Page 1

34th Year

What’s Inside

Candidate

— No. 55

Lazy days are here again

speaks up; gets warning By Dwight

date must be a one-year member or a member of the

LASA

First-year

Blanchard

BOD

Irwin

is

student Brad

glad he stood up

executive to time president.

for himself.

Blanchard,

who was

defeated by

Steve Coleman for the position of vice-president of activities in the

CTV

personality in college hail of fame.

PAGE 2

I

run

for

CSI full-

“I was severely disappointed that was told I could not run for full-

time president,” Blanchard

He

said, if

it

is

said.

possible for the

recent

vice-president

Conestoga

ensure that first-year students

of

activities

to

who

Students Inc. 2001/02 execu-

are

tive elections at

full-time president, can do so, he will malce it happen. “If not. I’ll ensure word is executives and colput forth to

coming into the college and want to help out by running for

O onestoga

First-year computer programming analyst student Shaun Teskey catches some rays and a quick nap white waiting *

my

doesn’t

regret

voicing

his

opinion during

an

the CSI amendment

to

repealed and that any person

...

ensure

Blanchard

meeting,

March

March 22.

(Photo by Kirsten

to Fifteid)

my

lege teammates

all-candi-

dates

fffi^SiPfn©Fiicte''outsiae ooor"SS»“OTT

held

in

the

that

CSI to investigate new health insurance

is

can be the full-time president,” he said at the meeting.

6.

In doing so he broke a contract he

and the other candidates signed

what

in

By

Mustang back to

life.

or the election process during

LASA

first-year

campaigns.

PAGE 6

breach that contract. In doing so, he received a verbal warning

the warning he

from CSI chief returning

what he

officer

Trevor Trewartha. The warning will not appear on Blanchard’s permanent record. It is

which precedes a written warning and then disqualification from running for student government if a third warn-

just a disciplinary step,

ing

is

required.

During the March 6 candidates

Students concerned with the of extended health-care

quality

student

coverage at the college will soon see an improvement.

11

COMMENTARY New video

sets

doubie standard

PAGE

4

Mike Harris, CSI vice-president of academics, said the CSI executive,

admits to breaking the conto

which is looking into how it can best meet the extended health-care needs of the student population, has met

and

with an alternative provider. Harris said the executive is look-

said.

but he

felt

somebody had

say something. “I fully believe in

what

I

said

what I did. “The people who heard my voice and heard what I said will only have more respect for me than they did before because there

is

actually

ing at an alternative after

dents

came

many CSI

stu-

ple having a hard time getting the

was

changed by the CSI board of directors two weeks before last year’s election, states that any student running for president must have at least one year’s experience on either

the

CSI executive or

its

board of directors. Blanchard was stonewalled by the ruling and he felt something needed to be said. “I wanted to run for full-time president but then I was advised I had to have one year of BOD experience,” Blanchard said. Blanchard put forward the point that

nowhere

posters,

on

the

distributed

Doon campus, does

it

election

throughout state a candi-

“I

am

Blanchard said he will pursue CSI board of directors for the 2001/02 school year and then run for president the following year. Trewartha said it was just a verbal warning which had no effect on election to the

the current election.

He was affair

it

between

Blanchard.

to give more was an internal CSI and the

hesitant

details, stating

is

Associates, an insurance

broker in Toronto that has a partOntario with the

nership

Community Parliamentary

College Student Association to

which the college belongs. Harris the

provider contacted the

to inquire

about giving a presit could

entation about the services offer students.

“We need demographic

to

better

grasp the

at the college,” said

Harris.

Continued on Page 7

Election results suspect By Dwight The wait

Irwin

CSI CSI board of director’s meeting on March election are still unknown.

continues. Because of a complaint raised by former

president Phil

one.”

The possible new provider

ACL &

said

plan started,” said Harris, “and also

which

cerns.

CSI

view on March 21. “I’m still a student of this college. And even though I am a candidate, I want to express to the students that I am still a student and I think as they do, I do as they do and I live as they do.

constitution,

Harris added that the selection

September with complaints about the service they were receiving from the college’s current insurance broker Campbell & Company. “The complaints dealt with peo-

the

others,” Blanchard said in an inter-

run for the position of

they had

if

of drugs covered by the plan, the cost of these drugs and general customer service were also con-

in

to

who can The

PAGE

He traet,

;

for

was assessed

questioned the CSI’s rule about full-time president.

Donald to bring more courses online.

In a way, Blanchard agrees with

a student out there that will stand up for himself and the rights of

meeting, a student in the audience

money back

getting

I

But, Blanchard felt he had to

Students bring

Kirsten Fifield

decided to opt out.”

said and what did Brad Blanchard,

I

their

believe

candidates will not question the

CSI

fully

“I

with the CSI. The contract states

LeBeau

28, the results of the

at the

LeBeau questioned discrepancies in the voting process that may have seen votes, rumoured to be more than 100, discarded. In order to ensure nobody voted twice, it was required students put their student number on the

many

day of voting (March 13) were not counted. The BOD held a lengthy in-camera meeting on March 28, with LeBeau in attendance, to decide what steps it should take. At press time, the CSI’s stance was “no comment” on whether the original voting results were to become official. The unofficial results of the March back of didn’t

their ballot. But, poll clerks

tell

students to

do so and

on the

first

the unsigned ballots

22 recount had Jon Olinski defeating Jessica Sperling by eight

votes.


Page 2

— SPOKE, April

2,

2001

Graduates inducted broadcasting

into

hall

Four vie for governor seat By Reni Nicholson

Hutcheson,

The competition

Trifunovich

students

tell

to strive for

lege

for

Conestoga College who are vying for a position on the college’s board of governors. Student employment officer Sajel Boteju, alumni services

over

a

print

Stroh are

most votes

in

the election

all full

and part-time people employed by the board as a member of the

Conestoga College’s Broadcasting Radio and Television Hall of Fame on March 22. Jeff Hutcheson, class of 1978 and into

semesand ongoing until Aug.

in the fall

31, 2004,

the

position is

one

Dollars. He moved to CTV’s flagship morning show Canada three years ago. speech, acceptance his In

AM

Hutcheson told about 200 audience members about his days at the Blair campus in Cambridge and how he

wanted “I

to be a radio disc jockey.

never even thought about got a job at

vision until

I

my

year. It’s

second

things

work

out,”

tele-

CKCO

in

amazing how Hutcheson said.

The broadcasting students honoured Hutcheson with hilarious work with Canada AM. Trifunovich has worked his special effects magic on movies like Murder at 1600, with Wesley Snipes, The Horse Whisperer, clips of his

of three inter-

were inducted into Conestoga College’s broadcasting radio and television hall of fame at the program’s banquet held March 22 at Bingeman’s. Hutcheson is on-air talent for CTV’s Canada AM, while Trifunovich is a special effects specialist in Hollywood, Calif. Robert Redford and Shanghai Noon, with Jackie Chan. “I’m not trying to name drop, I directed by

just

want

to

show you

students

anything can happen. Set your goals and go for it,” said Trifunovich, who flew from Hollywood for the ceremony. “Who would’ve thought a kid from Fergus would be living in Hollywood and working with these great actors? It shows anything can happen.” The pair join Paul Cross (class of Ltd., freelance 1979) of television director William Elliott

CHUM

(class of 1973)

elected

(class of 1975), a technical opera-

CTV Ontario,

in the hall

and

of fame.

The broadcasting students also paid homage to professor Mike Du Boulay,

who is retiring at the end of

academic year, after 22 years teaching at Conestoga College. this

Du

Boulay,

who

teaches the tele-

component of the broadcasting program, worked for CKCOvision

TV,

CFRB BBC,

Radio,

CITY-TV and

London, England, before becoming a professor at the

a

Last year an administrative

member

tjy Dvi/ight /rwin}

CFTO-TV

on

rotating basis.

and Steve Coulter

tions director with

positions

nal

Neil Trifunovich

(Photo

in

to the position

Toronto. council

The is

a

Colleges

and

Universities Act. The counprovides

cil

independent advice to the

Knowles

you win the prize you bid on.

The draws

for the prizes will

be held on April

5th.

All winners not able to pick up their prizes in person will be contacted.

The students of the Recreation and Leisure Services prorgram in partnership with Argus and the Betty Thompson Youth Center, would like to thank you in helping us pull together for youth.

Guelph where the college is partnered with community agencies who deliver the employment preparation. Conestoga delivers the entire program in Stratford. Shirley co-workers Her Donezyk, student employment assistant and Lynne Proctor, coop advisor with student employ ment services nominated Boteju for the position.

knowledgeable on and even the

Staying

events, changes

direction

are

of

the

part

position’s requirements, said Boteju. “I

can bring

a new, fresher

to the board,”

Boteju

said

who added IS

she

Stroh

a visionary. ”I

am

very

much

excited about

promotion and growth future,” she said. “I’m moving with trends and up-to-date. I'm good at

for

the

good

at

keeping being a

step ahead.”

Boteju said she easily relates to the mature staff, as well as the students. “I feel comfortable with both ends of the spectrum.” Taking everyone into account

of the college, as a whole, is important to Boteju. She said get-

college sector as a whole.

ting insight into what’s happen-

seetor

The appointments

are

made

and working for the best

interest

ing at the various levels of the

based on suggestions by current members of the board. Each of the appointed people are permit-

college

ted to serve terms of three years

continuing education.

and contributing to the growth and vision of the college would be satisfying, said Boteju. “Conestoga College is definitely where I want to be.” As a graduate of the college in

She said the incoming member must be familiar with the way the

1970, Himmelman said her longtime experience at the college

The outgoing support

staff rep-

on the board is Joyce program administrator for

resentative

Items will be on display from April 3rd to April 5th in the main cafeteria.

worked

minister on the and is the only impartial agency in the province whose mandate is to consider the

college

each.

ticket,

services she

with Job Connect, a provincially funded program to assist youth

younger look

Fundraiser For

your

employment

look, almost a

A

If we pull

Himmelman

student

Three external positions on the board must also be filled. The positions are appointed by the Ontario Council of Regents in

the Ministry of

!

col-

the

lege’s

position for the fall 2001.

Pulling For Prizes

BUY A TICKET! BUY FIVE

Prior to join-

ing

college’s

agency established under

Help us pull together and raise money for Argus and the Betty Thompson Youth Cetre. These local organizations provide sevicesfor homeless youth at risk in the tri-city area.

degree.

and next year an academic member’s position on the board will be vacant. A student is elected to the board every term. Vice-president of academics Mike Harris has held the position since September 2000 and has been acclaimed to the

provincial

April 3rd to the 5th

a

psychology

was acclaimed

Boteju

Conestoga.

Argus and The Betty Thompson Youth Centre

in

Conestoga delivers the job development portion of the program in and Cambridge Kitchener,

which was introduced last year. Hutcheson worked as the weatherman and sports anchor for CKCO-TV in Ktchener for about 20 years, as well as being the host of other programs like Bowling for

and

of

Guelph 2000 with

employment or job placements.

ter

left,

the

University

transportation,

shipping,

Conunencing

Hutcheson,

from

care, maintenance, building, serv-

program’s annual awards banquet held at Bingeman’s. They join three others in the hall of fame,

Jeff

graduated

between the ages of 16 and 24 and some adults to obtain

cafeteria or nursing staff,

broadcasting

just year,

office, clerical, technical, health

ice,

Neil Trifunovich, class of 1977, at the

liaison officer Jan counting on getting

The position was open to

a special effects whiz were induct-

were inducted

all

being held April 4 for the board’s three-year seat for support staff.

Irwin

A host of CTV’s Canada AM and ed

Monica Himmelman, shop employee Lynn

Knowles and the

By Dwight

strong for

four support staff employees at

officer

their goals

is

and looking toward the future.” Boteju, who has been employed with the col-

Irving,

college operates. “( riie

member must) be aware

of the strategic role that the board |ilays in terms of policy making

is

a

good way of doing

this.

Knowing

that

she

is

involved

gives her the familiarity with the

college

community needed

the position.

Continued on Page 3

for


SPOKE, April 2, 2001

board seat

Filling

Continued from Page 2 Knowledgeable and in tune with support

the

Himmelman

print shop,

familiar with

would be an advocate on but

a two-way street,” she would also communicate information back and forth to each

Knowles.

group.”

to the best

munication level,

at

the

Himmelman

com-

of

my

said

will

work

ability to

be a

“If voted to the board,

I

corrunitted, dedicated, responsible

support staff plans to be

member and

board

will strive for

effective solutions in all issues.”

available to support staff by having

She

drop boxes on campus and making available her phone number and e-

will be posting posters in the

college hallways in preparation for the election.

mail.

colleagues

Stroh’s

“We’re (support

become

support staff to the board,

“I

In hopes of increasing the

to

the policies

the college would be a main concern for the representative of the

it is

certainly said.

some of

of the college,” she said. Helping to resolve issues within

beneficial to each party.

staff,

me

“This has allowed

communication between the support staff and the board would be “I

direct

port staff, faculty and students.

said she feels proper

behalf of the support

Pot project

contact, with administration, sup-

concerns,

staff

Knowles has had

Pat

greases the college’s wheels and

McPherson, liaison Tanja Gancevich,

from

training officer with Job Connect,

that oil

staff) the oil that

you can get some good

specialist

and

employment

energy and direction,” she said. If she is voted to the position,

have given

Himmelman

she wants to work in conjunction with the union executive, “so that everybody

board.

knows who’s on first.” Himmelman, who is the founding

but she has been a part of the college for more than three years.

president of the college’s alumni

Along with Boteju, Stroh worked

association,

of time in

lot

community volunteer

positions on

local boards such as the Kitchener

YMCA, United

Kitchener- Waterloo and as president of Regional Hornes^ for

the

Way

Waterloo Health.

Larissa McicMillon, left, Catherine Cardiff and Jenn Castellan, all second-year nursing students, work on their marijuana presentation for the bio fair held in the Blue Room on March

22

.

(Photo by Kyla Rowntree)

the liaison office for 10 months,

with Job Connect.

Unsure of what exactly the board does, she said if she

is voted in, she spend most of her first year observing, but hopes that in doing so she can be the voice of the sup-

will

port

staff.

“I’m a good

listener. I can quickpick out the important points and look at them creatively and clearly,” she said.

ly

"l feel that I

know

the college

from the inside out, and 1 have a good knowledge of how government and board issues are presented,” said

Himmelman.

She said she cares a is

Stroh said she would be able to bring concerns from support staff to the board, as long as she has the

lot

about the

college, as a whole.

“This

by nomi-

Stroh has been employed with

with alumni services for two years.

She has spent a

their support

nating her for the position on the

said

has been employed

— Page 3

certainly a position that

I

would respect and be conscientious

appropriate feedback.

Stroh said having more contact between the board and support staff is a major goal.

Bringing concerns to the board

about.”

Knowles,

who was nominated for

from support staff at all campuses would be the main attribute she would bring to the position, she said.

by fellow print shop employee Ed Reihl and shipping and receiving employee Cliff Ingham, has worked at the college

requires her to visit the four satel-

since 1989.

lite

the position

While working

at

the college’s

position

Stroh’s

campuses

at

in

least

liaison

once

a

month.

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— SPOKE, April

Page 4

2,

2001

Four articles of war banned by the Geneva convention unusual cruelty; the bayonet, biological weapons, nuclear weapons, and the land mime.

Experience needed

for

for president’s job Experience

is

must for any job.

a

workplace and when problems

makes

It

arise,

for fewer surprises in the

experience will usually lead to the

answer.

Conestoga Students Incorporated realized

this

and now has safe-

guards to ensure the only type of person to be the full-time president

is

an experienced person.

The

rule states

any candidate for full-time president must have one-

member

year experience on the CSI executive or as a

of the board

of directors. a

It's

who

good

rule.

It

would be unwise

to

have a student body president

Some may

has to step into the position from scratch.

had experience

full-time president, but

few high school student governments have a

budget of over $300,000 It’s

charge

CSI

at their disposal, as the

amount of money

a huge

argue they

high school level and should be able to run for

at the

does.

for an inexperienced person to be in

no matter how mature or responsible that person may be. first- and second-year Conestoga students are prevented

of,

This means

from running

for

CSI

president,

which some find

unfair. First-year stu-

dents cannot run because the elections are held before they arrive at the college and second-year students cannot fun because they must

first

serve on the executive or the board of directors before running for president.

On

we have

week’s front page of Spoke

this

LASA

student Brad Blanchard,

who

a story abotrt first-year

wasn’t allowed to run for presi-

dent for the 2001/02 school year because he didn’t have the required experience. Instead, he ran for vice-president of activities, but he

was

defeated for the position.

Blanchard spoke up

at the all-candidates

experience on the executive or

CSI and

saying

6,

BOD shouldn’t be a necessity to run for which said he wouldn’t denounce

president, despite signing a contract,

the

meeting on March

Blanchard should be commended for speaking his mind and standing up for what he thinks is right, but he’ll likely get his shot at running for

He

currently exploring tKe possibility of being

is

on the board of directors

in the

2001/02 school year and then running

CSI wants from anybody interested in stucommittees as an executive member, or on the

That’s exactly what the

dent politics. Sit on the

Go

board of directors.

to the meetings,

watch the paperwork

on the president’s desk as he/she stays here

until

pile

up

midnight sifting

how

the

CSI works from

the inside and then

make an edu-

cated decision about whether they want to run for full-time presi-

“The

BOD and executive is a person’s way to get acquainted with the

CSI,” current president Brad Whiteford said.

To be

CSI

the

minimum

maximum

his/her program. Jon Olinski,

March,

taking the second option.

is

management only

the

video Feels

It £I

at the

conclusion of

He

is

ti

2' 3,

Much

Music,

It

full-time president

opportunity

to

and permits students not

serve,

only

in

two-year programs

students

in

three-

year programs.

The CSI

is

make

in the little office in the

sure

its

president

This

is

knows how

things

work

Sanctuary. Less training will be required for

each new president, which should mean

less rookie mistakes.

a good rule and one that should be followed for years to

to ensure the

It is

on

sial lic

come

Conestoga’s students.

Spoke

true that the

something

is,

wants to see

more controvermore the pubit

fipd the video’s double standard

I

think

Madonna’s

intent is to get

people thinking and angry.

Madonna does

believe

these

The

outrageous acts in order to stay on

critics

the charts as the competition in the

again.

music industry increases.

With her movie Truth or Dare, her self-published book and her latest video Music, I wondered what

herself in the spotlight again as the

Madonna

takes her

grandmother on a crime spree.

Madonna

Madonna

tinues with cars,

stealing

blowing up a gas

two

station,

shooting cops with a real-life looking water gun, running over

some

playing ball hockey and blow-

else she could possibly do?

for the public. I

controversy and a refuse to air

lot

a lot of

of stations

after the video

MTV and

was dubbed

consistent to talk

Madonna’s video

is

ways of

for

Madonna’s

getting people

about her songs, books and

men.

of her victims

of her targets are in

the

girl”.

find her act

is

with her image.

getting old, along I

don’t think the

video should be aired because of the double standard and

I

also don’t

think the violence towards

men

is

necessary.

Madonna

said the video

shows her

character acting out a fantasy and

doing

things

that

girls

aren’t

allowed to do.

Madonna’s career controversy.

is

based on

the controversy

is

It

which enables her

The new song

violent in the

all

“bad

to get

In an article in the Toronto Sun,

much

to stay

on the

charts.

sense that All

don’t care

videos.

it.

on the American stations

VHI

with

Madonna’s ever changing entertainment style, I wondered what else was going to evolve out of her mind in order to produce a shock

ing up a gas station.

The video has sparked

up

growing

After

She knows what to produce

I

is

awful and

I

think

She

said she hopes the video will

get people to ask questions.

The feedback is Madonna wants and I

Just

what

don’t think

the public should give her the grat-

most pointless

ification

of watching her video just

video ever produced on the market.

because

it

the

video

is

the

sparks controversy.

SPOKE

Keeping Conestoga College connected

is mainly funded from September to May by a payment from Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) in exchange for the insertion of advertising in the paper. The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not neeessartly relied the views of Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers in SPOKE

tain the

Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz; Faculty Supervisor: Christina Jonas

Phone: 748-5220,

would be

there

over the world.

mother of two has got the

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Dwight Irwin; Photo Editor: Kirsten Fificld; Production Manager: Kyla Rowntrec Advertising Manager: Jody Andrus/.kicwicz; Circulation Manager: Reni Nicholson address

all

talking yet again.

is

SPOKE’S

women

towards

are not endorsed by the

SPOKE

a

extremely wrong. If a male artist had produced a video that was all about violence

I

it.

this

like

destructive teenager.

outrage

the

acting

is

many concerns

violent towards men.

most knowledgeable people available are representing

how Madonna

is

Well, she has done

the

The video was played only once

trying to

I

a man-hater in

is

about the violent content.

men

this semester.

CSI set it up that a president can serve directly after gives anybody with the interest and the experience to

more

the

This concept

me on

the first

March

Madonna

video and she

I

must say

gains ratings in the industry.

for

with a taser gun and the spree con-

graduating from business

and harms

specifically runs over

Girl,

aire d

of three, which

the full-time presidency earlier

she

heard how controversial and violent the video was, the later I stayed up to watch it.

robbing a bank-machine customer

fair the

graduation.

become

who won

devilish look in her eye as

I

in a

means the president either has to take a year off in the middle of his/her program to serve as president or serve directly after graduating from

It’s

newest

What was

video are male and she has this

these men. s

This spree begins with

must be enrolled

full-time president, a student

of one course per semester and a

be Madonna’s cup

tea.

Mador ma

In the video

dent.

in

of

despite

it.

Find out

sort of controversy in today’s

Like for

for president.

through

Like usual, anything that creates

some

society seems to

the election process.

president next spring.

Video sends wrong message

is

299 Doon Valley

ext. 691,

Dr.,

Room 4B14,

Kitchener, Ontario,

N2G 4M4.

692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-3534 Pl-niail: spokc@conestogac.on.ca

CSI

logo.

CSI unless

SPOKE

shall not

arising out of errors in advertising

their advertisements con-

be

any damages amount paid for

liable for

beyond

the

the space. Unsolicited submissions

must be sent to the editor by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a

MS Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not contain any libellous statements and may be accompanied by an illustration (such as a photograph). WordPerfect or


animals

Killing healthy

RECOCNIZETHE

/! VISION PROBLEMS Sudden lo» oF>ision, panicukrty in one eye or double vision

M HEADACHES

SIGNS OF SIROKE

Sudden, severe and unusual headaches

fi WEAKNESS

must be regulated

Sudden weakness, numbness and/or

WHEN YOU

tingling in the kce.

/

arm

HEART

or leg

AND STROKE FOUNDAnON

TROUBLE SPEAKING Temporary loss of speech or trouble understanding speech

Seek immediate

No

No

control.

No

regulations.

Commentary

understatement. Government departments of agriculture are on a blitz to stop the

by Reni Nicholson

plague devastating

livestock, but there is nothing stopping hundreds of healthy sheep and

in their herds.

Daily, governments in North America and Europe have seized and killed many animals from hun-

dreds of farms to prevent the spread of the family of diseases

vidual farmers? Because nearly 100

killed in the

Control yourselves,

make some

make some

and have a

rules,

heart.

uncommonly known

as transmissi-

ble spongiform encephalopathies,

or

mad cow

mouth

disease and foot-and-

disease.

TSEs

group of diseases that

are a

affect the animal’s brain. Prion protein,

the cause of the disease,

is

deadly for sheep and cows.

Where

are the rights of the indi-

people in Europe have died from the human form of TSE, farmers in North America have lost their rights.

There have been no reported cases of death caused by TSE in humans in North America, and still these animals are being unlawfully slaughtered.

Tests have been done on sheep

Even

where there

in situations

is

infected with the protein created

little

and humans who have consumed the infected ani-

the animals are infected with the dis-

disease, scarpie,

No

have farmers

erated, only to then

United States. The Canadian and American governments suspect that some sheep may have been exposed to mad cow disease through contaminated feed before they were imported from Europe.

laws,

ease,

to

no

scientific

evidence that

government agencies have

was no disease

When

one animal is discovered be infected with the disease, it has been the government’s initiative to go from farm to farm within a five-kilometre radius and kill off all sheep and cows for fear the disease has been transmitted. to

Has nobody tainted

America?

with

Why

TSE

in

are

these live-

all

North

stock being killed innocently?

Very few, but some herds believed to have been exposed to animals contaminated with the disease have been quarantined and are being monitored for symptoms of the disease.

Observing these animals, instead of butchering them without proof,

somehow becomes stagnant in human beings, posing no danger. So why are so many sheep being killed? More than 800 sheep were

their

fact,

recently

the

protein

destroyed in Manitoba,

own

herds.

has stepped tle

in,

The government

and stepped

in a

lit-

prematurely.

Tuesday

at

noon

must be received by

for the following issue.

will benefit the farmers,

and the public. Farmers wouldn’t

animals

lose

Letters can be e-mailed to spoke ©conestogac.on.ca, dropped off at the Spoke newsroom at 4B14, or mailed (see address at bottom of page 4).

Please include your full name, address and phone number.

mass

quantity of stock, animals wouldn’t

With no proof of illness, these animals arc being slaughtered because the only known method of testing

be killed innocently and trade and sales

would continue

’with

those

Anonymous

letters will not

be

printed.

animals not suspect to the disease.

Reduce the health

risks associated

with excess weight. Live better

and longer

...lighter.

pgmapacTionf ig i

f

www.participaction.com [

SPOKE wants to hear from you The

reporters at Conestoga College’s student

j I

the editor.

letter to

Letters to the editor

^Wai g- Mot. wa^it^t j

hear from you.

ing the disease.

of cows and flock of sheep for tests. The farmers have no control over

In

Write a

to

There are better ways of contain-

become infected when they consume the diseased sheep.

revealed that

Spoke wants

has been no proven case of sheep

intervened and seized the entire herd

test

Got something to say? Do you have a beef?

realized that there

humans

mal.

medical attention if you have any of these symptoms.

Too many animals have been

find out that there

slaughtered.

Unsteadiness or sudden falls, especially with any of the above signs

slaughtered, tested and then incin-

and hundreds more have been

cows from being

DIZZINESS

can be done on the brain. The animal has to be to dead to perform the test.

Please

fill

off in the

out the survey below and deposit

Spoke newsroom

in

it

newspaper want to hear what you like and dislike about our pubheation. boxes in the learning resource centre or at CSFs office in the Sanctuary. You can also drop

into

] {

it

4B13.

| I

j

I

What information

is

important in your

life

at Conestoga Colle ge?

What do you want to know about Conestoga

What do you

like or dislike

What would you like

to see

I

College?

about Spoke?.

more or less

of in Spoke?.

We would like to hear from you. Spoke is your newspaper and it should represent your needs and interests. We will take your sugand do what we can to ensure that this publication benefits all members of the Conestoga College community. Thank you for your time and we look forward to hearing your concerns and serving your needs. gestions to heart

J


Page 6

— SPOKE, April

2,

2001

Guelph campus students rebuild 1 988 Mustang for the drag strip By Kyla Rowntree

suspension,

brakes,

rear

transmission,

wiring,

fuel

engine, axle,

the starter.

“So many people want to see it,” “The enthusiasm from the students and other professors is just ecstatic. The college morale is just incredible when it comes to

Mustang

as the task of rebuilding

edelbrock intake manifold, hooker

the car

refeired to.

headers, a shift kit and four 10-rear

1

is

Many

components have the car to soup it up

special to

for the races.

Some

of

components

these

include a speed-pro camshaft, an

There are about 200 first-and second-year apprentices working on

axle gears.

the car.

speeds of about 160 km/h.

Jim Palmer, automotive service technician faculty, says this

work

the

a

for students to

great opportunity

team about

is

related

The

car

Since the students work on their cars mostly in class, this proj-

ect

is

a

to

dents

learn

how

designed so stuto

rebuild

and

service every part of an automobile,”

said

exactly what

Palmer, “and this

we

is

are doing here.”

fill-in project.

think this

their apprenticeship. is

expected to reach

is

own

“I

“The program

experience

You

is

a good

for us.

really get to

know the

different

kind of parts.” Chris Bruckman,

September. Palmer sandblasted the rust spots and prepped and painted the car.

service technician student

overall cost

when

the car

is

completed will be about $4,500, well below its resale value, said

This

is

the first time that a car has

been brought

in as a sehool project

at the college.

Palmer,

who

will drive the car,

would like to have it ready The car has about 360 horsepow?- Tto race by June and hopefully a liter and has been upgraded to a 5.8 tle sooner. litre engine. The car, which will not be street The students have rebuilt the legal because the car would probaPalmer.

Palmer said students and faculty always stopping by the shop to see the car and how far it has come. Students have been donating miscellaneous parts for the Mustang at the college are

throughout the entire project. “The students want to see raced,”

Palmer.

said

the track

more

it

is how a 1988 Mustang looked before being rebuilt in the automotive service technician program. Jim Palmer, an automo-

This it

“They are

donating parts so they can get

to

tive service technician faculty

member, purchased the Mustang

frame the summer before bringing

it

to class. (Photo submitted)

quickly.”

Palmer wants to display the car at fairs, open houses and mall displays in order to promote the college.

“Our goal

second-year automotive

The

Project Mustang.”

is

to get the college

logo on the car,” said Palmer.

to class in

it

said Palmer.

college

Palmer purchased the frame of the car in May after beginning work on the body during the sum-

mer before bringing

be used for racing purposes

only.

been added

in the

will

system, electrical components and

automotive service technician program at the Guelph campus are rebuilding a 988 Ford Mustang that will probably be hitting the drag racing strip. Students from every year in the program are working on Project Conestoga students

bly not meet emission standards,

said he

Conestoga design students are working on a painting and lettering scheme for the car. Chris Bruckman, a second-year currently

automotive service technician stusaid doing this helps him learn more about how to take things apart and rebuild them. “I Ulink this is good experience

dent,

Bruckman. “This projmore of a challenge. You

for us,” said ect

is

really get to

know

the different

kind of parts.”

From left, Martin Mechler, Azfar Usman and Jim Palmer, from the automotive service technician program, work on rebuilding the 1 988 Ford Mustang on March 23 at Conestoga College’s Guelph campus. (Photo by Kyla Rowntree)

Conestoga College continually seeks opportunities for improvement to Conestoga College

meet and exceed the needs of our students, employees

and communities.


SPOKE, April

2,

2001

— Page 7m

Peers recognized for hard work Appreciation

week honours

students’ extra effort By Kyla Rowntree Conestoga College

is

recogniz-

ing the students at the college take the time to

make

who

a difference

office,” said Turner. “They put in numerous hours on top of their heavy courseloads. I think they make a difference and I think it is

important that

someone else’s life. The week of April 2-6 is peer appreciation week which recog-

es,

nizes and celebrates the 150 stu-

really

in

who work

dents

peer hosts

as peer tutors and

them.” peer service

a

administrator from student servicsaid tutors are students with

good people

and a

skills

lot

of patience.

at the college.

Tutors are paid $10.50 an hour to offer their services to students

five-hour contract within

week

we recognize

Liz McGrath,

on a

a

six-

period.

Students

who need extra help can

“They put in numerous hours on top of their heavy courseloads.”

pick up this low-cost tutor service

Melissa Turner,

for $15.

learning skills adviser

Hosts are students matched up with international students to help

them adjust

Conestoga.

to life at

There are about 25 hosts at the college who volunteer an hour per week. Melissa Turner, a learning skills adviser from student services, said this is a very important week. “We have over 150 peers in our

Drug cost dnd service a concern

“Our

tutors are very people ori-

ented,”

have a

McGrath.

said lot

“They

of academic informa-

tion.”

A

peer appreciation reception will be held on April 4 at 4:30 p.m. in the Blue Room at Conestoga to celebrate

achievements

the

peers at the college.

(Photo submitted)

RECOGNIZE THE SIGNS

students

to

the

at

JOIN PEER SERVICES IN CELEBRATION OF

PEER APPRECIATION WEEK

Continued from Page 1 Harris added that the provider did not offer any additional savings

of

Peer appreciation week, April 2-6, is recognizing 150 tutors and hosts. Some of them are: (left to right) front row, David Poidevin, Ryan Grass, Robert Good and Jung Choi; second row, Sylvia Pladwig, Alex Josic, Beth Gellatly, Andrea Lutchman and Linh Tran; third row, Stephen Potidevin, Sean Campbell, Melissa Bowman, Amy Emmerton and Lyndsay Davidson; fourth row, Huy Nguyen, Tim Benedict, Richard Shim, Gail Cryer, John McDonald, Stephen Lyon and Chris Shaw.

initial

renewal meeting, but made the changes after it found out the CSI

APRIL 2

had spoken with an alternative

-

6,

2001

provider.

CSI would most make a decision at its board of directors meeting on March 28, and any new coverage will take Harris said the

likely

effect in September.

“We best

will

for

go with what we feel is our students,” added

Harris.

HEALTH CARE TIP

A VISION PROBLEMS Sudden

loss

of vision,

particulaHy in one eye or double vision

Sudden weakness, numbness and/or tingling in the face,

arm or leg

TROUBLE SPEAKING Temporary

IMMUNIZATION Immunization armour.

It

is like

protects

a suit of

you from

infectious diseases as long as it is kept up to date. If you are making travel plans to

away land

some exotic

this year,

loss

of speech

or trouble understanding speech

DIZZINESS Unsteadiness or sudden especially with

falls,

any of the above signs

far

plan to see

your doctor or community health nurse before you go.

You may

need some extra protection against disease that

is

country

specific.

Remember

zation

just as important in

is

adulthood as

it is

that

immuni-

in childhood.

HEART

AND STROKE FOUNDATION St.

John Ambulance

INFORMATION DISPLAY AT DOOR 4 APPLICATIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED FOR FALL 2001 POSITIONS


.

Page 8

— SPOKE, April

2,

2001

m

Teaching the early childhood educator Conference workshops help participants refresh By Reni Nicholson

KidsLINK

is

Conestoga College was host to 13th annual eont'erenee for

improving the

lives of children

Bill

and

families.

“The conference gives ECEs a

^early eluldhoocl educators, attended

by about .300 people at the Doon campus March 23 and 24. The event, which has been held at the college every year since the second conference in 1989, is southern Ontario's largest annual conference of its kind. This year's conference. Early Childhood... Where It All Begins, was co-sponsored by the preschool support services program at

chance

knowledge, gain new skills and network with colleagues,” said Judi Neufeld, supervisor and program manager of early intervention services with kidsLINK. to refresh their

Up

speaker

Brantford

who

with

Region of Waterloo’s

affiliates at the college.

to

Parker,

director

workshops were con-

children;

in

family violence

and child abuse; and the role of early childhood education in positive social development for children.

from 4 workmorning and 13 in the

Participants chose in the

1

afternoon.

Bergman, professor of

Sherri

The workshops, taught by univer-

childhood education at Seneca College in Toronto, spoke before the morning workshop session. She spoke about the topic

early

and college faculty from across Ontario, and area child-care consultants and professionals, focused on the development of early educa-

entitled Restoring the Soul of the

tion for children.

Early Childhood Educator.

The

topics

ranged from profes-

sional interest areas such as

his points understood.

stress

shops

sity

has 25 year's experi-

kidsLINK, the Region of Waterloo child-care division and the ECE

the

In-class

a resident of

ence providing motivational speeches and inspiring workshops. He used humour, storytelling, music and fun

make

Mary

ducted March 24.

with Laughter featured

Mike Moore,

services,

child- care division.

Friday night’s schedule entitled Light

knowledge and gain new

Other speakers included Neufeld, Jeffrey, dean of Conestoga’s health sciences and community

a non-profit organi-

zation from St. Agatha dedicated to

tlie

their

program

In

Kent

afternoon,

the

ECE

Billinghurst, an

Windsor, addressed the topic Conquering

lum and program development;

Confliets with Children.

College

Clair

in

By Jody Andruszkiewicz

1

April

Martin Building

1,

responsibilities

for

Conestoga

College.

According to Barry Milner, manager of physical resources at Conestoga, London-based Martin Building Services is a company he feels can take Conestoga to a higher level through its services. Conestoga’s current contract

M&M

with Double expires on

March

1995

Inc.

31

M

Double & M, a London-based company which submitted a bid to the college to retain the cleaning

First-year broadcasting student Kevin Teixeira entertains his classmates while waiting for class to start on the third floor on March 1 5. (Photo by Rent Nicholson)

been working with

contract, has

the college for the past 10 years, but Milner said it was time to

review the needs of the college and to give other companies opportunities to work with the col-

In part lives,

1

,

and

we

and Stress Management

lege.

The new

Stress

discussed that stress

that

Stress

we respond to

April

is

the continual change that

these changes in different

and agencies, and 13

ty resources

retailers including educational toys

and books, and child-care products were available. “If they like you,” said Michael Graves, sales and marketing con-

Palmer Group, a produces the World’s Best Silly Putty, “most times they’ll be willing to try the sultant for the

company

that

product.”

A

crowd constantly surrounded

Graves’ display and

many

ways

we

all

face in our everyday

physically, emotionally and

mentally.

1,

contract runs

from

2001 - March 31, 2006,

with the potential for additional five one-year contracts to be added.

During the college’s pre-qualifyperiod, Martin Building Services, an ISO 9002 certified company, had to meet the criteria ing

A goal is not to eliminate stress but to learn how to manage

it, even use it to help us. Raise your awareness of your stressors and your reactions to them. Don’t ignore your problems.

minimum

of a

of five years expecleaning academic build-

student client services

the

building,

the

ATS

building,

recreation centre as well as

M

Building Services can certainly provide all the services the college is

looking

for.

Milner went further in saying that Martin Building Services, the only ISO certified company to submit a bid, will be able to meet the college’s needs as the school expands because of the company’s ISO certification and its commitment to keeping Conestoga’s Key Performance Indicator ranking in facilities very high. KPI’s are used as benchmarks of excellence for colleges across the province. Before Martin Building Services

was awarded

the

cleaning con-

Milner said the school checked the company’s references and received high praise. Currently Martin Building Services works with Toyota, the Canada Trust tower in London, tract,

Fairview Park mall in Kitchener and Humber and Centennial col-

mum

of 750,000 square feet of

But what Milner are

What can you change? Can you avoid or eliminate the stressors? Are you working too many hours? Is this interfering with your educational goals? Can you reduce the intensity of your reaction to stress? Are you making a difficult

space

in size.

Service’s internal policies.

situation a disaster?

The presentation

is

only 5 minutes in length and worth

5% ofyour grade. all

Having mutually-supportive friendships, setting realistic rather than and being good to yourself all contribute to managing stress. For further assistance, talk to a counsellor in Student Services.

perfectionistic goals

Student Services

(Room 2B02)

Martin

impressed Building

All employees will wear uniforms and carry their own business cards. The equipment used is eSA approved. Employees

Building Services will require a

ees.

job of this size as the company will be responsible for provid-

auditing

said

that

Martin

ing

their

own equipment and

chemicals.

As outlined

in

the

contract,

Martin Building Services will be

A Message from

really

considerable amount of equipment

also

for a

Cut one cup of coffee from your morning routine.

leges.

training programs are lengthy and there is an extensive health and safety manual for employ-

He

take better care of yourself, building your physical and emotional well-

being? Exercise, sleep, nutritional eating and watching what you smoke and drink add to your physical health.

Milner said the reason the contracts are so long is because a company has to have a certain amount of time to amortize over (the course of) a contract.

all

on the Cambridge, Waterloo and Guelph campuses. While Milner said the college received very good service from Double & M, he said Martin

rience

ings in Ontario that were a mini-

the

buildings

Ifyou failed the first test of a course, decide what you can do to increase your chance of success next time.

Can you

confer-

ence participants took the challenge of making the putty.

the early childhood education cen-

Services will assume the cleaning

Coping with

full day of information

the

booths and displays from 1 area education organizations, communi-

tre,

On

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

to

resource

Even the cleaners are ISO certified

Hanging out

Part 2:

addition

learning,

professor at

development; the teaching value of games; new approaches in eurricu-

St.

In

skills

required to clean the main academic building on the Doon campus, the

the woodworking building, employee services building.

They

also

have

process

an in

internal

place

to

ensure quality service. “They provided us with a sense that this company can provide a safe environment for their workers

and our community,” Milner said. “They’re head and shoulders above anything we’ve seen in the industry.”


SPOKE, April

Stratford

campus

introduces

2,

2000

— Page 9

Lucky guy

career counselling program Will assist residents of Perth

County

in

By Kirsten

Kitchener,

Cambridge

gram

Fifield

Conestoga College’s Stratford campus will be home to a full-time

in

choosing career paths

and Guelph, where it is partnered with community colleges who

employment prepara-

deliver the

career counselling program, start-

tion.

ing mid- April.

Conestoga delivers the entire program in Stratford.

The program, which will be fundHuman Resource ed by Development Canada (HRDC), will help residents in Perth County

Leis said the objective of the

program currently

is

to help people

new

who

are

unemployed or underem-

would then be directed to the counselling program for an assessment.” Leis said the college already offers some career counselling courses, but this one

because

is

it

is

special

funded 'by

the

HRDC. “It is also

not as intensive as a

course,” added Leis. “Individuals

choose a career path that is right for

ployed to determine their next

may

them.

steps.

three sessions over the span of a

Kim Way, a facilitator for the employment training readiness and focus, for change programs at the college, has been hired to head up

Way

said she

is

excited about the

reach their career

helping people in their career and

and employment

employment

goals.”

search.

a

great

satisfaction

Kim

when you can help someone reach their career and employment added Way. Andrea Leis set up the career counselling program and is also a manager of Job Connect, a provincially funded program that assists youth between the ages of 16-24 and some adults to obtain employment or job placements. Conestoga delivers the job development portion of this pro-

in

for

Leis said the counselling could

satisfaction when you can help someone

position because she enjoys

“There’s

come

month.”

“There’s a great

the program.

new

only need to

facilitator for

Way,

employment

training readiness

goals,”

and

focus for change programs She added the program

will serve

as a second step for people search-

ing for employment.

“Their

first

step could be going

one of the community'partners, such as the Job Finding Club or Partners in Employment. They to

take the form of one-on-one or

group sessions. “Sometimes people work better in groups when they can bounce ideas off one another.” She added it could also be more efficient to run group sessions, but she won’t know how the program will play out until it gets underway. Leis said individuals could end up enrolling in Conestoga programs after their counselling, but may also go into other college programs or different types of training. “We are not just feeding our own programs,” she added. Although the career counselling program will be based at the Stratford campus, it will also have a satellite location at the Listowel

(left to right), Tanya Lee and Brandon Tschirhart take a break from broadcasting production classes and hang out in the Sanctuary on March 14 (By Jody Andruszkiewicz)

First-year broadcasting students,

Sablick, Tae-in

.

Town

Hall.

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•skill-testing


SPOKE, April

Page 10

“When diabetes

2,

2001

Balladeer cues

enters your

Krauss sings simple and down-to-earth

you need someone to

life,

By Jody Andruszkiewicz

standing on a street corner

Diabetes Association.” Corot Seto, dtetttian

SOMEONE YOU KNOW. CALI CAN«^0!AN oiAseitis

ASSOC SATiOfj

ASSOCSAtJON

OU

DSABfi-tE

www.d!0b«{»s.co

good other forms of music can

Better

be,

song so that you want to

to

repeatedly.

of years ago, Krauss

simple and down-to-earth. It’s not hard to get involved in his songs,

isn’t

preach-

is

telling a great story: his

ouch potatoes, not French fries, may be to

3 How many eat

for obesity. That was the of a recent arycle exploring

title

factors involved in effective

We

’other

"

and lived standing on that comer. While a six-minute song about

fat

really

The

to

body weight, but

understand

Do

With an

active Living

In fact, they are a ‘

and young

teens

maintain

on the

rise.

increased intake of "fast

and

adults

is

junk foods" combined with sedentary lives as a result

of TV, computers and

video games, generation "X"

is

quickly

same with your

the

"Balance and moderation are what need,"

suggests Judy 'Loews,

registered

dietitian

book on

raising

a

and author of a

"weight-wise"

"Nothing we

Loews notes,

kids.

good

claim

to

eat

lifestyle

can

song, and that only enhances the quality of Cueball. In today’s world of one-hit ders and

CDs

Cueball

who

tened to from

As powerful

over the

is

work

that

it’s

the music

make

be challenging.

weight

completes this collection of

abilities.

And

you’d also be doing a

disservice to yourself.

or

activity.

for

of following

low

begin

bj

a

is

low

a

being

30-60 minutes per

the necessary changes,

setting

and

reasonable

Monitor your progress

specific goals. to

off can

and

diet

fat

To make

day.

it

to successful

and maintenance

loss

combination calorie,

The key

measure that the goals you

and

Establishing is

set are

attainable.

healthy habits

essential.

"

says,

"When

otily

one per customer."

it

comes

at

an

As the old adage to bodies, there’s

Your family doctor,

must be eaten

a

registered

in

educator

or

community

fitness

Toronto

helpful

easily relate

folk

in specialist

can

provide

a big difference

helping you reach your weight

goals.

you

I

more

musician Eugene Krauss’s debut CD, entitled Cueball, recalls stories that listeners can to.

loss

lerc are .some ideas to help get

started:

In a journal, record everything that eat

and drink

for the next

Be sure

to include

what you

you

much and 3

3 days.

eat,

following

questions...

1 Did you

eat a variety

2 Did you

eat the

Guide

to

Eat right

how

of foods?

recommended

servings

and

fruits,

ow much? Houf often?

Ask your doctor about a healthier

you 5 grains,

&

paRitapaaion^^

Physic it! Ac tivity

2-3 milk products and 2 meat and alternatives)

Activity

daily

from Canadus

Healthy tutting

(5 vegetables

sical

Exercise too

the time you eat. After the

days ask yourself the

number of

lis-

Not

Krauss’s exceptional story-telling

information. in

needs to be

start to finish.

doing that does a disservice to

as the 54-year-old

Krauss’s lyrics are, that

all

won-

have one decent song while the remainder are filler, that

erences to Canada. But what else could I expect from a musician

has travelled country?

Each musician

doing?

arc

moderation. Making small changes

your

his stories.

tell

brings something special to every

is

into a healthy diet,

fit

.some foods

him

active?

Losing weight and keeping

early age

some foods

for us, while others arc ‘junk.’

All foods can

but

How often were you

1

reasonable, realistic

absolutely perfect or entirely bad. Ifs simplistic

I

days.

physically active for

becoming generation "XL".

we

his

2 How long did you do each activity? 3 Did you enjoy what you were

of obesity in children,

rate

and have

yours. In fact,

Cueball

with your friends)?

how long for 3

dynamic duo.

become

Like his lyrics, the music on is easy and flowing. Krauss has assembled an interesting collection of musicians to help ear.

the food was there, you were out

More

weight gain.

essential to

too.

identify with his lyrics

that they are

hungry or did you

Healthy eating

crucial,

is

frequendy are you eaung?

5 Were you

Record everything you do and

is

retelling all that he’s seen

www.participaction.com

www.pagyidedcom

a

the

eat for other reasons (just because

we have come

a proper

comer

it’s

foods did you

the serious effects of physical inactivity. is

a tale

an engaging song telling about a man standing on a is

that

welcome change. The music accompanying

fries?

high in sugar,

(those

4 How

have long blamed improper

recendy,

The

music heard on the radio

alcohol)?

weight management.

diets for creeping

Perhaps one of the most engaging aspects of his lyrics

found myself smiling as I listened to I-2-T-4 Blues because I could relate to having to pay income taxes. I could also relate to Krauss’s ref-

track.

Nowhere will you hear anything heard on Top 40 stations. In fact, Cueball is so far from the typical

lyrics isn’t harsh or offensive to the

The lyrics to Krauss’s songs are easy and flowing. They gather you in and Krauss masterfully spins

ninth

stories.

ALL ADDS UP!

IT

many

listen

life story

Comer,

the

it

own.

Cueball’s

catchy

way he composes

this

them so that you have dazzling imagery playing in your mind.

Couch potatoes? French

the

Eugene Krauss’s Cueball is a stellar work of folk music. However, unlike other folk artists

Krauss

blame

still is

especially folk.

ing about peace and love. Rather,

PARTICIPACTION

nor-

everything else that has flooded the airwaves, it’s often forgotten how

and

roll

I

CANADSEN!<g

is

mally nothing to write home to mom about, Krauss, who currently lives in Powell River, B.C., makes it easy to listen to such a song.

Amidst the pop, rock and

C

lyrics

Canadian

turn to. Call the

HELP

up

it

YV///V//>


1

SPOKE, April 2, 2001

m

New

man

tech

Doon campus

at

By Jody Andruszkiewicz

proven software

in

WebCT

citing

that 1,700 colleges across the globe

Conestoga College wants

to

be

use

recognized as the top school for

information

Canada and

it

who

Donald,

PhD.

from the

fall

of

Conestoga’s director of educational technology development, is

to

(Photo by Jody Andruszkiewicz)

for the college.

ter.com, an online

sold used trucks,

locations across

based assetcontrol.com, an online asset disposition

company

that auc-

tioned off a company’s assets to the

Before

Canada and

the

United States. Currently,

with

Donald

web course

is

tools

working

(WebCT)

He

said

WebCT is

a

course management software that allows instructors to manage courses,

give online tests and give marks

to students.

Three existing programs at Conestoga use WebCT software, the career development practitioner, human resources management and

courses.

computer programmer, also a two-

However, Donald said one of the problems with this process is the training and education of instruc-

year program.

tors to actually deliver courses in

are

will start

this

way.

But, said Donald, the “college

made

Donald said Conestoga

using

is

This program

is

ties

Hotline centre

now has a new

hotline in place.

as curricu-

lum development. “When you put a course Donald said with respect

It

online,” to cur-

riculum development, “you have to develop the curriculum ahead of for having the

is

easy

to access.

From outside the college phone - 748-3565

time.”

is

these

From inside the college phone - ext. 365

end of the

Springtime studies

Kathy Grant, left and Colleen McDermot, both second-year graphic design students, enjoy the first signs of spring on March 1 9, outside Door 5. (Photo by Reni Nicholson)

370 HIGHLAND ROAD

385 FAIRWAY ROAD

402 KING STREET

W.,

S.,

N.,

KfTCHENER FOOD BASICS PLAZA

KITCHENER CANADIAN

WATERLOO BETWEEN

its

Rec Centre

online access

and bandwidth - as well

courses online

get

The recreation

also helping the

-

to

top notch.”

college by providing funding for the infrastructure

commitment

a

(information technology) capabili-

Food and Rural Rural Job Strategies Program. This program will help Conestoga build and develop 80 online web-enabled courses in

The deadline

technology marketing programs.

when

Twelve courses could be ready by September. Conestoga could have 1 1 0 courses online by the end of this year with the 80 online courses from the Rural Project and the existing 30^ ready.

information technology.

Entrade Inc., Donald worked for seven years at Conestoga-Rovers & Associates as director of information service where he was in charge of developing, installing and maintaining software for the company’s 40

company that and Rhode Island-

said courses will be offered

Affairs

software to develop online courses

Two of the sites he worked on were California-based truckcen-

this soft-

calendar year, but Donald

2001

Agriculture,

John Donald, Conestoga’s director of educational technology development, works on the WebCT software that will be used enable courses to be taken online. highest bidder.

sites.

this

web-enabling (readying these programs to be instructed online) these programs in April and they should be ready by September. All of this work is being done under the Ontario Ministry of

school of information technology and Donald,

manager co-ordinating the development and implementation of business-to-business e-commerce

Canada using

Donald said the college

a

Beginning his job on Nov. 1, last year, Donald came to Conestoga from Entrade Inc., where he worked for one year as the project

across

software engineering technician, a two-year program and

Additionally, Conestoga wants to

create this entity.

offered in 12 differ-

semester that will use

ware

in information technolo-

charged with trying to determine the infrastructural requirements to

is

Some of the full-time programs being prepared for the upcoming

reality.

gy-

create

it

software.

Waterloo, said Conestoga, in line with its goal to create a polytechnic institute, wants to develop applied degree

programs

and

tutions

graduated with a

in civil engineering

University

it

ent languages. There are 187 insti-

technology across hired John Donald to

help bring that goal to

— Page 11

TIRE PLAZA

HARVEYS & BURGER KING

415 HESPELER ROAD, CAMBRIDGE ACROSS FROM MCDONALD'S

744-1 01

893-2464 884-7376 622-7774


!

— SPOKE, April

Page 12

2,

2001

PEER SERVICES RECOGNIZES THE EFFORTS OF THE DEDICATED STUDENTS WHO JOINED OUR TEAM AS PEER HOSTS, PEER TUTORS AND ORIENTATION ASSISTANTS DURING THE 2000 - 2001 ACADEMIC YEAR

Ailauis

Erin Aiikl

Chrb Allen

MarlcH?

Rosamie flaiMian

Enrk’o Bofghcse

Melissa Bow'imn

Borinfo” Yvonne Berewdsen Andrei Brennan

Tanimv

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leMieiie llischan;®!

Mike Cmm^'

Sue Carpam Cdleen Clark .Alan C:4lan^

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tieoedki

Joe Benlfey

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tkdels

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Siclkik BUI# Sliijrri Holing Radiel Hoio

Vidor flinpSerg Edwin Hue

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Stephen Lyiwi

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Tom Malijicmskl

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Susan Micl^ey

Beverly Millisr

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Aogt’la Ravas

Jen Suhdiej

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Jeanino Misengr

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Craig

Fhilana Paidlehm Sylvia

flinJwIg

David Pr«»ai4t Nttman Fashld Julk Sdmurr

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Bqjana Peristc Ehivid IVidcvin

Tina Price

Adam Reed

Clwis

Scagcf Sue Shearer

Bryan

Iknuiie Slelrtman

Rob Stepbenstm

Audrey Lang

l.elgh Twylor

Da^id

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Paul

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Mark Shivers St Amant

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Tammy Iviocfettrodt

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Hinapci^ Peter Huey

Kofeia Landry

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Dupuis Troy Evans Beth Fraser Bedi (joBaily CaJiie Oolder Ryan Cnw#!:

Olitespk Bdbcrt CIuchI

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Brian Clliidi

Frances C^mfsolly

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Evaiis

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Rufh Hill

Amanda Briaod Kdty GiMweli

Amy Emmerlop Alhti# f'u

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Blanchard

Arranda Dillman

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Paulina Frosimp

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Mancy DcsJ»dliis

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lijida

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AJkn

fat

Van Her Wolf

Amy

Vesprini

Brsul Whitctiml

Shaw KmtaSllk

Virginia

Van ChwdiT

Xufocijca

Paula Silva

I

Ihiticauli

flnh

Ike Vcen^ira

Cory WatMRt

Brooke W'eber

YaiHing Zhao

Ping ZtHi

/'weep

THANK YOU FOR A JOB WELL DONE

Digital Edition - April 02, 2001  
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