Page 1

34th Year

Harris

— No. 53

makes

suggestions

board

to By Dwight

feedback from students, who have been transferring, to ensure other

Irwin

Mike Harris, vice-president of academics for Conestoga Students Inc., outlined things he thought the Conestoga College board of governors should consider regarding student government, leadership roles and relationships with students to the board at its meeting, on Feb. 26.

He placed the ideas into four categories: partnerships

and fostering

leadership, transferability of cred-

and standards, communi cation and affordability/accessibility. Under the partnership category,

its

Under the communication

should be constantly seeking student feedback, other than the

Key

Performance Indicators. KPIs are ann ual surveys, which establish benchmarks of excellence at Ontario’s 25 colleges. They are based on independent surveys completed by students,

Conestoga has maintained a No. position two years in a row in the

KPI

surveys.

“Colleges must work work with

their

with their student

student governments to provide

and support leadership opportunities to students,”

Harris told the

board.

Some ways show

the coUege could

for those

is

who

of his other ideas in

aU coUege conunittees and

Two Conestoga College students were nominated for the 2000 Coop Student of the Year Award for

vice-president of academics

at Conestoga College

this

activi-

sponsor students at external

conferences and events and create

rewards and incentives for extracurricular involvement.

“We need

to

encourage student

KPI process

feedback, outside the

bringing their concerns forward,”

munity.

then explained

and responds like

how the colway it manto

student

appeals, complaints,

Policies and procedures should also be reviewed to ensure they

and not outdated. Hanis sympathized with the

are valid

col-

lege because of the funding cut-

PAGE

4

from Conestoga will be given equal opportunity as other students.

The

college must also collect

ing Conestoga’s winners.”

Home, who

is

completing her

work term with Ontario Waterway Cmises as a chef, was shocked and a- little surprised when she found out she was nominated by her employer for the award. “I thought

wow, they

really think

Home

Hardware’s head and continues working there while she attends classes, was extremely honoured when she found out she was nominated for the award. terms

honour the student who wins,” said Linda Hast, co-op advisor. “But we’re honouris to

at

office in St. Jacobs

“I

felt

privileged

that

my

employer would say such great things about me,” said Reed about the letter of recommendation her employer wrote.

Reed plans to stay with Home Hardware as an accountant assistant for her third work term, but

impressed.”

doesn’t

tuition fees.

She said the co-op program has given her the opportunity to do

after she

something different. “The program benefits the

pay for me to get my Certified General Accountant certificate, but I’m getting married in the

ensure college and programs are of high quality.” Harris gives up his seat as student governor when he graduates from Conestoga in April.

are either transferring to or

of a 4-H dairy club. Reed, who has spent two work

knew

students are being given fair credit

who

com-

stressed the college should freeze

“Between 1990-91 and 20002001, tuition fees have increased 132 per cent. Funding is needed

students

the coUege and in the

are

life.

backs it has faced from the Ontario government, but he

must maintain its transferability of credits, from institution to institution and standards to help ensure

way

student at the

“This award

general feedback and guidance.

for programs. That

accounting

Doon campus,

ment at

ages

School shootings

administration

comfortable

if students feel

issues

no longer top news

student at the Waterloo campus, and Stacy Reed, a third-year busi-

ness

is key in Home’s She gives much of her time to the Knox North Easthope Presbyterian Church in Stratford. For the past 10 years she has also contributed her talents showing cows loceilly and nationally as part

Volunteerism

work

He

COMMENTARY

work.

Mary EUen Home, a second-year food and beverage management

being recognized for their achieve-

lege should revise the

Harris told the board the coUege

their outstanding

know if that’s where she would like to stay. “I want to cook and work with food, but I don’t know if I’d want to stay with the cmise hne.” doesn’t

and respond to student concerns in a timely manner. But this can only

Harris told the board.

Mike Harris

co-op students

leadership opportuniMike Harris,

participate with stu-

category are to include students on ties,

dean of

Biil.

College honours By Reni Nicholson

to offer free tuition

dent government, Harris said.

Some

and

Kirsten Fifield)

governments to provide and support ties to students.”

paitnership with student

its

government

right,

student gov-

ernment “Colleges must

CoHege preisident Johni Tibbjts.

the school of health sciences and community services as well as ISO management representative for the college, toast the colleges completion of the final phase in its go^ to become completely ISO certified,' at a mini celebration in the Blue

graduates and employers.

how it fosters how it works with

its

cate-

gory, Harris stressed the college

1

leadership and

transfer to another

smoothly.

Harris said the college should look at

who

students

post-secondary school can do so

if

we

are

to

tuitions are affordable

that highly

dent,

of me,” she

said.

they Uked me, but

the

employer

I

and

“I

was

stu-

the

completes college. has offered to

“Home Hardware

sununer.”

school.”

Home has

know if she’ll be returning

accepted a position as

head cook with Ontario Waterway Cmises and plans- to begin the position in the summer, but she

With a wedding date set for June Reed is unsure of whether she’ll stay home and have a family or 2,

start

a career.


1

— SPOKE, March

Page 2

2001

19,

News Co-op

Nine students nominated

has

raffle

prizes galore By Reni Nicholson

Kitchener.

A

I

In celebration of National

operation

Week,

CoConestoga

mother

disease.

It^;

is

dying from

f

luntinglon

an inherited brain disorder

that is slowly chipping

away

if

they develop the disease, then their

children face those

.

the

may

before

it

disease

- even 25 -

take 10, 15

finally kilts tet.

may not go

odds.

gift

of

mtnher,

I

wanted

to give

Mtat have f done instead?

life.

years

And even then,

to the grata: with

the

But there

is

hope. Recent research

breakthroughs have brought us closer

Iter.

than ever to finding a cute.

You

see,

once you develop Huntington

disease, iherc^ a

will pass the

50

percent chance

you

gene responsible for

Huntington’s along to your children.

And

I Various prizes

With your support, we disease once

and

for

all.

away to co-op students between March 19 and 23. “I’m miming out of room for

Woodworking

working programs I

4 HUNTINGTON t-^;HurvHngton Society of

I

academic

A gym bag full of prizes from

shirts

sweatshirts and

two golf

from the City of Kitchener.

I

An alumni

I

A three-month membership to

the A.R.

services golf shirt.

Kaufman

YMCA

in

to

extra-curricular activities

baskets and dinner for two. gift

The draws

bution

A letter Morming employers of Conestoga co-op students of the opportunity was sent out in the last year and in response nine co-op students were

nom-

by

their

employers

for

inated

will take place dur-

the award, but

each institution

Friday any leftover prizes

win be

the

to

community-at-large; and contribution to co-operative education.

ing National Co-op Week, with two draws taking place each day.

On

at

school; contri-

great response,” she said.

Two

per-

formance; contribution

Hortons.

in

raffled off.

Canada can

only

nominate

two

students.

Therefore,

In the candidates for

CSI

a

mittee

which ran in the March 12 edithe fact that he is a third-year business management student running for CSI president, was left out. Spoke apologizes for the omission. election story

Reed

commade up of Mary Wright,

selection

Clarification tion of Spoke, Jon Olinski’s full

Rcgisfmion MitniW

performance;

Boutillier said everyone has been very generous and willing to donate to the campaign for prizes to give away to co-op students; “We’re doing this to recognize the students and we’ve had a

Conoda

SociSt€ Huntington du Ccinada

Ontario

Centre.

boxes of prizes that have been donated by programs at the college and locjd businesses. Some of the prizes include: I Two gift baskets from Pioneer Park Pharmacy. I A gift pack of coffee from Tim I

included

tions

employment

Prizes include coffee,

hallway.” Boutillier has been col-

Huntingon Socisy of Canada today

We need yeyp help

at the

col-

wood-

the co-op services staff.

me,” laughed Violet Boutillier, a co-op adviser/employer liaison. “Pretty soon I’ll be out in the

will beat this

Please call the

from the

lege bookstore and the

lecting

my

Just like

mind,, her body .her soul.

It

same

at her

dinner for two from the

Waterloo campus dining room.

College’s co-op education services has an office full of prizes to raffle

My

Continued from Page 1 She spends her spare time at the Elmira Pentecostal Church helping with a kids club and tutoring, and plays for a women’s hockey team. Criteria considered for nomina-

manager of student employment, co-op and alumni services and Monica Himmelman, alumni services officer, had the task of narrow-

name and

5i?l6

ing the competition.

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Contest’s odds are deceiving Must be picked from a second draw By Reni Nicholson

main

the

Group

cafeteria, with

Canada

Compass

purchase

Limited.

ballot

Contestants for this month’s con-

Contestants at the college would

Conestoga

also have a better chance of winning the grand prize because of

test in the cafeterias at

College must read further than the ballot

box

to determine the

odds of

wiiming.

The

fine print

on the contest rules

sheet states that contestants

whose

names are selected for the first draw will have the chance to be entered into the draw for the grand

but the college cafeterias didrun the contest for its allotted

But if somebody wants a ballot and he/she isn’t purchasing any-

The

Dooners and main cafeteria state that a combo must be purchased in order signs posted in

thing, the cafeteria staff will give

them At

to receive a ballot.

one.

“It’s

no big

deal,” said Kast.

the end of the promotion, one

name will be randomly drawn from contest that officially began

Feb. 19, but started at Conestoga March 5 and ran until March 16,

two winners will receive Modrobe T-shirts by iceburg.com. Each winner will then be eligible to enter the final draw to win the $5,000 grand prize, which includes an IBM ThinkPad A20 with an Intel mobile Pentium III advertises that

‘The contest rules say that no purchase

computer speaker system and a

necessary, but to

get a ballot

must

someone

write to the

company

to request

one.” John Kast, manager

cafeteria

car-

a T-shirt. Conestoga will draw four finahsts,

is

Compass Group Canada

Ltd. out-

lets.

for wiiming a T-shirt at

Conestoga are double that of most other institutions because the college has two accounts, Dooners and

combos

by posted signs are any baked good and a large hot beverage; aU soups and a sandwich; stir-fry and a beverage; any Harvey’s combo; any wrap or deU sandwich and a beverage; and any pizza and a beverage. “The contests rules say that no Valid

because the college has

For the grand prize draw, only fi nalists who were selected to win a T-shirt have a chance. Finahsts from all of the Compass Group Canada Ltd. retailers will be entered into the final draw for the those

IBM

open to any of the patrons of up to 105 participating contest

outlets.

contestants will be

four T-shirts to give away.

rying case.

The odds

each of the participating

Each of those

declared a finahst and will receive is

processor, Altec Lansing five-piece

The

a free ballot.”

ficult to get

prize.

The

necessary, but to get a

is

this,

in the

computer

someone must write to the company to request one,” said John Kast, cafeteria manager at the college. “It’s just to make it more dif-

n’t

time.

to win laptop

as stated

laptop.

Conestoga cafeterias usually run two promotions a year. The next one will be held during Nutrition

Week, March 19

to 23.

The

cafe-

be posting and distributing pamphlets to students regarding nutrition awareness terias will

Cafeteria cashier Carol

Duby shows the

ballots for

a contest

to

win a laptop.

during the contest.

(Photo by Reni Nicholson)

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Page 4

— SPOKE, March

19,

Coum^tary

2001

Human

When used

rights

sporting

goods

date.

must top agenda College’s agreement with China

sends wrong message Conestoga College president John Tibbits should have thought about the message he was sending on behalf of the college before signing an agreement with Heilongjiang International Tourism and Business College to open a satellite campus in China. The agreement signed on Feb. 13 creates a new division of

Heilongjiang College. Chinese students accepted into the Conestoga division will pursue a one-year English language studies program.

The students will then proceed into the first two years of study in business administration/accounting or business administration/management studies. Students will complete the final year of their studies at

The agreement was signed

Doon campus.

one day after Amnesty and ill-treatment of prisoners and detainees is widespread and systemic in China and the government is not doing enough to fight it. The London-based human rights group went on to say that just

International said that torture

officials perpetrating these

As an

abuses included not only police and prison officers, but also

institute of

tax collectors, family planners,

higher learning, the college’s top priority

neighbourhood watch groups and business security guards.

On

should be to protest ,

^

ment,

.

the

,

individual to have the freedom to speak his/her mind without

U.S. State annual report

Department’s said China’s poor human hghts record worsened during govern-

fear of persecution.

ment’s respect for religious

freedom deteriorated as and Tibetan Buddhists.

By

down on

cracked

it

Christian groups

signing an agreement to open a satellite

China, Tibbits

is

By Reni Nicholson

The shooting

after Tibbits signed the agree-

the rights of an

.....

Feb. 26, just two weeks

Shootings downplayed

sending the message that

campus

human

in

Santana high

at

school in Santee, Calif., on It’s

turned into a competition of top the mass killings of Columbine high school

1999’s

It

seems as though one

kill in

mass numbers, say 12

shooting.

must

Williams, the 15-year-old gunman two students shot dead and the

minds for sometime. Not because they were there or because the

,

13 students injured, in the race for

more to get news coverage. The news networks received a lot

The

local

6 p.m.

of

tury that wasn’t

at

CNN

sec-

on March

broadcast

from

live

Columbine campus for about

television

newscast after the storm of the cen-

shooting

newspaper did such a good job of reporting on the scene, but because

attention.

was broadcast

incident

ond on the

came in second

media

of flak after the excessive coverage

school

have

will

those pictures instilled in then-

the

or

the

Most North Americas

which involved Charles Andy

5,

who can

repetition of school shootings.

March

the three

days. In response to the public out-

CNN

rage at their coverage,

5.

has

rights are

Columbine. In respond, the net-

not a big concern at Conestoga College. As an institute of higher learning, the college’s top priority should be to protect the rights of an individual to have the free-

works have cut airtime for the

newscasts and gaining the majority

rences.

The

increasingly popular school shoot-

of front page coverage in newspa-

are not

enough

’em-up phenomenon, but the pub-

pers across North America were

edge needed to make the public

knowledge of such aggressive

grim pictures of frantic and sobbing

aware of the dangers of sending

occurrences has lessened because

smdents and faculty and disturbing

children to school each morning

of the lack of media play.

pictures

dom

speak his/her mind without fear of persecution. Ensuring these rights at Conestoga is not enough. The college should place these rights at the top of the agenda when signing agreements with other countries. to

In the March 12 edition of Spoke, Tibbits is quoted as saying that he wouldn’t advise people to go over there (China)

and challenge the

political

system or the fundamental premisit would be asking for trouble,

es of Chinese society because just like

anywhere

else.

signing an agreement with a country that Tibbits himself has admitted still has problems with human rights issues, Tibbits

sending the message that Conestoga will look the other way. Chinese students should not be punished for acts committed

by

In 10 years, there have been 19 reports of gunfire at middle

and

high schools in North America, but

none have come close tation that the

April 20, 1999, topping

down

school

like the

the street.

It

has become a

isons.

Which

ing the attention school shootings

networks not giv-

pare to the 12 dead and 23 injured

America don’t have the chance

on one occasion

hear about each and every school

rights record improves.

neither does the

injured.

These numbers don’t com-

at

Columbine, but

news media cover-

age received for each incident.

Spoke

parents, teachers

shooting.

lead

to

and

all

Not knowing

this

type of occurrence.

recognize that acknowledgment of school shootings can only be benefi-

to

cial,

and

that these shootings

won’t

stop because the press has stopped

ignorance and increased

giving them in-depth attention.

SPOKK

is .mainly funded from September to May by a payment Irom Conestoga Students Inc. (CSl) in exchange for the

Keeping Conestoga College connected

SPOKE is published and

produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Dwight Irwin; Photo Editor: Kirsten Fil'ield; Production Manager: Kyla Rowntrec Advertising Manager: Jody Andruszkicwicz; Circulation Manager: Reni Nicholson Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz; Faculty Supervisor: Christina Jonas address

CNN and

Parents and school officials need to

will just

insertion ol advertising in the paper.

The views and opinions newspaper do not necessarily leflect the Conestoga College or the CSL Adverti.sers in SPOKE

expressed

views

Phone. 748-5220,

takes a

news networks have reduced

glamorize

of North

ol

in

this

are not endorsed

SPOKE’S

It

to get the

coverage of such events so as not to

deserve, and children, teenagers,

government but Conestoga College must take a stand human rights, by forgoing all business deals with the Chinese government, until their human their

against the repression of

more than 12

world’s attention because other

publicity.

Because of

11

Santana weren’t enough. killing of

most shocking and

shootings in Canada and the United

and

may

What would it take to get the now? The two deaths at

game of compar-

there have been eight high school

States, totalling six deaths

Columbine

to instill the knowl-

pubhcity

school shooting was

this,

pictures of

breakout that day in their school.

How many

which deserved the most

downplayed similar occur-

with the possibility that gunfire

high

of these pictures are too many?

the worst and

Since the Columbine incident,

since

all

of chaos at what could

have been and looked

to the devas-

Columbine shoot-

ings left behind.

By

is

lic

On

is

ext.

299 Doon Valley

Room

4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. 691, 692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke @conestogac.on.ca Dr.,

tain the

CSl

logo.

arising out ol

by the CSl unless

SPOKE

enors

shall not

their advertisements

con-

be liable for any damages

beyond the amount paid for must be sent to the editor by 9:d() a.m. Monday. Submissions arc subject to acceptance or rejection ami should be clearly written or typed; a in advertising

the space. Ihisolicitcd submissions

MS Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not contain any libellous statements and may be accompanied by an illustration (such as a photograph). WordPerlect or


SPOKE, March

name

Bar’s Surveys

will

19,

2001

— Page 5

be decided by students

to

be located

throughout the college; best suggestion to be chosen By Dwight

With the bar now located in the

Irwin

concourse, the fitness centre will

new

Conestoga’s its first

bar has tapped

keg.

In a small the college

ceremony on March 9, showed off its newest

feature, located in the

concourse of

programs

the recreation centre.

Prizes

who

were also given to students

had distributed 8,500

personal trainers from outside the

facili-

people use at the rec centre and what improvement they would like ties

to see.

Craig,

student,

compliments

a

first-year

won

a fridge,

Molson

of

Breweries, Jeff Foster, a first-year accounting student, won a hockey

bag and a sweater and Nicole Caldwell won a quartz wooden desk clock. Tony Martin, development manager for athletics and the recreation centre, praised staff at the rec cen-

hard work and dedicamaking it possible for the new pub to open on time. tre for their

tion, in

“(Recreation centre maintenance manager) Peter Schlei and his crew have been fabulous. TTiey’ve really gone above the call of duty in making sure this thing got ready in time,” Martin said.

The new bar has yet to be given a name. Martin said he is leaving the name of the bar up to students. Flyers have been distributed throughout the college and students can return their suggestions to the recreation centre.

suggestion will

become

of Conestoga’s

new pub.

add to the pub atmos-

phere.

Tables have been set up in the

concourse and along the windows overlooking the gymnasium and ice surface to allow bar patrons to

enjoy watching Conestoga’s varsity teams play.

The bar also features a revised menu, which offers hot dogs and a new sandwich menu, to go along with the alcohol

“The food Martin

The

is

it

what each program has to offer, limes for workshops are posted at the recreation centre.

Tony Martin,

development manager for athletics and the recreation centre, presents first-year with a fridge, courtesy of Molson Breweries. Jeff Foster, middle right, a first-year accounting student, receives a hockey bag and a sweater, courtesy of the Toronto Maple Leafs, from Peter Schlei, the maintenance manager of the recreation centre. Missing is Nicole Caldwell, who won a quartz wooden desk clock. The students won the prizes for filiing out recreation centre surveys, which were posted around the college. (Photo by Dwight irwin) left,

LASA student Heather Craig

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ping-pong table, pool table and video games are also situated in the concourse with the new bar. There will also be three televi-

serves.

going to be a

lot bet-

said.

bar’s hours are 11 a.m. to

Monday to Saturday. Martin said the bar might stay open later than 11 p.m. if business is good. 11

During the week of March 19, workshops will be held to give

free

the

A

ter,”

college.

students the opportunity to see

Heather

sions to

yoga and

boxing. Each program will have

surveys to determine what

LASA

like self-defence, Tai chi,

aerobics, karate, judo,

survey forms. The

filled out

rec centre

room where the Condor Roost was previously. It’s slated to open in September. That opens up the former fitness centre area for more specialized relocate to the

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Page 6

— SPOKE, March

19,

2001

New CBSA

AL LOGAN AWARD APPLICATION FORM -

Conestoga College would

like to

executive elected

honour a student who:

warm and

*

has demonstrated a

*

has demonstrated initiative and leadership

*

has been available to help and support others

*

has a sense of humour!

caring attitude

By Jody Andruszkiewicz It

took less than 60 minutes to a new executive for the

elect

Conestoga

Business

Association on March

Students 8.

Class representatives elected the

incoming executive, though only two positions - president and treasurer - for the election were

NOMINEE

contested. Candidates for the other

ADDRESS

four positions on the

CBSA

were

acclaimed to their positions. The incoming president is Joe

TELEPHONE NUMBER

Bentley.

Currently, Bentley, 24, serves as the vice-president of the

PROGRAM AND YEAR

CBSA.

NOMINATED BY

During his speech, the secondyear computer programmer analyst

(CP/A) student said he wants to improve the CBSA for next year.

EXTENSION

One of

the initiatives Bentley

said he wants to

work on

is

seminars for business

PROGRAM

having

students

where guest speakers would come and speak to students about what’s going on in the world of

in

SIGNATURE OF NOMINATOR

business.

Bentley defeated first-year

DATE

student Jordan

Gage

as president of the

win

CP/A

his seat

CBSA.

TTie seat for vice-president

went

A

first-

uncontested to

CP/A

year

ALL NOMINATIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 2001 IN THE STUDENT SERVICES OFFICE ROOM 2B02

to

Ben

Mills.

student. Mills, 21, said

one of his goals is to get the word out about the

CBSA so more class repre-

more meetings. “The CBSA is not some acronym for an answer to a trivia question,” he said, saying that executives on the CBSA have to go to the first year classes and talk up the organsentatives attend

NOTE: PLEASE STATE YOUR REASONS FOR NOMINATING THIS CANDIDATE

ization.

Jessika Kunkle,

currently run-

ning the promotions portfolio for the

CBSA, was

same

acclaimed to the

position.

Kunkle, a second-year accounting student, said she wants to in during the

summer

to

major events.

Continued on Page 7

Want to know more about government services •

Looking

Starting your

Getting access to the Internet

for

a new^ job

own

business

• • •

for

you?

Taking parental leave Planning your retirement Making your home energy efficient

Learn more about the hundreds of services available. Call us and an agent in person. Visit our Web site. Or drop by the

talk to

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1 ^

800 0"Canada (

1

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come

set

up


SPOKE, March

News

19,

2001

— Page 7

Four students acclaimed to jobs A

Continued from Page 6

dent,

One of the problems Kunkle lined in her speech

was

timing for events was

off.

out-

that the

She men-

second-year accounting stuHome said she needed to be

more involved

and in her hoped she improve student

at school

position, she said she

could be able to

tioned the beach party and said

life.

even though free leis were given away on the Monday of the week of the party,' by the time the day of the party arrived on a Thursday, the beach party was forgotten about. Kunkle, 24, also said it was hard being thrown into her job after she took over the position. In the other contested spot on the CBSA executive, Emily Home, 20, defeated incumbent Matthew Lavert to be elected as the new

During her speech. Home said one of her goals was to keep things up to date.

treasurer for the

CBSA.

and be serious.” For the position of computer liaison, incumbent Adam Kowalyk, 21, was acclaimed to his position.

The second-year CP/A student was really looking forward

said he

CP/A

First-year

student Jerry

Roux was acclaimed munications

position

CBSA. The

com-

to the

with

the

Roux

to

spending a fall year with the executive and that he was

CBSA also

looking forward to getting

more

class reps out to

CBSA meet-

ings.

In his speech,

Kowalyk

also said

delivered a light-hearted speech

one of his goals was to finish the CBSA Web site and bring more

but said he

traffic to the site to

20-year-old

felt

munication

he had strong comand is a solid

skills

He

team worker. “All joking aside,” he said, “I

know when

to get

down

to

work

generate

some

The new CBSA Ben Mills, Joe

cash inflow. also said he

wanted

to

work

with computer services to get better computer upgrades for the CBSA.

.

(front)

Adam

executive (back, Bentley, Jessika Kowalyk,

to

left

Emily Horne, Jerry Roux and

right):

Kunkle,

(Photo by Jody Andruszkiewicz)

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: A Healthy Lifestyle mmammni The pressures of school can of themselves and the need

easily cause students to lose the balance

between taking care

to put their best efforts into succeeding acad«nically.

all make demands on us which can cause But there are ways to maintain our health and keep an equilibrium between competing demands on our time and energy. Scheduling in time for

School, part-time jobs, family and relationships stress

and

stress-related illnesses.

may mean reserving several hours a week for a fitness activity we enjoy. We need fiiends we can talk to about personal matters and daily life, and people to just “hang self-care

out” with and do something purely for fun.

We need to

with time for relaxation and quiet reflection. Getting eight hours of sleep nightly, eating

I-888-3345M idecom

at

least

feel

comfortable in being alone,

one

hot, balanced

daily,

maintaining appropriate body weight and monitoring our use of alcohol, caffeine and

tobacco are choices that will help us live longer and prevent

illness.

Living a healthy lifestyle will also help now, by boosting concentration, stamina. Having a balanced, healthy lifestyle helps us feel

more

A Message from

Student Services (Room 2B02)

Quality Policy Conestoga College continually seeks opportunities for improvement to Conestosa

meet and exceed the needs of our students, employees

memory and

relaxed, in control of the

present and our future direction.

College

meal

and communities.


Page 8

— SPOKE, March

“And

19,

2001

this

News year’s award goes

Conestoga students have mixed opinions on myriad By Jody Andruszkiewicz

^

Everywhere you look, in the newspapers, on the radio and especially on the television, there is a woman barely clothed with some

man

well-dressed

down

following her

a long red carpet.

That means its awards season and the world is waiting to hear

who won

casting student, said he watches

awards shows because there’s always something interesting going on, from celebrities in conflict (the Eminem and Christina Aguilera and conflict at the 2000

some-

“Even

if I

wouldn’t watch them.”

said, “I still

Tim

did have cable,” she

Lichti, a

songs) to what celebrities

the entire thing.

management

are

vey

stu-

also

the awards

shows because in

bits

the

media

Students Inc.,

she

said she does-

Hill,

watch awards shows all that much.

a

The second-

student,

year manage-

said he doesn’t

ment

movie

necessarily

student

watch

the reason she

crazy things.” Lichti

also

Lichti

said he likes to

Doon campus

broadcasting

see bands perform at these shows.

program.

Kathleen Deschamps said she watches awards shows because

Peer Services

awards

shows, but rather

Application deadline to request tutoring Is April 1, 2001

studies

said

does

watch them is to see who’s the most naked. “The only thing entertaining is what they (celebrities) wear,” she

he flicks between the shows and anything else that’s

Hill

said.

Condors compete soccer regionals

in

By Reni Nicholson

IMPORTANT REMINDER

circus.”

n’t

studies

do

easy

Conestoga

in

curious to see stars

pretty

it is

Tracy Evans, current vice-president of student life for

second-year

of Conestoga College on March 8, student opinions regarding the

Second-year police foundations

new

Andrew

“I’m kind of

es

he’s

what’s

shows get

a bunch of hoopla,” Hill

“It’s

said. “It’s a

“I love seeing

student,

television at the time.

said awards

boring and are stacked so to guess who will win.

life.

third-year mar-

said.

Durdle

Durdle

She also said doesn’t have cable so she can’t watch them.

first-year

and pieces of an awards show, but not

in

sur-

the

journalism student said awards shows are an escape from the stresses of real

The

fashion,”

random at

watching them.

on the

He

said he’ll watch

over

said he watch-

of

ing.

...”

awards shows

of

they are interest-

Awards

what they do. During a

dents

said

keting

wearing.

at

Deanna McCormick

student

she doesn’t watch these shows because she’s not interested in

Grammy Eminem’s

has just

best

March was mixed. Mike Durdle, a third-year broad-

lyrics

thing for being the

myriad of awards show that hit the airwaves during February and

to

Conestoga College’s indoor soccer teams participated in regional

Dietz, Maansson and Alfred Maikano. “(The team) had a lot of heart and spirit this weekend. I’m really

tournaments on March 9 and 10.

pleased with

The men’s team showed their skills, winning three of four games at Redeemer University College in Ancaster, while the women’s team

Jamie Scott and Ohver Kopilas were star players scoring over half of

couldn’t get the winning edge during Friday and Saturday’s meet at

Canadore College

The men

m North Bay.

lost their first

game

6^3

on Friday, though Jamie Scott scored two goals and Peter Maansson scored one. ' The playing system he had set to

St.

Clair College

out for the

game wasn’t working,

coach Geoff Johnstone said. Johnstone said the Condors had to dig deep after losing the first game to come back in the second to belt the host team. Redeemer, 7-2. Oliver Kapilas scored three times, while Scott shined through

again in this

two

game with another Ambramovic and

goals. Ivaca

Sheref Sherefali also scored. Saturday’s first game saw the Condors win 5-1 against Mohawk College, with yet anothe^two goals from Scott. Rob Dietz, Maansson and Lev Sherifal each contributed a point towards the Condors’ win. In

the

final

game

against

Niagara, the Condors nudged their

way

to a 3-1

win with goals from

how

they did.”

the team’s goals in the tournament.

The women’s team started off even with a 1-1. tie against the home team, Canadore. Melinda Wilkinson scored the lone Condors goal. The referee was calling a free kick rule that isn’t a regular ruling. “The ruling gave the game a slow We had maybe

stop-and-start pace.

five minutes of play because of the rule,” she said.

The rule was omitted after Den Haan and a coach from another team argued

it.

Nipissing defeated the Condors 2-0 in the women’s second game

and they

lost their third

game

College 8-2. Teresa Hussey and Vanessa Laye scored for the Condors. Den Haan said the Condors gave their best effort and played their best

all

weekend during the first game against Humber.

half of the

She said she knew Humber would be the team to beat going into the tournament.

“A few unlucky bounces and a missed penalty shot can really cost you a game.”

Attention:

Don’t get caught

maze, a tutor may be able to help you through the semester

Native and

in a

Applications available in Student Services

Rm. 2B02

li/letis

Students

would like to hear from you. am researching the need for cultural and educational services for our Native and Metis students. Please drop by room 2A109 to pick up a questionnaire or e-mail me at knixon@conestogac.on.ca. I

to

Humber

I

Thanksll Kelly Nixon, College Counsellor

Digital Edition - March 19, 2001