Page 1

34th Year

We’re ISO

certified,

aimost

By Tammy Somerville

very proud that we’ve done We’re happy,” said Tibbits.

be completely

to

certified.

Auditors from KPMG, an exterauditing company, reviewed

Toyota, are also

nal

and

assessed

the

college’s

The ISO sets definable and documented standards for consistency and quality for businesses

to fol-

low.

Conestoga will get the final word in four to six weeks, after KPMG assesses the review by its auditors. been turned certification

after

Tibbits said the college has

well in

John

Conestoga College’s president (left), KPMG assessors Joe Beingessner and Carolyn Macdonald and Bill Jeffrey, dean of the school of health sciences and community services and ISO management representative for the college, are all smiles Feb. 26. After their final ISO registration audit Beingessner and Macdonald announced Conestoga will be recommended for certification. (Photo by Tammy Somerville)

Some

students

received

an

unwelcome Valentine’s Day present when their cars were broken into Feb. 14.

A total

of five Japanese and for-

windows smashed and car stereos stolen eign import cars had their after

an unprecedented crime spree

across

A1

Doon campus Hunter,

supervisor,

parking

security

said

the

lots.

services break-ins,

which occurred in lots 1, 2, 3, 4 and 11, happened between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. “In each instance, someone broke a window to get access and in each instance it appears the thieves were after stereo equipment or CD

'nfe'

.

‘Mf

-.a

excellence

at

Ontario’s 25 colleges. Estabhshed two years ago by the Ministry of

Training,

Colleges and KPIs are based on independent surveys completed by students, graduates and employers. Conestoga has maintained a No. 1 position two years in a row. Continued on Page 6 Universities,

college cars

a car alarm they hear. doesn’t look right, give us a

it

call. If it’s nothing, then great. We’ll never treat anyone as being over zealous.”

Three vehicles have been stolen

from Doon campus parking

lots

since Jan. 4. ’95 General Motors pickup, a ’93 Chevrolet Blazer and a ’97

A

Chevrolet pickup were stolen between Jan. 4 and Jan. 17.

lots in the area

may

also have been

Conestoga security services

is

any more break-ins by adding addi-

“We

also want to inform stu-

and staff to keep a look out for suspicious people,” thieves

bers of the college conununity to in

this

most

be aware break-ins do happen,

some of the students were from out of town and had to get home. Security services helped some patch up their windows with blankets and tape,

anyone sees people hanging let us know. The more pairs of eyes and ears there are out there,” said Hunter,

Ken

enough

“the safer the college will be.”

tow one

Everyone at the college is encouraged to trust their instincts, even if it

their

recent case,

be able to drive home because the weather was really bad that day.” to

of

hit.

were pretty brashy. Everyone should know that these things don’t just happen after hours and after dark.” Security services wants all mem-

“Unfortunately

establish

benchmarks

always

notified of the incidents because of

said Hunter. “In this instance the

vehicles,”

“If

hit

is

the possibility that other parking

spots spread over 12 parking lots.

said Hunter.

one of the most impor-

(KPI) surveys, but there

room for improvement. KPI annual surveys

corridor

The

them have been student

is just

things for

done

Indicator

probably see more of this type of crime.” Waterloo regional police were

dents, faculty,

occurred on opposite

“I think

number of

Key Performance

“We’re right off the 401. Most colleges along the 401

value.

thefts

we

said Hunter.

tional patrols.

“We only had one break-in this year before this instance and all of

what's that smell? PAGE 4

were on their way home. Hunter said he believes the thieves were not part of the college community. The location of Conestoga makes it an easy target,

Hunter added most of the equipment stolen were JVC models, but he was unable to give the total

sides of the campus’s 130 acres.

Oooooh,

Heavy, wet snowflakes blanketed Waterloo Region during the day and snow continued to fall through rush hour, when most students

taking additional steps to prevent

college has 3,000 parking

will mean a the college.

Day vandals

changers.”

The

COMMENTARY

Tibbits,

being recommended. John Tibbits, Conestoga’s prcsident, said being ISO 9001 certified

Valentine’s By Tammy Somerville

that

of students for and they also give considerably as far as donations.”

for certification.

dards.

certified.

train a lot

Standards Organization documentation Feb. 26 and despite four minor non-conformances, the college will be rec-

Non-conformances are things that do not comply with ISO stan-

ISO

“These are companies

International

ommended

feel this.

From a marketing point of view, being certified is important because many of the companies Conestoga deals with like ATS and

the first educational institution in

ISO

We

tant things is the pride.

Conestoga College completed the final phase in its goal to become North America

— No. 51

although they are rare. “If

around, they should

Corbett, tow truck driver for Becker Bros. Towing, prepares to of the cars

broken

into Feb. 14.

A total

windows smashed and stereo equipment

of five cars

had

stolen.

(Photo by

Tammy Somerville}


Page 2

— SPOKE, March

5,

2001

College and McMaster

Conestoga women join male-dominated world of skilled trades women on

By Sanja Musa

the first information

was higher than expected. She said a lot of women were concerned about the math component of the program, but they were also

enter into partnership Nursing gets four-year degree program

session

Conestoga College is one of the seven community colleges in offers the that Ontario Manufacturing Technology for Women program to women who are striving for a better and more, secure financial future and are Manufacturing Tfechnology for is a pre-apprenticeship

Women training

program

initiated

Ontario

Women's

Directorate and

Automotive

the

Manufacturers’ prepare

the

Parts

Association

women

to

for careers in the

manufacturing industiy because of the significant shortage of

women

in

male-dominant

the

environment of skilled

The

shortage

is

trades.

especially felt in

trades such as tool

and die makers,

mould makelectricians and

general machinists, industrial

ers,

of

opportunity to get into the trade areas without paying a tuition fee

interested in technology trades.

by

women were

very enthusiastic about being offered an lot

interested in the pro-

an equivalent education to enter the program, said Barlow.

“Of course, they

‘They had to be interested in working

also had to be

working in trades and

technology areas,” slie added. Applicants also had to complete a participation question-

and mathematics, English and mechanical reasoning tests. Based on the assessment of the

naire

trades and technology areas” in

Lynne Barlow, co-ordinator of the

manufacturing technology for

women

tests,

only a certain number of the

applicants was’ ’imTte3~W Teltitti for a personal interview.

30 weeks of the Doon campus

Barlow said

that

class studies at

consists of courses such as safety,

skill and theory-based work and a higher level of expectations in

The

been partnership has formed with McMaster University

now

that

The four-year nursing

in

integrated degree

be

will

offered

as

McMaster University

the dean for the

Jeffrey,

munity services, said, “the college is very happy to have McMaster as a partner because they are an actually

is

a

the graduating stu-

cal applications, prints, standards

of Applied Arts and Technology in Barrie, Niagara College in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Fanshawe College in London, St. Clair College in Windsor and Mohawk College in Hamilton also the Manufacturing offer Technology for Women program. The Ontario Women’s Directorate funds the full-time programs for 20 women in the industrial electrician program at

and code, personal assessment and career planning skills and employment skills and strategies. To complete tlie program, students must also complete 600

honours level, like all nursing programs, and the degree will be granted by MeMaster. Conestoga

and another 20

Kitchener

in the tool

and die/

general machinist program at the

Guelph campus. The full-time programs, which consist of 30 weeks of class smdies and 20 weeks of paid work placements, are to start on March 12. Applicants were offered free information sessions at both

Doon

exemption test and to enrol in the second year of

tunity to write an

the five-year apprenticeship pro-

gram, said Barlow.

However, the biggest benefit will gain after completion

The

lies

starting salai

7

in

a

more

levels in

man-

be a

and 27. According to Lynne Barlow, coordinator of the Manufacturing Technology for Women program within the School of Trades and Conestoga at Apprenticeship College, the turnout of about 40

services

$10 an hour, Barlow said.Howlot higher.

0 years, they will The women will

1

have an opportunity to earn about “If they continued to

work

at

Wendy’s or at some other similar they would probably also earn $10 now,” said Barlow.

job,

“But that wouldn’t

is

up

to

into the

you and

have time

Use

incrca.se

all

for

Unfortunately, students will have

pay about $3,800 to $4,000 in which is double the tuition for the diploma mirsinff program, to

tuition,

change,

have at least one course in English, one in math, two in science and two other courses of the student’s choice.

Jeffrey said.

Admission requirements will also change as the college will need students to have at least six OACs to enter the program,

They

will

have

Final

said Jeffrey.

to

is

Exams

to sulk or to

smdy. Whether to become How you use your time and

will determine your level of success or failure.

exam period with your eyes wide open, you need

to

know:

each subject.

Ask your faculty for help and information about the exam. Avoid common mistakes: • over-studying for the first exam and running out of time and energy • working hard for the course(s) you like and neglecting others; not starting early enough, leaving too

little

office, or attend

one of our workshops:

“Preparing for Final Exams” workshop (date time

room)

much

time working

in

various areas of

the skilled trades.”

A Message from

Student Services (Room 2B02)

for the others;

exam week. exams, come to the Student Services

time during

like assistance in preparing for final

as

in five or 10 years as it will they spend the same period of

areas;

sources of help available to you: old exams, classmates, study groups, class

would

class-

Expecting nurses to have degrees not new, said Jeffrey. It has been discussed for about 35 years. The standards are going up in all nursing programs and paramedic programs because increased skill and knowledge are at a higher requirement than ever before,

Jeffrey said.

review time, text notes or highlighted sections, text summaries and chapter questions.

If you

to enlarge

more

The Council of the College of Nurses of Ontario and the government is in favour of all nurses having degrees instead of diplomas and that is the reason for the

• what percentage of your final mark the exam covers. About three weeks before exams start, mark the times and locations of each exam on a calendar. For each course, list what you need to study and the sources you will use (textbook, class notes, lab. assigmnents). Estimate the amount of study time you will need and indicate study periods on the calendar. By planning ahead, you know you will

$5{),0(X) to $6(),0(X) a year.

if

have

ing the field.

what format the exam will have (multiple choice, essay, short answer);

ever, after five or

campus on Feb. 6 and 7 and at the Doon campus on Feb. 13, 21

of health sciences

what material will be covered with emphasis on which

ous manufacturing occupations.

Guelph

dean for the school

women

will

have to get a degree, but will have to prove they can meet nursing standards once a year after enter-

explored job opportunities in varisessions were

Conestoga

women will have an oppor-

gram,

ufacturing occupations are about

college’s

Jeffrey said.

enlightened or to remain in the dark, hoping for the best.

energy

sci-

ences before entering Conestoga,

meet some of the instructors, learned about work placements and

the

of university courses in health

After completion of the pro-

nent jobs.”

secure financial future, she added.

at

facility.”

and community

Whether to panic or to prepare. Whether

To go

to

from high schools. Then, smdents will need one year

how many exams you have and in which subjects; when, where and for how long they are scheduled;

received a description of the types

The information

-

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

of the program

held

at the

when

will

and Guelph campuses, where they of courses taught, had a chance to

(BScN)

have

enrolled at Conestoga will not

University,

The degree

only

will

OAC courses until 2003, the OAC year is eliminated

educational

three-way deal with McMaster

offered again after this year.

Students acquire

are an accredited

Bill Jeffrey,

Conestoga and Mohawk College and together it is going to form a very strong nursing program relationship because all three schools have solid programs, he added. Conestoga already has a diploma nursing program, which will not be

before, he added.

program, he said. Conestoga will enroll between 80 and 100 nursing students this September and 80 to 100 more nursing smdents in January 2002. The nursing students currently

accredited educational facility.”

The partnership

for

courses

rooms and rebuild the science lab to accommodate the new nursing

partner because they

school of health sciences and com-

OAC

have

to

the skills lab, acquire

“The college is very happy to have McMaster as a

along with Conestoga faculty. Bill

Exam

for the degree graduates.

instructors

Training in Burlington, Georgian

in

will help prepare

graduates for the revamped

Canadian National Nursing

Conestoga College’s Doon campus

science in nursing

Doon campus

These classes

at

mentation and electronics, practi-

the

elective classes.

that will start in 2005, the first year

Centre for Skills Development and

be offered assistance in finding job placements,” Barlow said. “I will be monitoring how die women are doing at their job placements. There will be ongoing support, so that the 20week placements turn into perma-

higher levels of nursing

ing in 2005.

dents will earn will be a bachelor of

“Women

statistics,

the

registered nurses

rnatfiematics, trade tlieoty, instru-

hours at paid work placements.

will

students

courses in science, research and

must have a degree instead of a diploma startall

Besides Conestoga College, the

College

more

ship.

will travel to Kitchener to teach

Women

include

ing

and

gram had to be at least 16 years old and had to have Grade 12 or

degree

in nurs-

For the first time in the college’s Conestoga will be starting a fully integrated degree partner-

for the nursing program,

their previous education.

The college could never ask

be recognized on the degree.

The bachelor of science

for the program,” she said. “Most of them were also quite amazed when they saw the shop because it involves a lot of high technology, computerized learning assistance.” According to Barlow, the prerequisites for enrolment in the program were the women’s age

interested in

industrial millwrights.

will

history,

enthusiastic.

“A

By Derek Lester


SPOKE, March 5, 2001

Knti^rtatnineQt

Sex By Sanja Musa

ality differently,

Sue Johanson, who doesn’t hesito talk about any aspect of human sexuality, proved once more to be a top-class entertainer when she appeared at Conestoga College’s Sanctuary on Feb. 13. Johanson, a registered nurse and host of the Sunday Night Sex Show which was launched in 1995 on Women’s Television Network, has been talking to Canadians about sex tate

for close to

She

30

Sue

with

female partners explore ways on their own.

know it feels good,” she said. “But girls incorporate par-

into a relationship, her partner

because they

words into their behaviour.” Johanson said parents make mis-

ents’

takes

when

they don’t encourage their children to explore their sexu-

can talk openly about sex to anyone children.

“Sexual feelings are normal, natu-

and healthy,” Johanson said. “However, parents make boys feel ral

like perverts if they are exploring their sexuality.”

Parents go even a step further when they give their daughters a

lesson on sexuality, she said.

“Nice

don’t do that. They are from gpys,” said Johanson

girls

different

referring to the parents’ advice to their daughters.

However, male and female children accept the first lesson on sexu-

I

don’t give

damn what you do, but my children won’t

At first, Johanson said, male and female children react similarly to

newly discovered sexual feelings don’t comply with parents’ concept of morality and proper behaviour.

my

else but to

a

first

as other parents.

when they discover early in their lives

children because their

woman

a huge fuss about

brings a vibrator

it,”

do

it.”

makes

she said.

Johanson also told the 150 students attended the event a story about an incident when the airport security

who

an electronic pen

that they are sexual beings.

their

a

same mistakes

at

their newly discovered sexuality and both equally like to explore ways to achieve sexual pleasure. However, Johanson said, parents soon try to plant the seeds of guilt

“When

contours” was actually

I

show

their

to achieve sexual fulfillment

ality, but make sex a taboo topic. Yet she admitted she has made the

years.

started off her sex

and educational

fun

“Guys hsten, turn away and fprget what their parents just told them

Conestoga College by comparing the reaction of male and female children

into

Johanson added.

thought her sex toy called “natural

some kind of

eraser.

She didn’t fail to give advice to male side of the audience. She told the men that each of them has on average 500 milhon hyperactive sperms and commented, “It is enough to populate the whole world. So guys, don’t worry.” Students had an opportunity to write their questions for Johanson and put them in a box when they the

Sue Johanson,

entered the Sanctuary prior to the

Sunday Night Sex Show host

show. Johanson answered all of the about 20 anonymous questions.

“I’m a mother of three children and I am imposing my moral values on my daughter. It didn’t really

Although laughter was heard throughout almost the entire show, the Sanctuary grew silent when

work with my

Johanson answered one of the questions on sexually transmitted

sons,” Johanson said. can talk openly about sex to anyone else but to my children. I don’t give a damn what you do, but my “I

children won’t do

diseases.

“Chlamydia sexually

it.”

is

the

most common

transmitted

disease,”

Johanson seamlessly switched the topic and gave the female side of the audience some advice on how to

Johansoa said. “It is almost epidemic. There are no physical symptoms of the disease, but it causes

achieve sexual pleasure.

permanent

“Females are responsible for

own

sexual satisfaction,” she expect men to know' what brings women sexual pleasure.” their

said. “It’s unfair to

However, she reminded woilien that

men

usually don’t like

when

— Page 3

women.

sterility in

both

men and

A real cure for this disease

Su 0 Johanson, host of the Sunday Night Sex Show, discussed various sexual aids with Conestoga College students during her

show their

want the students to know what they are doing and to plan “I

the Sanctuary Feb.

actions

ahead,”

1

According

to

some

studeiits’

opinion, Johanson succeeded in getting her message across.

“The show was entertaining, but was also informational,” said Mike Maxwell, a third-year marit

(Photo by Sanja Musa)

3.

said

Johanson. “I also want them to always practise safe sex.”

hasn’t been found yet.”

Johanson said the entire show actually carried a serious message for Conestoga students.

in

keting student.

Bob

Smith, a second-year wood-

working technician student, echoed Maxwell’s opinion. “It was fun and educational at the same time,” he said while Rachel Butcher, a second-year law and security student, nodded her

head

in approval.

Conestoga College fi

Quality Policy Conestoga College continually seeks opportunities for improvement to Conestoga College

[j

meet and exceed the needs of our students, employees

and communities.


Page 4

— SPOKE, March

5,

2001

Drunk drivers are responsible who make mistakes

Citizens

should pay the price When

a person

drunk from an

awarded $300,000 for driving home it smacks of something disturb-

is

office party,

ing.

Linda Leigh Hunt of Barrie must be laughing. Recently awarded $300,000 from the Ontario Superior Court for an incident in 1994, she

her

own

is

now only 75

per cent responsible for

actions.

In 1994, the Sutton Group Incentive Realty of Barrie, of which she was an employee, held a Christmas party with an open bar. Hunt helped herself to enough alcohol to acquire twice the legal limit in her bloodstream, and then drove home. Of course, not before she and a few co-workers drove to a local bar for a few more drinks. After leaving P.J.’s Pub, she continued her drive home.

That is, until she lost control of her vehicle in the slippery conditions and veered into oncoming traffic, hitting a truck.

The Ontario

No one told Hunt to No one told

her to drink to

No one

told

her to drive home. She made all those decisions on her own. She should

that

of her

Life stinks.

everything else from frozen french

Well

least

fries to

her former employer holding the bag for $300,000. Think on that ruhng. The Superior Court awarded

parts of

any-

bottles should

driving drunk. The. Superior Court told her, and all of us, that she wasn’t completely at fault for her own for

consequences

of those decisions.

actions.

They

Get a whiff of this

out of business, that leaves

Linda Leigh Hunt $300,000

then be responsible for the

Court

employer and the pub were equally responsible for 25 per cent of her damages. But since the pub has since gone

drink.

excess.

Superior ruled

and us, that she wasn’t completely responsible for the consequences of those actions. Consider if someone other than she had been injured in that accident. She might have been awarded $300,000 for injuring someone. told her,

a sad testament to our society when citizens are not expected to take responsibility for their own actions. Hunt is merely the latest example of what is wrong with our little comer of the world. No one told Hunt to drink. No one told her to drink to excess. No one told her to drive home. She made all those decisions on her own. She should then be responsible for the consequences of those decisions. But no. Not according to our Superior Court. But Hunt is not the problem, she is merely a symptom, and she is someone who quite intelligently took advantage of a flawed system. The problem lies not with Hunt, but with a legal system that awards people for escaping responsibility. It has failed us and it failed her by allowing her to believe she v^sn’t totally at fault for her own actions. Citizens who make mistakes should deal with them like responsible adults. But that’s just it. We are no longer a society of responsible adults. It is

at it

walk

Ever

down the way and

Calvin Klein, Roots or Oceanus.

think

o 0 0 o h

Christmas

thrown

,

but

gift,

out.

it

I

to the

gym

and get

It is

haven’t

I

keep saying to

myself that someday

that

Or go

smell?”

I’ll

wear

products, sells plenty of Oceanus

our bodies, savouring them.

sweat

exploded You’re

but smells like a

at all,

cologne

of

bottle

all

or

perfume

savour the smells of

my

cinnamon, freshly

is

be able

to

son and someone

recall

moment’s

you has rubbed on, squirted on or sprayed on a bit too much eau de

to unlock a treasured

it

I

have found myself sweat-

out at the gym,

wide open, taking around me, when

whoosh, I

1

I

in

all

lungs are

all

the air

of a sudden,

er,

do another

first

have no problem with fragrance, 1 have no allergies and 1 don’t think my nose is any more sensitive than the next person’s.

think perfumes and colognes

come with

to

what we

their culture.

derful

We

eat

get

and drink. So

like broccoli

Egyptian

life.

Keeping Conestoga College connected

is

because sometimes,

life stinks.

mainly I'umled from September to

Conestoga Students

Ine.

in this

May by

The views and opinions

newspaper do not necessarily

CSl

address

Phone: 748-5220,

is

ext.

299 Doon Valley

Dr.,

Room 4B14,

Kitchener, Ontario,

N2G 4M4.

691, 692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

SPOKE shall

reflect the in

SPOKE

their advertisements

not be liable for any

arising out of errors in advertising

con-

damages

beyond the amount paid for must be sent to the editor

the space. Unsolicited submissions

by

9:.'1()

a.m.

or rejection

Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz; Faculty Supervisor: Christina Jonas

logo.

CSl unless

a pay-

(CSl) in exchange for the

insertion of advertising in the paper.

expressed

up

ries.

one of the Three

lixim

scents conjure

Sometimes the smell just makes you want to plug your nose

Scents were consid-

In the Bible,

all

wann, happy, sad or sexy memo-

ered more precious than gold.

published anfl produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Somerville; Photo Editor: Michelle Goring; Production Manager: Paul Kostal

SPOKE’s

and

perfumes

smelling

be aware not

ment

Advertising Manager: Derek Lester; Circulation Manager: Sanja Musa

1

embalming of the dead, perfume was an integral part of the the

tain the

is

guess

1

and wine.

colognes out there, but users should

directions like

Tammy

own from

it

involving the burning of incense to

are not endorsed by the

Editor:

sci-

am sure that there are some won-

1

ceremonies

each have our

views of Conestoga College or the CSl. Advertisers

SPOKE

it

attracts

smell.

must smell

incorporate perfume into

what

We

skin.

individual

SPOKE

Spoke

own

might have from an

the religious

like

20/20 or acmally,

humans to each other is their own body scents. Not Herbal Essence shampoo or coconut scented body lotion, but our entists said

evening of passionate sex.

From

1

should

I

NBC,

Learning Channel, but anyway,

does not rouse any heartwarming

any memories

it.

remember watching a show

could even have been Oprah or The

can awake

childhood memories or tantalize

rep anyway.

1

It

really smell

My nose is tingling just think-

Dateline

Egyptians are believed to be the

my nose and walk

didn’t need to

I

memory. The smell of Tommy Girl, howev-

can’t breath.

have to cover

away.

my

notice.

said to

images and emotions, turning a key

toilette?

Often

like?

ing about is

Moonflower.

Moonflower

Spirit of

a scent at a

burning because the person beside

Spirit of

What could Swiss Army and

showered, and even the

The experienced nose

and your

eyes are watering and your nose

ing

and

vanilla,”

smell of a good sweat.

over them?

sitting in class

its

aromas and sucks them into

life’s

I

for

namral, environmentally friendly

stuck on a Stairmaster where the

their forehead, doesn’t smell

The Body Shoppe, known

it.

said that our nose envelops

person beside you, sweat running

down

The Bay’s most popular perfumes for teen girls are Ralph and Tommy Girl and the adolescent male population prefers Swiss Army and Aqua Di Gio.

and even have some perfume of my own. I didn’t buy it. It was a

hall-

what’s

like

dis-

love scented candles, incense

I

yourself,

to

O

have automatic

pensers, one squirt per day.

way.

Wise Men brought this gift to the newborn Christ. I wonder if it resembled today’s

baby Aspirin. Or maybe the

Monday. Submissions

are subject to acceptance

and should be clearly written or typed; a

WordPerfect or

MS Word

must not contain any

file

would be

helpful.

libellous statements

Submissions

and may be accom-

panied by an illustration (such as a photograph).


1

SPOKE, March 5, 2001

Emergency

— Page 5

pill

available at college One way to

health clinic Canadian market. She also explained that

the

'Fhc emcr|;ency conlracuptive pill

or lif^P

Conestoga College students

m

Waterloo

“The doctor doesn't have

an elevated dose of birth

control pills

iliat

contain estrogen

and progesterone and it is used to prevent piegnancy within 72 liours

unprotected inter-

after

The HCP woiks by

conrst'..

iittcr-

rnpting a female's tcproducUve cycle b> .•flowing ovulation and lessening sperm's mobility. 'T thought

offer

when

present

is

it

the

would be nice to

same-

.set

vice

to

Conestoga students as uiher- stuWaterloo have,” said Or. A.nne Marie Mingiardi, a dia^tor with the college’s health clinic.

woman has

to get the pill

as {lussiblc.

,So, it is

a.s

"A

soon

much more

col-

womim

the

nurses

give,

questionnaire,

two of

the

the birth con-

woman and

trol pills to rite

then

given a Gtavol

addition

In

cramping According

to

sUlc effects

may

nausea,

to

can be and

sirle-eff(‘cts

other

spotting,

available

Canada

by pre-

are Ovral

and Preven, each consisting ot four strong binh control pills with the hormones estrogen and progesterone.

Although

on

instructions

Preven, produced by Roberts Pharmaceutical, stress tliat it will not dislodge or abort pregnancy, a controversy resurfaced when Preven became available on phar-

macy

shelves in

Canada

RU-486. According to Contraceptive Technology, a book written by Dr. Robert A. Hatcher, Dr. Felicia

Stewail,

Dr.

Deborah

Kowal, Dr. Gary K. Stewart, Dr. Willard Cates and PhD James Trussell published in 1990-’92,

RU-486

is

“a competitive antag-

onist of progesterone.

When strual

given in the

cycle,

RU-486

late

men-

leads

to

rrre

effects such as severe

Mingiardi refused to comment on the issue, but she said that a new brand of ECP, Plan B, is

soon

to

be

released

on

Sign up at Student Services (Room 2B02) with a copy of your timetable. You will be contacted by the facilitator, Karen Rittinger, to confirm time and date.

ness of breath, .severe headaches and binning or Ir^ss of vision and severe pain In the legs. If a woman develops any of these, waraing signs'" she has to iimnediately contact the college’s health clinic or one of the

Waterloo Region hospitals’ emergency rooms, Mingiardi said.

An ECP failure to prevent pregnancy

is

1/2 to three per cent,

1

she added.

“A

follow-up appointment to

discuss birth control methods

is

scheduled after someone takes the pill,” she sard. “Also, a preg-

nancy

has to be done

test

woman

if

a

hasn’t gotten her period

within three weeks after taking the pill.”

Depo-Provera is the most effective,

reversible

birth

control

method, said Mingiardi. Depo-Provera has been used worldwide since 1969 and it was approved in Canada in 1997. Depo-Provera is an injection of

cent effective.

be an abortifacient.”

and informative group.

Please wear comfortable clothing.

abdominal

Some

to

to attend this enjoyable

temporary, but

hormone progestin, weeks to prevent pregnancy. Each injection costs

it

Plan

last for several days.

menses. If given within several days of ovulation, RU-486 prevents implantation or causes sloughing of a fertilized zygote. researchers consider

wishes of participants.

Avery small numlK'i of women more serious side

last year,

because pro-life groups associated Preven with an abortion pill

them;

liiarrlied.

pain, severe chest pain or shortin

Practice in deep muscle relaxation, cortical relaxation, abdominal breathing, and/or simple stretching exercises, depending on needs and

Mingiardi, these

clinics.”

The F(’Ps

because some have nausea after taking

women

how to overcome

Barriers to relaxation, and

pill

exfie-rience

scription

explore the following topics:

Ec;p.

if

at the college, insteail

We will

two more after 12 hours.” She said these women ;mi also

she cjm get it line, of going to the Waterloo health or urgent care conve-nient

participants.

has to go

witli the nurses through an interview about any health problems she might have.” Mingiardi said.

‘'\fter

One and one-half hour session. Time to be determined from timesheets submitted by

to be

the pill is given to

someone, but a

dents, 1bi insianoc, at university in

tlie

a.s other health and urgent clinics in Waterloo Region when dealing with ECP.

at the

Region.

FiCP

more about

lege’s health clinic follows the

college's health clinic as well as at otlier health units

learn

same protocol

available to female

is

life is to

Relaxation Technique

'

By Sanja Musa

deal with the stress of student

a

synthetic

given every

$27

to $41

1 1

and

it is

about 99 per

Other available contraception devices such as condoms, birth pills, foam, diaphragm, sponge and cervical cap are 79 to 98 per cent effective.

control

psm-ntfPifrrfOfiB

sical.

ow much?

How often?

370 HIGHLAND ROAD 385 FAIRWAY ROAD

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I


Page 6

— SPOKE, March

5,

2001

CSI executive members meet the deputy minister By Michelle Goring

to hear

our concerns,” Harris said.

The deputy minister attended CSI vice-president of academics Mike Harris and CSI vice-president of operations Jon Olinski attended a private luncheon with

OCCSPA conference to talk with members about issues concerning the various student govthe

ernments.

of

“Meeting him was definitely the

Colleges and Universities Kevin Costante during the February conOntario the of ference Community College Student

highlight of the conference,” said

Parliamentary Association (OCCSPA) that took place Feb. 9 to Feb. 11 at Centennial College in

schedule to

Deputy

Canada’s

Minister

Scarborough. “Jon and I had a private luncheon with the deputy minister and his assistant and were able to discuss

Conestoga related issues,” said “After

highest

the

is

come and speak

to

us.”

Although the meeting with the deputy minister was important, Olinski said he believes there were many significant parts to the

OCCSAP conference. “As a member of OCCSPA, all

commu-

the

nity colleges to various groups of

could talk to him about

He

Conestoga College’s voice is heard on provincial issues,” said

for

Olinski.

college related

issues.

then led us into a private

room

“What we

a luncheon.”

Harris refused to reveal the issues discussed at the luncheon, he said the deputy min-

Although

was very

“We were

government,

helpful.

glad he took the time

it

is

important that

try to

issue raised

by Harris

was

at the

student

the

union’s right to exist. According Harris, student unions in Ontario do not officially have the right to exist where in Alberta and to

Manitoba it is a legislated right. “We were given the impression it would be included in the spring session at the provincial parlia-

ment,” Olinski outlined in his conference report. According to Olinski, he was disappointed when the Ontario Public Services Employee Union (OPSEU) representative didn’t

appear for the scheduled collective bargaining discussion.

20-minute talk to we went to him and

his

OCCSPA, asked if we

ister

“This

bureaucrat in the system and he took a Saturday out of his busy

which represents

Harris.

some

Harris.

An

conference

do

is

take a

on behalf of the college and represent that view to the spe-

position

people who come to me at the conferences who want to hear the views from the college.” cific

“We were

kind of disappoint-

all

few

ed,” Olinski said. “I had a

questions for their representative.”

Other topics discussed at the Key the were conference Performance Indicator surveys

community

colleges), the

upcom-

ing faculty negotiations and stu-

dent rights.

Conestoga College was one of

Continued from Page 1

Tibbits.

Parliamentary Association

13 colleges to attend the conferincluding: ence Cambrian,

be

Conestoga, said the two-

said other factors

to the last three.”

Jeffrey said if the coOege had a major non-conformance, which would be a failure to recognize an ISO standard, Conestoga would have continued to work towards its

is

college and

deficiencies.

“John (Tibbits) was also out of

When

9- 18 as part of the

was

local

Team Canada

goal.

“We would have continued work until we achieved what we Jeffrey

will set standards for other colleges

have

remains to be seen. St. Lawrence College in Brockville began the

Jeffrey.

lier

than Conestoga, which Tibbits

was sort of a wake-up call. “That made us think because

want to be in the situation where a whole pile of colleges out there were ISO certified and we weren’t,” said Tibbits.

“This

“We decided

SOMEONE YOU KNOW. 1

-800-BANTING

CANADIAN DIABETES ASSOCIATION

ASSOCIATION

CANADIENNE

DU DIABtTE

www.diabetes.ca

recommended

it is

col-

for

not the end.

a beginning, not an end.

come back every

six

months for periodic assessments.

We

can celebrate to

move

this,

but

we

forward,”

still

said

“They want to see improvements we want to ensure students get benefits from it.” and

auditors gathered informa-

by examining records, observation and interviews. The cost for

tion

full range of documentation assessment and pre-assessment cost

the

the college roughly $20,000.

life,

to turn to. Call

Carol Seto, dietitian

is

They’ll

The

we

didn’t

diabetes enters your

CALL

added although the

lege has been certification,

process for partial certification ear-

to set

out to do.”

Mission, which saw Trade Conestoga sign a major agreement with Heilongjiang College of Harbin to open a satellite campus. Whether or not Conestoga’s lead

it

WWW, paguide.com

it

the Canadian Diabetes Association.

HELP

living

thought

be around,” said

was a member of a

you need someone

WrtfffA/

and

lose time in a

said

ed time to regain and correct any

((

I

You

delegation that went to China Feb.

Jeffrey said after the initial docu-

y Gnitiv

we

Tibbits.

Tibbits

exams

have

Christmas break.

ed in a good system for the college. “I’m absolutely delighted the college has come this far and I’m optimistic that once we get registered, we don’t have any place to go except towards improvement,” said

mentation review, the college need-

found out that in fact we were down

not a regular organization. This kind of organization

‘This

important that

time to Feb. 21- 25.

it

were

involved in delaying the final audit.

and-a-half-year journey has result-

review in November found four minor non-conformances. The date was bumped back a second

show some leadership in this we woke up one day and

to

before

you

14- 16 after the initial documenta-

Physicn! Ai t h

we wanted him

down around Christmas

tion

r-'i,

North America

present,” said Jeffrey.

Tibbits

St.

Ste.

Cite,

Marie student administrative council and Sir Sanford Fleming.

first in

the country and

Northern,

Lawrence, the Sault

Centennial,

Fanshawe,

Confederation,

Humber, La Clair, St.

when

The final ISO registration audit was originally to be completed Jan. 18 and 19, but was changed to Feb.

.

Scarborough.

Algonquin,

slows

Jeffrey.

Get

in

(Photo by Michelle Goring)

community services and ISO management representative for

Stephanie Denhann, left, and Aliycia Punnett, a CSI executive member, demonstrate their skills to the girls' soccer team during a Feb. 1 3 practice. Denhann, coach of the women’s soccer team, asked for Punnett’s help to improve the team’s defensive skills. The team is winless in 13 (Photo by Tammy Somerville) games.

(OCCSPA)

dean of the school of

Bill Jeffrey,

sciences and

and Jon

Costante, deputy minister of colleges and universities, during the Feb. 9 to 1 1 meeting of the Ontario Community College Student

will

“We’re always trying to do a better job and this gives us a more solid base on which to build a continuous improvement system,” said

left,

of operations, talked with Kevin

CSI vice-president

(which establish accountability and excellence benchmarks at

Conestoga

Sharing soccer secrets

Mike Harris, CSI vice-president of academics, Olinski,


SPOKE, March 5, 2001

— Page 7

Award-winning teacher joins Conestoga By Tammy Somerville Conestoga College’s journalism and broadcast program wel-

don’t thing there

scaped.

I

campus

like

said Haskell. feel

a high school, but

into

comed a new

Conestoga, when you walk

addition to

its

faculty

Haskell, a former instructor

reporter/videographer for the

WE television station

ing.”

“Some

New

teaches tele-

,

go

vision performance and fundamentals of reporting and research. resume to his sent Haskell Conestoga a few years ago when he

was rethinking

He

his career goals.

letter, which said were no openings at the time, but encouraged him to get some

received a reply

colleges you

into feel like

teaching at

St.

offers a hands-on experience.

After teaching television production and persuasive writing for one

semester at

St. Clair,

forward to the challenges ahead. “I’d like to teach

My

Conestoga, when you walk in, it feels like a place of higher Dave Haskell

ance. I

course

load

broadcast faculty

I

a teaching perspective, ly amazing.”

Looking to the would like

said he

it’s

future,

“It’s

my

Outside of his

a master’s

itself.

well laid out and nicely land-

as an alter-

Myth of Innocence summer of ’92, even-

new

evolved in the

and placing second

Hard Rock Cafe

Haskell

to see the broad-

duties at the

doing some documentary work. background educational His includes a bachelor of arts with honours in English and philosophy and

campus

years as lead singer of the blues/rock

band Myth of Innocence. Marketing themselves

at the

SkyDome

Battle of the

Bands

in 1993.

college, Haskell looks forward to

Haskell,

news report on alcohol raids in London, Ont. Haskell also enjoyed nearly 10

absolute-

who

said

for his

equipment here. From

used to do all of his own camera work and editing. Haskell is enjoying Conestoga College and said he loves the actual

background,’’

the award documentary on the growing popularity of cosmetic surgery and

Foundation.

tually playing the university circuit

“I love the

big a drawing card as the print side.

that’s

Directors

the province, said Haskell.

casting side of the program be as

because

and

Radio

the

News Haskell won

native band,

television perform-

videography

by

The broadcasting equipment at the college is easily some of the best in

also hoping to teach

would include

am

journalism print and

more broadcast-

projected

nalism from Western’s Graduate School of Journalism. He placed first in television news at the TV Ontario Telefest and was awarded the annual G.R.A. Rice Television

learning.”

Haskell got a

from Conestoga and now looks

Haskell has also received numerous awards, among them, the Hugh Bremner Prize for broadcast jour-

Scholarship

Clair

College after realizing he wanted to teach at the college level because it

Toronto.

high school, but

post-secondary teaching experience.

He began

a

He also received a bachelor of education from the University of

Ontario.

for a

there

Student receives

it

College in Windsor and

at St. Clair

ing.

in,

feels like a place of higher learn-

Dave

call

any

“Some colleges you go

like

print

Jan. 8.

Dave Haskell, Conestoga’s newest addition to the journalism print and broadcast program, said the college’s equipment is some of the best in the province, which is great for teachers. (Photo by Tammy Somerville)

is

in southern Ontario,’’

it

degree in journalism

from the University of Western

In

Myth of Innocence demo CDs, which

1994,

recorded 1,000

sold out almost immediately.

The band had success

locally at the

popular college and university hangouts Loose Change Louie’s and Wilf’s at Sir Wilfrid Laurier.

“We were

a Canadian band,” said

Haskell of the

band.

“By

inklings

that

of

now dismembered I mean we had

54-40

and

Tragically Hip.”

Swingin’ sweethearts

bill

for college letter By Tammy Somerville

college’s annual postage bill over $200,000, not including parcels and courier service. Conestoga does not receive any discounts because of volume. Large volume mailers like Visa and

The

is

When

Trevor Hilker, a second-

year general arts and science student, picked up his mail Feb. 6, he received his student achievement form and a bill for its postage.

Attached to the envelope was a postage due card from Canada Post for

94

cents.

The card reads, “with this card you received mail that was sent without enough postage.” “I thought it was pretty odd that the post office would send it with no stamp and the college is cheesy for sending it with no stamp,” said Hilker.

The amount of the postage due is ,

a question Hilker can’t figure out, but he said it doesn’t matter

banks receive a discount. A Canada Post employee said the 94-cent bill is double the price of a first class stamp and is normally posted on mail with no postage. If Hilker had been home at the time of delivery, he could have letter, which then would have been returned to the college. Because there is no way to know

denied the

the postage was actually paid, the postage due cards are based on

if

honour system. It doesn’t have be paid, but it is supposed to be.

the to

because he’s not paying it anyway. “I’m not the one who didn’t put

94 cents on it. The college sent me and it would be pretty stupid of the college to pay 94 cents.” Vince Alvino, print shop supervithe

;

it

to

sor at Conestoga, said for Hilker to actually receive the mail is unusual

because normally the post office would return mail without the

Preschoolers at Conestoga College’s Doon Child Care Centre take advantage of the strength his first of Joe Melow, an early childhood education student at the college. Melow is doing

proper postage to the sender.

The

print

shop

is

placement

responsible for

“It is

possible two pieces were

come

Alvino. said bundles,” “Considering the amount of mail that goes through here every day,

in

it’s

gonna happen.

It’s

a machine.”

the centre’s Blue

Room. He

said he likes the experience

and said the

children

Jack O’Neil, Alex Fairless, aged 2 to twice a day no matoutside children get The Massey. Taylor and Jessika Burke, Quinton Goos was sunshine is preschoolers these among consensus The weather. ter what the season or

4 are enjoyable. Swingers

stamping the college’s outgoing mail, which averages about 2,500 pieces every day. stuck together because they

in

Trevor Hilker, a second-year general arts and science student, holds up the

bill

he

received from the post office. (Photo by Tammy Somerville)

left

to right are Erica Each,

go outthe best, no matter what the temperature outside. Children at the centre are allowed to Somerville) Tammy by (Photo -14C. side unless it is colder than

The


Dream CD a By Derek Lester

when you hear

The new pop sensation group Dream had its dream come true as it released its first CD, It Was called

All

A Dream, in stores on Jan.

The

four young

23.

women from

California, Ashley,

Diana, Holly and Melissa, have 12 songs on their CD plus one remix of a song to

make a They ing

of 13 songs. also included three annoytotal

between some songs, which could have been omitted from the CD. The first four songs on the CD, which includes their first single He Loves U Not and their next single interludes

little

in

This Is Me, are really upbeat, pop songs should be.

That

is it

like

for the upbeat songs,

though, as they really slow down the pace of their songs on the rest of the CD.

This

CD

one

anyone can most of the songs are catchy, and they sing is

that

really sing along with as

the chorus so often,

much

it

makes it that words to

hit

it.

These three songs all have a really good beat to them that anyone could dance to. The second song. In My Dreams, is also not a bad song to listen to, but the rest of the CD gets slow and kind of boring and you may find yourself only listening to the first half of these songs before skipping

ahead to the next one. Almost all of the songs deal with relationships and being with that special someone.

One

CD

frustrating thing about the

was

the lack of information

about the young women.

of their

It

gives

all

names, but their last names are nowhere to be found. first

They deserve the recognition for good CD, and if they put out

this

another album like this one, many people will know their names.

Another good thing about this CD is that there are no explicit lyrics or parental advisory warnings, so little children can even listen to their

music.

easier to learn the

If

you

like

sing along.

slower songs,

The first song on the CD, He Loves U Not, is probably the best song on the CD with the upbeat pop style of music coming out nicely.

enjoy.

pop music or even CD you will

this is a

Me, and Don’t Like

These young women really prove can sing, and they will probably be a big hit. So Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera better watch out because

Anyone, are the next best songs because they too have that upbeat pop style of music that you just want to start singing along with

a dream has come true for four other young women and their debut CD has started them on a rise to stardom.

The

third song. This Is

the fourth

song,

I

Qream’s debut album,

It

top 10 best-selling chart

that they

Was in

All A Dream, Canada.

is

a big

hit,

making the

Get to work with a post-graduate diploma i n Business Administration-Marketin g Add

a greater

dimension to your

business education by emphasizing

management

functions in marketing

studies. Graduates of this

may

program

also use their credits toward a

bachelor degree in Administration or Professional Arts in Communication

through distance education from Athabasca University (Alberta).

Apply now for Fall 2001 Business Studies Division 1460 Oxford Street East P.O. Box 7005 London, Ontario N5Y 5R6

FANSHAWE COLLEGE

www.fanshawec.ca

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

Learning Disabilities

There has been eonsiderable attention paid to the term “Learning Disability” in the past few years as educators become increasingly aware of the individual needs of students.

The term was coined in the 1960’s to describe people who, while having average or above average abilities, exhibited difficulty learning in one of the basic academic areas such as reading, writing, or mathematics. Since that time considerable research has helped us to identify and classify what a learning disability is, how to diagnose how to help individuals who have a learning disability. Research has taught us that

this

problem, and

:

Learning disabilities affect about 2-5% of students. Learning disabled students show a marked difference

in

what they are capable of

learning and their achievement in certain areas.

Learning disabled

students do well in College and University programs given the right

kind of support.

There are tests and procedures that can help identify the exact nature of the disability. There are strategies that can be used to help overcome a learning disability. While everyone has different leaning styles, learning disabilities are marked areas of difficulty.

A Message from 2A109)

Student Services (Room 2B02) and the Special Needs Office (Room


College alumni honoured to be award nominees By Tammy Somerville Two Conestoga

College gradu-

who

individual

of development for the United Way of Kitchener-Waterloo and

Witmer

area since 1997. Before that, she

Conestoga

praised

College and said

helped set him on

junction with the annual conference of the Association of Colleges of

was manager for the Arthritis Society and a unit co-ordinator for the Canadian Cancer Society. She is known for her development and presentation of professional and community workshops on fundraising and subjects of value to

Applied Arts and Technology of

non-profit organizations.

low-up

MacKay member

advisory committees.”

ates

nominated for

this year’s pres-

tigious Premier’s

Awards say they

were honoured

be recognized.

to

Anne MacKay and Jim Witmer were nominated by Conestoga for the Feb. 19 awards held in con-

Ontario

(ACAATO).

The five winners of the awards were Paul Rowan from George Brown college, Betty BedardBidwell from Fanshawe college, Paul Vessey from Durham, Hazel

McDonald of St. Clair and Kirk Mandy of Algonquin. Each of the winners received $5,000 in bursary funds, to be presented to the colleges of their choice.

The Premier’s Awards honour community college alumni who have achieved career success and

made

contributions to their

com-

regional

MacKay, a business administration/management studies grad from 1987, has been the director

also active with

trainer for the Volunteer Leadership

program

Development

of

Centre

Volunteer Action

the

of the

Kitchener-Waterloo area. She was

a

also

member

of the board

at

Guelph-WeUmgton Women in Crisis. MacKay said she was incredibly honoured to be nominated.

me

As

far as

timetable scheduling

goes, there probably won’t be

much

of a change in the next couple of years, but change is coming eventually.

he doesn’t believe there will be any real advantage to computerized timetabling for Conestoga at present.

He added that as Conestoga grows there will most hkely be a need to go to computerized

of computerized timetabling as the

longer be any abtiity to

When

body increases

dents and

becomes

He

more

that

more

much more

would no work around

scheduling, however, there

Several

members of

of the college, including the sched-

on Friday afternoons.

McGregor

said the idea of ending

classes earlier

uling of timetables.

on Fridays had been

Currently the college employs two

considered by adntinistration, but

work

he called that a “slippery slope”, saying that when classes are pushed back to noon on Fridays, it won’t be long before it becomes 4:30 on

out the schedules for each semester.

timetabling

are brought to the college adminis-

and McGregor said the two employees have tried to work

Thursdays.

around legitimate concerns. McGregor has recently complet-

tions to handle the extra student

tration,

ities

for timetabling

facil-

and compared

the effectiveness of their computer-

ized system to Conestoga’s

MacKay about

at

Conestoga

gave

a chance to learn more

life situations.

She said theory

essential, but

is

apply it, there’s a chasm between the two. “Because of the kind of faculty until

at

students learn to

Conestoga who have been in

have the opportunity

to deal with

people out there.

makes learning more MacKay.

applica-

ble,” said

Witmer, a 1981 construction engineering technology alunmus, has

District Chapter).

been director of building and chief building official with the city of Kitchener since 1990. Witmer is also a noted presenter of industryrelated courses and workshops and is the author of Kitchener’s Risk Management Plan and Building

current

Administrative Report.

Witmer

said

Municipalities

also the

is

the

Chief

Large

Building

Officials Association.

He

is the founder of the Athletes Action Baseball Camp, and is on the corporate board of directors for Ray of Hope, an organization that counsels young offenders.

in

although he was

deeply honoured by the nomination, he was also kind of embarrassed because he is not the type of

He of

chair

The Premier’s Award originated mark the 25th anniver-

in 1992, to

sary of Ontario’s system of colleges

of apphed

arts

and technology.

WANTED Part-Time or Full-Time Jobs Available !!!

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the college

the attendance of students at classes

on every aspect

ed a tour of Niagara College’s

Studying

also active profession-

Waterloo Region Chief Building Officials Committee and the Ontario Building Officials and (Wellington Association ally in the

difficult.

said that with computerized

the post-secondary system in 2002,

Any concerns about

to go.”

program

stu-

council expressed concern about

people, working part time, to

you want

and

suggestions for schedule changes.

in size.

the double cohort of grad-

will put a strain

road that helps you decide where

It

program is

abilities,” said

has a tremendous fol-

classes, scheduling

uating high school students enters

it

fork in the

students are assigned to do, they

timetabling because with

student

is like that

have the chance to publicly thank the college and faculty for what they have given me,” said

At a recent college council meetGrant McGregor, principal of campus, Doon Conestoga’s revealed that Conestoga would most likely have to go to some kind ing,

Conestoga

the workforce and the projects

to

my own “It

Witmer Jim Witmer

Anne MacKay

is

remains unchanged Kostal

Witmer.

to is

I

fident in

MacKay. “For most people, going

Timetable scheduling By Paul

It provided the needed to handle various jobs and people and become con-

for the future.

tools

Executives.

“I think the nicest thing for

munities.

“Conestoga College prepared

me

Canadian the of Association of Gift Planners and the Waterloo Region Fund-raising In addition, she

it

the path he has taken with his Ufe.

was also a founding

Jmiior Achievement and serves as a

personal

seeks

attention

manual

He

said other possible sugges-

load of the physical space in the buildings would be to extend class

hours to 5:30 p.m.

He did stress, however that that may not be possible because many

one.

students have part-time jobs and

“They employ two people full time to work on the computerized scheduling,” he said, adding that

children to pick up at day-care centres

which would prohibit schedul-

ing of classes that late in the day.

Check Out Our Services > Free Resume and Cover Letter Critiques

> Free

Tip Sheets for

Job

Search Activities

> Resume Referral Service > Employer Profiles and much more Visit the

Student Employment Office

Room 2B04 I

1

1

I

in


1

Page 10

— SPOKE, March

The

2001

5,

your heart -Cheap camera By Paul Kostal Remember The The sense of

Sixth

Sense?

fear and foreboding

you experienced the watched it?

first

time you

The Gift, starring Cate Blanched, recreates that sense of and terror

fear

expertly.

B

1

a n c h e

plays

a

tricks

have to be the aforementioned Reeves, and a strikingly powerful performance by Giovanni Ribisi

(The

Mod

Squad, The Other an abused shop mechanic. Blanchett gives an understated and subtle performance as the single mother trying to cope with the weight of the Sister),

as

1

world.

The first hour of the movie is designed to build

mother

cursed with the “gift” of psychic pre-

the

tension and up the conflicts that will be

who

set

uses her abilities

pay the and raise to

bills

unravelled in the

her

hour of the movie. last

three sons.

Set in a small town of the American south, many of the

Watch

for several clues in the

dreams and visions early

in the

The

townsfolk, and in particular, wifebeater Donny Barksdale, played convincingly by a scruffy Keanu

and may require a second watching to fully

Reeves, brand her a witch and a

understand.

charlatan.

erence was particularly clever. Co-starring Katie Holmes, Greg

The daughter of

a wealthy and

prominent businessman in the city goes missing, and, when the police can unearth no clues, they turn to, yep. Blanched. At times predictable, and often using cheap tricks like camera angles and sudden changes in volume to get the audience to jump. The Gift is still a remarkably good thriller that is built around the strength of solid acting throughout the picture.

The

best of the

Working up a sweat

have audience jumping

single

science,

make pound

Gift will

bunch would

movie.

They

are very subtle

The blue diamond ref-

Kinnear and Hilary Swank and produced by Billy Bob Thornton, is

it

somewhat

surprising, given

the star-wattage involved in the film, that it hasn’t received more all

publicity. It

is

deserve

Cate a solidly acted

Gift, starring

Blanchett,

is

horror movie set in the American south. Blanchett stars as a single mother with

a psychic gift who is witness a gruesome murder of a prominent woman without even being there. to

Make no

mistake, even though

a horror movie it is the characters and the many character conflicts that drive this movie. AJl in aU, The Gift is not a remarkthis is

certainly

soHd enough

to

it.

Directed by horror-master Sam Raimi, of Evil Dead fame, the Gift is a much more sophisticated thriller than some of his other movies.

ably spectacular film, but it is a great to get a good fright from, and

movie really,

that’s

accomphsh

all

it

was

trying to

Gene

‘Shoeloss" Jones sweats it out during « game of at the rec centre Fob. 15. Jones, who has been .. member of the centre for about five years, got the nicknq “Shoeless" after showing up twice to play squash withoi

squash

shoes.

in the first place.

DISCUSSION & NETWORKING GROUP

FOR GAY/LESBIAN/BISEXUAL /TRANSGENDERED

STUDENTS

Meetings every Monday (except Study Week) from 4:30-5:30 p.m. In

Student Services

Room 2B02

(Photo by

Timmy Somi


SPOKE, March 5, 2001

— Page 11

S^ports Referee leaves mark on Condors By Paul

Fleming opened the scoring early when

Kostai

Wes Neild The last time Phil Olinski refereed a game at Conestoga’s recreation centre the Condors and the visiting Cambrian Golden Shield combined

for 114

minutes in penalties with

beat

Andy Hopkins.

one-minute mark, Peter Willis converted a feed from Neild to make the game 2-0. Just like the last game Olinski refereed at the

rec centre,

on Jan. 13 against Cambrian, he

the

the players play the

Sir Sanford Fleming on Valentine’s Day, hoping to finish the season on a winning note, and referee Olinski imposed himself upon the outcome

the

home team losing the game. The Condors played host to

of the

game

again.

Conestoga and Fleming combined for over

two hours

m penalties.

Just past the

first

half of the

let

game unscathed for about

first

period before he

start-

ed calling penalties. The Condors’ Darren Smegal was able to answer one of Fleming’s goals near the 15 minute mark of the first from Matt Turcotte and Dave Stewart, just after two Fleming penalties

Fleming

started the

again

middle period quickly,

with Neild scoring within the first minute again, for his third point of the night.

Conestoga answered when Turcotte put one past Dave Burroughs from Stewart and Paul Flewwetting. Fleming would add two more to make the score 5-2 after 40 minutes.

Stewart would assist on both of Conestoga’s goals in the penalty-ridden third period to pull the home team within one.

But Neild would pot fifth point,

his fourth goal,

and

of the night into the empty net

with just two seconds remaining.

had expired.

game

Head coach Greg Rickwood puts the Condors through drills during a practice Feb. 12.

(Photo by Paul Kostai)

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— SPOKE, March

Page 12

2001

5,

Student Life

Students say college overstepped bounds By Michelle Goring

son

s

said Ibrahim.

complaints.

supervisor.

The complaint form process had

would not defame faculty

Tibbits said the college

“We have

the right to

express our opinions.”

Ryan Sykora, a

lege

shouldn’t the

tell

CSI to comform

Conestoga College president John Tibbits asked the CSI to cease

received negative feedback from

or poison the learning environ-

business

and desist their student complaint form process at a meeting on Jan.

Employee Union Local 237, which

ment.

dent,

represents faculty and Local 238,

During a random survey of

believes the col-

“Students

lege has an obli-

should be able to speak freely,”

Ontario

the

Public

Service

which represents support staff. The unions were concerned about thirdparty record keeping on faculty performance and the CSI collecting information about faculty and employees at the college.

29.

The CSI student complaint forms were implemented for students who feel they have not been treated fairly by the college or believe their student rights have been violated.

Subsequently, Tibbits asked the

This includes harassment or discrimination by college employees,

CSI

and desist

to cease

after the

college

tolerate letters that

students

Doon

at

Feb. 16, students they

felt

most said

tell

CSI

will then write a letter to

the subject of the complaint and a

college for deal-

the problem

copy of the

ing with these

over final grades, too

reviewed

cancelled classes and mark-

ing biases.

it

is

is

com-

plaint

and the CSI vice-president of academics.

The CSI

and deter-

mined

signed by the student

letter is sent to that per-

their

of com-

letters

After a complaint form pleted,

the

the

they

Ibrahim

plaints.

would

by

said

Harris, a

occu-

telling the

CSI

to

stop the complaint form process,”

assistant tant

Hearn.

“I

students

Hearn

feel

threatened and discouraged going

Harris

pational therapy

were outside the exclusive forum set down by the

many

process.

think

Kim

to cease complaint form process. Dahlia Ibrahim, a first-year journalism student, said she believes students have a right to express their opinion and have a right to speak out. “The college is trying to cover up

disputes

the

plaint

he

to

first-year

Sykora

stop

respond to student com-

the col-

lege didn’t have the right to

stu-

said

gation

the

campus

first-year general

and physiotherapy assissaid the complaint

student,

forms are a reasonable way to deal with problems that might come

to

management

themselves.”

Ryan Gibson, a

first-year

robotics and ani-

mation student,

about.

said

“We’re here to get an education and we’re paying for it,” Harris

should be able to decide whether they should use Gibson

said.

Brad Hearn, a first-year accounting student, said he thinks the col-

CSI

the

the student

com-

plaint forms.

Protecting our natural heritage Jean Fan is a chief park warden protect the plant

for

and animal life

Parks Canada.

He and his colleagues

in our national parks.

They

Canadians explore and enjoy these special places. This of the

hundreds

of services

is

also help

just

one

provided by the Government of Canada.

For more information on government services: • Visit the Service Canada Access Centre nearest you

www.canada.gc.ca • CaU 1 800 O-Canada (1 800 622-6232) TTY/TDD: 1 800 465-7735 •Visit

Canada

SPOKE wants to hear from you The

reporters at Conestoga College’s student

Please

fill

off in the

out the survey below and deposit

Spoke newsroom

^liat information

is

in

it

newspaper want to hear what you like and dislike about our publication. into boxes in the learning resource centre or at CSI’s office in the Sanctuary. You can also drop

it

4B 13.

important in your life at Conestoga College?

What do you want to know about Conestoga College?.

What do you

like

What would you

or dislike about Spoke2-

like to see

more or

less

of in Spoke2L

hear from you. Spoke is your newspaper and it should represent your needs and Interests. We will take your suggestions to heart and do what we can to ensure that this publication benefits all members of the Conestoga College community. Thank you for your time and we look forward to hearing your concerns and serving your needs.

We would

like to

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