Page 1

m 34th Year

— No. 46

Woodworkers awards

vie for

and

prizes

By Tammy Somerville

The award-winning the

Twenty-two second-year woodworking students at Conestoga vied for the college-sponsored

Winners Of awards

display woHc.

PAGE 2

fall

Master Craft Awards Dec. 21. Winners earn a chance to move on to the college finals in May. The awards, established in 1980 by then Conestoga College president Kenneth E. Hunter, were created to recognize the excellence of students’ achievements in crafts-

manship.

Machining in practical woodworking technology and technician students displayed their projects

which included anything from night tables to desks and hutches to

projects will

when

and he is very proud of his achieve-

hoping

agreement

Affinity

^

will benefit college.

PAGE

it

He

hopes his achievement will

him land a job where he can concentrate more on designing help

because he enjoys that aspect of the trade more than anything else. “I really like Auto Cad. I get really good marks. In fact, I thin k I’m at the top of my class,” said Grabreck.

The Master Craft Award goes to the person whose project

is

judged

their

to exhibit the highest

summer

level pf excellence.

and winter semesters. Second-year woodworking technology student, Mark Grabreck,

won

will help with a job,” said

Grabreck.

go up against those

entered by students in the

was

dresser

piece he built for himself

ment and his work. “I was constantly doing work on it. Before I worked on it I went through a plan in my head of what to do. It took a lot of effort, but I’m

10 faculty judges in hopes of improving their prospects for employment and their chances of winning $500 in cash or tools. The winners, one chosen from each program, will move on to the semi-finals in April

first

Dennis O’Reilly,

*

woodworking program co-ordinator

with his tum-of-the-century

Kyle Patrick, 4, practises his snowboarding skills by sliding the slopes at Doon Child Care Centre Dec. 20. Although he took a few tumbles, Kyle never gave up. The entire junior kindergarten class spent time going down the

down

makeshift bunny

hill.

(Photo by Tammy Somerville)

*,,,

mission-style dresser. “I chose to make a dresser to have somewhere to put my clothes. If you could see where they are now, you would understand why,”

Craft award for his program, had

said Grabreck.

not given

Each of the

five drawers in the

dresser took approximately eight

hours to make. is

shop

staff

applauded

PAGE

4

wood wine

which holds five

bottles

made

Grabreck

said,

were, made from the leftover siding

Print

net,

ond-hand junk,

‘The cedar (drawer) bottoms

COMMENTARY

much thought to the benof winning the contest and in fact had to be convinced to enter.

my

house and the mirror came from a broken one found on the side of the road.” Although he does not yet have a shop of his own, Grabreck uses the large supply of tools in his garage and those belonging to his in-laws. Woodworking comes almost natural to Grabreck who said it is something he has always been of

interested in. “I got A’s

in

woodworking

in

Affinity

agreement signed

By Kyla Rowntree

using the credit card, will go to the

efits

his biggest project to date,

project.

new year. PAGE 6

the semester’s Master

side-of-the-road treasures or sec-

adding his resourcefulness is what helped him complete his winning

studying in

who won

Jensen’s cherry

All of the furniture in his house

Shaping up and

Scott Jensen, the second-year

woodworking technician student

cabi-

and

was

is

also

“I’ve been collecting red wine for little while and I wanted to have a piece of furniture to store it in for dinners and stuff,” said Jensen, who added that he beheved it was the first time a student had

the last

built anything like his cabinet.

Although having had a multitude art degree from uni-

of jobs and an

way

versity,

Jensen didn’t find his

to the

woodworking program until

at

a stomach-upset-

ting event as a nighttime cab driver.

“The last job I had was a nighttime cab driver and somebody puked

in the car. That’s

high school and D’s in EngUsh,” he

‘That’s

said laughing.

else.’”

it,

I

gotta

alumni association at Conestoga College has signed an affinity agreement in principle only with the MBNA Canada Bank.

The

for personal reasons.

Conestoga

The

when I said

do something

MBNA Bank is going to use

the alumni mailing

lists

to provide

the alumni with the opportunity to

apply for a

new

credit card bearing

Conestoga’s logo.

alumni association. “This is a great way to generate money back into the college,” said Monica Himmelman, an alumni services officer.

The credit card bears no annual fee and the annual percentage rate will be a fixed rate of 16.99 per cent.

The

MBNA Bank is sdso offering

The MBNA Bank of Canada will pay the association a royalty calculated from the credit card accounts

customers opportunities to select credit insurance as a benefit under the program. Seven other colleges in Ontario

with active charging privileges.

including

The

MBNA will pay

the associa-

Sheridan,

Algonquin, Fanshawe,

Humber, Michener

new account opened 90 consecutive days. The bank will also pay $1 for each alumni customer credit

Durham and Centennial have also signed the affinity agreement with Bank.

account or student customer credit account which has a balance

agreements with the other colleges have been successful. She also said the affinity agreement Conestoga College has with Johnson Insurance has been rewarding.

tion $1 for each for a least

greater than zero.

Another 0.35 per cent of all retail purchase transactions measured in dollars, generated by the alumni

Institute,

MBNA

Himmelman

said

the

affinity

Continued on Page 3


.

— SPOKE, January

Page 2

15,

2001

News

Award winners represent high Continued from Page

level of

excellence

1

Jensen’s cabinet will compete against

hutch

a

working

summer

for

wood-

the

technology

Don

by

built

MacKay, winner

program’s

semester.

Grabreck will not know who and what he is up against until April when a winner will be chosen from the

woodworking technician

pro-

gnmi’s winter semester. “I

chose

to

make a

dresser to have

somewhere

to put

my

If

clothes.

you

could see where they are now, you would

understand why.” Mark Grabreck, Master Craft Award winner Dennis O’Reilly, woodworking program co-ordinator, said students could choose to

make what-

ever they wanted with the only it had to have a moving working door. “This requires them to apply hardware and fit the door, giving them

course requirement being

better skills. set

up so

involved.

The course

there

project

is

are design skills

They designed

it

in first-

year machining and started building it

in September,’’ said O'Reilly.

While Grabreck and Jensen did not receive a prize, the winners

chosen to represent each program in April will receive a power tool. “TTie Master Craft Awards goes to the person whose project is judged to represent the highest level of excellence of all the projects entered,” said O’ReiUy.

Scott Jensen, a second-year woodworking technical student,

won

a Master Craft Award with his cherry wood wine cabinet Dec. 21 Jensen was inspired by his new-found hobby of collecting red wine. (Photo by Tammy Somerville)

Mark Grabreck, a second-year woodworking technology student, the fall semester’s Master Craft Award for his turn-of-the-century mission-style dresser Dec. 21. He moves on to the semifinals in April when someone will be chosen to represent the

won

technology program

for the finals in

May. (Photo by Tammy

Somerville)

Quality Policy Conestoga College continually seeks Conestp^ College^

opportunities for improvement to

meet and exceed the needs of our students, employees

and communities.


SPOKE, January

News College

ago.

It

consisted of teaching the

senior radio staff

Pat

John, vice-president of

St.

development and continuing education at Conestoga College, has completed the second part of an initiative helping a radio station in Poland gain knowledge and tools to apply democratic printraining and

ciples in radio broadcasting.

Polskie Radio emerged in 1993

when

helps update Polskie Radio

official

By Sanja Musa

strategies, goals

how

how

develop

to

and objectives and

government should

keep moving forJohn said. He said he would be very pleased to go back. “Poland is a rising star in Europe,” he said. Conestoga College will be working on two more similar projects. One project will be in Mexico and another in Brazil and each will last for approximately five years. St. John said that he hopes Conestoga will be heavily involved

broadcasting.

“We are trying to teach them how government should be at arm’s length from public broadcasting. To keep the govermnent at arm’s length is the cornerstone of a dem-

to reverse the planning

process and get them to look at using their

“They would like us back just to provide some consultation to the

not be interfering with any public

the entire organization.

aU

St. John’s mission also consisted of teaching the public radio broad-

casters that the

to incorporate these plans for

“We had

employees as a team to give

the listeners information,” said St.

John, who has 25 years of experience in the broadcasting field.

ocratic society.”

amalgamated

The second phase consisted of

During the communist regime, the

Polish radio and television separat-

giving Polskie Radio the tools and

ed into two independent media, but communist regime has

knowledge

appointments of directors in the broadcasting and commuitications industries were based on service to

been experiencing technical

Conestoga College provided Polskie Radio with information on

the previously

the former

culties

diffi-

establishing a public

in

broadcasting system.

Association

Community

Canadian

of

Colleges,

a

sent

request for proposals to colleges

and universities

in Ontario. In the

request the Polish authorities asked

management

for

and

program

delivery technical assistance for

Polskie Radio in defining

its

role

and mandate as a public broadcaster in a competitive market place and assistance in developing capacity for training employees and acquiring the skills required to implement new technology. According to St. John, Conestoga College

initially

learned about the

request in October 1999 and sub-

mitted

its

deadline.

what the audience

Pat

Because of the complexity of the ect into several phases.

phase of the project was cornpleted about seven months first

Continued from Page is

way Himmelman.

a wonderful

money,” said

way

1

in

the Polskie Radio staff realize to

how

compete within the private dereg-

ulated environment they said St. John.

now

face,”

“We gave them insight

and the tools to become a better pubbroadcaster and to become more

lic

competitive within a deregulated broadcasting environment and inde-

pendent broadcasting.” Polskie Radio, consisting of four

Canadian Broadcasting Corp., St. John said. PR 1 is very similar to CBC Radio 1 because it broadcasts ,

news and information.

“It is

a

back to the students. We (the alumni association) want to maybe be able to provide a residence some day for the students great

the

way

to give

have alumni that halls and facilities at

Universities

lege before the mailing

to

be able to fund a residence

here for the students.

Himmelman come several

said she

had

list

could be

given to the bank because college that

owns

it is

the

the database with

over 25,000 alumni names.

Himmelman

said

she

had

Information Act to determine

to

to over-

how to

applying democratic princi-

ples to radio broadcasting.

When

2 broadcasts mainly classical music. PR 3 targets young adults and PR 4 targets children with an educational and scientific approach. However, lack of knowledge on how to target each program resulted in a decreased audience. “It (Polskie Radio) was losing its battle because it doesn’t really know how to target its programs,” St. John said. ‘The audience for the independent broadcasters increasing.

The

Polskie Radio

is

is

rapidly

audience

for

rapidly declining

because it is stuck with an old way of doing things and it has to come forward and learn how to do things in a new environment.”

ple out.

our database so the

MBNA

is

MBNA

Bank

is

ations throughout the U.S., Canada,

Ireland and the

UK.

rescue for the Canadian

He and his colleagues and partners help Canadians in danger.

They respond around the clock to ernergencies on land by the Government

is

of

just

one

of the

hundreds

or at sea

of services

and

provided

Canada.

For more information on government services: • Visit the Service Canada Access Centre nearest you

www.canada.gc.ca •Call 1 800 O-Canada (1 800 622-6232) TTY/TDD: 1 800 465-7735 •

ested and eager to learn casting

is

done

how

broad-

in other countries.

“The people there

moving

in the right direction

and

sent

them

Mexico or Poland

some teaching and

to

to

do

training.”

Conestoga students from various programs such as marketing, advertising, promotions, human resources and all communications programs would have a chance to go to other countries on their work terms. St.

that more would help

John added

tional projects

interna-

the col-

lege in establishing the School of

are absolutely

wonderful,” he said. “They are think that they have

we

I

made tremen-

dous progress.” The Polskie Radio representatives expressed their concern that they were afraid of slipping back to the regulated government system during the final ceremony prepared for St. John and about 40 other officials.

Communication and Media. “We (Conestoga College) are getting ready to launch the School of Communication and Media and we would certainly want to have a much higher profile,” he said. “We want to be the best School of Communication and Media in Canada. One of the tools to get that recognition

is

to

do international

consulting.

the world’s

any kind of service

This

ple are highly motivated, very inter-

if

not

Captain Bruno Castonguay coordinates

lives.

said.

John also noted that PoHsh peo-

Brazil,

commu-

school and this

given their names.”

lives

help save

ment,” he

this

proud

who do not want thennames given out would contact me, we can easily code their names in

Helping save Forces.

for strong service to the govern-

St.

of expertise,” he said. “They would

make

those people

with managed loans of $84.7 billion. The company has international oper-

air

wasn’t a part of their appointment, but a political award

projects.

names given out to the MBNA Bank and that is not a problem. If

lege to use their, names to promote

completely respect that peo-

look after one of the govermnent channels. Experience or

two

“We have faculty throughout this college who are tops in their areas

their

lege they give permission for the col-

“We

to the highest ranking offi-

cials to

St.

in the other

nity

“This was a prestigious appoint-

ment

ward,”

may not want their names given Some people may not want

largest independent credit card issuer

hurdles before the

John.

certain areas to

Himmelman

students register at the col-

at the college.

St.

expertise

PR

The

proceed.

the institutions. Conestoga’s alumni

want

agreement was signed. She

to present the idea to the col-

become familiar with the Freedom of

universities do.”

fund certain

had

ence and expertise. Each channel tended to be the spokesperson for a different pohtical party, according to

public

affinity

to raise

and development and

Conestoga College, went to Poland to assist a radio station

Hurdles had to be overcome; “This

John, vice-president of

continuing education at

understanding how the private broadcasters do their programming, how they set up their music systems and how they develop their

news programming. “Our job was to demonstrate how public radio should work and to help

St.

training

wants,

really

different programs, is similar to the

issues, the college divided the proj-

The

the government, instead of experi-

chaimels more effectively to find

proposal in time for the

November 1999

compete with private

broadcasters.

researching audience, targeting the

The Polish government, through the

to

Page 3

2001

15,

Visit

Canada

Monica Himmelman, of alumni services, displays the credit card be part of the affinity agreement the alumni association signed with the MBNA Bank on Nov. 30. (Photo by Kyia Rowntree)

that will


Page 4

— SPOKE, January

Hope

Comro^tary

2001

15,

best

for

shop

in print

resolution We have a “made-at-Conestoga” solution to the print shop outsourcing decision.

The four

current staff will remain in the print shop as employ-

ees of the college, but the college intends to contract the operation of the print

shop to Grenville Services, a reprographics

company out of Toronto. While

it’s

not the solution preferred by the print shop staff who

also bid on the contract, ation the staff’s

it is

a solution that takes into consider-

desire to remain

employees of Conestoga

College.

The employees were told they could apply fora one-year leave of absence from the college to work for the contracted employer and if after one year they wished to stay with the contract company, they could opt to do so. remain employees of the new company, bumping and layoff rights contained in their collective agreement and return to work at the college. If they did not

want

to

they could exercise their

is

It

this

a

the hope of everyone at the college that

Conestoga solution will result in more efficient operation

financially

The innocent need answers

that

maintains or improves existing service and

shop staff are treated the contract company.

that the print

fairly

by

admire their tenacity. They forced the college to take their position into account and to find another alternative. The decision was a long time in coming. to

college originally had

hoped

to

make

In schools run

by the Waterloo Region District School Board he was passed

Consider

of Conestoga.

The

be con-

If

But the employees refused these options and continued to tell Conestoga management that they wanted to remain employees

You have

you have

cerned, be very, very concerned.

a decision by Oct.

1

home

children,

schooling because

there is no one to protect them from teacher pedophiles like Ronald Archer.

around every few years after

Archer, forced out of three con-

made

sexual advances toward her.

At Forest Glen public

about Archer’s relationship with

some of the boys

in his gymnastics

He showered with

club.

them.

He was showering with them! He was found with Schmidt on

secutive schools during his 28-year

repeated accu-

career as an elementary teacher,

sations, concerns

the

couch in a locked classroom

was found

from parents and

the

same

guilty Oct.

27 of sexual

with a weapon,

assault

exploitation

sexual

gut feelings.

and uttering death

I

blame

Archer was forced to leave these of those

all

who tamed

a

schools and was passed around like

threats.

review and decision process. The delay left the print shop employees wondering about their futures for much too long, but the decision will hopefully be the

charges against Archer in

The abuse included everything

the children

best possible solution for the college and the print shop staff as well as the college’s other employees and students who use the

from fondling to anal intercourse. There is some relief that he was

someone they should have been

or

able to tmst, confide in and look to

school and

facility.

finally

The decision accommodates the print shop staff’s desire to remain Conestoga employees and it supports the staff’s stated need to maintain or improve existing service levels while allowing the introduction of new equipment, newer technologies and a greater range of service which addresses the college’s con-

not enough. Others are accountable

rough-and-tumble teenager from a

students, parents

broken home

leagues to Justify

cerns.

Archer’s reign of sick terror on

might have spared Schmidt from

pened.

innocence.

the endless nightmare he endured.

could Archer get that far?

Grenville with the proven print

shop

staff will

human

resource base of the existing

ensure that service levels are maintained or

further enhanced. It

one

financially

after

for

brought

19,

1998

almost five years of abuse.

brought to justice, but

what happened

to

the

put a stop to

downtown youth who could be

parks

streets for lost

and

if this will

happen.

It is

the

hope of every-

He was

a vims, everyone trying to rid themselves of

Every one of them should apologize to Michael Schmidt and all of

the right medicine.

guidance.

fell

Their

some

in the

very place where

community should

feel

SPOKE is Editor:

1983,

angry parents ques-

tioned Archer’s

use of graphic

street

language during sex educa-

Park senior

I

need

1

Wilmot sen-

when my son 1

will

to

be able

be able

without

this

hap-

happen?

How

my

school next year,

starts

to sleep at night. I

walk him

to

want

if

the next time

eyes

bus

to the

gut rotting from

his blue-green

ior public school

claimed Archer

have

that sparkle

I

fear,

look in

they will

if

still

of innocence.

SPOKE

is muinly funded from September to May by a payment Irom Conestoga Students Ine. (CSl) in exehange for the

Keeping Conestoga College connected

insertion of advertising in the paper.

The views and opinions newspaper do not neeessarily reflect the views ol Conestoga College or the CSl. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the CSl unless their advertisements contain the CSl logo. SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages expressed

in

this

arising out of errors in advertising

Advertising Manager: Derek Lester; Circulation Manager: Sanja Musa Faculty Adviser; Sharon Dietz; Faculty Supervisor: Christina Jonas

or rejection

address

it

know, the community

to

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Somerville; Photo Editor: Michelle Goring; Production Manager: Paul Kostal

SPOKE’S

could

know and we deserve to need some assurance that

wondering

In 1992 a student at

going to

is

it

know why

to

How

know.

that

Tammy

Phone: 748-5220,

sus-

*

children are secure.

Spoke

next

They never had a chance.

want

off concerning Archer.

public school.

the

I

needs to

guidance

existing service and that the print shop staff are treated fairly by the contract company.

the

more

not enough.

action that

with the devil, alarms were going

tion classes at Stanley

improves

leaving students

The board says

Long before Schmidt’s dance

ing his degenerate and nauseating

efficient operation that maintains or

ceptible.

its

case to decide what to do. That’s

and Archer’s col-

more

broad daylight, spread-

are

shredded,

cions and legitimate fears raised by

his

in

lives

The records from each school where he taught were thrown out

review the transcripts of the court

college that this Conestoga solution will result in a

work

victim to

but never taking

it,

They can never forget. There were enough serious suspi-

In

a teacher, allowed to do

who

destroyed.

Archer was not a sexual predator

roaming

blind eye, refusing to face the ugly

reahty of what was going on.

for

numerous

unnamed boys and Schmidt,

who

it’s

easy prey.

remains to be seen at the

Michael Schmidt,

at

school.

last year, but provincial support staff contract negotiations and the complexity of the alternatives considered made for a lengthy

The college stated in a memo to the college’s employees that combining the reprographic expertise and reputation of

school,

teachers and parents were worried

is

ext.

299 Doon Valley

Dr.,

Room

4B14, Kitchener, Ontario,

N2G 4M4.

691, 692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

beyond

the

amount paid

for

the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor

by 9'30

Monday. Submissions arc subject to acceptance and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect or MS Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not contain any libellous statements and may be accoma.in.

panied by an illustration (such as a photograph).


0

1 (

j i

SPOKE, January

15,

— Page 5

2001

Students benefit from articulation By Quan La

Australia

two years ago

after obtain-

Conestoga College has articulawhich permit the

tion agreements

college’s, graduates

obtain

to

advanced standing at several universities where they can obtain a baccalaureate in a year and a gradu-

two years. April-Dawn Blackwell, a Conestoga College graduate, went to ate degree in

Blackwell currently works with a boutique firm in Kitchener as a

marketing

went

graduate,

to

school has an international office

Austraha six months ago because of the one-year degree opportunity. He

on the Western Sydney Parramatta campus to answer all silly or legit-

Laura Brillinger, a Conestoga

was interested in the out-of-province

imate questions.

the University of Western Sydney.

College marketing graduate, trav-

She said she went to Western Sydney because it had a program applicable to her Conestoga program, she was only required to complete eight courses and the location was very appealmg.

elled to Australia

degree completion agreements at Western Sydney in Australia, Hawaii

ly takes care of interaationd stu-

Pacific University in Hawaii and Royal Roads University in British Columbia, but Western Sydney was

Most teachers have realworld experience and there are no more than 30 students per class for

-

ing her business administration

management

studies

diploma to

complete a bachelor of business

human resources

at

consultant.

two years ago

to

obtain a degree in marketing at Western Sydney. She said she had always wanted to go to Australia and this was her chance. Scott Lichty, a Conestoga College

his first choice because he to other students

Lichty said Western Sydney realdents.

had talked

all his classes.

who had completed

the program and had loved

it.

He said the reason he got a degree

COUNSELLOR’S CORIVER: I

used to make New Year's resolutions that generally didn't

that fresh feeling

of having a chance

January 10th.

It’s

new heights and As the new year begins, we are often excited

with our good intentions for positive change, despite past resolution

make him

said

is

the international

also something that will

it

and she was able

He

$10,600

want my grades to improve this semester” is more attainable. A step-by-step approach might include: attending all classes, with only sickness as an exception; staying ahead by doing textbook reading prior to class; and seeking help when necessary from faculty or a peer tutor. The latter are smaller,

week he spends $50 on rent

this

year.

said each

It

food, $135

and $50 on entertainment.

lot.

She couldn’t

she saw wild kangaroos, strange lizards, koalas

long distance

ing trips, travelled in a cyclone, developed lasting friendships with Australians and realized that Canada

calls,

because

it

to use his

es,

costs

home

is

Western Sydney. The school

learned

and amazing beach-

how to surf, went on sail-

a small Section of what people can explore and experience.

a large

is just

international student population at

Lichty said no matter what happens over the next six months he’ll never regret going to Australia.

tries

make the students welcome when they arrive. In addition, the to

(2B02).

taught her a

find red licorice for 10 months, but

spends $50 on phone bUls a month, which doesn’t include his

Blackwell said there

confidence and motivation. Success builds confidence and motivation.

A Message from Student Services

friends for a year.

is

phone.

Set goals for yourself that are realistic, achievable and measurable. Failure saps

more homeless people tittle dirtier.

would not change any of it includ-

He

20 cents each time

achievable goals that will almost assuredly lead to higher marks.

a

and not seeing her family and close

Lichty said his tuition cost

on

it’s

ing leaving home, selling her car

sooner.

appears. Instead, a long-term goal, such as “I

pay

Canada does, so

Blackwell said she thoroughly enjoyed studying in Australia. She

job

to get a

get-

and

Western Sydney meant she could earn a degree in one year instead of three

some

said Australia takes

there, are

saved her money

in the long run because going t5

I didn't

similar

ting used to because they don’t

the level of tax

stand out in the job hunt.

Blackwell said

need more motivation; I needed smaller goals, or at least my long-term goals needed to be organized into easily manageable steps. Many of us tend to set goals that may be out of reach (“This semester, I'll get all A's”). As a result, we feel let down, frustrated, even powerless when the first disappointing grade Year's resolutions never worked.

He

exposure

failures.

My experience at a “Changeways” workshop helped me to recognize why my New

He

college diploma, but he’ll have both.

delivered using

are

methods such as tests, presentations, group projects, essays and exams.

uate requires a university degree or last past

to solve problems, achieve

challenges that encourages us to set goals.

es

was because the business world is split on the issue of whether a grad-

Goal-Setting

^

Blackwell said the education system is very similar because cours-

CORRECTION In the Jan. 8 issue of Spoke it was incorrectly reported bursaries would be doled out the week of Jan. 8. In fact, they will be available from the registrar’s office the week of Jan. 22. Spoke apologizes for the error and any inconvenience it may have caused.

CLASSIFIED

SUMMER OF YOUR LIFE — Camp Wayne, NE PA. Counselor Specialists for

Outdoor Adventure

-

all

LandAVater Sports. Tennis;

Climbing/Ropes, Camping, Mtn.

Biking; SailingAVaterskiing/Boating; Roller Hockey;

Rocketry,

A & C, Drama, Radio, Video. RNs for our

Health Center. Interviews in conjunction with 4-school

Job Fair in Kitchener on TUES.,

FEB

6.

Call 1-888-549-

2963; E-mail: info@campwayne.com; On-line application:

www.campwayne.com.

EXTRAMURAL MEN’S HOCKEY TRYOUTS

mumrkbeataoeson.com

3;30pm-4:30pm. Full protective equipment is mandatory. Tryouts are for a non-contact tournament in Sarnia on Feb. 2 & the Conestoga Contact tournament on Feb. 9 All

'/M/^rsPh'/vy

tryouts are from

THURS JAN

WED JAN WED JAN 370 HIGHLAND ROAD W., KfTCHENER FOOD BASICS PLAZA

744-1

385 FAIRWAY ROAD

893-2464 884-7376 622-777A

402 KING STREET

S.,

N.,

415 HESPELER ROAD,

KiTCHENER CANADIAN

WATERLOO BETWEEN

TIRE PLAZA

HARVEYS & BURGER KING

CAMBRIDGE ACROSS FROM MCDONALD’S

11

17 24

1

PLAYERS MUST BE A FULL TIME

CONESTOGA COLLEGE STUDENT

NO VARSITY HOCKEY PLAYERS


Page 6

— SPOKE, January

15,

2001

Fitness

Student life a popular resolution

still

By Kyla Rowntree It is

The time we

that time again.

designate to

sit

about resolutions

down and think we would like to make in the new yeim Students

said

Kimmel.

“I’m

in

weight.

thought

new

year as indicat-

ed in a random survey conduct-

Doon

campus

in

this

and

to I

me

reach

she’s never really tion before,

made a

however

different.

this

resoluis

family.”

have a fitness goal. need to do some more running and have a goal set that

school

and

I

full

time

work

part

I

as

all I

don’t

Being in third year, I think you from all the stress. I dso want to study more. I think I just failed the exam I wrote and I want lot.

I

help

will

me

New Year’s

reach

think

disco clubs,”

“I

my

LASA

ogy lege,

at

the col-

said

getis

a

resolution.

student

student,

said she plans to stop swearing in

the

new

year.

a

second-year

need to classes, I

studying more,” “I’m slacking off in

start

I

“I

but

have

accounting stu-

work less

doesn’t

study

sec-

ond-year

tion to

and

as

Darrell Brown, a

dent,

he

said

bother

making resolu-

Brown

tions.

trated, I swear.

marketing

I

need to study

a resolu-

second-year

have also planned to not work as much in the new year. I have two

I

made

more.”

pretty bad.

the

all

know I still pass all my courses,

going out much.”

need to stop swearing,” said Hallam. “When I get really frusIt’s

going to

said Maikano.

said

my

“I

need to work out two or three times a week,” said Donald. “I have also made a resolution to “I

Bekele,

management student, she needs to put more effort

think.

management

to stop

more and stop

“I

Christine Hallam, a second-year

materials

need

materials

into her school work.

resolution.”

director of educational technol-

thafs

said Bekele.

First-year

student,

said he needs to study harder.

Eden

Sheena Wilson,

John Donald,

management

husband works and I

enough.

more so

can do better.”

winter coat,”

I

I

eat a lot

my

Alfred Maikano, a second-year materials

I

Kimmel

to lose

ach.

do.

I

need

said Oxbig, pointing to his stom-

My

“I

ting in shape

year

need to hang on to a job more than six months and I need to buy a car and most of “I

to

need to work as

eat a

Donald

go

I

time.

program

my

kids,

my

think

year’s resolution.”

Heidi Kimmel, a third-year computer programming student, said

more

hope to stick to my resolution by working Iqss and giving more time to myself and I

much

to study

goal set that will help

sleep and to "spend

my family.

lose

I’m taking has

made me

more

time with

I

Sheena Wilson, a first-year law and security student, said one of her goals is to start working out. “I have a fitness goal. I need to do some more running and I have a

new

get

married

May

College have put

tions for the

ed at the December.

diet,”

want

into their resolu-

Wilson

“I’m going on a

Conestoga some

lutions he has this year.

list

for

getting at

New Year’s

Studies, family also top

Mike Oxbig, a stu-

_ few reso- ^^^'9

“I tend to

dent, said there

year.

are a

because

ConesScgef's Pids

make

resolutions as I

go along,” said Brown. “I make goals for myself throughout the I

make them new year.”

don’t

it’s

a

just

Itialte

Fiddleps Gpeen TLJ^sdav JciniLjarv 2000 T <^>

5 Bucks

for

the bus,

Go't

One

@

NO COVER!

Beer?

@

Bus Leaving Rez 1 0 9 pm another Sign-up in the cisi Office

pm


SPOKE, January

And now

teeing

15,

2001

— Page 7

Condors scratch out win

off...

Viveiros notches hat-trick By

in victory.

Lisa Hiiier

Jeff Viveiros scored a hat-trick

and the

winning goal in the Condors’ last soccer game of the year to beat top premier league team SNP United 6-5 on Dec. 21 at the

Doon campus

recreation cen-

tre.

Viveiros scored the the

game

less

the

half.

into

first goal of than 30 seconds

He was

open,

received a pass and put the ball off the post and into the net.

Alfredo

Maikano

scored

the

Condors’ second goal and Sheref Sherifah scored to put them up 3-0.

Condor Ambramovic

goalie

in front of the net

good

Ivica

anticipated passes

and made some

saves.

SNP United kept coming though and scored two goals before the end of the half as they were left wide open in front of the net. This cut the lead to one at 3-2. The game got increasingly physical as it went on. Goals went back and forth. SNP United tied it at three when Ambramovic let an easy one go in from about mid-field early in the second half. Jose Rivas scored to tie the game at four on a shot that the SNP United goalie only got a piece

United scored again and

Viveiros scored his second goal of

game to tie it at five. Ambramovic continued

United forward streaks past a Conestoga defender during

indoor-soccer league play Dec. 21

matched, back-and-forth

The Condors

times.

eventually

and

won

to

make

The contest was an evenly the lead changing hands four the

game

6-5,

solid goaltending

(Photo by

some good saves and keep team

in the

on the strength

from Ivica

Ambramovic.

Usa

his

using some harsh words to describe the refereeing, before finally leav-

to bear the brunt of Conestoga’s

ing the game.

defensive lapses. However, a col-

incident seemed to upset United and Viveiros was able to pot a third and go-ahead goal to hand SNP United its first defeat of the season. One blue card was also handed

lision near the

caused

the

end of the game ejection

and

of

Doug

Oberholzer of SNP United. The caU was for hitting and then

The

players stayed on the floor.

The

SNP

out to Conestoga player Ilias Tsatsas.

Countdown O O O) O

i-i

to 00

ISO Registration

(f) Conestc^ College

The

registration audit

is

Hiiler)

game, despite having

arguing with the referee.

the

.

affair with

of Jeff Viveiros's hat-trick

Ambramovic

of.

SNP

A SNP

February 14, 2001 Join the celebration!


Page 8

— SPOKE, January

15,

2001

Conestoga’s Graduate

new to

FM radio station

something different

Digital Edition - January 15, 2001  
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