute walk from the college, has added 210 private suites to its

The new

said.

Aside from the dust arid occasional loud bang from the construction. Cleaves thinks the new development is a great addition to the college. “I think it’s good that (the school) is expanding. It makes it look like it has more to offer,” she said.

lion

having

Monk

has no problems with the expansion project. “I haven’t even noticed, it doesn’t affect

expansion is intended to accommodate the onslaught of graduating Grade 12 and the last OAC

Construction of the building, which will be connected to the health sciences wing and the recreation centre ramp, has caused the loss of about 110 parking spaces in lot 12. Although the lot

hard trying to find a spot. Especially

get here after 8:30,”

First-year -general business student Julie Cleaves

13, the

still

tough,” she said.

already in place.

the key objective,” Putt' said.

was extended, students are

it’s

Putt believes the college should be able to get through the situation with the close to 3,000 spaces

an increase of about 1,400 full-time students. “We will be able to service more students and clients,

engineering technology-

automated manufacturing student, Kim Monk, had trouble with parking just three days into the semes-

attend the college in 2003, the

Building project

2003

of student increase in

isn’t the

amount of

shelf

space in the bathroom and kitchen

be read online!

that I expected,” said second-year

accounting

student

Tamara

Konigshofer. “I ended up going and buying a separate shelving unit.”

Another disadvantage students found was the setup of the rooms. In order to have friends in everyone has to pile into one room. But the biggest complaint by. far, according to Sarah Viola,

manager of

the residence,

the phones in the

is

For the latest college, entertainment and sports news, as well as games, puzzles,

weather and reference links, visit www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

that

new rooms can

make room-to-room calls, but to numbers outside

calls

not the

building.

800 0-Canada.Talk to us. Do you have questions about

child safety,

pensions? Our information

officers

can

For more information on

government services:

jobs, parental benefits, passports or help.

Canada. gc.ca Find out about the hundreds of services available from the

Government

of

Canada.

800 0-Canada during regular business hours and a real person will answer your call. Call

Canada Access Centres

Service

1

Canada

1 (1

800 O-Canada 800 622-6232)

TTY / TDD

1

800 465-7735


SPOKE,

Good times Not

local

all

businesses

By Laurie Vandenhoff

“We

are a family restaurant.

are not a bar

As September began,

so did

its

familiar sights and sounds; allergy

autumn

season,

and

students

returning to school.

when Kitchener welcome

businesses in

school year means more customers for the next eight months.

Restaurants and bars, especially,

to bring students in (to

restaurant),”

Bloom’s

Kim

said

manager of Molly Pub on Manitou

Fitzgerald, the Irish

Drive in Kitchener. However, not all businesses in the area around the college embrace the student population.

Employees

they

come

here

not encour-

that,” said Lori, the restaurant

who

manager,

student discounts,

want

to

move

Lori

company does not

but the

said,

in that direction.

A1 Cheapolini’s

regular customers.

Rebecca Park, an employee

at

Pioneer Hairworks, said they encourage students to use their services even though they do not offer

them discounts.

This

is

a

common

situation

among area businesses. Hamid Hussein, the manager of Video Tyme Superstore, also in the

the Pioneer Park Plaza notice the

Pioneer Park Plaza, said she sees a lot of students from Rodeway

increase

Suites

at

in

students

September. However

warm

it

in

during not a

is

reception for students.

body

“We

already have good specials,” said Hussein, referring to the dis-

counts that they offer to every customer.

Many

businesses chose to reach

coming into her store. However they also do not

through flyers and coupons that were distributed in packages given out by Conestoga Student Inc. at the college registration.

Despite not offering specials for many surrounding businesses do want to invite students to

become

offer discounts to student

students

A1 Cheapolini’s has discussed offering

— Page 7

Bloom’s

at Molly

did not want to

students,

gear up for the school year by offering discounts to students.

“We want

if

we do

reveal her last name.

back Conestoga College students with open arms. For them the

our

age

also the time of year

It is

and

looking for a bar

We

Sept. 17, 2001

Included in the package was a coupon advertising Wednesday as Conestoga College night at Molly Bloom’s Irish Pub. Students can receive pitcher and food specials or use their coupon to receive a free entree

when

pur-

chased with another entree. Students who went to Molly Bloom’s for the first Wednesday of the school year enjoyed an open jam night while drinking their favourite beer in an Irish atmosphere.

“We want

students to feel

discounts to students.

left to right, Dan Anderson, Paul Chad Woods enjoy a drink at Molly Bloom’s Irish Pub Wednesday nights are Conestoga College night at

on Sept. 5. Molly Bloom’s where students can enjoy discounts and an open jam night. (Photo by Laurie Vandenhoff) .

com-

fortable,” said Fitzgerald.

offer

Conestoga College students, Cronin and

visit certain

Students at Molly Bloom’s agreed that they can be enticed to

establishments.

attract

“If they (businesses) offered dis-

counts...

I

imagine that would

more people,”

Anderson, a

said

Dan

first-year police foun-

dations student.

Cafeterias offer students plenty of food choices By Kathleen Deschamps Kraft dinner. Beans.

Dee. This

many

is the

Chef Boy-R-

food sustenance of

college students.

With the high cost of tuition, books, rent and transportation, there is

money

little

meals.

for

left

However, with proper budgeting and knowledge of ^e foods available, a student can eat like a king without going into early bankruptcy.

The

cafeterias

College offer

Conestoga and

at

many

nutritious

delicious selections. “It’s

a typical college food fare,”

said John Kast, food service direc-

“We try to provide a first-class food service to

tor at the college.

students.”

“We’re trying to pro-

Peter Katrakis,

vide a first-class food service to students.”

1

9,

a first-year marketing student, bites which is available in the cafeteria at

Harveys french fry Conestoga College.

into

Ginny Hawkrigg, a CSI board member, and other college students place their bets at a roulette table during the CSI’s casi-

a

no day on Sept.

{Photo by June Graham)

5.

(Photo by Kathleen Deschamps)

John Kast,

food services director Gone style

are the old days of hospital-

food

Now

This year the Conestoga cafeteria has introduced new features due to the

fast-growing

student

body.

bank card, instead of using cash. This should reduce the lineups at

Ultimate

bank machine dramatically. is down when the bank machine is down,” Kast said,

Questions

the

a

Ready-made wraps can now be

“Business

student can eat just about anything,

purchased in the main cafeteria as well as Dooners, which provides a

adding, “Students can

in the cafeterias.

from Haagen Dazs ice cream for $2.78 to a seafood and crab super sub for $8.49.

The chain

Conestoga are Pizza Pizza, Harvey’s, Mr. Sub and Roasters. The main cafeteria and the smaller Dooners cafeteria both cany wide selections.

“Many

students don’t even

know

about Dooners until they see someone with Pizza Pizza and ask where they got it from,” Kast said.

The main

cafeteria

located on

the

stir-fry

program we

reasonable price. “There is a fair choice available,” Kast said. “We

said Kast. “We’re trying to provide

a first-class food service to students

this

year are popular

which allow

fruits

yogurts. In the stir-fry program,

“All students have limited time,”

Interac machines,

close to the bookstore.

Vegetarians also have a vast number of choices to choose from for a

have a number of salads, nutritious yet fast meal.

and Dooners

main building, on the second floor,

will offer

John Kast

the first floor of the is

as well.”

vegetarian dishes.”

on the go.” Also new

is

a

cash back option with the Interac

“In

restaurants at

now have

stu-

dents to pay for their food with a

will

offer

vegetarian

and

we

dishes

throughout the year.” Suggestions, complaints or any new ideas about the cafeteria can be made on the bulletin board in the

main

register.

cafeteria behind the cash

Bible study by correspondence. For a

copy of the course please send name and address to: Bible study, Zion United Reformed Church, 1238 Main St. Gen.del, Sheffield, Ont. LOR 1Z0 or

free

e-mail bible@zurch.on.ca Visit

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site:

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Page 8

— SPOKE, Sept.

17,

2001

Student life

time to get your butt in gear

Bookbinding

It’s

By Tannis Wade

depending on what package and length of time

Conestoga College students and t^nployees have no excuse for not

facility

getting adequate exercise thanks to

room and

the recreation centre.

A

variety of

programs are being offered anyone interested in a challenge. Classes range from aerobics and karate to kickboxing and Tai Chi. fitness

to

"The recreation centre has always been here for the students. These new programs are interesting

and

challenging,

so

is

Also included fee

desired. in

the recreation

use of the weight

is

other fitness equipment such as treadmills and step machines. All you have to do is bring your student card and you will be admitted. “1 think a lot of people would be interested in the classes, especially if

they have done this sort of thing

before,” said Christina $pina, a

first-

year law and security administration

there

me

should be something for everyone,”

student. “It also helps

Lynda Tribe, community program co-ordinator at the rec centre. So far both students and staff

shape and meet some of the fitness requirements for my program.” Classes run from Monday to Friday and are offered at morning,

said

have demonstrated great interest and high demand for the programs. “Attendance has been really good. A kickboxing class on Sept. 4 had about 30 people registered and another eight or 12 on a waiting list. Aerobics also had a turnout of

afternoon and evening times. ation centre, in the Registration

who

as

are recre-

members. All other people in the community can purchase memberships though the recreation centre. Prices range from $95 to $370 ation

centre

many people come

out as possi-

(Photo by Shannon McBride)

Anyone with

that they

would

should contact 748-3512.

like to see offered at

day

first

starts badly

Tire blowout results in rumpled appearance Daniel Roth

ideas for other pro-

grams or classes

Lynda Tribe

Student’s By

ble,” Tribe said.

staff as well as

remained long

5. ’Fhe lines

748-3565.

programs should drop by the centre and pick up a registration form. “I am looking forward to seeing

Doon campus who paid to staff

at

Any students or staff who are looking to join any of the fitness

the recreation facility fee with their

and

Students at Conestoga College wait in line to get into the bookstore on Sept. throughout the first week of classes.

and

Orientation guide, or by calling the

information hotline

All classes are free of charge to

tuition,

Full

schedules are available at the recre-

'about 15 people,” Tribe said.

students of

to stay in

find out, that

Take the

Have you ever had one of those d^ys where everything that could go wrong, did. As you will soon

is

the story of my

life.

day of school as an example. I work from 5 to 9 a.m. stocking freezers at the Costco in Kitchener.

first

It’s

a great place to

work

so close to the school. This fine establishment is only a fiveas

it’s

minute drive from parking Lot 12, where my car hangs out while I’m in the college. Howeier, on Sept. 4 this journey took me a little more time to complete, 35 minutes to be exact. As I rounded the sharp corner of the new on-ramp from King Street to the 401 I thought things were going well for me, that is until my tire went flat as I reached my

the 401.

It is also dripping with 9:30 in the morning. To top it off the fence looks a lot higher then it does from the highway.

dew

Fortunately, I’m a

Knowing

that

take

it

slow

was almost

I

exit I

until

turnoff. Just as

I

something.

I

exploded, like on

all

I

turned around and

all

as a golden light surrounded the

tow truck marked CAA. It had stopped on the side of the 401 and the driver was shouting and waving at me.

All the voices of heaven started singing as a

at the

my

lad and fig-

the voices of heaven started singing

decided to reached the

stopped

tall

ured that getting over would be no problem. I was roughly halfway over the fence when I heard a guy shouting

cruising speed.

Homer Watson

at

golden hght surrounded the

tire

those Ford

tow truck marked

CAA.

Explorers.

Now, because it was the first day of school I was wearing nice, respectable clothes.

am

Even though

I

wanted to make a decent impression on acquaintances. So there I am on the side of the 401, metres away from my parking lot, which I can see from my position. My only option is obvious, to call CAA to change

my

a returning student,

I

tire.

I was wearing nice clothes was no way I was going to do this if I could gel someone to do it for me. Yeah, Fm a wuss too. So 1 pressed the power button on my phone. Then I pres.sed it again

Since

there

Brat Goes On

since

1

more for

less

obviously didn't press

hard enough the

USED CO OUTLET

Play

1

mcHEHCR

893-2464

1

was

me from I

not about to

seeing

gathered

let

that stop

my friends. my belongings,

up

turned on the hazards and headed

beatgoeson.com

KITCHENER

744-1 011

370 HIGHLAND RD. W. (FOOD BASICS PLAZA)

for

the

CAMBRIOOE

415 HESPELER RD (ACROSS

622-7774

FROM MCDONALDS)

WATERLOO 402 KING

ST. N.

(BESIDE

884-7376 BURGER KING

surrounds the

school grounds. Did you nice,

'='^'

fence that

black

Italian

made my way back

my

to

car

through the waist-high weeds and ankle-deep gravel and watched the hero of the 401 change my tire. It wasn’t too long before the problem

was

fixed and

I

was on

my

way.

Again. After a quick detour to Roasters 1 climbed the stairs to the journalism lab and joined my friends. entered 1

the

room with dirt-packed

shoes,

spotty wet pants and perspiration stains

under

my

arms.

My

friends

They know belter, as have a dilemma everyday, and why would the first day of school said nothing. 1

be any different?

time.

forgot that the battery had died.

Well

385 FAIRWAY RD. S. (CANADIAN TIRE PLAZA)

first

it

SWEEEET, I grunted despite being halfway over the fence. I

know

leather

that

shoes

sink to the brrttom of fresh gravel

on the side of the highway? Did you know that you eould get lost in the overgrown grass on the sides of

1

w'ould like you to post this

arti-

your locker or on the fridge and just read it whenever you are having a bad day. I'll bet you'll feel

cle in

better.

And by

the way. thanks to

fellow students

all

my

who honked and

waved at me on the highway. That was a nice touch. 1 just thought you should know I saw yoUT parking passes and in.

I

know

the lot you are


SPOKE, Sept.

LRC has

College’s

all

2001

17,

— Page 9

the resources

By Sarah McGoldrick

Photocopies are available in the library at 15 cents a copy.

The Conestoga College Learning Resource Centre offers a wide variety of academic aids to accommodate students. The centre has more than 40,000 books available with many geared towards specific programs at the college. The books are available for

A

is

also available to

Seminar rooms can be booked in outside of the rooms. Available for use with the bookings are projectors for presenta-

while the larger seminar

tions,

room has a data video projector for Power Point presentations. “A video camera is also available

option of renewal.

Also available

is

transparencies.

binders

two-week loan with the

a

thermo fax

make overhead

an online data-

to tape things

such as role play-

which consists of both newspapers and magazines. The database can be accessed from a home computer as well as the school. To

ing,” Potvin said.

gain access requires going to the

commercial films that are geared to programs and courses or for use by teachers in-class. The library is open from 8 a.m. until 7:30 p.m., Monday to Thursday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday and 1 until 4 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. The LRC has 12 people on its library and audiovisual staff. “We have a friendly staff who are

base,

Web

Conestoga College

site

www.conestogac.on.ca/lrc,

number

using a student

the larger

up

new

a

or

and

to search

database called

Newscan,

which is a virtual said Cathy Potvin, co-

Conestoga College’s Learning Resource Centre

ordinator of information services

able to help students with their academic needs.

library,”

Sue Czubak,

aids,

left,

and Cathy Potvin are

avail-

(Photo by Sarah McGoldrick)

at the I .RC.

Potvin added that they also have a

new

applied science and technol-

ogy magazine available online with full text magazines. The learning resource centre (LRC) is

There are 25 computers available

main part of the centre research on the Internet or in the

More

than 450 different sub-

for

scriptions are available in the

the

azine section of the

mag-

LRC with

sug-

libraries,”

Potvin said.

The magazines and journals available

on a three-day

are

loan, with

school’s database.

gestions from students and faculty

the exception of nursing and cur-

Britannica online.

word processing.

always welcome. “We have some magazines and journals you wouldn’t find in other

rent

also in the process of purchasing

Potvin said that the computers are not to be used for e-mailing or

Innovative college

Web site

Conestoga’s associate faculty By

Lisa Hiller

may

categories for which a college

submit an entry.

Conestoga College has received one of five 2001 Conny awards in the category of Web page design. Conestoga won the award of excellence for its Web site pages designed for associate faculty

mem-

bers.

word

(a

that

comes

from continuing education), has been awarded to continuing education

David Stewart, the director of continuing education for Conestoga

accepted the award, Conestoga’s second since the College,

awards originated.

The

first

award was won

1994

in

management for being the only college to hold an annual assofor best

The Conny

practitioners

Ontario col-

at

ciate faculty conference.

Stewart said the

Web

site

pages

its

and practices

instructors. Stewart said the old

in the field

of part-

On June 19, the 2001 Conny awards were handed out at the Kempenfelt Centre at Georgian College in Barrie, Ont., where senior administrators were holding their

annual

general

Programming,

meeting.

marketing,

adult

Web page

approximately

reason to be putting a Web site

valid

up.”

Dave

of doing that was writing “Dear colleague” letters to each and every

Stewart,

Glibota

today and tomor-

funds for the student

food bank operated by Conestoga Students Inc. The auction will run between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. of each day at the alumni associ'

-

iTc-

Room

According limmelman.

room

“We had

a good, valid reason to

be putting a Web site up,” Stewart said, “The natural next step was to

Continuing Education catalogue, which features pictures highlighting the firefighter program, for the marketing

He

category.

said

because of the innovation of the cover, there has been an over-

which can be reached through Conestoga College’s home page, were judged on accessibility, innovation, readability, content and

whelming response to

the program, adding he wants to put the catalogue forward as an example of how you can market a program and

graphic design.

get a terrific response from site

that

was made simply because it was the “it

only submission did not

mean

it

had

multiple registration paths for part-

time student enrolment; Niagara

and employ-

criteria,”

and

Mohawk

ment opportunities,

information

in

the

tors.

about Conestoga’s associate faculty advisory panel and services avail-

tional,

tremendous amount of information and doesn’t

Loyalist

them, and a means for Conestoga continuing education administrators to provide notices of

cost a

care,

“We needed

a

way

to effectively

who

are spread

all

over the

adding the

Web

able to

He

As

said Conestoga’s site

provides

is

func-

a

lot.

2002, Stewart wants to the cover of the latest

for

submit

it.

Other Conny winners for 2001 were: Seneca College in exemplary practices, for its development of

fessional development

useful proce-

that

make an application for the award,” The associate faculty pages,

College in marketing, for

communicate with our associate

next to

its

part-

time course catalogue; and Loyalist Colleges, co-winners

programming

won

for

betes education,

and

its

category.

courses in dia-

management and

Mohawk

for

its

distance

education courses featuring instruction in the Braille language.

Balancing act

needy students

The alumni association for Conestoga College is holding a

ation

importance,

clear that

Auction to raise funds

to raise

located between

in the

to be chosen,” Stewart said, “It was judged to be worthy based on the

area,” Stewart said,

row

the security office.

is

dural information, notices of pro-

exemplary procedures are the other

silent auction

LRC

of the library.

The

The problem with that was the information was already out of date by the time it reached the instrucone.

faculty

By Sanja

said Potvin.

it,”

Doors 4 and 5

category this year,

education

The pages provide

need

Nursing magazines and journals cannot be taken out issues.

Although Conestoga’s Web was the only one submitted in

director of continuing

way

here to help the student use the resources and ask for help if they

receives award for excellence

“We had a good,

700 part-time

education strategies for success and

for

30 people.

to

earns Conny Award

site is current, and information can be delivered in a timely fashion, “Our biggest chore now is to get associate faculty to go to the site and get the information they need,” he said,

help the college communicate with

leges for outstanding achievements

time study since 1993.

that

Potvin said the centre offers non-

the databases.

“We have

She added

room can accommodate

2B08.

to

ident of the alumni association and an alumni services officer, four pairs of Toronto Maple Leafs tickets will be auctioned. The tickets are a donation from alumnus Mike Shipley, a 1986 graduate from Conestoga

College’s materials

The

bid for each ticket, which

retail at

Monica

the founding pres-

management

program.

The

$38, will

start at

$40.

association hopes io raise

a'oout $1,000,

Himnielman

>aid.

I

Students Ryan Rumig,

left,

and Ryan Kleinknecht jousted

at the

pond

party. (Photo by Julianna Kerr;


— SPOKE, Sept.

Pa^o 10

17,

News

2001

same as always: Hunter

Parking problems By Mike Metzger

Hunler

The problems and

hassles with

parking during the

first

wrong

week of

on

with

the

permits.”

which

tickets until Sept. 6,

There are about 3,000 piuking

instruct-

officer

tickets

year as in the past, he said. Despite the procrastination, the

parked

parking passes

situation that put students at risk.

same general time

as every year.

Because many students waited until the last minute to purchase their pass.

was

on students parked in the

lenient

wrong

Security Services

lot

or those without passes.

“Every year the

day or two

first

people end up in the wrong

Security officer Michelle in lot 6 with no permit on Sept. 6 at the col-

In

the

dents

midst of a local doctor

may

some comfort

take

in the

fact that they have a pair of dedicated physicians awaiting them at

Doon

Doon campus.

lege’s

four days a week.

a

parking

actual

tickets

(Photo by Mike Metzger)

is in, for

were still given out had permits, but

that

to park in a different lot.

who

went

to

the

Security Services office with

com-

were given an explanation of the circumstances and were given instructions on alternative plaints

to

of

of spaces available, and that faculty pay the same as everybody else.

Hunter thinks that Conestoga College offers adequate parking for

Al Hunter,

its

Many

students

Hunter

end up sharing and passes

could be returned for a refund.

problem for a lot of students and faculty has been the construction near lot 12. Hunter asks that students slow down around that area. The college added 80 parking

make

some stress on the community. It is becoming increasingly more difficult to find a doctor. Not so at

clinics in order to help those stu-

Conestoga.

about our doctors,” Weiler said. “I think servicing our students is very

urgency of care required. “Everyone has their own reasons for coming,” Weiler said. She wants to be there to help in any way possible.

important.”

everything from matters that need

who were

the

summer.

around over

still

enough

“I can’t say

in

of

to the

parking,

amount of

less this year.

at least

a call on behalf of the patient

come

lot

compared

keep valuables in their cars. There were several break-ins last year, and Hunter hopes that there will be

where outside the K-W area and do not have a family doctor in town. Conestoga doctors present a con-

to ensure the specialist realizes the

Students

staff.

importance of locking vehicles doors and windows, and to not

A

going to be,” Weiler said. The doctors even held several

a

students per capita,” Hunter said. He also stressed to students the

said,

Conestoga students, dents

students and

“We have frankly,

Conestoga College nurse Trish Weiler said the shortage is putting

“We’re extremely fortunate at Conestoga to have two family

those rumours, saying that the college only sells passes for the amount

supervisor of security

passes.

faculty

that

members were given discounts on permits. Hunter was quick to dispel

capita.”

route or any other

fire

vehicles

were forced Students

writes a ticket for a

vehicle parked

The doctor shortage, Conestoga College stu-

in

Warning

lot,”

By Julianna Kerr

pared

is

Rumours have been heard that the lots at the Doon campus

comthe amount

of students per

to

Wadge

lot

be

parking

parking, frankly,

on Sept. 5 alone. 6,

spots will

were oversold, and

“We have a

were placed on vehicles that had no parking permit, or were

More

hassles.

reclaimed after the construction completed.

available.

dred warning tickets were issued Starting Sept.

sold out at the

failed to

event that a spot becomes

in the

for parking information. Eight hun-

this

tion

who

purchase a permit on time were given the chance to be pul on a waiting list,

on duly or Security Services

and all parking passes for these spots were sold out by Sept. 7. The passes went on sale Aug. 7, but students did not come in to purchase them as early

spots in lot 12 to ease the construc-

lots.

instructions to contact the security

Doon

said,

still

parking such as the daily parking Students

ed the offender that their vehicle must display the proper parking permit to park in the lot, and gave

Hunter.

campus. Hunter

exercising

are

people

Security Services issued warning

Conestoga College’s 2001 semester were no different than past years, according to head of security A1

spots at Conestoga College's

“We

said.

discrelion

venient alternative to the frustrating, often fruitless search for a new physician.

The growing population of

for

national students

may

inter-

also rest easy

According to a June 8 KitchenerWaterloo Record article, an esti-

physician practitioners who are incredibly competent,” she said.

25-40 students

physicals, information or even pre-

mated 70,000 people in Guelph, Cambridge and K-W do not have doctors. Family physicians are retiring and replacements for them are scarce. A recent survey by the

are at Conestoga. Health services

Doctors Anne Marie Mingiardi and Yasmin Keshavjee are avail-

She keeps as many resources on hand as possible

natal care. Weiler understands that

will

for

students

students are on very tight schedules

company, and

and

help

Ontario Medical Association found that more than one in five Ontario physicians intend to retire within the next five years, leaving a huge

gap

in local

communities.

able to students

Monday through

As

the college nurse, Weiler sees daily.

seeking information

with

health

issues.

Thursday mornings, as well as Thursday afternoons. They see approximately 10-20 patients a day, and make themselves accessible to Weiler for emergencies

Conestoga’s medical staff is qualified to deal with a great number of them. Weiler said she has had good

when they

results

usually

let

there.

“They

me know where

they’re

aren’t

Students look to health services for a variety of reasons, and

when

referrals to specialists

were required. She

will personally

Women

prepared to march Sept. 20

in effort

to ‘Take

Back the

immediate attention,

to

regular

and

that health is really important. Students often have problems fit-

ting off-campus doctor’s appointments into their schedules, so the Conestoga staff does everything it can to see everyone in need. Weiler said that many student

patients are originally

from some-

series of sexual assaults in

England

Are you able

Night’

In

up with a theme for the march. This year’s theme is “to respect.” “We were throwing ideas around and decided that we wanted a positive affirmation,” said

of Leeds organized a march to reclaim their

“The idea of respect works well because if everybody

rights.

respects each other, the violence

lead to the imposition of a eurfew.

Several

Waterloo

hundred

women

Kitchenerare

getting

ready to take back their freedom at this year’s

Take Back the Night

march.

On Sept. 20, women and children from all over Waterloo Region will meet al the Victoria Park clock tower to send a message. Organizer Linda Brewster said that

message

is

should be able to

that

everyone

live free

of vio-

and ehildren eould not be

out on eity streets after

“The idea of respect works well because if everybody respects each other, the viowill

stop.”

the

women

Brewster, rural co-ordinator with the

Kitchener- Waterloo

Linda Brewster,

march organizer

Sexual

take

and eurfews.

there, the

to lake aelion.

make

violenee

Instead, they

wanted

form of

originated

in

the

1970s after a

at

march

the

meet

will

women and

their

the

Since (hen, marehes have been organized around the world to stop violence against women.

return to the Victoria Park pavilion

march was organized by the

University of Waterloo Centre.

mareh

Women’s

The group helped with until

1991

when

for refreshments.

Though

men

the

march

is

for

women,

also play an important role.

They are invited to line the downtown streets in support of the mareh participants and are wel-

come

to

meet back

at

Victoria Park

the

for refreshments.

the

Brewster said that last year’s mareh brought out almost 300

Walerloo Sexual Assault Support Centre look on the task. Each yetir organizers try to come

women. "We hope to that many again this said.

is

healthy,” she said, “they’re going to

do well

to volunteer a

in their course.”

few hours weekly dur-

The FRIENDS

get al least

year,”

she

service at

CMHA matches volunteers with children who need additional support in their school setting. Please call

744-7645 X317. www.cmhawrb.on.ca

“When diabetes

enters your

down-

town streets with noisemakers for about Hi hours. The women will

'fake Baek the Night marehes have been going on in KitehenerWalerloo sinee Sept. 20, 1984, The

best care possible. “If a student

From

children will

way through

insurance

Weiler makes the priorities of Conestoga’s medical staff clear: give as many people as possible the

6:30

al

will begin al 7 p.m.

student’s

that student will not

necessarily have to present medical

clock lower and the

a

in the

Kitehener-

Take Back the Night is an annual march against violence. J'he mareh

Participants

the

while they

records from another country.

will .stop.”

p.m.

the

bill

Brewster.

Assault Support Centre, said the women of Leeds weren’t going to

first

Take Back the Night

10 p.m.

without male accompaniment. response,

This aelion eame march.

lence.

lence

Women

utilize the doctors

Volunteers Required

ing the school day?

By Shannon McBride

and

life,

you need someone

turn to. Call the

to

Canadian

Diabetes Association.” Carol Seto, dietitian

HELP

SOMEONE YOU KNOW. CALL CANADIAN DIABETES ASSOCIATION

ASSOCIATION I

CANADIENNE I

DU DIABeTE

www.dlabotes.ca

I


9

SPOKE,

Laughing at deficiencies motto for Kitchener band This

is

the first in

series taking

ent in the

livid in its

a five-part

a look at musical

tal-

K-W area.

emotional and serious

By Dan Roth Week of September 17-23, 2001

looking to listen to

This Christmas the group’s debut

album,

titled

at local

Dia, will be available

record shops.

It

nine songs, including the

Not

the

band,

features

title

track

Same. According to the prides itself on its

Kenghk

original music, a genre of Incubus,

No

More, Salvodor Dream, and Red Hot Chili Peppers. Kenghk’s music has heavy beats and layered composition, and is Faith

Your natural

“An

ability

to

your birthday

(Virgo\Libra,) have a

this

happy

week,

is

birth-

try

day!

Let your friends take you out on your special day. Don’t be discouraged if one of them can’t make it, they may bring you a special gift another

may seem

time.

consideration.

Laurel Creek, where

few thousand people. According to bass player Jared Kingsland, an establishing point

Kenghk was

performance at Kitchener’s Club Abstract openfor

their

ing for the California-based band

Tub Ring. It was then

that the

realized their fan base.

ered

we had

band

first

“We discov-

kind of a following,”

Driver said.

Kenghk

concerned about the lack of K-W music venues. They feel that if it doesn’t happen here, they will simply go someisn’t

where else. “Even if we were the only five people in the world, we would still be in this band,” said Pancer, “because the only reason we record and play shows is to allow others to hear what

we

Currently,

is

to

in pre-pro-

duction for a music video. Future

®

Cancer; June 22

Be kind

July 22

-

who

to everyone

close to you. Their ideas

is

foreign but are worth

Luckiest day: September 18

JAM

Aries:

I

March 2 1 - April

pay off worth

1

Celebrate! Your enthusi-

asm and determination

Leo: July 23 - August 22 Don’t let the confinement of college suppress your

will

in a big way.

extra time

hear.”

Kenghk

ability

test. Don’t be afraid to something new. Luckiest day: September 23.

laugh at your deficiencies,” said

in

June

-

put to the

Driver.

The band

21

juggle school, work and social time

The band’s biggest performance to date was at the Shakedown they entertained an audience of a

If you’re

is,

May

Gemini: 21

elements.

Festival

music with a grove-core sound, you may want to whet your palette on the Kitchener band Kenghk. Comprised of five members, Kenghk has been playing the local scene for two years.

theme which

— Page 11

HOROSCOPE

If it’s

By Janine Toms

Sept. 17, 2001

Spending the on a project will be

need of the outdoors.

Do

much

as

activity as possible.

it.

Luckiest day: September 21.

Luckiest day: September 20

performances include a Halloween

credits

its

musical style

on the collaboration of each individual, and being able to, “Leave the outside world behind at the door,”, said Pete Sintic, rhythm guitarist. Words, written by singer Jordie Pancer, reflect the band’s

show

at

The Basement,

venue located

at

a

276 King

new

downtown Kitchener. For more information visit their Web site at www.kenghk.com to view photos, ance dates.

MP3s and

Taurus: April 20

Financial

St. in

perform-

causing grief and

-

May 20

insecurity

is

mp IP*

Virgo: August 23 September 22 Your friends know you

stress.

Don’t let your frustrations cloud your judgment in consulting a friend.

can be trusted, don’t be surprised if they come to you seeking advice. Luckiest day: September 22

Luckiest day: September 21. Libra:

September 23

-

October 22

Your natural balance your

ability

will

life

to*-

help you

through this week, which may throw you a few unexpected curves.

Luckiest day: September 17.

October 23

Scorpio:

li|^ November

-

21

Work hard and

you’ll

achieve your goals, but don’t step

on anyone who may be important later in life. This week be extra careful of who you trust. Luckiest day: September 21. Sagittarius: November 22 December 21 You will keep your colleagues laughing. Your natural ability to entertain through humour

fP*

will

-

keep your popularity high.

Luckiest day: September 22. Capricorn:

ys

December 22

January 19

-

Don’t be afraid of your new surroundings. Your practical

you peace. Luckiest day: September

nature

will bring

22.

January 20 bruary 18 four unpredictable iV confuse j^nvnnp npu/ \quarius:

Have you confirmed Pisces:

your “in-study” status?

February

19

-

March 20 Problems are not as complicated as they seem. Try to focus

Avoid early repayment! If you have a previous student loan,

on what

important to confirm your “in-study” status with your lending institution.

Get the information you need

astrology

visit

your school’s financial aid

and other clairvoyant

issues for three years.

the National Student Loans Service Centre at

or

make you happy.

Daniel Roth is a second-year journalism student and has studied

at

WWW. canlearn. ca, call

will

Luckiest day: September 19.

it is

Spoke goes

office,

online

CANADA STUDENT LOANS PROGRAM

Canada

Sept. 17!

Check us out

at

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke


— SPOKE, Sept.

Page 12

17,

2001

S^IHNrts

swings back

Varsity golf By Vanessa Laye

Club, and are now being held at Whistle Bear Golf Club on Dickie

As Conestoga College

students

in

Kitchener.

medal match is where a total of each player’s strokes will be taken, and the fewest strokes overall wins.

refurbishment of the college recreation centre has enabled

women and

one alternate will be chosen by Martin and Mike Banton, a student at Conestoga College and a member of the

are

Canadian

same

swing of things,

The

so does the varsity golf team.

new programs and

it

to create

activities

for

Because golf has become

students.

a popular sport amongst other col-

Tony Martin, coach of the new golf team and director of athletics and recreation centre at the leges,

college, decided to bring golf to

“Golf

makes

what

an

it

exceptional

sport,” said Martin.

Tryouts for the team began on

4

Sept.

at

Doon

the

Valley Golf

compared

then

other

the

to

men’s teams from each

and

participat-

women

For the

competitors the

rules apply, only their total

score consists of the best two out of three.

Conestoga

one of the

is

who

1

1

In addition, each player’s individ-

partic-

compete at an invitational tournament on Sept. 20 at the Lakeridge Golf Club in Durham. Each team member will play an 18-hole medal match, on an individual level and as a will

ual

medal match score

is

compared

shirt

track suit

able at the recreation centre by

required to supply their

own

equip-

from the college and a free on the condition that they volunteer two hours of their time wearing the track suit to a spe-

With the golf season only six weeks in length, the team doesn’t always have enough time to improve their skills on the green, so a golf room with two nets has been set up in the recreation centre and available year round to students

appointment and will begin in October. Four golfing lessons are included in a package with each session being approximately 45 minutes in length. Special rates are available to students and groups.

A

helpful

“Be

pants.

and members free of charge. Times must be booked at the front desk of

self,”

the recreation centre.

tals

team

to win, but

is

added

that as

“You can be good one day

a golfer,

Other golf programs have been

hint

to

first-time

golfers and lovers of the sport

is

the

community and

students at Conestoga

against the other college partici-

Martin said his expectation for

for both the

who wish to improve or learn how to play golf. Lessons by Rob Hannah, a member of the CPGA, are avail-

team are

the

cific special event.

ing college.

be helping Martin coach the team. ipating colleges

so frustrating, and that’s

is

Golfers’

the best five scores are totalled,

up

set

who make

Students

ment, but will be provided with a

For the Conestoga men, four of

Association (CPGA). Banton will

back

Conestoga's varsity lineup.

Professional

and bad the next.”

running

Of the 27 students trying out, only nine players will make the team. On Sept. 18, five men, three

get back into the

'

Road

Settlement

A

team.

into action

patient.

%

Martin

is to:

Don’t out think yoursaid.

“You must have good fundamenand

of your

in

any sport play

to the best

ability.”

New

soccer players strengthen team The women lost their first game 6-0 on Aug. 8

By Mike Sperling

tion

Conestoga College’s women’s soccer team is looking

Centennial College, but they

second exhibition game

varsity

the

stronger this year according to the

against Sheridan College.

Andrea Kerkovica scored

team’s coach.

Last year the team struggled to

win but Stephanie Den Haan said

new

the

exhibi-

against

players this year have a

better skill level.

“As new players come up, more come in and that

skillful players

will increase year after year,” she

won 1-0

the

goal for Conestoga in the second

game.

Den Haan said it took the players some time to get used to playing as team

a

during

exhibition

the

games.

was

“It

their first time playing

Den Haan

said.

together as a team,”

According to Den Haan, knowledge of the game, 100 per cent effort and a positive attitude during practices and games are expected of each player. “You can teach them skill but you

“But once they got the hang of they played very well.”

can’t teach

them passion,” she

said.

Any women

still

said. it

interested in try-

may do so throughout the season by contacting out for the team ing

Den Haan

at

748-3512,

ext.

Kathleen Lindenfield, a first-year student at Conestoga College, takes a shot on Rachel Hartwick durwomen’s outdoor soccer tryouts on Sept. 6.

ing the

(Photo by Vanessa Laye)

3385.

Blue Jays’ dismal year the result of a team By Marc Hulet

The Blue

Jays’ run production

has also been a problem this year.

As

Major League Baseball down and

the

regular season dwindles

the playoffs approach, fans of the Toronto Blue Jays can only turn off their television sets and wait for next year. The Blue Jays - third

They have scored only 684 runs and need 177 more runs in their last 20 games to reach last year’s total. Yet another problem with the Jays offence

is their

horrible strike-

stretch of

won

have since been released.

over 10 games this season the inconsistent Esteban Loazia at

place in the American League East

struck out an alarming

New York Yankees and the Boston Red Sox- will fail to reach

The Jays have 960 times while walking only 413 times.

at least

Their strikeout

bullpen.

to the

the playoffs for the eighth straight

season.

One needs only Blue Jay

why the

to

stati.stics

look

to

the

’at

understand

they will not be competing for

October crown.

The Jays offence, which led the American League with 244 home runs

has

year,

last

hit

only

174

out-to-walk

ratio.

total

is

the fourth

worst total in the American League. The Oakland Athletics, leading the wild card race and presumably headed for the playoffs, have drawn an amazing 147 more walks than Toronto.

year.

last

Carlos Delgado, Shannon Stewart,

remaining

Brad Fullmer and Darrin Fletcher

regular season.

Along with that, the Blue Jay batters have managed to hit only .264 as a team this year, compared to .275

in

average

Their current team

2()()().

is

good

for lOth in the 14-

team league. The American League leading Seattle Mariners have an ama/ing 102 wins and only 40 los.ses

while

maintaining

team

average.

stands

at

69-73.

Toronto’s

a

.285

leeord

among many

and

reliever Paul Quantrill at

have

10 wins and one more in the

Three of those pitchers

at least 15

wins.

One needs

only to

look at the Blue Jay

stand

why they

the October crown.

Toronto hopes to climb (heir way back into the playoffs next year (hey will have to overhaul

which is t)verburdened with homer-happy sluggers and lacking in players willing to play the “small ball” that is always offence,

starter that

pitch

they could rely

effectively

one on to

not hail

season.

all

Supposed number starter Esteban Loa/ia was banished to the bullpen I

earlier in the season. Veteran Steve

Parris had a horrible

first

a roronto Blue Jay and

is

month as currently

successfully executed by playoff

on

bound teams.

Carpenter has been the most eon-

That’s not to say :ha(

ilie ''li'enee

the

sisient hut

disabled

list.

even he had a

Chris hv)rriblc'

time next year alongside

full

the likes of sluggers Delgado, Jose

this year-

Even closer

pleasant surprises

Koch has

Billy

looked less-than-stellar this year two vqry effective seasons.

after

His ERA climbed above 5.00 unheard of for closers. Toronto pitchers have also allowed batters to hit .278 against Seattle has held baiters

to .238. Seattle pitchers also

ERA

have a

while the Toronto pitchall

arc also a

the

1

ERA.

negatives, there*

number of

things that

Jays’ fans can look forward to next year.

Felipe

Izturis,

Lopez and Vernon Wells have recently added a spark to the Toronto

lineup

opportunity

ti'

when given

play this year.

the

They

star

and Raul Mondesi. As well, there have been some

the year in the Jay’s rotation but

Rookies Cesar

The Blue Jays have

others.

play

Cruz-who has emerged as a

Despite

not be competing for

slowly

is

Michalak and Joey Hamilton began

ers have posted a 4.3

will

he

regaining late in the season. Chris

3.59

under-

statistics to

that diminished

his confidence that

them while

-

If

their

1

10-2. Seattle has five pitchers with

That includes

dingers with less than three weeks in (he

10-1

Almost all of the Jays’ hitters are having worse offence seasons compared to

games

the only problem the Toronto Blue Jays have. The pitching staff has underachieved for a few years now. Only two Blue Jay hurlers have is

effort

among

the pitch-

ers.

Kelvim Escobar. Roy Halladay and Chris Carpenter finally look ready to assume the pressures of leading the Blue Jays’ starting rotation.

Escobar spent most of the season the bullpen, but

in

when

injuries

and inconsistencies ravaged the starters, he entered the rotation and has been dominate. Halladay spent two-thirds of the season in the minors suffering from a breakdown in mechanics and confidence. But since his recall he has pitched almost as well as Escobar.

Carpenter hits

is

the only starter

who

spent the entire season in the

rotation

and he looks ready

to

be

have played solidly in the field and have not looked overmatched at the

the leader the Jays’ pitchers have

Their blazing speed has excited fans and helped win ballgames.

If Koch can regain his past form and the young starters can continue their winning, ways Toronto should

plate

i'l'ic

the

either.

.lays

would be wise

to

allow

)oungslers an opportunity to

needed.

iic in

a \cty different posiliop next

September.

Digital Edition - September 17, 2001  
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