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— No. 56

34th Year

Former president Irwin

But, during the

first

former Conestoga Students

Incorporated president has filed a formal complaint against the CSFs recent elections.

president before Christmas, the

ing

was

know

he was questioning

its

election

results.

a complaint on the process.

not

It’s

involved. wins,

against

the

people

don’t really care

I

who

want to see things done said LeBeau, who filed the

just

I

right,”

complaint with the office of college principal Grant McGregor.

LeBeau’s complaint stemmed from the fact the voting procedure was changed half way through the election. P‘011 clcrRs were instructed to ask students to put their student numbers on the back of their ballots, to ensure nobody voted

tV-v* '

Hi

twice.

Former

Literacy tab's r software top quality

Irwin

Conestoga

Students Incorporated president Phil LeBeau has asked for the resignaof current vice-president of

tion

first day of the were not counted in the

official tally.

Trevor Trewartha, the

CSFs chief

returning officer, said the constitution states that the

CSI has

be

to

sure voters don’t vote twice and

changing the voting process was the best way to do so. LeBeau asked if anybody had voted twice and Trewartha told

him nobody

had.

“So, in cross reference nobody

voted twice,” said LeBeau. “Everybody voted comectly as the polling clerk told them to.” Students who voted the first day

“Why throw away (the votes one group of people?” Continued on Page 2

Qyefph,

of)

saying he only said that because he was recognized by the chair of the board as. having the floor to “I

was

they need

He knows

we do

how

well a job

I’ve

done,”

I

every wasn’t saying I at

better than him,” Harris

election.

tion is

April,

sons.

own

LeBeau

personal

agen-

resign,

For example, at the March 28 BOD meeting Harris raised his

LeBeau

voice at

He

him.

effect of,

here,

said

“Fm

just

“It

LeBeau

“I believe

I

has

requested

but

directors),

something to the the board of director

LeBeau

BOD.

have the support of the board (of

for interrupting

get to speak,”

!

we’ll

have

to

see,” he said.

Harris

said.

shows he thinks he’s

was

shocked when he learned of

Students explore

more important than

career paths.

students.”

LeBeau’s

However, in an April 4 interview LeBeau changed his stance, saying he was just trying to send a message to the CSI that students were still in charge and the CSI is

request for his

PAGE 10

COMMENTARY Region should fund taxi service Page 4

the rest of us

accountable to the students. “It’s not a personal attack against-'

Mike. lost

to

I

like

Mike. They (CSI) have it’s time to go back

focus and

where they should be,” LeBeau

said.

wfm

Harris denied these allegations.

By Kirsten

Fifield

After a 2

1

/2 year

journey col-

lege president John Tibbits final-

best interest of

ly

students.

waiting

put

my

I’ve

neck on

line

heard the words he’s been for,

as the college learned

was officially approved for full ISO 900 quality system registration on March 26. This announcement by the it

for

1

Harris be impeached by the

said.

officially

not acted in the

the

Since Harris has said he won’t

interest

das,”

LeBeau said the resignamore for “symbolic” rea-

certified,

me

never

“I’ve

Since Harris graduates from Conestoga College at the end of •

We’re ISO

Harris said.

said.

board of directors (BOD) meeting, which LeBeau attended to file a complaint about the recent CSI

pushing his

has personally sent students to

when

Rules of Order as

(pao/o by Rem Nichoisonj

computer.

“How dare he say Fm not working

help.

was any

no longer acting in the of students. He’s

la|)top

in the best interest of students? Phil

trying to follow Robert’s

speak.

other meeting.

is

won jlhe

for Harris’s resignation

LeBeau made the written request on March 29, the day after the CSI

“He

'i

Btad Whttefofd CSI Iitjjsi£tepi«,0n^ 4obn Kast, •^Bwsageit K»nner-of the cafeteria t oiitest on Marcn 27 Kinnfe Botifangiac a ^cond-year business student fioin

academics Mike Harris.

best

hj 1!

of the election voted correctly so tWoir v'otos should be counted, he added.

LeBeau asks By Dwight

stu-

votes cast on the

at

CSFs board of directors meeton March 28 to tell the board

“It’s

...

dent numbers were required on each ballot. So, the more than 100 election

LeBeau, who resigned as

Phil

Is

day of elec-

tions, poll clerks didn’t

A

the winner

complaint

files By Dwight

And

LeBeau

and

I

not doing

KPMG

my job.”

CSI president Brad Whiteford

firm

names

said he received a written request

joins the prestigious

from LeBeau to force Harris to resign. Under the constitution, he doesn’t have the power to force any executive to resign or carry through with an impeachment.

cational

institutions

America

to

“That’s

of the

more

the responsibility

BOD,” Whiteford

LeBeau would have

list

in

of edu-

North

be completely ISO

certified.

The ISO sets definable and documented standards for consistency

and quality for busi-

nesses to follow.

said.

to argue his

BOD

in

Conestoga

Tibbits said a lot of people

board would then make its decision on whether to impeach Harris. If a

that

vote for impeachment

ed for certification on Feb. 26 by KPMG auditors after they reviewed and assessed the college’s International Standards Organization documentation and found only four minor nonconformances. Continued on Page 2

will

have never doubt-

who

is

and the

passed,

it

up to the CSI executive to administer the sanction, which could be anything from a verbal

ts

felt the

warning

was part of a personal vendetta LeBeau holds against

“Even

see us giving

him.

warning,” Whiteford said.

that,” said Harris,

request

auditing

Kitchener

which he not grant.

my job

don’t speak up for students then

Fm

case in front of the

hard to understand. I’ve been working hard to do my job for two years. I have been committed to

I

if

resignation,

“It’s

ed

them because

to dismissal. if it

goes through, I can’t him even a verbal

worked hard and it is

he’s pleased

finally official.

The college was recommend-

I


— SPOKE, April

Page 2

9,

2001

Nfws

Fate of election Continued from Page 1 Mike Harris, CSI vice-president

proposed amendments as the docu-

of academics, said there have already been two sets of recounts, both of which had Jon Olinski

candidates and scrutineers author-

to the 2000 conmust be taken to the CSI’s general membership, which is the students, within one year’s time. Those who attend the annual meeting, which usually takes place in late April each year, then vote for or

ized the votes in a meeting and to

against the

defeating Jessica Sperling by eight

(The discarded ballots were

votes.

not included in the recounts.) All

follow due process the appeal isn’t

supposed

to

results are

made

the

BOD

made

be

the

until

He urged on and make the

official.

to carry

ment

Any amendments

move ahead and

stitution.

the general

then Phil

to

Menage added,

be a yes or no vote

tonight.

We either accept the candi-

dates or

we

to

in-

After the in-camera session, the

BOD

voted to hold off on making

March 30

interview, current

CSI president Brad Whiteford

said

the issue has been sent to the CSI’s

lawyer.

The

first

job of the lawyer will be

which constitution to use. He might deem the most recent constitution (1999) as the one to use, or he might deem the 2000/01 to decide

CSI executive’s

who

“It’s the

CRO’s

66 2/3 their program

on the CSI execuWhiteford said. “Since the amendments haven’t been taken to the general membership yet, does that rule die? That’s

it

gets better’ situations.” presidential candidate

is

LeBeau

a separate

in a terrible position,

wasn’t his fault.”

resolve

if

the lawyer can’t

snap by election.

“On

to the lawyer,”

versy

said.

feels the col-

CSI through

their problems.

Sperling’s eligibility to run for

get

more

students out to

may be

“It

internal (to the CSI),

but the college should be involved

because they collect the (student)

The CSI has

fees.

to face the fact

the college,”

He

said the

a hefty job, but

“It’s

it’s

the foun-

dation of operations and needs to

Mike

Harris,

of academics,

CSI

vice-president

said

the

college

should have no interference with

vote.”

He was

it’s

“I’m pleased

just a

little

too

in a position to address

these concerns and he quit.” said she hopes things can be corrected.

confusing and

want the

just

a mess.

it’s

I

right thing to hap-

pen,” Sperling said.

She said she

is

prepared to accept

the lawyer’s decision either way.

be done.”

the bright side, the contro-

may

late.

“I’m upset with the way things have been handled, but I’m not mad at anyone personally.” She said this situation might bring about required changes. “It could be one of those ‘worse before

it

gets

better’

situations.

People are trying their best to get things cleared up. I hope it happens soon,” Sperling said.

get everything 100 per cent updated.

there will likely be a

it,

“The corporation was left in a disbeen an uphill battle ever

aster. It’s

lege should step in and help the

LeBeau said. CSI has a lot of constitutional amendments that need to be updated. He suggested maybe shutting the CSI down for a year to

Whiteford said

Michael, Kerri-Lynn Kitt and Paul Luquin all resigned in the past year.

“It’s

Although the CSI

becomes a personal attack. He’ll have to deem which rules, if any, were broken during the election. The CRO made some calls that it

a high turnover rate in the CSI. Executive members LeBeau, Ramy

Sperling, in an April 2 interview,

Jessica Sperling,

corporation,

get messy.

it’ll

it

Harris said the problems with the

he’s concerned,

they are connected at the hip with

but

constitution with

those ‘worse before

to

happen,”

elections, because

since,” Harris said.

could be one of

It

have put us

Whiteford

“The election procedure was misSome votes were counted, some weren’t. I just want to make sure it’s done fairly,” LeBeau said. handled.

“It

its

a separate entity.

is

constitution and election stem from

March 29 interview LeBeau

In a

CSI or

the

available at

reiterated his argument.

her run

he can’t resolve the election on these grounds, then he’ll go to the “murkier waters” of what happened during the election, Whiteford said. “If he goes into the balloting and conduct, then

The

responsibility to

ensure this doesn’t Whiteford said. If the lawyer finds

tive,

main question

let

and the lawyer may allow her stand on those grounds.

to run for a seat

the

have

was not

6.

press time.

her courseload, the chief returning officer shouldn’t

are taking

per cent of courses in

final decision

look at Trewartha’s role. Even if Sperling is ineligible because of

it.

One of the proposed amendments, made by this year’s BOD, is time students

Whiteford hoped to have the lawyer’s decision by April

lawyer also has to

default. But, the

until

to allow part-time students, or full-

the election results official. In a

membership adopts

the president, then Olinski wins by

Phil LeBeau, former CSI president

in

options.

its

lawyer finds she doesn’t have the proper courseload to be

I

be taken seriously.”

attendance, to discuss

made official

verifying that with the

If the

and some weren’t. just want to make sure it’s done fairly.”

don’t. Phil’s appeal has

The board went into a lengthy camera meeting, with LeBeau

not

is

is

registrar’s office.

“The election procedure was mishandled. Some votes were counted

Harris said.

“There has

load to run for president, so the

lawyer

amendments to the conThe new version of the

constitution

can launch his appeal afterwards,’’ Ex-officio Ellen

he has heard varying stories about whether she has the proper course-

stitution

results official.

“Let’s

full-time president is being considered by the lawyer. Whiteford said

to follow in this case.

hands

lawyer’s

in

Olinski said he thinks the original

vote and recounts

should stand because each candidate and scrutineer agreed to the final tally. If he ends up losing the election because of the lawyer’s decision, he said he’ll likely file an appeal.

College continues

areas

to identify

improvement

for

Continued from Page 1 Non-conformances refer to areas where the college does not comply

DIVERSITY

with

ISO

standards.

Tibbits said the college has a plan in

place to deal with these non-con-

formances

before

auditors

the

return in six months.

• Transfer your Conestoga College credits

HPU Bachelor’s

towards an • Study with

from

ail

degree

more than 8,700

50

U.S. slates

100

successful at the next audit, adding there is a fair amount of pressure on individuals because the audits occur so often.

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E-mail: intema6onal@h|iu.edu • httpV/www.hpu.odu/intemational ,

“It’s

not meant to be ruthless,

meant to make sure that you know their standards and you know that you have to measure but

it’s

Tibbits said that

Conestoga College president

strategy.

the

identified

100 per allowed a

number of non-confor-

certified

built

(year).

is

mances.

Tibbits,

Tibbits added that as the college

(month)^

to say that the college

not expected to score

is

up.”

John

Adilrcs.s:

45-045 Kamahamoha Nwy. • Kanaoho,

• Take advantage of HPU’s affordable tuition

system anid looking at the procedures is you can find areas where you can do better.”

student services

• Participale in an interaship program after

to see that the non-confor-

mances have been fixed and will then proceed with random checks

certain

Science, Management, Social Sciences,

• Take courses at HPD’s two campuses

of

(documenting the

Computer

Internet access

said the auditors will definite-

check

He went on

and 100 countries

degree's including; Accounting,

• Select

Tibbits said the college management has already discussed how to make improvements in order to be

students

• Choose from 40 Bachelor’s and Master’s

Justice Administration,

dents.”

Olympics where you win the gold, go home, put on 50 pounds, drink a lot of beer and relax because no one can ever take your medal away,” said Tibbits. “The problem with this thing is you're only as good as your last

“It’s

metres

QUALITY

not like winning the

is you can find areas where you can do better, so now the next step will be looking at ways to improve the services offered to stu-

cedures

ISO 9001 system they

areas that could use improvement. “One advantage of documenting the system and looking at the pro-

is

part

becoming ISO of a long-term

“We’re trying to raise the qualiof the institution in every dimension. No organization is ty

perfect but it’s important that we continue to work on improvements, so this is another step in a quality journey.”


.

SPOKE, April

Guelph campus shows what’s Faculty

and students conduct

By Kyla Rowntree

pus April 1 to show the transformation of the campus into a centre of excellence.

About 72

2001

— Page 3

inside

workshops and demonstrations

people what he’s doing in class. “I am also learning here today,”

An open house was held at Conestoga College’s Guelph cam-

and students paropen house, volun-

faculty

ticipated in the

labs,

9,

have been working water system and I have

said Hillier. “I

on

that

never done that before.”

Ray Bonneau,

a welder

fitter stu-

dent in the one-year program, was

how

demonstrating former works.

a

roll

teering their time to conduct labs,

workshops

arid

demonstrations in

technical learning.

About 500 people attended event to see the upgraded

“We want

to

the

facilities

and equipment in technical learning and students in action in their

what we have to offer.” Stu Hood,

particular trade.

Programs

show

the public exactly

welding program faculty

that participated in the

event included welding and metal

automotive service plumbing, metal machining and computer numerical control machining and millwright. Each lab mounted a demonstrafabrication,

technician,

carpentry,

tion of the skills the students are

The

former

roll

is

used to

roll

pieces of metal into a one-piece cylinder that can be used for things like

making a

“For

me

boiler.

this is

said Bonneau.

a second career,”

“Today

is

a good

learning in class. Demonstrations

opportunity for prospective students to come out and see what we

like a drive-clean test in the auto-

have

motive service technician program and welding were held every half hour in specified classes. Joe Hillier, a second-year plumbing apprenticeship student, and David Boys, a third-year plumbing apprenticeship student, were working on testing a valve in a water system as a demonstration as well as showing how copper pipe is installed and put together. Hillier said he came to the open house because he wanted to show

part of a demonstration

Bonneau welder

(Photo by Kyla Rowntree)

said he used to live in

fitter

to take the

course.

some

on the Internet to determine where the best course was offered and he said did

that led

him

a wide the

investigation

to Conestoga.

“I packed up my family and we moved here because Conestoga has

scale

program

of information in

such

as

.

demonstration

in

his

program.

(Photo by Kyia Rowntree)

math,

Stu Hoock a faculty

member

of

welding program, said the open house was to show corporate partners who have donated funds or equipment to the college what the

their donations are providing for

at

Conestoga College, said

a great opportunity to

this

was

show

the

$400,000 worth of donations and equipment that corporations have donated in the past year. Christa Correll, a Stratford resi-

English, computers and practical

the students.

dent, said a friend brought her to

application.

Much of the funding for the upgraded equipment is donated by corporations in the community. “We want to show the public exactly what we have to offer,” said Hood. “We want to show the trades and apprentices at work.” Hans Zawada, the chair of technology trades and apprenticeships

the open house.

Students and faculty were on hand to

the

employment prospects, application and admission

discuss

the best to offer in this field.” Bonneau actaed that other col-

process, financial aid, sponsorship and apprenticeship procedures. The theme of the first open house

leges only

offered a six-month

to

He

said Conestoga offers

course.

Jaime Histrob, a first-year welder fitter program student, presented stick metal arc welding at Conestoga College’s Guelph campus open house on April 1 Histrob was welding as part of a

in his

program at the Guelph campus open house on April 1

to offer.”

Ottawa and he wanted

He

Joe Hillier, a second-year plumbing apprenticeship program student, solders a joint on a piece of copper piping as

be held at the college was technology and trades.

“We’re really amaz.ed and impressed,” said Correll. “For us women, all these machine shops are so interesting. I went to Conestoga many years ago and my education has always helped me. I think this opportunity is excellent.”

Conestoga College

Quality Policy Conestoga College continually seeks opportunities for improvement to Conestoga

CoUege [j

meet and exceed the needs of our students, employees

and communities.


Page 4

— SPOKE, April ^

»».

9,

i

i

Commentaiy

2001

w^

V'^mawiww V wiMi

V'

ii

.

-.«

More money is needed In February of this year, the Investing in Students

and Pathways,

piled their report entitled Portals

ondary Education

when

In a time

of Post-sec-

Ontario and the timing couldn’t be more

in

student debt

tuition is being deregulated

recommendations

Task Force com-

A Review

is

vital.

skyrocketing to unparalleled levels and

by the province,

made 33

this task force

government regarding post-second-

to the provincial

ary education.

The

15 recommendations deal with

first

They

students to use.

making services simpler for what needs to be done

highlight such things as

for students transferring

between the university and college systems.

The following 14 recommendations concern issues educational institutions will face in the next century and what the province should do to deal with those issues. They deal with such things as ensuring “special populations’’, such as natives

and francophones, get

access to

full

opportunities other residents of Ontario have.

The

recommendations deal with how

final four

implement the

to

recommendations made to the government, with such ideas as

prior

Universities received

encouraging colleges and universi-

$1.7 billion from Ontario while

system

colleges received

$856

million in

work together to create a works for both institu-

ties to

that

tions.

Perhaps the most important recommendations deal with easing

2000.

student debt (recommendations seven through 13).

The debt

students are incurring

government deregulating

how much

determine

is

troubling as

it

is

occurring without

tuition to allow educational institutions to

program

a three-year

is

worth on the open mar-

Most of

ket.

The

task force says the government needs to involve itself

aiding

students

in

needs funding

Taxi service

attending a post-secondary

more

in

through

institution

don’t think twice

us

about something as simple as going park on a sunny day.

to the

We

streamlining the application process for government grants and student

wake up

in the

amounting

vert. Provincial grants

to

$10,000 per vehicle offset these

48

service

its

hours

in

advance. Let’s not also forget that in 1991,

costs.

The

morning, see

book

article

went on

to say that in

Mobility Plus, then Project

Lift,

loans as well as encouraging institutions to help students to complete

the sun shining,

1994 when the Harris government

struck a deal with the region’s three

their studies.

get dressed, get

discontinued the grants. United Taxi continued to provide the serv-

taxi*companies because it couldn’t keep up with the demands for its

This was possible because the company’s 71 drivers are also

service. Mobility Plus

imagine able

shareholders and were able to sub-

cannot accommodate a request.

This isn’t to say the government should run willy-nilly, throwing tons of

money

into the educational

Mike

only to have another slash the budget effort to control

But

it is

monies

system as

it

did during

come

Harris government

Bob Rae’s in

days,

and hack and

allotted to post-secondary institutions in

an

spending on education.

money

in the

post-secondary system. Students need to be able to afford the edu-

money

the

government needs

to invest

post-secondary system, Ontario’s post-secondary institutions

in the

will turn into to afford to

American colleges where only the

affluent will be able

send their children to get a college or university educa-

tion.

Furthermore, the Ontario government needs to universities

and colleges

if

there

is to

be

to

equalize monies given

this unified

system.

In 2000, universities received an estimated $3.1 billion in operating

revenues with almost $1.7 billion coming from the Ontario government.

By

contrast, colleges received an estimated $1.5 billion in oper-

ating revenues with an estimated

car and

drive to the park.

Now being

$856 million coming from the gov-

ernment.

ice.

to

some-

enjoy

prudent for the government to invest some

cation they seek. Without the

the

in

thing this

The region

would require you to

pany

ple

an unequal playing field even though 39 per

$6 minimum

now found

fare.

no

it

anticipate that

longer profitable to continue to pro-

to

vide the service and

may be

seems like an unreasonable request to most since a lot can happen in two days. You

to pull the

could get sick,

refuses to reinstate the

This

probably

maybe you

it

just

could rain or

won’t

feel

like

going out.

A

walk

park

in the

is

a sponta-

some

dents

some

K-W

a simple pleasure that

resi-

sort

the

If

forced

vans off the road unless of assistance

is

provided.

government

provincial

much

need-

vans have become a in

service to

the

company

residents, but

is

not

own

its

Mobility Plus dealing with the

According

same

is

if

it

no

is

its

service,

not capable of

is

number of demands

and people with

have expressed

48 hours

in

dis-

their frustra-

book

the service

advance.

The region needs

for debate.

it

to continue to provide

on

tions with having to

necessity

sight

longer profitable.

abilities

may

many

the service

for

costs of these vans.

common

unreasonable for anyone to expect

should look into supplementing the

The question of

it

and an invaluable

the region

ed grants, the regional government

neous activity most of us take for granted, but for

quite evident there

to charge a

United Taxi has

you may want to go the park two days in advance.

com-

also allowed the

uses the

when

United Taxi’s specially equipped

sidize the costs of the service.

sim-

still

specially equipped taxis

to

seriously

article.

consider the impact taking these

soon be taken away from them.

United Taxi’s wheelchair service

vans off the road would have on the

accounts for

lives of

it’s

For the past 10 years United Taxi has had a fleet of five specially

deplorable. Action must be taken to eliminate that disparity and further

equipped vans, which enable the

action must be taken to ensure that students can even attend a post-sec-

company

ondary

in wheelchairs.

It is

is

cent of Ontario’s 436,856 full-time students are in college. Yet this task force wants the university and college systems to

There

is

work

together.

such a disparity between the colleges and universities

institution.

In today’s high tech world, a post-secondary education is a must.

getting that education shouldn’t

deep

it

will

cause

real

mean

But

students must go into a debt so

hardship to repay

it’s

to

According in the

accommodate people article

Kitchener Record, the vans

were introduced

it.

March 27

$45,000 each

to

in

1991 and cost

1

the

7 per cent of

its

busi-

Some

people

company does service

may

argue that the

not need to provide

because the region

already has Mobility Plus, which

Grand River

part of

is

Transit’s spe-

cial services division.

purchase and con-

But

it

usually requires users to

Having a

Keeping Conestoga College connected

Editor: Dwight Irwin; Photo Editor: Kirsten Fificid; Production

Manager: Kyla Rowntree Advertising Manager: Jody Andruszkicwicz; Circulation Manager: Reni Nicholson Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz; Faculty Supervisor: Christina Jonas

Phone: 748-5220,

disability

should not

come and go

to

as he/she pleases, and

the region should

make keeping in service

the

a top

priority.

i.s mainly funded from September to May by a payment from Conestoga Students Ine. (CSI) in exehange for the

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College.

address

and come

United Taxi

exclude someone from the right

United Taxi vans

The views and opinions newspaper do not necessarily rellcet the views of Conestoga College or the CSI. Adverti-sers in SPOKE insertion of advertising in the paper.

expressed

tain the

SPOKE’s

to help

with the costs of operating the vans.

in

this

arc not endorsed by the

is

residents

SPOKE

Spoke SPOKE

many

up with a plan

ness.

the

to a

to

is

ext.

299 Doon Valley

Dr.,

Room 4BI4,

Kitchener, Ontario,

N2G 4M4.

691, 692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

CSI

logo.

CSI unless

SPOKE sh.all

their advertisements con-

damages amount paid for

not be liable for any

arising out of errors in advertising

beyond

the

the space. Unsolicited submissions

by

9:.10 a.m.

or

rejection

must be sent to the editor Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance and should be clearly written or typed; a

MS Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not contain any libellous statements and may be accompanied by an illustration (such as a photograph). WordPerfect or


—— News

SPOKE, April

9,

2001

— Page 5

Engineering students beat university By Jody Andruszkiewicz On March 20, the number 1 college in Ontario beat the number 1 university

Canada

in

the

in

Kitchener-Waterloo section of the of Electric and Electronic

Institute

Engineers (IEEE) Student Paper’s night.

Held

the William G.

Davis centre on the University of Waterloo campus, five Conestoga students, split into teams of three and ‘two, captured first place in their respective categories and tied at

for first place overall for their projects, beating out the

two University

of Waterloo presentations.

The one of the

project to claim a share

first

Corrall and digital

place prize was Jeff Nemanja Jevremovic’s

robots of other machines

to Corrall, a third-year student in

said costs thousands of dollars.

electronic engineering technology:

this project is to

replace a normal film canister in a

35-millimetre

camera

with

a

the

CCD,

project

els.

students

According this

on February he and

to Corrall, research

project

began

in

a component Jevremovic

Dalsa was also involved in the by critiquing it from an

computer systems co^p. This module would allow an analog camera to double as a digital camera without the user having to buy a digital camera, he said. The module would replace a normal film canister in a 35-niillimetre camera and store 48 digital pictures at a resolution of 128-by-128 pix-

engineering perspective.

The module

is in its final

stages and should

testing

be ready by April

19.

The other project on process monitoring via Web browser or wireless personal digital assistant

(PDA) was designed by third-year Greg Ferguson, Dan

Jaffares

and Craig

Nowak from

the

electronic engineering technology:

while both 2000, Jevremovic, who are in the same class, were on their co-op terms. Construction of the module began in September.

telecommunications systems program. “It (the project) enables users to monitor all relevant information in an electronic system,” Nowak said,

The Waterloo-based company construction

adding this project could be adapted to anything from parts per minute produced on an assembly

cameras

line to the temperature

imaging module.

The idea behind

- donated

charge-coupled device-based imaging system (CCD), according

Dalsa, the best in the world for --

of machine vision cameras mounted on

to real-time monitor.

“One machine

to

cameras.

(Photo by Jody Andruszkiewicz)

of a specific

piece of machinery the user would

want

and Nemanja Jevremovic celebrate their firstplace ranking at the Institute of Electric and Electronic Engineer’s student paper’s night for their digital imaging module for 35-mm Jeff Corral, seated,

the

entire

Toyota plant could be monitored at one time,” he said, adding that any time any of the criteria the user outlined to be monitored changed, the user’s PDA would beep and show

Got something to say? Do you have a beef? Spoke wants

to

hear from you.

the user the changes.

The

three

students began the

Write a

letter to

the editor.

research phase of the project in the spring of 2000.

Construction of this project began in September and is currently going through its final testing to be completed by April 19. According to Rudy Hofer, a professor in elettronic engineering tech-

nology,

all

projects have

some

sort

of practical industry apphcation.

He also said that while these projCraig Nowak, off

left,

components

Dan

Jaffares, middle,

and Greg Ferguson show

night. Their project

and Electronic Engineer’s student paper’s is based on real-time monitoring via Web

browser or personal

digital assistant.

(Photo by Jody Andruszkiewicz)

I

I

Conestoga has

ences between universities and col-

more of a compared to

leges, as universities take

theoretical approach

the colleges’ practical approach.

Tuesday

at

noon

must be received by

for the following issue.

can be e-mailed to spoke @conestogac.on.ca, dropped off at the Spoke newsroom at 4B14, or mailed (see address at bottom of page 4). Please include your full name, address and phone number. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Letters

SPOKE wants to hear from you The

j

are the best

ever had, they highlight the differ-

of their first-place winning prospect for the

Institute of Electric

ects

Letters to the editor

Conestoga College’s student newspaper want to hear what you like and dishke about our publication. Please fill out the survey below and deposit it into boxes in the learning resource centre or at CSI’s office in the Sanctuary. You can also drop off in the Spoke newsroom in 4B 13.

I

reporters at

!

it

| •

j

What information

is

important in your

life

at Conestoga Colle ge?

What do you want to know about Conestoga

What do you

like

Colle ge?

or dislike about Spoke2

What would you like

to see

more or

less of in

Spoke!

We would like to hear from you. Spoke is your newspaper and it should represent your needs and interests. We will take your sugand do what we can to ensure that this publication beneHts all members of the Conestoga College community. Thank you for your time and we look forward to hearing your concerns and serving your needs. gestions to heart

J


Page 6

— SPOKE, April

9,

2001

He has

that winning feeiing

alarm

Fire

triggered Student’s logo picked for skateboard parks By Kyla Rowntree

in

Cambridge

By Dwight

designing the logo.

wanted something really modern looking, vibrant and something

A fire alarm was set off at Conestoga College’s Doon campus on March 29, around

with

3:05 p.m.

“I

Ivan Ramirez was one of the 29 second-year graphic design students who entered a competition to the

a

Ramirez.

strong

contrast,”

official

“I

Ramirez added

Ramirez was announced the win-

that

March

bookstore and the woodworking building.

knew the competi-

on 28

tion

“We checked

the building for

smoke and fire but didn’t find any. Then we saw the alarm was

was

tion

alarm was

pulled on Level 3A, between the

he was confi-

-

i

A1 Hunter, supervisor of security services, said the

dent with his design however he

ner of the

compet

said

looked through magazines and got a good look at skateboarders in action.”

logo of the skatebotuding parks Anywhere and Nowhere in Cambridge. design

Irwin

going to be

hard

pulled,” Hunter said.

organof the

because he

The Kitchener Fire Department also responded to

skateboard

said

parks,

the call,

were many

by izers

Colleen

Ramirez’s winning logo

good

be representL c h ing the Cambridge skateboard parks recreation Anywhere and Nowhere. t

i

i

will

Cambridge

The top logo was picked by a focus

group of skateboarders, skate park staff and park administrators. “We’ve had a lot of fun doing this. We want the students to know important this

is to

us,” said

Lloyd.

“This logo

is

re

going to be around

for a very long time.”

Lloyd added that the logo will be featured on helmets, decals, hats and shirts. Ramirez said he had a lot of fun

Lichti

given the task by Cambridge’s community services department to build a park for skateboarders. The skateboarding season for Anywhere and Nowhere runs from May 1 till the end of August. The parks average about 80

manager of the Anywhere skateboard park. “There was amazing creativity

came out of

that

this

process.”

Lloyd, the manager of the Nowhere skateboard park located in the Karl Homuth Arena in

skateboarders a day and sessions run from 1-4 p.m. and 6-9 p.m.

Cambridge, said his 10-year-old park began with a student who skateboarded walking into Cambridge city council and asking for

some place

Cambridge. Lloyd said

to

daily.

The

cost

is

$10 a season or $l a

Lloyd said

his park

called that because after that

day he was

Nowhere

it is

is

stationary

in the arena.

who had

left the

“We

dim view of

take a

gering false alarms.

It’s

nal offence,’’ Hunter said. If caught, the perpetrator could

a mobile skateboard

ferent parking lots around the city.

The park

^^ogfSfjl^ he added.

park that travels

because

is

in a trailer to dif-

Anywhere

called

can go just about anywhere, said Lloyd. “This park Anyyvhere is designed for kids without transportation,” said Lloyd. “We bring the park to them.”

Anywhere

operate for

will

,./Sv^S^th a controlled evacliatiotv somebody .could still be

it

a s4fety thing.” Hunter -s^d 'security services eontint^s investigate the >incidet^"dnd encourages anyone with information^ to come for,^vard. The Waterloo regional

LihjVired.vIt’-s .

.

its

this year.

'

The parks include a quarter pipe, a half pipe, verticals, pyramid ramps and tons of street stuff.

police a«Tnot involved at

risks associated

with excess weight. Live better

and longer

...lighter.

P3fmaP3cnon0 ^ “"I

wwwparticipaction.com

I

Cqnestdea Student Present

Last

Movie Night

of tho School Year You Don't wont to miss

this

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what Movie is playing by checking our Website Find out

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Play while

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tf

they develop the disease, then their

childien face those same filty-ntiy odds.

her Just like niy mother, the

I(

may

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ii

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lake 10, 15 - even linall;- kills

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cl

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then, ihe

not go lo ihc grave with her.

But there

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Recent researeh

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see,

once you develoj)

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With your

pa.ss.ihe gene losponsible ior

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liinimgions along to your chikla'ii,

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and

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Socieiy of

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We need your help

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@ Door

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than ever to Imding a cure

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Prizes to Win!!

,u

mind. ..her body., .her soul

disease, ilieivs a

Licenced Event. Free Popcorn.

dying ftwm Hunimgion

an inlienicd biain disoidcr

slowly chipping away

is

this

he ad^ed.

point,

Reduce the health

WaisiLMOt want not

The

trig-

a crimi-

5^|"pumshed with anything from warning from the college to discotjtinuajion from his/her

is

second season

session.

skateboard in

Anywhere

while students, staff

faculty,

building, looked on.

(Photo by Kyla Rowntree)

very pleased to have this partnership with Conestoga,” said Lichti,

arenas.

means of elimination by

how

We

and

from the skateboarding parks in Cambridge, present Ivan Ramirez, a second-year graphic design student at Conestoga College,with a $500 cheque for his winning logo on March 28.

submitted. “

and Doug Lloyd, manager of

Doug Lloyd and Colleen Anywhere and Nowhere

designs

,

co-ordinator

there

Hunrington Society of

Canada

HUNTINGTON Canada

Societe Huntington du

unlay

ihe


!

SPOKE, April 9, 2001

— Page 7

3

Literacy lab Students with a learning By Kyla Rowntree The ment

lab

literacy

College

for

at

knowledge maps and flowcharts of any learning material.

Conestoga

It

with special

students

also outlines a view-help index

and concise

that allows for clear

needs and learning disabilities. Some of the latest technology

software.

gram

ware and software tial

Special learning devices in the lab enable students to learn without

learning

their

New

speak to the students as

in

predicts

types.

This

dictionary

with over

all

this

any

in

other college or

facili-

funded by the Learning unless

ty

it

is

The

exception dictionary

is

includ-

in this software that allows the

words or abbreviations.

It is

also

capable of reading an entire docu-

ment in selected voices. ReadPlease 2000 is a screenreading computer program that will read any text displayed on the screen.

about the size of a marker with a scanning device on the end allows students to scan any

from a document and define

it

A

Su

Lyttle,

parrot organizer is a voice-activated electronic organizer that can

spelling

be used as a calculator, alarm clock, memo pad and planner. Su Lyttle, the computer technician consultant for special needs

assistance phonetically and an auto correction.

services, points out that the highquality equipment is excellent.

computer technician for special needs services

The program provides

ZoomText

pro-

is

a piece of interest-

ing software in the lab that pro-

gram transforms

text

on pages

into

vides students with screen reading and magnification. The program

a voice reader.

The program

also

magnifies the display of word

includes a talking dictionary with

processors, spreadsheets, databas-

over 175,000 words with synonyms.

es and online services.

JAWS

“You won’t find all this equipment in any other college or facili“unless

ty,” said Lyttle,

Opportunities Project).”

by

the

The

LOP

Learning

Project

Bill Vastis, a first- and second-year recreation leisure student at Conestoga, uses the JAWS software in Conestoga’s literacy lab on April 2. Vastis, who is blind, uses the literacy lab to write documents.

(Photo by Kyla Rowntree)

with a post-secondary education.

A reading pen

visually or audibly.

Project.”

speak naturally into the computer with continuous speech.

pro-

An

text

Opportunities

is

allows students to

The

jirogram

a more advanced word

equipment

another unique piece of software in

of scanned text images.

that converts text into voice.

the Iritemet.

“You won’t find

voice.

The software Kurzweil 3000

text

also

voice to pronounce any unusual

have hands-free operation of the software by using their voice. Students can create such documents as business letters and spreadsheets merely by using their

vides audio and visual presentation

program

student includes

to

ple voice conunands.

The

ed

voice-recogni-

The program handles specialty vocabularies and allows for a hands-free mouse control with sim-

voice.

into

converts text to speech while the

tion software that allows students

lab that

words being

another program that

is

100,000 words.

the

word or

letter,

the

student success.

Dragon Naturally Speaking

and the program converts the

that

prediction

is

attached to

program is capable of reading from word processors, spreadsheets and

with a learning disability to achieve

Dragon Dictate

is

The scanner scans

in

will

Aurora

easier for a student

it

flatbed scanner

includes a pronunciation dictionary and spell checker. WillowTalk is another program

disability

hardware and software

makes

pro-

typed, into speech.

affect their education.

the lab

The

complete sentences. This software also includes a spell checker and word prediction

that help stu-

despite their disability.

letting

a program designed

is

they type either by

dents to reach their highest poten-

A

the selected text into the computer

TextHelp

consists of adaptive hard-

ly visually impaired.

well-organized format. to convert text to speech.

The lab

Kurzweil 1000 is a program that advanced reading tools for people who are blind or severe-

the computer.

is

at their fingertips

provides

written proposals and reports in a

brand new advanced pieces of equipment and featured in the lab

have top-quality equipment

disability

with concept maps, process flows,

of top-notch equip-

is full

of adaptive software

full

is

funded (Learning

it is

Opportunities

a four-year project that

The

project

is in its

third year at

the college.

leges,” said Lyttle.

“We will help whoever we can, basically.” Su

Lyttle

Lyttle ensures every student

comfortable lab’s environment. Lyttle uses

in the lab willing to assist any-

that

“There

“Hopefully by the end of the four years the LOP will filter through other universities and col-

uses the lab

one one

who

in., the

is

techniques such as

turning the lights off and providing

each station with its own lamp because she feels the soft lighting creates a comfortable, quiet study

environment.

comes is

in.

always help or

tance,” said Lyttle.

whoever we can,

“We

assis-

will help

We

basically.

encourage any special needs student to use the lab instead of having to fight

way

his/her

into

an open

access lab.” Lyttle

added

that after the

LOP

funding ends the lab will still continue to run suecessfully. “We’re not shutting up shop,” said Lyttle. “We’re still going to be here. I am quite confident with the efforts that we have been through with this lab that nobody wants to see the project shut down or fold up.” Lyttle added that statistics point

hardware overwhelmingly helps the students. to the fact that

another piece of screen reading and magnification software. The program is designed

enabled the college to enhance and update the facilities in the lab to meet the needs of the

found a lot of students complained about the fluorescent lighting,” said Lyttle. “I think this

“They keep coming back.

for blind and visually impaired

students.

way

dents stop using a piece of equip-

Inspiration is designed for these

students and the software accom-

students in particular.

modates

The purpose of the project is to encourage more students in second-

more of a calm and pleasurable environment.”

Some students learn more easily by thinking with pictures rather than words and the program

The program provides

the student

is

all

levels

of computer

users.

has

ary school to consider continuing

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS for the

“I

the subdued lighting creates

Lyttle said there

is

always some-

“We think it works,”

said Lyttle. If stu-

ment then we need

to evaluate

whether we need it. had that happen yet.”

We

A Special Message

haven’t

/S

AUBREY HAGAR AWARD

From the CSI Would you

like to

nominate a distinguished teacher?

For information or nomination forms, contact one of the following committee members:

to everyone

Sue Garlick (Cambridge 623-4890) Titia Taylor (Doon,

ECE ext.

Susan Hartley (Doon

ext.

392)

who has Volunteered

over the

last

y^r!

338)

Maureen Nummelin (Doon ext. 300) Salmikivi (Doon ext. 353) Peter Sheldon (Doon ext. 212) Ted Spicer (Doon ext. 282) Edie Torbay (Doon ext. 381) Greg Bums (Doon, ext. 613)

Mark

Nominations Nominations

We just wanted to say Thank You

OPEN on March 12, 2001 CLOSE on April 20, 2001

We certainly could

not have

done

anything without your help! We're looking forward to working together in the next school year!


Page 8

— SPOKE, April

9,

2001

World’s largest By Jody Andruszkiewicz

program and make presentations. During

Conestoga has many distinctions can be proud of and now it can add one more to that prestigious list the

college

has

the

largest student chapter of the

feels

great,”

edu-

man-

cated to using education to improve

sionals in materials

bottom line companies worldwide.

students can find out what their edu-

dent.

to

Web

their

site,

APICS

school starting in the

met prior

fall,

management

sors and instructors

dent chapter

the stu-

comprised of students from different years. Golder said the student executive is designed like this so that students

APICS ’s

chapter and the

Additionally, the executive of the

involved with the executive who wish to continue working with the

parent chapter, the Ontario Grand Valley chapter, one of more than 270 chapters in North

student chapter organizes an annual

student chapter’s executive already

resume binder of all first-, secondand third-year students that is sent

tive

local

20,000

cation can

America,

serves

members

Waterloo

Brantford,

Stratford,

Elmira, Walkerton,

in

Region, Goderich,

Mount

Forest,

adding

Orangeville,

Marys, Listowel, Palmerston and

Fergus,

Paris,

St.

Milverton. In maintaining

student

level,

membership at the Golder said the

do

for them,”

Golder said.

out to potential employers. Golder said the job binder

is

an excellent

have knowledge of how the execuworks and there will be continuity from one year to the next. Golder also said the student chap-

idea because there are employers

ter

looking for

it

students for

first-

and second-year

summer

help.

During the membership drive, Golder said the executive arranged to have professionals come in to talk to first- and second-year stu-

According to Golder, four students from Fanshawe are interested in joining the Conestoga chapter to get the student benefits from APICS.

is

in

profes-

were very helpful by allowing the executive to go to every section in each year of the

management so

management field is. Going one step further,

the business

Guelph,

this year.

to

According

college’s

Giving a lot of credit for the success of the chapter to its executive. Colder said the 127-person membership has been very aggressive

that materials

beneficial contin-

has nearly 70,000 individual and corporate members dedi-

according to

the executive

APICS and how

uing their education in the materi-

Callie Colder, the chapter’s presi-

She said

dents about being involved with

als

agement (APICS). “It

even spoke to a secondyear maiketing class by accident. tour, they

Ontario Grand Valley chapter has helped the student chapter by offering students discounts to functions

world’s

cational society for resource

their presentation-making

and giving them the same benefits and accessibility to resources as any professional. “We set up functions with profes-

it

as

APICS chapter at college

has so many members because has a large pool of students to draw from.

Word of Conestoga’s

student chap-

even

down

ter

has

filtered

Fanshawe College, where

there

is

to

no

APICS-affiliated student chapter.

Golder is the president Conestoga’s student chapter

Callie of

of the educational society for

resource management. APICS the largest student chapter in the world. is

(Photo by Jody Andruszkiewicz)

Graduating

Need A Job ??? Let

Us Help You

The Ke4ume'7^e/efTf^5en/6ce'

!!!

Physical

is

How often?

FREE for the first 6 months after graduation!

Student Empioyment Invites ALL UpComing Graduates to Register for the IZeM'ivyis/tZe^^rciVS&vvCce^in

2B04 between

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8:30-4:30 Monday-Friday

(Tuesday 8:30-7:30) Bring in 2 copies of your resume and cover letter and we will send it out to employers that are posting jobs related to your field of study with our office. 1

For More Information Call Ext.756 or Drop In

-

888 -334-9769

wvvw.paguide.com


SPOKE, April 9, 2001

CBSA Web

open

site

for

business

Free e-mail, message boards and links offered to By Jody Andruszkiewicz

can get straight to services like free e-mail and the message board from

There wasn’t a lot of room for expansion on the former Conestoga Business Student Association Web site found at but

http://www.cbsa.on.ca,

Kowalyk has changed

By

Adam

new CBSA Web

obvious that Kowalyk, a second-year computer programmer site,

it’s

analyst, has

Web

been building a better

site.

Kowalyk, 21, said the former site needed to be changed because there was a lack of information on a site that sees an average of more than 3,000 hits per week. “The original page had nothing to do with the CBSA,” he said, adding •

the

on

new it,

The

site,

new

site is

a lot faster for users, and the site doesn’t have to reload pages

browse

new

site,

different pages.

Kowalyk

to

class projects, meetings with pro-

fessors

dents

in

student

each with six megabytes of storage. In addition to the free e-mail and

used the Hot Dog Professional software that was donated to the CBSA to write the code that brings the CBSA site

everyone.net, a will

American

as users cMck the banners.

“Obviously it’s not going to be anything large,” Kowalyk said,

With

referring to the revenue site,

“but every

little bit

their

sell

porting unlimited e-mail accounts,

American-based

money

even

dollars

ners on the top of each page.

company

instructors, or for stu-

to

be

will

CBSA. Advertising space Will be made available in the form of ban-

small amount of

and

used books. The message board is set up so the different programs in the school of business have their own area to post things. However, each area is open to all students. The free e-mail provided on the CBS A. site is also open to all students, even ones not in a business program at Conestoga. There are 65 active e-mail accounts, with the CBSA site sup-

hosted by the Canadian

the

and faculty up-to-date on

e-mail to co-ordinate meetings for

in

when

said users

site,

electronic bulletin board, and free

company Execulink,

made and paid

also said the

open

also be a source of revenue for the

Internet

Kowalyk

CBSA

a business program at Conestoga.

especially relating to things

CBSA awards banquet and

site is

ones not

Internet

CBSA Web

happenings within the CBSA. He said he hopes students and faculty use the message board, an

students, even

Using

site

the yearbook.

the

ail

students

Outside of the revenue-generating aspect of the

dents

free e-mail pro-

vided on the

has more information

like the

users

The

all

Kowalyk said the site has a lot of room for information to keep stu-

pages.

Web

that.

pointing and clicking across

the Internet to the

all

from the

helps.”

message board, Kowalyk said the CBSA site has a links section and space has been reserved for

Adam Kowalyk works on used

the

new CBSA Web

promote all upcoming students about the CBSA. to

Web

CBSA activities

life,

sites.

Kowalyk

the

site

enabled Microsoft

currently

is

said

which

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

the

Jeremy Vender Gaag, a second-year mechanical engineering student, lines up this tough shot while playing pool in the Sanctuary on March 30. (Photo by Dwight Irwin)

One

is

in all

site is

browsers soon.

Sexual Assault

fear

of

becoming the victim of sexual assault. Most people believe that sexual assault happens in “dangerous” places such as parking lots or dark alleys. However, more than half of all sexual assaults are committed in private homes or by men who are known to the women. Women are less likely to report these assaults or to be believed, although assaults taking place under these circumstances are no less criminal than those committed by strangers. A sexual assault happens when a man thinks his desires are more important than a woman’s are. By using pressure or force, the attacker imposes his wishes, which are more important to him than the woman’s right to say no. Some men believe that women say no when they mean yes, or even that women secretly want or deserve to be raped. This is not true.

who commit

a

woman wears, where

she

inviting sexual assault or giving

is

sexual assaults are responsible for these crimes, not their victims.

she goes, what she drinks or

up her right

to

who

she talks to does not

mean

say no. These myths blame the

Any woman of any age in almost any situation can woman is sexually assaulted, it is not her fault. If you know someone who has been sexually assaulted, listen to her. Let her know that it victim for the crime, not the offender.

be sexually attacked. If a

was not her

fault

Student Services

and

that she is not alone. Let her

at the

know

that help is available through

college and in her community, including the following agencies:

Sexual Assault Treatment Centre

-

A Message from

658-0551

Crisis line, counselling support

Community Justice

-

749-6994

Short-term counselling for recent survivors

Sexual Assault Support Centre

Initiatives

Support groups Student Services (Room 2B02)

for

Internet

work

But he said the

any unwanted

What

only

progress and should be ready for

in four

People

be

Explorer browser.

act of a sexual nature imposed by one person upon Canadian women has been sexually assaulted, while a small percentage of survivors of sexual assault are adult men. Most women live with the

Sexual assault

another.

will

and inform

(Photo by Jody Andruszkiewicz)

Having

to

site

Cool hand Jeremy

(7

— Page 9

744-6549

a


1

Page 10

— SPOKE, April

9,

2001

Getting a head start on a career By Reni Nicholson Teaching

Conestoga, which is a member of the chamber, donated the

cliikiren about careers

an early age was the aim of the ninth annual Cambridge Career at

Fair

held

at

Conestoga College

when

they see a career that they arc

interested in.”

space.

Students

The grade school curriculum forever changing,

Oldham,

said

is

Charlene

need

career path

Grade 9 or

know what

to

they'll

be taking by said

10,

Maureen

special projects co-ordi-

Byrne, a co-op placement officer

Njgreh 28.

nator with the chamber, adding that

About 1,200 Grade 7 and 8 students from Cambridge schools

labour

for the Waterloo Catholic District School Board. “They need to know, so they can

took the opportunity to

make con-

nections with about 38 businesses

from all over the region. Students from both the Cambridge Catholic and public school boards were in attendance. The day consisted of a session with., local co-op advisers and the opportunity to meet potential employers who had booths set up at the col-

The college began

participating

information

semi-

nars are included in this year's cur-

riculum.

The career tion

fair

sessions are

students

and the informaways in which

receive

will

understanding of what for

a is

better

required

employment, said Oldham.

nicely

chair of the career

are

preparing

said.

good way for know what options

think this

the students to

is

a

love to see the kids get excited

“I personally love the event

into

the

fair.

of the seventh and eighth grade curriculum.

Commerce, about

four years ago.

ties

system said Brad Hyde,

dents for things that

are out there,” she said.

the event,

The event school

“Teachers

which is organized by the Cambridge Chamber of in

,

follow the appropriate curriculum in high school.”

Students are also required to volunteer in their community as part

“We

lege's recreation centre.

market

we

stu-

weren't

prepared for until college,”

Hyde

said the career fair

good way

he is

a

awareness for gives the kids an

to build

the students. “It

idea of what Jobs are out there

and

I

and how

to

go about getting the

Jobs.”

Giselle Burrows,

left to right, Stephanie Pyke and Maureen Grade 8 students at St. Andrews Catholic School in Cambridge, examine the Cambridge Memorial Hospital display the chamber of commerce career fair, March 28, at Conestoga

Bolton,

all

College.

at

(Photo by Reni Nicholson)

College gets

ISO

certificate

By Jody Andruszkiewicz

ESL instruction. Tibbits said eventually the col-

ceremony

open the board of governors meeting on In a small

March

to

26, Joe Beingessner, lead

assessor

KPMG

with

Registrar

Quality

presented

Inc.,

Conestoga College president John Tibbits and the board with the school’s ISO 9001 banner and certification plaque.

On Feb. 26, auditors from KPMG, a Kitchener auditing firm,

targeting

recommended

it

the college for

ISO

certification. Tibbits said the

announcement from

KPMG

came

as a surprise because the final deci-

sion

expected

wasn't,

to

be

announced so soon. Conestoga is one Of an elite group of educational institutions in North America to have full ISO 9001 certification. During the meeting, Tibbits academic bargaining has begun

.said

402 KING STREET 41 5

S.,

N.,

KITOIENER CANADIAN TIRE PLAZA

mjERlOO

BETWEEN HARVEYS & BURGER KING

HESPELER ROAD, CAMBRIDCE ACROSS FROM MCDONALD'S

893-2464 884-7376 622-7774

cation.

He

said

it

was hard

to

com-

pete with the school board.

was

“It

when

frustrating to

Conestoga

high schools offer free train-

ing." he said, citing that adult edu-

cation and training being offered in that area consisted

getting

high

of adult students

school

credits

for

Also raised during the discussion for a vice-

president of academies.

The com-

In

385 FAIRWAY ROAD

for a long time as

bargaining teams have met a handful of limes. J'he contract for

more

744-1 01

Guelph

major market for adult edu-

a

was Conestoga's search

the faculty expires Aug. 31 of this

BASICS PLAZA

is

aiul

year. Bargaining,

KnCHENER FOOD

Tibbits said Conestoga had been

atteiuling classes.

the

W.,

and the three area universities Wilfrid Laurier and Guelph. During discussion at the meeting, Waterloo,

it was revealed the Upper Wellington separate school board is getting out of adult education.

9001

370 HIGHLAND ROAD

would like to build an ESL sehool that would* serve Conestoga lege

active in

.saiil

May

Tibbits, gets

and June,

other news, there was

di.scu.s-

mittee involved in the search has

met twice and Tibbits said the wrap up in June. Ads

.search will

will

be placed

Mail

and the

in

the

Globe and

Kitchener Record.

sion about Fnglish as a second lan-

Tibbits said the person filling the

guage

position will possess a

instmclion.

University

Currently,

the

of

Waleiloo's math deptirtment sends foreign students who fail to meet FSl. iet|uirements to

Conestoga

(.luring

the

school

PhD.

Tibbits also spoke brielly about

recommendations in the Investing in Students Task Force

the

But

report prepared for the Ontario government. He said the first 13

Waterloo's .science ilepartment will now also seiul students to

recommendations dealt with the improvement of .service:, for stu-

Conestoga over the summer

dents.

year

for

FSl,

instruction.

for


SPOKE, April 9, 2001

A jarring By Reni Nicholson

SF Song’s

This venture to find what else may be hip is a risky one for hip.

Downie.

CD

Downie’s jarringly inharmonious song style that would be slightly familiar, but surely surprising to most Hip features

Downie’s

able tracks.

simple story of not telling

what’s

to get

psychotic sounding.

anything that

It

Downie

Not even singing for most of the vocals in song, Downie’s Starpainters are matched by the

poem

not like

would expect from

Starpainters

is

14,

Yer Possessed,

is

and long held

Track

Irrelevance,

15,

start to finish.

a nice and relaxing

is

introduction to the end of the

CD.

Eerie and poetic spoken lyrics, similar to

Track

16,

Jim Morrison’s

style,

make

Insomniacs of the World,

Goodnight. sounding in

Almost its

too

relaxed

delivery, the song can its

intentions as

a lullaby.

Occasionally melodic, but disso-

Sunday

Hip tune from way back.

mon, Downie presents

his talent of

like a

“Everything will be just fine,” said in Track 10, along as you

Downie

dream of the

Vancouver Divorce, the second Track on the CD, sounds more like the Downie we’re used to. Ithas a recognizable tune that most Hip fans would appreciate. The song actually sounds like a Hip cover song, but it’s not.

mixed with honky-tonk

nant, sounding like a

a good introduc-

poems that can be heard throughout the CD.

much of

voice in Blackflies. This song sounds

more

tion to his fantasy

Name

circus

very well be used for utilizes his ability to dra-

matically change the pitch in his

sounding tunes of an organ.

styling we’re used

intensely slow track tells the

to. ITiis

Every

scary and

is

that

Downie does

use.

sounds smooth from

Downie.

sounds.

Irish

1

is offset

Mexican mandolin

little

This song

is

what most but

tunes.

Using an eerie tune to start off the song. Nothing but Heartache in Your Social Life, features a spoken

me

to,

almost ear piercing in combination

title

and intolerable

like

doesn’t quite contribute the spicing

The

of person,

by Downie. This Track

harsh

with a

more

be used

is

will

at the high octaves

but in such an ear-bending manpast the

Elaborate

Hip fans

with Downie’s attempts and failures

to interpret his music, as always,

ner that didn’t permit

it.

sounding Track

hip.

Name

that

rate.”

commonly

known as

melody

anything, “because he didn’t elabo-

album Coke Machine Glow is a gamble from

his listeners

matched by the accompanies

up the song can keep to the vocal

writer to poet, overnight.

Downie allows

journey in Track

Chancellor and the Never-Ending accompanied with good beats, make for two Hip-lover lik-

Downie’s debut solo

Using his ability to take a word and make it possess five mean-

of Downie’s

lyrics

life’s

12, Mystery, is well

attempt to go from singer-song-

ings,

The depressing

reflective

is

Fans

Downie

of starting on a high note and

style

Canada Geese, with its fairly heavy chords and out-of-tune lyrics, makes for a song that sounds as if it was recorded in a band mate’s garage. The poetic lyrics of the

unsynchronized with most of the band’s melodies throughout his

down, what

his vocals.

will recognize the familiar

artist.

into the

styling

Downie does with

depiction of

style.

lyrical

exactly

is

with the storytelling lyrics we’re used to from the Canadian

These are works he’s created over realm of the Hip’s

falling”

quickly lowering his tone.

The CD is packaged with a book of poems "written by Downie. fit

down

“Down,

Chase.

Butterfly

Sounding almost country-western, Downie’s song entitled Trick Rider makes an attempt at a song

Present,

fans.

the years, that couldn’t

peculiar sounding

filled

Coke Machine Glow is a gamble from what’s commonly known as

The

attempt by the Hip’s leader

harmony takes away from what would be a great sounding song.

All credit should go to the band and even to the lyrics, but not to the Jim Morrison crossed with Chris Isaac sounding voice of the Tragically Hip’s lead singer Gordon Downie. Downie’s debut solo album

nate manner.

that

is

one of those few albums

manage

to lull the listener off

and dreams, flows nicely with a folksy-like tune even when Downie

into a

throws

world seen through his eyes

in a

Downie

phrase in French. shines

slightly faster

through with a

pace and more familiar

sounding lyrics in

Boy Bruised by

a

new bar

ser-

creating poetic verses in an unfortu-

This

lofty pines.

Lofty Pines, a song about chances

the

world of imaginary lands.

Downie’s manner of expressing the

Machine Glow

in

Coke

courageous attempt, but he shouldn’t quit his day a

is

Gordon Downie’s

job.

Attention

all

CD

can be purchased with a

students

wants students to name the new

in the following ballot with

name of the pub. Drop

Hotline The

recreation centre has a new hotline in place. It is easy to access. From outside the college

now

bar, in the

concourse of the rec centre. fill

collection of poems.'''

Rec Centre

Needing money!!

Conestoga’s recreation centre and Spoke

Just

— Page 11

phone - 748-3565

your idea for the

From

inside the college

phone -

suggestions off at the rec centre,

ext.

565

Spoke, or send interoffice mail to the rec centre, c/o

Tony Martin, through

Deadline for ideas

announced Student’s

is

the student services office.

April 16. Winners will be

in the April

23 edition of Spoke.

name

Be

Program

a Conestoga

College Tour Guide!! The student who chooses the best name will

win an editor 's

chair,

donated by Pepsi.

Life is short,

detail

Talk

to

Melody, Information Centre, Or call 748-5220 ext. 730

SCSB

extension ^

Live longer with daily physical activity, healthy eating and following your doctor’s advice. ww.porhcipoctionxom

fietit 11-888-334-9769 r

I-

v-<

Cj

pi


Page 12

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; SPOKE, April

9,

2001

CSI Board of Direotors Eleolions

up a Nomination Package Or to ask any Questions

To Pick

@

Contact the CSI office 748-5131 or 1-866-968-7274 if long distance


Digital Edition - April 09, 2001