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33rd Year

What’s Inside

Snow days

rare

— No. 44

-

Not afraid to flaunt

it

at the college By

Kirsten Fifield

Milner said by not having vehicles in the parking lots, the clear-

The snow day that closed Conestoga College on Dec. 12 marked the fourth time the college has been closed since 1988, says Barry Milner, a manager with physical resources.

He added the last time he can even remember discussing a closure

was

ing crew was able to clear the lots

more

efficiently.

“We

can normally stay ahead of said Milner, “but Tuesday was difficult because of the wind and the timing of the the

storms,”

storm.”

Milner said the college had four its staff working on

members of

in 1997.

CHYM-FM reported at 6:15 a.m.

snow

clearing the

Dean Robinson

on Tuesday morning that classes would be cancelled and at 6:45 a.m. that the college would be

the college,

resigns from college.

closed.

p.m. that night.

PAGE 2

Milner said

followed the protocol on college closure due to excessive snow, which says a decision should be reached by 6:30

The

The

final decision is

made by

who

discusses the situation with staff at

each of the

he

college

that the

may remain open

close, or decide to close just

one or

Electric vehicle

wins

robotics contest.

PAGE 3

Amy

consultation

full

of snow and had to be

trucked out.”

This

the first time in a

is

few

years that the college has had to resort

to

more expensive

the

process

other

on

locations

campus.

Milner said

River Transit, the Region of Waterloo and the public works departments in the various munici-

college to do this so early in the

palities to gather information

on

road conditions.

Milner said there are many con-

it is

also rare for the

season.

He

said

the

spaces due to is

loss

of parking

snow accumulation

not a big concern for the college

and he estimates the college

is

run-

cerns other than whether the col-

ning with about 100 less than

lege parking lots are clear to con-

usual 3,100 spaces.

when deciding

if the

college

will close.

“We need

to ask ourselves if

it’s

safe to have students and employ-

ees on the roads,” said Milner.

“We

also need to consider that even if

we can

get people into the lots,

continued snowfall

from getting them

contest,

Milner. “One-third of parking lot 6

involves Milner contacting Grand

sider

Vanmackelberg, a Conestoga graduate, won the bikini and Chris Karr, a first-year civil engineering student, won the male hot bod contest at the Biz Bash Dec. 7.

said.

CSI president resigns By Tammy Somerville

dent of student

option of moving snow piles to

two of the campuses.

The

contractor had eight pieces

out of places to put the snow,” said

despite

area school boards deciding to

for

called in at 9

“One of the problems was we ran

was

McGregor emphasized

was then

of machinery working to clear the campus and had cleared it twice prior to the snowfall that began again at 4 a.m. Tuesday morning,

college principal Grant McGregor,

Milner and campuses.

who works

contractor,

The

this

a.m.

as early as 11

a.m. on Dec. 11.

may prevent us

out.”

He

said the college lots

its

CSI

president

LeBeau

Phil

resigned suddenly Dec.

Brad Whiteford, CSI

were

snow on Wednesday and would continue trucking snow on the weekend to deplete some of the mounds in and around the ing

lots.

“I’ll

vice-presi-

student

president Dec. 14 after a board of

restructuring

and

“I think

and

it

looking

is

new role.

I’m up

for the challenge

definitely will

be one,” he for

said.

com-

Whiteford said he believes LeBeau’s reasons for resigning were due to academic and ment,

but

financial pressures.

One of Whiteford’s

PAGE 7

directors elections are held.

‘We need to focus on trying to cresome cohesiveness and train new bodies before current members move on so they (new members) know where we are directed,” he added. ate

Jon Olinski will take over the position of vice-president of opera-

Technology

for full-time, part-time, continuing

Conestoga College has hired a director for the new School of

nology for seven years. He will be designing the new school to include current programs such as computer programmer

in Kitchener, a business-to-business

e-commerce company, for one year. He also worked for die ConestogaRovers and Associates in Waterloo, an environmental engineering firm.

will offer opportunity

education and trades and apprentice students, said

Donald.

gram in the School of Business, and introducing new programs

Conestoga College president John Tibbits said Donald has been working with experts in the industry to choose the best programs for

such as information technology

the

management. The School of Information Technology will also include newly

veys of other colleges to get ideas

/analyst,

which

is

currently a pro-

designed post-graduate programs,

programs and courses. School of Information

certificate

The

at

top priorities

as the director of information tech-

John Donald was hired for the new position on Nov. 1. Donald has a PhD in engineering from the University of Waterloo. He was a senior project manager for Entrade

the rec

be looking

be working on team-building in the new year because of the amount of turnover within the CSI. Ramy Michael, former vice-presiwill

By Quan La

Information Technology.

I’ll

and long-term planning.” Whiteford wants to get a good core of people for February when the executive and board of

new school. He said the college

has done sur-

new information technology

for the

which is required

expand the offerings at the college and meet the requirements of a major school,

to

on the CSI board of and on the academic sub-

tions. Olinski is

directors

committee.

Donald joins college as new director Condors stung 8-5 by Seneca College.

KPI surveys and

centre. Internally

forward to his

to progress with

the college issues such as

dent of operations, was appointed directors meeting

resigned

affairs,

heavy courseload.

be looking

some of

5.

LeBeau was unavailable

designed with snow control in mind. The contractors were still clear-

parking

Sept. 21, citing a

of IT

sector with lots of jobs.

There is a need for information technology graduates because there are many information technology jobs unfilled, said Tibbits. It is expected that the new School of Information Technology will open in the fall of 2001. The college will begin promoting

the school

sometime

after the

New

Year, said Tibbits.

The

college

is

hoping

it

will

be

able to offer applied degrees in

information technology in two to three years.


— SPOKE, December

Page 2

18,

2000

Journalism loses one-of-a-kind teacher By Tammy Somerville

make Conestoga College is losing one of its most professional and dedi-

member

program is

at the

in the journalism

college since 1989,

resigning effective the end of this

month. Robinson, who has taught nearly every course offered in the journalism program, is well liked by his students and well respected by faculty colleagues.

Dick

Scott,

teacher

a

at

Conestoga for over 31 years, said Robinson has been a wonderful asset to the program, because of his

combined teaching talent, recognized writing ability and his depth of journalistic experience. “Dean’s departure will be a major loss to this

program,” said Scott.

think they can teach, but

“Many

Robinson was a professional.

knew

He

His funniest and most enlighten-

to

ing

first

said

Jankowski. that

est quality is that

had it in my head we could just sit around and talk about writing. My first class went fine, but the second class only half showed up. I learned there better be structure, guidance and assignments for them

Aubrey Hagar Award for outstanding teacher. I’m sorry he didn’t think he should have.”

Robinson teacher

is

Robinson moments as

who brought all of his work

and recreational experience and knowledge to the classroom. He isn’t sure what led him to journalism, but when he was in grade school he had a paper route for the London Free Press and sports, religiously.

“By reading

the newspaper a

lot,

consciously or otherwise gained

an appreciation for

how

stories are

put together,” said Robinson. Ironically, his career

in

Dean Robinson, a journalism teacher at Conestoga College for 1 1 years, is leaving the col-

lege at the end of the month.

began at the 1965 in the

(Photo by

Tammy Somerville)

what he preaches which

made

Scott added Robinson has a very

promotions department as a writer

tise

humorous way about himself

and in the newsroom as a general assignment reporter. He worked at CKCO-TV and CKKW-AM/CFCA-FM Radio in Kitchener as a news and sports reporter and announcer from 1978

him a better writer, he said. “I was forced to defend some of

dry,

and

is

a wonderful storyteller

who

leaves out no details.

“You got wanted

it

it

all,

whether you

or not,” he said laughing.

Scott thinks of his co-worker as a

man who

goes into the classroom

incredibly well prepared and has great knowledge of what he

is talk-

ing about.

to 1979.

Robinson said he started teaching change of pace. At the time he was working at the

for a

a former co-

Stratford Festival as a supervisor

ordinator of the journalism program, who taught at Conestoga for

and freelance writer and editor, but he wanted to be more involved in writing without the day-to-day

Andrew Jankowski,

27 years, agreed that Robinson is an excellent teacher. “He is very meticulous about his

grind of journalism.

Students have forced

him to

prac-

proud

down

it’s

most

the

the practices talked about in class,” said Robinson. “Good students can

would be easy

to

say I’m

How

that.

how good you

good you get

Jim Hagerty, who taught

edge.

“He

freely gives to anyone,” said

who added

Hagerty,

that

Robinson

he’s in the classroom

and he does what he knows needs to be done. “He’s not standing up at the front

room saying ‘Hmmmmm,

now what do

I

do?’

He

believes in

proudest of the people who have gone out of here and have done well in the field of journalism, but

giving the students the best educa-

I’m not sure they wouldn’t do well without us,” he said.

means material,” said Hagerty. Sharon Dietz, journalism program co-ordinator, started teaching at Conestoga at the same time Robinson began. She said his best asset as a

He was

that

happiest about students

with good intentions, work ethics

and not many skills, “They showed up every day, persevered and worked hard. I’m not sure they would have made it, but they believed in themselves and we showed them we believed and they were able to do something.” Robinson said the most important

be challenging. It’s good for them and those who stand in front of them.” Robinson said he has also gotten energy from his students. Before he started teaching he had written five books and since he began teaching he has written 13. His books include a biography of hockey player Howie Morenz and histories of towns and townships in Huron

thing for journalism students to

and Perth counties.

class with a desire,

know is what they are attempting to do

is

doable.

“It isn’t rocket science.

task

is

getting

researching

way

it

to share

said. “It takes

a

The

story

and writing

it

mean

in

his

CD

o GO

is that

students

cerned with improving standards and was always watching to make sure standards weren’t eroded.

“He always said ‘This program should be hard to get into and hard to get out of.’ He sets the bar high

in a

doing well.

and encouraged faculty to keep up by encouraging them to seek prosaid development,” fessional Dietz.

can help you

Continued on Page 3

Quality Policy Conestoga College continually seeks opportunities for improvement to

meet and exceed the needs of our students, employees

it

he connects with his by using humour. “Even when he’s telling them they need to improve, he says it with humour. He is an incredibly good teacher,” said Dietz. Robinson has always been con-

teacher

Conestoga college fp

view

razzle-dazzle,

idea,

it with others,” he hard work and inter-

I

he can, which

doesn’t

basic

What I can’t do in any tangible way is make you want to be a writer, but if you come to

est in

tion

College np

§

in the

1999, said the thing that has always impressed him the most is that Robinson shares what he has, especially his experience and knowl-

Conestoga

§

is

want.”

journalism program from 1993 to

of the

prominent.

would read the paper, especially

I

many

has

a teacher, but said

hard to narrow “It

channel

knows why

to do.”

well-travelled

a

day at the he taught changed his ideals

“I

for the

I

was on his college. The first

as a teacher

about teaching.

Robinson’s greathe cared about his

work. “I nominated Dean a few years ago

win, but

moment

class

London Free Press

his craft.”

way

could offer,”

he

He added

Dean Robinson, who has been a

out of his

sure his students got the best

of what

cated teachers. faculty

He went

work.

and communities.


SPOKE, December

18,

—Page 3

2000

Educate yourself online By Quan La Pamela Stadden, co-ordinator of education at Conestoga

online

College,

new

offering a

is

online

submit two essays and write a final exam. Dave Stewart, director of continuing education, said Conestoga

instead of waiting for the next

College provides an array of online

semester the course

courses and will continue to add

Online education also benefits people who want to get skills or upgrade their skills to compete in

ma

or certificate, pending approval

^

1 to right,

Electric vehicle

access to an

Each member of the group was

Inc. team’s pop-bottle transporta-

usually assigned a specific job or task in the assembly of the final

automation competition for design project number 2 in the program’s problems and design class on Nov.

model and throughout

27.

shared with each other to allow us

The device Jones, Brissett

by robotics and Freeman Gowland, Paul

progres-

“Ideas and improvements were to construct the

students,

economically efficient vehicle to

Roger

transport

pop

the

the job market, said Stewart.

Students save on travel time and expenses. Students with children

bottle,”

said

-

Tek

was required

members and

the

to design

The team encountered a few

and manufacture a fully operational and safe electrically powered vehicle. Ten teams competed. Each member of the group pre-

obstacles along the way, but with

sented four designs for possible selections and each of the designs were reviewed. Techno - Tek

Technologies’ design considerations included circuit timing power, transferability, reliability,

ingenuity and determination, they were able to overcome most of

them, said Gowland.

“We had

The device has components

visual

three unfixed that currently

show the college calendar and will be used for college marketing conventions or for display

at the

Tibbits said that in the past the

a lot of laughs and cre-

ativity during the entire process,”

Gowland. “Every member of the team had something unique to offer and we all contributed a good

had been

“We didn’t want to make a small

Continued from Page 2 “Dean is a person who seeks

Robinson

an exceptionally fine teacher who came to Conestoga and revamped every course he is

taught in the journalism program, she added.

“He worked hard to build the repand the college.

Dean

teachers like is

number

goes to

1

It

is

program

because of

that this college

in the province. Credit

all at

the college, but

Dean

an example of what excellent

is

and unless

die in the next couple won’t die a teacher.” Robinson prefers things were different, but since he is not able to change them, he will move on. “This has been for the most part

of weeks,

I

I

in my working “Not everybody gets this opportunity and I’m lucky to have had it. I will look back on it fondly.”

a

special

life,”

he

part

said.

“Robinson has been very ed over

this past

semester in partic-

ular,” said Dietz.

“He’s decided he

doesn’t have to live his that,

frustrat-

life

like

he can go on and do some-

cost effectiveness, durability, ease

project.”

sen to do.”

of operation and safety. Their third design incorporated a large bicycle wheel attached to a

enjoyed the process of designing and building

Robinson is leaving Conestoga because of differences with college management.

wooden frame which had a motor mounted to it. The motor was

“I think the projects assigned in

wheel during operation. They chose to build this design. The assembly of the car, testing of the circuit and final assembly of the project and report were completed at Gowland’s house, where large

he

the device.

the

“In this equation, I’m the

problem solving and design provide

an

remarked Tibbits

display

in

size.

nicely into a

fits

from the showroom to fit into almost any size car, he said. An update on outsourcing the print shop followed. Kevin Mullan,

is

hoping for a

final decision to

made between Dec.

11

and

be

14.

Support staff at Ontario’s community colleges ratified a contract on Nov. 16. Tibbits said Conestoga’s support

voted 81.22 per cent in favour of the settlement. Results across Ontario from the 4,785 support staff who voted staff

were 83.82 per cent

thing else and that’s what he’s cho-

course

change,”

regard to the display’s

the agreement and 16.15 per cent

faculty can do.”

attached to the frame with a dowel on the shaft, which rotated the

Conestoga.

be done.

effort to lead to the success of the

said

Students can register for any OntarioLeam.com online course at

in support of

against.

Robinson seeks new adventures

utation of the journalism

said

Brissett

of online learning opportuni-

ability

limited and something needed to

with a statement of gratitude for

learning experience has been a good one,” said Jones.

class

and 14 metres in length.

college’s marketing tool

120 feet.

The display is about four metres in height

The students spoke about how they learned to cope under pressure in last month’s event.

sionally,” Dietz said.

156

Doon campus.

college.

excellence, personally and profes-

feet with their distance of

each

ties for their students.

The

Still

lege in November.

required from

its

site,

only one college to avoid competition, rationalize resources and increase the avail-

marketing department.

new

ing the previous college record of

Techno

provided

Conestoga’s vice-president of finance and administration, said he

Technologies Inc. has been very successful in completing the work

that

Web at

is

student/client services building at

ported a two-litre pop bottle full of water the furthest distance in 10 seconds. Their device won by beat-

feel

offered.

OntarioLeam.com course

and

reliable,

Wojtasiak. “I

is

program,

the

The group’s appearance ended

built

and Jack Wojtasiak, trans-

where 21 Ontario community colleges have partnered together to develop and deliver online courses. Each college selects courses that complement their existing distance

Championship followed by an

sion.

most

formerly

place in the Ontario Marketing

experiences from the two-day championship hosted by the col-

assortment of tools and hardware.

The Techno - Tek Technologies

automation

part of a con-

tube that can easily be carried

marketing tool. About 10 third-year marketing students, wearing medallions around their necks, shared their

sets distance record

its

is

OntarioLeam.com, called Contact South,

called

on the theme of marketing, college president John Tibbits commented on the college’s new marketing apparatus currently being displayed in the

explanation of the college’s

the robotics and

their

the financial and emotional support the college has given to the

Marketing was the hot topic at Conestoga College’s board of governors meeting on Dec. 4. The meeting began with an appearance by the college’s marketing team who won second

Jack Wojtasiak, Freeman Jones and Paul Brissett’s pop-bottle transportation device travelled 156 feet in 1 0 seconds, beating the previous college record by 36 feet. (Photo by Quan La)

The

mer to continue with

By Reni Nicholson

.

won

Conestoga College sortium,

Students thank the college

.

tion device

disciplined learner, said Stewart.

The colleges bid on courses and have a year to implement them, said Stewart. According to the

to

Students can use the courses as

can be very

education offerings.

online for discussions three times a

an hour,

is that it

student has to be a very

continue with their peers. Students can make up the course during the evening or in the sum-

benefits students

general electives towards their diplo-

full

fall,

The

Stewart said online education who have failed a course in their curriculum, but want

Stadden said students taking her course would be required to meet for

save on day-care costs. Stewart said a disadvantage of

offers

Eighty-three people have registered for online education this year.

20th century 48-hour course.

courses to provide students with the option of studying online.

team had

college cur-

26 courses ranging between 36 and 56 hours online and

and consider these charac-

new

the

The

lifestyles easily.

people’s

they are available during the winter and spring semesters.

week

By Quan La

into

fits

Students can learn about the basic elements of tragedy as outlined by

literature in the

left

lonely.

it

rently

teristics in relation to

Roger Gowland,

online learning

because

course called Tragic Heroes of Twentieth Century Literature.

Aristotle

of their program co-ordinator. Stewart said online education has become a popular way of learning

excellent

opportunity for students to use their own inventive skills and

move-

able object, so I’m moving. People in

my

and around the program know reasons and I’d rather look for-

ward, not back,” said Robinson.

Leaving was not a decision he made quickly or easily he said, adding there is some sadness

imagination,” said Brissett. “I think this provides excellent preparation for students entering

attached to

the workforce in the world of mechanical engineering.”

epiphany.

“I

look

it.

at I

it

as

wasn’t

a

bom

bit

of an

a teacher

of the most treacherous bodies of on a 300-foot Russian

water,” ship.

He

has

travelled

across

all

Canada and has been to more than 40 countries since 1973, including Egypt,

the Soviet Union, the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador, West Africa, Singapore, Hong Kong and

Czechoslovakia.

Robinson

is

known

for his “off-

the-beaten-track” adventures. In 1987 he trekked to the top of

Mount Kilimanjaro and

in East Africa

1994 he tackled the Inca

in

Trail in Pern.

He

also enjoys adventure

water,

kayaking

on the

various

rivers

Dietz added that she gives him

throughout Ontario, Quebec and

“walking the talk.” Robinson, who is only 54, said he is leaving, but not retiring. He

the eastern U.S. In 1991 he sailed

Va., to

doesn’t think he ever will.

In 1995 he kayaked Fiords of Nuuk

credit for

He

has a couple of ideas for books he’s hoping will come together next year.

He will also travel. In February he will again embark on a journey, this time to Antarctica where he is looking forward to his trip through the Drake Passage, “one

Ocean from Norfolk, Bermuda to New York City.

the Atlantic

in Greenland.

Robinson added he has no regrets about his decision to join the team at Conestoga. “It’s

been a

real privilege to

into contact with so

Over

many

come

students.

the years, they have taught

me more

than I’ve taught them.”


Private universities

c

1

threaten education Ryerson Polytechnic University students brought an emergency motion to the board of governors Nov, 27 requesting sup-

J4W

port in the fight against the creation of private, for-profit univer-

&

sities.

private, for-profit universities in Ontario

The introduction of

4$

will threaten students’ ability to receive a quality, accessible

local

public education, the university’s Federation of Students told the board. “Private universities are not a choice at hibitive

The costs are procompromised by ris-

all.

to education is already

and access

of the Canadian

ing tuition fees, deregulation and crippling student debt,” said Odelia Bay, vice-president education of the Ryerson local of the

student federation. Bill 132 was introduced in the Ontario legislature Oct. 19 by Diane Cunningham, Minister of Training, Colleges and

Universities.

The

bill

intends to bring several changes to the

Ontario college and university system. The purpose of the bill is to expand the access of Ontario student degree programs by allowing the establishment of privately-funded degree granting institutions in the province as well as

permitting Ontario

community colleges

offer

to

WHICH IDIOT SCHEDULED FIRE DRILL DURING LUNCH ?

rREAT

...

applied

degrees. Bill

132 will allow corporations to operate for-profit universi-

and colleges in Ontario. There are several concerns about private

ties

for-profit universities.

be privately funded because they will be funded by public funds such as student assistance and public research money. Secondly, the cost of private universities will be prohibitive for most students creating a two-tier system of education - one for

The

first is

that they will not in reality

who

can afford the exorbitant tuition fees and an under-funded public system for the rest. Access is already being compromised by increasing tuition fees. Students are graduating with obscene debt and private unistudents and their families

versities will only

make

Prejudice

Group home opponents need enlightening By

both disgusted and sad-

was

I

dened by the response of a few Kitchener residents to the location of a group

home

The

in their neigh-

who live in the Lackner Woods subdivi-

What

understand

to

an opinion

they attend school.

built

by the Sunbeam Residential

door.

not expected to meet the same quality standards as pubfunded universities. How can we be sure that high quality education will be offered by private universities? And is it possible that the government will reduce its commit-

ties are

lically

funding public post-secondary institutions if private forprofit universities are permitted? Post-secondary education is an imperative in a knowledgedriven economy. Students today cannot be successful without a

ment

to

post-secondary education and everybody, regardless of their financial status, should have the right to this education. The province has drastically cut funding to the universities. Nearly $400 million a year has been cut from the public system and universities are struggling to maintain then programs. -

Ontario currently ranks ninth out of the 10 provinces in Canada in funding to post-secondary education. Instead of importing U.S. -style private universities, the gov-

ernment should be looking at additional funding for publically funded universities and student loan programs to invest in the future of our province and the next generation. Private universities will change the education system into a

money-making industry with

a competitive market.

Education should not be turned into a profit-making industry. Education shouldn’t be about how deep your pockets are.

Development Centre, relocated. The four-bedroom bungalow will

way he would

not have

if

moved

I

comment from Arlene Metz who

said, “...I’m going to have to look

have young children

First

at

I

them. I’m going to have to feel

said,

will If

sorry for them.” it

We, as a society, need to accept and embrace our

should pity them.

bom It

people

with

except

from themselves

is

because they

tion, society will

I

never move for-

in this respect.

suggest the three residents of

of their parents and other adults

Lackner Woods who have a problem with this group home being

around them.

built in their

Metz

should see the creation of

group home as an opportunity

this

ences.

neighbourhood

for area children to

grow up

in a

adults they

grow up

that celebrates all

I,

people, not merely carbon copies

my

is

neighbourhood think

long and hard about what kind of

want

their children to

to be.

for one,

do not

fears to

my

aspire to pass on

children.

mainly funded from September to May by a payInc. (CSI) in exchange for the

ment from Conestoga Students

Keeping Conestoga College connected

insertion of advertising in the paper.

expressed

this

in

The views and opinions

newspaper do not necessarily

views of Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers

Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz; Faculty Supervisor: Christina Jonas

Phone: 748-5220,

are?

as there are people like

ward

tain the

address

to accepting

who we

simply because they are different

Conestoga College. is published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Photo Editor: Tammy Somerville; Production Manager: Kirsten Fifield Advertising Manager: Reni Nicholson; Circulation Manager: Lisa Hiller

SPOKE’s

comes

it

their ignorance to the next genera-

are not endorsed by the

SPOKE

when

each other for

The only reason they would ever be traumatized by someone

simply

means welcoming these

be able

Stajduhar and Metz passing on

dices.

mean

to

preju-

bom w ith

SPOKE

Spoke

like

we seem

that

is it

evolve in every other way,

to

As long

means we, as a society, need to accept and embrace our differThis

of

pick up on the fear and prejudices

various disabilities does not

we

Why

be because they inherit the

views

people.

all

know

I

these children are traumatized,

Children are not

looking for Stajduhar’s pity.

were

who

be traumatized.”

will

celebrates

of people in the area

Metz.

doubt any of these six adults are

Just because they

lot

ignorant

differences. I

“A

faced

group home as an opportunity for area children to grow up in a neighbourhood that

Living in a subdivision does not

was disgusted by the comments from Goran Stajduhar who

six

to 39.

dealing it

the creation of this

grant you the right to pick and

choose your neighbours. Secondly, I was saddened by the

24

is still

same prejudices

Metz should see

next

in

hard to believe that in the

100 years ago.

a right to

handicapped adults aged

house

with the

he does not

whether or not these adults move into his community. The same

want the group home, being

suffer if private universi-

that

it

21st century society

have the right to an opinion on

sion,

may

is

find

I

Stajduhar does not seem

upscale

residents,

of themselves.

our

into

neighbourhoods with open arms.

Student loan programs are woefully inadequate and most students who rely on government funding to attend university or college cannot afford their education without working while Third, the quality of education

homes

kinds of group

Kirsten Fifield

bourhood.

the situation worse.

exists

still

is

ext.

299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. 691, 692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

CSI

logo.

CSI unless

SPOKE

shall not

arising out of errors in advertising

reflect the

in

SPOKE

their advertisements con-

be

any damages amount paid for

liable for

beyond

the

the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor

by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance a or rejection and should be clearly written or typed;

MS Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not contain any libellous statements and may be accom-

WordPerfect or

panied by an illustration (such as a photograph).


.

SPOKE, December

18,

2000

— Page 5

A snow job

December

.-JP $

0

|Pf

0 0 0

Tts Lasil cy X

JL-j

(onVenient °nljj f°r

& Not

Quick and

]jaStJ

payments QVietrpas!

judication

(uafanteed Gx eJ fate Tor jjoITow up

20th, 2000)

1

year

mem L er

t

Simply complete the stocking stuffer application form available through the following representatives, or through the credit union office:

Bob Evans Ext 283 Tltte

Ext 392

Taylor

Send the form by fax, December 20, 2000

Duane Shadd, an academic support teacher for more than 20 years at the college, cleans off his car after snow squalls hit the region Dec. 5. Shadd didn’t mind the snowfall because he enjoys cross-country skiing, although he’s been slowed down lately because of a wrist injury. He says he’s ready to get back at it, but has to wait until given the OK by his physician. (Photo

by Tammy

mail or submit

it

in

person by

Conestoga College employees and their familes are welcome!

All

|ji|

'M'jh

Education Centre

Avenue

51 Ardelt

y

Somerville)

EpnSg ft

ECE

Bob Wall Ext. 354 Walter Boattgar Ext, 284

Kitchener, Tel (519)

ON N2C 2R5

742-3500

Fax (519) 742-6072

Web Site www.wcecu.com

students write

award-winning essays change and works towards the

By Quan La

cal

Local businesses have presented Conestoga College early childhood education students with

empowerment and self-determination of all women. Dixon and Panko won the A1 Gmelin award because of their

three

awards. Carrie

Koetsier

won the Women’s

Cambridge

Young

Christian

Associations

Cambridge

ECE

presented

by

Student

of

Award

YWCA

the

of

Cambridge. She received $500. Melanie Dixon and Jennifer Panko received the A1 Gmelin Memorial Award, which was presented by the Preston-Hespeler Rotary Club. The women received an award of $300.

The

YWCA ECE

Student

Award

presented annually to an early childhood education student who

is

demonstrated outstanding competence in their first year’s

has

field

placements.

The A1 Gmelin Memorial Award presented preferably to students with an interest in working with

is

children with

differing abilities.

Hamilton-Armitage, program co-ordinator, said are significantly more appli-

Birdena

ECE there

cations for the

YWCA because the Club

Rotary

Preston-Hesepler award is usually given to students whose interests reflect the Rotary Club’s.

Hamilton-Armitage said Koetsier award because

received the

YWCA

her past experience in

matches the

ECE

closely

YWCA mission

state-

ment which is an individual who provides high quality service, ad vocates for social and economi-

extensive experience with children said abilities, differing with

Hamilton-Armitage

To be

eligible for the

A1 Gmelin

award, students had to write an essay about their completed

CDs don’t

first

need for financial assistance and their interest in working

year, their

with children with differing abilities. The winners of the A1 Gmelin

fit your

Memorial award were required to attend a meeting at the Rotary Club on Dec. 8. The awards were open to all

ECE

students.

Dixon, a third-semester ECE student, said she was shocked to have won. She said she entered the

USED CD OUTLET

awards competition for the recognition and the money. Dixon said winning has also helped build her

Let us buy your used

self-esteem.

Panko said she was happy to receive the award because it will help with the purchase of next

CDs & DVDs

semester’s books.

Dixon and Panko said they want work with children with differing abilities. Dixon said she wants to work with special needs children. Panko currently works with chil-

to

dren with differing abilities in a therapy horseback riding program at the Central Ontario develop-

mental

program

riding

comment.

is

370 HIGHLAND ROAD W, KfTCHENER FOOD BASICS PLAZA

385 FAIRWAY ROAD

402 KING STREET 41 5

S.,

N.,

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744 - 1011 893 - 2464 884 “ 7376 622 " 7774

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a therapeutic riding program for special-needs children. Koetsier was unavailable Kitchener, which

for

new look

www.beatgoeson.com


Page 6

— SPOKE, December

18,

2000

Apply now to work By

Lisa Hiller

Pat

St.

Media and marketing

development and continuat Conestoga College, is looking for students and faculty to do some teaching and

John is looking to put together a team of people who would be

training

gain valuable

education

through

in

the

foreign

countries

communications

department.

Based on the success of a recent project in Poland, St. John said Conestoga College now has the opportunity to compete for and win projects

Mexico or

specialists

John, vice-president of

training,

ing

in

of a similar nature in

Mexico and

Brazil.

St.

willing to teach in other lands and

work experience.

John helped now independent Polskie Radio gain knowledge and tools to apply demIn Poland, St.

ocratic principles in radio broad-

Poland had had a statecontrolled communications system casting.

until

1993 when the previously

amalgamated Polish radio and teleseparated into two inde-

vision

pendent media.

The mission, through

the Polish

government and the Association of Canadian Community Colleges, was set up to show the radio officials how to organize and structure their now deregulated media system and second, to teach them how to compete with a new private system, which was not a factor during

sought

for potential projects

communist regime. At the end of the project, Polish officials were still concerned about slipping back into a state-controlled format and asked St. John to the

return.

As

Brazil

a result, a third phase

is

Poland John sees a

tunities in St.

now

yet.

real opportunity

for projects

Mexico which

and

Brazil

in

also had state-con-

communications systems. like to compete and

trolled

“We would

being considered.

win

John has been consulting with Polskie Radio officials by e-mail in between his two trips to Poland in

Requests for proposals or bids from Brazil and Mexico should be

St.

March and October, but does not know if there will be work oppor-

that training opportunity.”

coming

in spring 2001, and if Conestoga College wins the project there will probably be opportuni-

work experience in the fall or winter of 2001, according to St. ties for

1

iT o'

O O O O «v it it

t

it o' iV

it it it it it

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: The Meaning of Christmas

it

-it

it

o it

t it

o it it it o'

t

it it

o' it it it I? o* o' it it it it it it o* {? i**

it iT O*

Another holiday season is just around the comer, and with that comes a mixture of excitement, anticipation, and sometimes dread. We may be anticipating the spirit of the holiday season, a break from school, and a time for family get-togethers and mingling with friends. However, these feelings may be forgotten as we remember Christmas shopping not yet done, presents we cannot afford to buy, family obligations we have to meet, or loved ones

because he

is

be able to say he has interested peoup who can do the jobs in

ple lined

t

Those areas include

how

story

writing, pro-

selection,

to write editorials,

a newsroom,

how

editing,

how

to run

to generate busi-

and promotions, sales and

ness

marketing

skills.

“We would

like to

compete and win

it it if it it

many things to many people, but the common thread is that it is a time to make your own meaning, your own traditions, and your own fun. This holiday season, why not make it a special time by doing things you want to do, for yourself? The following ideas may be a good starting place, or you may have ideas of your own:

trying to find

is

now

already preparing proposals to send to Brazil and Mexico and wants to

o

that

training opportunity.” Pat

John,

St.

Vice-president of training

and development This opportunity

is

open

to stu-

dents and faculty from any program.

it

The it,

it

object

is

to teach people to

do

give them the tools and then they

them to that area. John wants to have some faculty to provide professor-level training and students to work sidewill apply St.

Make

Be with people you want

candles •

Go for walks to

Read a good book

be with •

Make

it

Drink eggnog

chocolates or your

Give because you want to • Be alone when you want to be • Watch a movie you like* Celebrate whatever spiritual beliefs have favorite cookies*

meaning

for

you*

Do something self nurturing

If the holiday season

is

it

by-side with people

who

o

have the skills. For faculty,

an excellent

for yourself

a particularly difficult time for you,

it it

opportunity to lay a

it

excellent

o*

St. John wants a first-refusal on Conestoga’s students for work terms meaning Brazil and Mexico

o' it

talk to a counsellor in Student Services.

o' o' <5*

HOLIDAYS

already

it

is

new foundation

and for students

it

SEASON’S GREETINGS

t

it o' o* it it it o' it

o' it

A message from Student Services (Room 2B02). o

t

t

o'

it o'

it

o

TfVi*

John said he

interested people

ducing,

it it it

Christmas means

HAPPY o*

interested.

various areas of expertise.

o

uni-

be notified and asked to submit a proposal if they are

g it it

whom we cannot visit.

maybe some

Colleges and versities will

St.

o .V

John.

o' it it o' o' it

ooo

t

it would be an work experience.

would look

at

Conestoga College

when they need students for work terms. “We would like them to come to us first,” St. students

first

John said. That is the main reason he wants to win the projects in Brazil and Mexico. “I think

it

some wonder-

provides

ful opportunities for the students to

gain

some experience, do some

travel

and get paid for

it

at the

same

time.”

John plans

St.

that

he

is

to get the word out looking for some talented

people to the program advisory committees, the chairs of programs and the deans at Conestoga. Two people from the journalism advisory committee have

approached him with “If

we can

interest so far.

put together a strong

enough team, we have a good chance of competing and winning the contracts.”

Anyone

interested in this oppor-

tunity for professional

development and work experience can contact St. John.


SPOKE, December

Condors lose By Kirsten

Fifield

The Conestoga Condors varsity hockey team lost to the Seneca Stingers for the second time in

third straight at

Ryan

Rnettner,

who was

centre.

food poisoning.

first

10 min-

game, but they lacked the momentum needed to beat the utes of the

won

Seneca

three

all

coasting to an 8-5 victory.

Condor Rickwood

assistant

Greg

coach

said Conestoga

not

is

putting forth a consistent effort for the entire

game.

“Getting 10 minutes of intensity a

game

is

not good enough,” said

win the entire game.”

— Rickwood

At about the 10-minute mark. Condor Dave Stewart scored on a short-handed breakaway to end the first

period.

About five minutes into the second period Condor Matt Turcotte received a 10-minute misconduct and game misconduct for profane

Rickwood. “We had maybe five players who played to win the entire game and we don’t have a team that can win with five, we need a full team

language and disputing a

effort.”

Seneca.

“Getting 10 minutes

a game not good enough.”

of intensity is

Greg Rickwood, Condor assistant coach Just under five minutes into the

call

with

the official.

Five seconds later Wismer capion the power play and

talized

added his second of the game for

About midway through the periCondor Greg Thede blasted a shot from the top of the circle, and teammate Steve Primeau knocked od,

Both teams turned it up in the seven minutes of the period.

Seneca scored two goals in the first five minutes of the third, giving them a three-goal lead on

Stinger Jeremy

Lawson

last

wristed

Andy

Hopkins. Less than four minutes

later

Andrew Verhovwen snuck one

o o o> O

centre. Stewart scored the Condors’ they ended up losing the game 8-5. 5-3 for Seneca.

from the blue-line by Dave

goaltender

battles for position with

lead to one.

game, Stinger Robb Wismer came from behind the net and slid one

Condor

Dave Stewart

a Seneca player during a game on Dec. 6 at the recreation goal unassisted. Despite the Condors scoring five goals,

a bullet

Longarini. At 16:37

Mark Maxwell beat Knettner up top to finish the period

from Andrew Willett and Ian Law. Condor Jason Eagan split the defence and bounced one in off shots

the crossbar at 9:53

game back

within

to put the

reach.

But

(Photo by Kirsten

Conestoga’s failure to clear players from in front of the net resulted in a goal from Steve Yurichuk at 11:17.

Condor Ted Albrecht pounded one into the comer with six minutes left in the game to round out the scoring.

Conestoga

now

has a 1-5-1 winwith

loss-tie record for the season,

Fifield)

straight losses at home. Rickwood said one of the Condors’ main problems has been taking too many penalties, which has kept them from mounting an effective

three

offence.

‘Teams are outworking us,” said Rickwood. “Three of the penalties we took tonight were lazy penalties.”

Countdown to

ISO Registration

v^o XvAv/0t-'/

___

,8P

CO

“ *e»sed%

Conestoga College np

Days

The

registration audit

is

^

first

in the rebound to narrow Seneca’s

one in at 13:50, but this was answered just 25 seconds later with

past

home

“We had maybe five players who played to

first-place squad.

periods,

— Page 7

not sched-

uled to play for another week because he was recovering from

out to a 2-0 lead in the

2000

between Hopkins’ pad and the goal post, making it 2-0 Seneca. This resulted in Conestoga pulling Hopkins and putting in

three games, after being out-shot 37-24 on Dec. 6 at the recreation

The Condors were forced to play catch up after the Stingers jumped

18,

to

Go!

February 14, 2001 Join the celebration!


Page 8

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; SPOKE, December

ife

18,

llfr Sfe

2000

*&r 'M ill*

m *

'

Season's Greetings and Best Wishes lor the New Year

Conestoga Students

* * & &

Inc.

& & & &

jjk


Digital Edition - December 18, 2000