Page 1

33rd Year

College mourns

— No. 43

Video voyeurism

student’s death By Tammy Somerville

assignments in on time,” said Scott.

He added

A

Conestoga College student

died suddenly Nov. 30.

Scott

Shaun Dennis Gilmore, 21, of Cambridge, a third-year computer programmer/analyst

student,

remembered fondly by

his teachers

is

and friends. Sarah Scott, a second-year marketing student, knew Shaun for about eight years. Their families are friends and the

two attended

Preston high school together.

“What

also

noted that

Shaun’s

Alan, graduated from the

same program six or seven years ago. Tanya Gafoor, a third-year broadcasting student, met Shaun in 1998 when they both worked at Sears and he became her reflexologist. “I know he had his certificate prior to 1998 and the upstairs of his house was converted into his

said Scott. ly

Cambridge.

Gap at Fairview Park Mall. “He was a friendly guy, a real people person and he came from a really

nice,

supportive family,”

“He was always friendand cheerful. He came from a

friendly,

family that really loved him.” John Scott, a professor in the

Friends were received at Little & Son Funeral Home in Cambridge

computer programmer/analyst program, who taught Shaun program-

Dec.

ming window

held in

applications

semester, said he

dent

who

was

a

good

this stu-

a good student

above average.

He

A

who was

always had his

Carla Oliveira, a third-year broadcasting student, shoots a video of college life around Doon campus Nov. 28. All broadcast television students are required to do a video on the college experience. Oliveira said it can be difficult because most students turn away when they see the camera. (Photo by Tammy Somerville)

3.

public memorial service was

the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses in Cambridge

Dec.

did quite well.

“He was

PAGE 6

father,

fairly

many questions.

office,” said Gafoor.

remember most about

at the

offered.

Shaun was

She added that Shaun was happy, and outgoing. “He was so cute. He was a very beautiful guy and was always very supportive. If you were in a bad mood at work, he would alw'ays bring you back.” Shaun is survived by his parents Bonnie and Alan Gilmore, his brother Christopher and sister-in-law Melissa, both of New Dundee, and his sister Bethany Gilmore, of

I

Shaun is that he had a great smile. He was great looking,” said Scott. She said Shaun liked to travel to warm places like Cuba. He was employed at Sears in the shoe department, but recently was hired

program

that

quiet and didn’t ask

9.

Interment took place in Woodland

Cemetery, Kitchener Dec.

1.

Saba gets award

for

time well spent

By Reni Nicholson Conestoga College student, volunteer and mother of four,

Dawna

Saba, was honoured *on Nov. 6

with the Waterloo

Award

for her

contributions to the community.

Saba,

43,

occupational

is

a

first-semester

therapy

assistant/

physiotherapy assistant student. Last year she studied general arts

and sciences. Along with two other longtime volunteers, Brian Norris and Ellis Little, Saba received recognition for her efforts in the enhancement of the quality of

More cameras added

life in

She was recognized

for college safety.

the area. specifically

for the founding of Bertie’s Place,

PAGE 7

a

mom, dad

or caregiver and tot

program.

one of Saba’s She has also given a helping hand at other programs and organizations in Waterloo including St. Monica Sunbeam Residential House, Development Centre, the Canadian Clay and Glass Gallery, Parks Minster Church, Le Leche League Bertie’s Place

many

COMMENTARY Long-term plan needed. PAGE 4

for Innu

Dawna Saba, a

first-year occupational

therapy assistant/physio-

therapy assistant student, received the Waterloo Award on Nov. 6 (Photo by Reni Nicholson) for her contributions to the community.

is

endeavours.

and professional storytelling. Saba said she was surprised that the award was based on the work she had done for Bertie’s Place. “I was in total disbelief. I founded Bertie’s Place almost 10 years ago. I have had no direct contact with it for about three years,” said Saba whose friend took over

Bertie’s Place. “It’s like the child that you had and they grew up and went to college,” she said about Bertie’s

Place. “It’s like

my

fifth child.”

who has been at home with four children who range in age

Saba, her

to 16 for 17 years, continues to donate her time. Saba said she is taking the

from 10

OTA/PTA certificate program in hopes of being a stay-at-home

mom for foster children. She figures the program

will

help her cope with taking care of physically challenged foster chil-

“Being able to contribute something to the world had always been a top priority to me,” said Saba. “Money has never been all dren.

that important.”


Page 2

— SPOKE, December

Mother

11,

2000

of slain “How

By Kyla Rowntree

was Not even

a pin dropping could be

heard in the room where Dawna Speers spoke in tears to about 100 students and faculty members Conestoga College on Nov. 30.

at

tionship abuse and told the story of

her 19-year-old daughter was

murdered by her exboyfriend on Oct. 7, 1991. The event was organized by the Women’s Resource college’s brutally

Group. Speers travels across Canada educating and informing youth and adults about the warning signs of

first thing that came to mind when she was waiting hospital to find out what was

Speers spoke of the “rippling murder has had on her

effect” the

family and about

ficult

and

how

how

was not

ordered

him

to

was more

she could have done to save her daughter.

Drake was repeatedly stabbed by Adam Hutton in Mississauga. Hutton is now serving 21 -year-old

life

sentence.

Speers’ powerful story shocked

many

as

choked

she spoke bravely and

back

tears

about

the

herself during the relation-

In the

fall-

end Drake, who had moved

own

that

the judge had

out on her

wake

up. Speers said

was continuously

her eldest son had jumped up and

Directorate.

the time of her death and Speers

The

film

is

educational

and informative about the warning signs of relationship abuse.

The video starts out with pictures when she was a happy-go-

evening she found out her daughter

of Drake

was murdered.

lucky child and then goes on to

“I

won’t

to escape Hutton,

stalked by him.

Adam make me a vic-

let

tim,” said Speers. “

look

I

hatred.

EWER THEW

it

that

I

am

not allowing

Adam

to

have another victim.”

Dawna Speers spoke about

her daughter’s murder to college

students and faculty on Nov. 30

in

the hopes of educating others

about the warning signs of relationship abuse. (Photo by Kyla Rowntree)

Speers said

when

she talks about

her daughter’s death ing a

wound

that is

it

is like

still

open-

very raw.

She offered advice on how people can be helped in abusive rela-

depict Drake’s

relationship

with

Hutton.

Hutton and Drake had been dating and eventually moved in together

when

the relationship

became

tionships

loving toward Drake.

ears to listen to people

Hutton progressed to a very abusive boyfriend and Drake became

help and not your mouth,” said

trapped.

abusive.

Speers said at

first

Hutton was a

and pointed out how

man when he came to her home and that he was caring and very nice

The video shows how

Hutton pushed Drake around and

friends can help too.

Speers. hear.”

W THE EACH

W THE CHRISTMAS bRAW AT THE CESA OFFICE

DRAW Will Be HEW tHEDNSWV DECEMBER 11 2000 AT 2.00PM

who need

“Don’t judge because want to

AS MANY OF THESE PICS AS YOU CAN FILL

“Open your

that’s the last thing they

SAm has come early AN0

at

have a big gap inside me that is void because of Monica. I won’t let this hole be filled with anger and I

b/memv woemet 11 2000

ftNti

late.

in the video said

ship.

Speers said during a preliminary hearing in court that Hutton had

she was going to be

Drake had become quite submissive and

time dealing with the murder

en asleep and

when

A friend

their anger.

to the heart.

at

call

her family

her sons had a dif-

Drake was stabbed 13 times. The fatal blow was the twist of the knife

Monica Drake was 19 years old

a

working while he took her paycheque and gave her an allowance. He became very aggressive and pushed her around when the kitchen was a mess, when there wasn’t any laundry done and when she didn’t

wrong with her daughter as she had no idea her daughter had been mur-

grieved and

controlling and aggressive.

Hutton gained control of Drake’s life somehow and he had Drake

the

wanted to wake him and that she literally had to restrain him in court. She spoke of how her youngest son has become a very angry person because of this tragedy. Speers presented a 19-minute video, A Love That Kills, that documents the life of her daughter and the events leading up to her death. The video was produced by the National Film Board with the help the Ontario Women’s of

relationship abuse.

said she feels that there

was very

daughter”

Speers’ at the

tears

tells tale of

dered.

Speers addressed the issue of rela-

how

my

dare he hurt

daughter


SPOKE, December

new

Burley graduates to By Lisa

Hiller

tion

manager and then

570’s sister station, 96.7

Mark

programming specialist for Conestoga College’s new community radio station CJIQ Burley, the

FM,

88.3

says he wouldn’t change

anything about his career in radio broadcasting.

Burley

his business is people spend three

said

Some

mobile.

or four years at one place and

people stay

at the

same place

some

for

30

“Radio

my first love,”

is still

who

Burley

said

adds that he has had

several jobs

different

in

cities

throughout his career but he does-

moving around

regret

n’t

since

every job he has had he hopes has

improved

his career

and made him

a better broadcaster.

Burley has worked in the radio business since 1976

ed part time while

at

when he

start-

CKKW in Kitchener

a student in the broad-

still

casting

program

College.

He

at

Conestoga

operated voice tracks,

delivered live broadcasts and remotes and worked as a producer.

when he

started part time at

CKKW while

in

still

in

He

then got a job at called

Kitchener in

on

essentially

Choo

Country in 1978 where he was air

as an all-night

grammer.

He programmed CDs

those five years was the toughest part of his career because he

away from

was

and two kids

his family

attends

Grand River

institute

and

collegiate

Ryan, 19,

his son

17,

is

currently the

is

manager at Ontario Place. He was last on-air in Sudbury on Sept. 8 and then returned home to start work at Conestoga with CJIQ. “Kitchener

is

home and

it’s

that’s the is

being

just wonderful.”

Even though Burley has spent

all

time in the radio business, that isn’t what he originally wanted to

collegiate

while working on a production of

cials as the

production manager.

Between 1980 and 1985 Burley worked at CHYM 570 in Kitchener as an

“It’s

a

announcer and then produc-

In high school at institute

in

Kitchener,

he was production trailers from Conestoga College that were there to tape the show. Burley decided he wanted to be a

the

going to be

blast.”

Mark Burley, CJIQ program specialist CJIQ has been 15 and

Mark Burley has had a long and varied career in radio. He brings his expertise to his new job as the program specialist for Conestoga College’s new community radio station CJIQ 88.3 FM. (Photo by Lisa

television

is

testing since

Nov.

currently playing music

Wizard

enthralled

of

with

Oz,

the

cameraman,

later

nar-

at the

frequency to make sure it isn’t interfering with other stations and airplanes, and that the software is

Hiller)

college by Martin Grinwis, a

on track. Burley also talked about the opportunity students will have to cross over from radio to television

woodworking teacher. As program specialist

Burley will look after programming elements, programs and peo-

to print, journalism.

acceptance into the broadcasting program at Conestoga College was

ple on-air.

pared to the ’70s even the ’80s are just so huge nobody can gauge it.”

he had to interview someone who worked in radio and then write why that person was his favourite

sure the station delivers

that

announcer.

The interview was on-air and it was after this experience that Burley decided he wanted to be a radio announcer. Burley said he is lucky to be getting the opportunity to build the

station

literally

from the

ground up. “Very few people have the opportunity to put something brand new on the air.” Burley said CJIQ was just a room with boxes when he started. Since then the computers, soundboard and microphones have been set up

on the news desk, which was

built

He

for

CJIQ

making 40 per cent Canadian music content and a certain amount of ethnic and instructional programming under the promise for performance by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission. is

also responsible for

Burley

is

also

responsible for

“The opportunities now com-

Journalists regularly move back and forth between print and broadcast journalism.

“Since there is so much choice,” he said, “that means more opportunity

for the

requirements.

teacher

At least two parts of a song must be classified as Canadian under the MAPL (music, artist, producer and

ordinator

The station will be non-hit driven with 50 per cent of the music being All genres of classified as new. music will be represented includ-

Barbara Beattie works with her detector dog Rookie and her colleagues at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. They help stop forbidden items from entering Canada that could damage our plants and animals or contaminate our food supply. This is just one of many services aimed at protecting the health of all Canadians.

Canada

when

they

Burley will be working with stamanager Paul Osbourne, journalism and broadcasting tion

lyricist) designation.

students

(graduate).”

making sure the station’s programming meets Canadian content

Protecting your health.

To learn more about the hundreds of services available from the Government of Canada: • Visit the Service Canada Access Centre nearest you • Visit www.canada.gc.ca • Call 1 800 O-Canada (1 800 622-6232), TTY/TDD: 1 800 465-7735

minutes. Industry Canada tests the

rowing that down to a sports cameraman working for Hockey Night in Canada. One of the requirements for

radio

Grand River

primarily on-air in the afternoon.

commer-

shoots a microwave

with a station identifier every 15

From 1978-1980 Burley worked in Stratford at CJCS where he was also producing

Doon campus

for

do.

1390.

transmitting

studio’s

above Door 4 of the main

teaching building at the college’s

From June 1996 until September 2000 he worked in Sudbury at Mix 105, later Ezrock 105.3, as program director and operations man-

this

He was

The radio link

jukeboxes, disc jockeys and clubs.

Conestoga College, worked with and helped him Burley at

AM

It

of

outskirts

Hamilton, as far west as Woodstock, up to Elora and Fergus and down to Lake Erie.

Mississauga as vice-president pro-

home,

CKKW

the

antenna on the Global tower in Ayr.

big part about this job

at

reach

will

1995-1996 Burley During worked with a company called Entertainment Resources Group in

ordinator of the broadcast program

Choo Country,

college station in the country.

signal to the 600-foot transmitting

announcer. Paul Scott, a former co-

get the job at

the largest coverage range of any

afternoon announcer.

radio person and

sta-

sta-

programming each week

must be spoken word. According to Burley, CJIQ has

“Early Mark Burley”, as he was known, did the morning show. From 1992-1995 Burley was in Guelph at 106.1 Magic FM where he was the program director and

sales

tion

Twenty-five per cent of the tion’s

station in Kitchener.

studying business administration and marketing at Conestoga. His second wife, Janet, is also a

program at Conestoga College.

AM

to Burley.

AM

Burley’s daughter Heather,

the broadcasting

an

interest in

so often and he wasn’t used to that.

Kitchener

a student

and blues. There has been some heavy metal, according

promotion manager in charge of contests, marketing and on-air giveaways. Between 1986 and 1989 Burley freelanced, working at a friend’s studio and did voice-overs for smaller radio stations in western Canada. Between 1989 and 1992, Burley 109 CKKW, which worked at

Burley said being in Sudbury

the radio business

since 1976

ing hip-hop, rock, classical, jazz

as

ager.

Burley has worked in

CKGL,

its

was a top-40

years.

alternative

CHYM

at

—Page 3

2000

11,

Tim Goebel, broadcast coMike Thumell and jour-

nalism co-ordinator Sharon Dietz. Burley said he has worked with each of them, with the exception of Dietz, at one point or another in his career and thinks

it’s

lege has brought

them

“It’s

great the coltogether.

going to be a blast,” he

said.


Page 4

— SPOKE, December

Commentary

2000

11,

Gas-sniffing kids

deserve better Innu children

to build a detox centre to treat

The government’s plan

may

addicted to sniffing gasoline

not be the long-term solution

required to help these children.

Industry Minister Brian Tobin announced on Nov. 26 that the Liberal government

would spend millions of dollars

to help the Innu

kick their harmful habits, but the government’s plan of impounding these children will

make them dependant on an

institution instead of

a substance.

A treatment centre is to be built in Labrador to treat addicted gas-snifffrom the communities of Sheshatshiu and Davis

ing Innu children

Inlet.

These gas-sniffing children are plagued by poverty, negligence, hunger, cold and alcoholism in their communities, but while they are

be watched,

in the institution getting treatment, they will

away from The many

fed,

warm and

their parents.

social reasons that drove the Innu children to sniff gas will

be addressed in the

institution,

which

make

will

the place appealing to

the addicted children.

Two weeks

ago, over a dozen children from Sheshatshiu, Nfld., were

sent to a treatment centre in

Goose Bay,

their

dependency on sniffing gasoline

Innu

tribe,

made

Nfld.,

by a court

order, to treat

Paul Rich, a chief of the

after

a public plea for help to treat over 39 gas-addicted

Innu children.

Many

of the children have

deemed them

days sniffing fumes to forget

The

hope because they

little

bum

as uneducated, alcoholic or a

who

feel society has

so they spend then-

because

it’s

cheap, widely available and can be easily stolen.

Sniffing gas sedates the children’s ies to the

minds and desensitizes

ing their

their

immune

their

bone marrow and impair-

system.

While undergoing treatment, the children

will deal with the effects of

withdrawal such as the shakes, hallucinations,

chills,

These children

will return

home to the same

situation that drove

them

to this addiction in the first place.

would be useless

to

The

Ontario

time because as long as they are returning to the same problems of poverty, hunger, cold and boredom, they will

want

to forget their prob-

lems and resort to sniffing gasoline again.

but sadly

ients,

not because the

it’s

government has continued

put forth a plan

pense funds and continued to con-

the

tribute to their habits.

provincial government.

would

make

it

the

those

welfare

recipi-

concluding that drug testing

jumping off point

ernment was

would be inhuman.

method

mandatory drug tests

In a proposal released Nov. 14,

who

recipients

test

that welfare

positive

then refuse treatment offered by the

government

provincial

denied their cheques and deemed

never stop.

unqualified for assistance.

freedom

to indulge in their habits,

and they may resent

more

It’s

They say such late

and

be a temporary solution for the children and the gas sniffing will parents gain

to decrease the

a

is

number of

be

will

human

a

gov-

rights, but if the

mothers

Single

make up about

do nothing,

all

rehabilitation

test positive

for

would be a

to help addicts

children

half of the 450,000

mothers on social

when

the violation of civil rights

Waterloo Region implemented the

no smoking bylaw? We’re a

and

cigarette

lot healthier since a

addicts

few

have chosen

quit or are simply abiding

to

by the

bylaw.

Even

assis-

tance are drug users, but those

about time our government

it

Ontarians currently on welfare.

Not

who

Wasn’t there a big uproar about

move would vio-

to

welfare

kick their drug habits.

welfare recipients.

before receiving their cheques.

take action to raise their children correctly, this detox centre will only

at treatment, their

and

treatment

take

A

drug testing program consisting of

doubting the province’s incentives,

to

from the

of funding

implementation of such a program,

Ontario’s Social Services Minister

While the children are away

treatment centres due to

in

John Baird suggested

Unless the parents are willing to change and stop their habits and

at

lack

to force

parents must be taught to give their children guidance or suffer penal-

such as having their children taken away permanently.

the

space

Canada

province

ents

ties

to dis-

protesting

are

Activists

first

community have problems with alcohol abuse and tend to neglect their children. The government sends the children away to an institution to get treatment, which doesn’t solve the problems at home. The solution must start at the source of the children’s problem. The in their

Ontario because of the lack of

government has that

send these children away for any amount of

Most of the older generation

Drug tests good idea

headaches, vio-

and other excruciating symptoms, but withdrawing them a period of time from gas sniffing won’t help them in the long run.

lent outbursts

It

BUSH OR GORE ANYWHERE !

FIND

bod-

CAN'T

1

cold and their hunger. They don’t worry about the effects,

which include brain damage, harming

for

THIS THING- IS CONFUSING...

they are.

children in these communities have resorted to sniffing gasoline

who

are need treatment, to ensure that

if

a few welfare recipients

who spend some, ty,

if

not the majori-

of the dollars they are given to

took action in an attempt to imple-

monthly cheques won’t be used for

support drug addictions

returning home.

ment a plan

purchasing substances like alcohol,

kick their habits by undergoing the

The government must provide counselling and support to all memcommunity to stop the gas sniffing. The social problems, including disempowerment, disruption in traditional activities, unemployment, boredom and northern isolation, must

distribution of taxpayers’

marijuana or crack.

provided treatment, the implemen-

be addressed.

than go out and buy a nice pair of

pair of boots because their

in their

slacks so they can find a job and

has a drug problem. That’s what

to treat

get off the system.

would

their children

bers of the family in the Innu

Improvements

in the Innu’s quality

of

life

and an increase

self-esteem and independence would be the most effective

way

substance abuse.

that

would end senseless

Welfare recipients get tested

money.

who

refuse to

would obviously

inject their

cheques up

rather

their

arm

It’s

dren

who

miss meals and have to

call

mother I

inhumane.

It’s difficult

for

to

tation of testing before receiving

welfare will be effective.

go through the winter without a

Getting off the system should be

a main objective for welfare recip-

hard to think about the chil-

manage

If

forced to quit in order to

receive monthly payments,

it

may

be possible that there will be a

whole slew of healthier Ontarians

anyone with a

drug addiction to get treatment

in

to

whom

portion of

I’d gladly contribute a

my

paycheque.

SPOKE

is mainly funded from September to May by a payment from Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) in exchange for the

The views and opinions newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the CSI unless their advertisements coninsertion of advertising in the paper.

expressed

tain the

SPOKE is published

and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Photo Editor: Tammy Somerville; Production Manager: Kirsten Fifield Advertising Manager: Reni Nicholson; Circulation Manager: Lisa Hiller Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz; Faculty Supervisor: Christina Jonas

SPOKE’s

address

Phone: 748-5220,

is

ext.

299 Doon Valley

Dr.,

Room

4B14, Kitchener, Ontario,

N2G 4M4.

691, 692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

in

CSI

this

logo.

SPOKE shall

not be liable for any

damages

arising out of errors in advertising

beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a

MS Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not contain any libellous statements and may be accompanied by an illustration (such as a photograph). WordPerfect or


.

SPOKE, December

11,

2000

— Page 5

Students secure with more surveillance By Tammy Somerville

believes increased surveillance

good thing With the major success of the voyeurism show Survivor and moderate success of its wannabe competitor Big Brother, many students have become accustomed to the idea of being watched and most feel it comes with today’s scripted

women and for those

cameras ing at

new

its

surveillance

main teaching buildDoon campus Nov. 24, at the

cam-

in the Sanctuary

just adds

was sure

to

be

McKay

busy hallways. “Things could potentially go wrong, like fights, stealing and other stuff that shouldn’t be going on. Having cameras will stop people from doing the wrong thing,” said Noon. He added that the system is prob-

is at

a loss for having

feel it’s

an

better for

worth safety

it

of

all

a

Hummel

the

Conestoga community.

looks at a

student,

first-year

said

she

but

new will

be I

it’s

a

On some

bothered a bit by

second-year

a

all.

“I’m not doing anything wrong. When I walk through the halls, I don’t even think about them,” she said.

Want to promote your upcoming event in Spoke?

token they are for

our safety and to protect us, but the

at

Be sure

same time

ing us like

need

to place

an ad.

they are watch-

we

be profrom our-

to

tected

Placing an ad

selves.”

Kiley Dodds, third-year

a

marketing

stu-

doesn’t

Dodds

dent,

Baan’s

way of thinking because she

knows

safety

understand is

make

Stories only run

you have give up a little

secure,

feel safer.”

guarantees your information will appear in Spoke.

the reason for the

cameras.

to

if

space

permits but ads always run.

For rates or to place an ad call Spoke’s ad manager at ext. 691

of your personal freedom,” said Dodds.

second-year

and animation student, the issue from a more fiscal robotics

Kevin Switzer, a

first-year

mechanical

point of view. “It’s

before. I wouldn’t feel

unsafe without them.”

and broadcast

new cameras do

first-year graphic

whole Big Brother

the

“It’s

thing.

Mark Hummel,

is

for the

members of

(to

ment them

they think

said

McKay,

the

surveyed

is

In order to be

girl),

like

to

Jeremy Baan, a

bet

of

don’t

I

print

are

equip-

know what

things

more eyes where they

student, said the

not bother her at

my first year so I don’t know was

journalism

it

“You have to be watched in this day and age. When you have nobody viewing you, there is a certain amount of risk you’re taking.

privacy and a dangerous view

the investment

broadcasting

it’s

rity.

those

Christina

thing

invasion of their

come, most of

McKay

I

the girls to have that sense of secu-

it

are not really

needed.”

no

it.

“It’s

Kirsten Fifield,

everyone’s safety and

for places like

beneficial to the col-

“As a guy,

only help increase safety.

While some students

good

that sur-

lege’s female population, but

one

“It is for

purpose.

Noon,

Of the 2000 2001 campus safety for women grant, $11,500 went to installing the cameras, which cover more remote locations and common

more

in the halls?

the cameras, but understands their

said

veillance

ably

do

really going to

deterred,”

of the upgrade to the college’s

During a random survey of students at the Doon campus Nov. 28, most students understood the reason for the increase in the number of cameras and said they could

you

design student,

dent, agrees with

areas.

are

gone, but now people will be

eras completed the second phase

security systems.

“What

cameras don’t bother

him because they

how

also a first-year broadcasting stu-

is

dent, said the

the school that others can’t see.

John

surveillance

Hummel.

“We need it because things do go missing. If I left something

bringing the total to 32.

The 16 new

15 years,” said

noticeable.

busy

utilizing

McKay.

Noon

something used for long term, 10 -

He added that students shouldn’t be doing anything inappropriate in

it

Conestoga College completed

a

for

areas.

society.

installation of 16

is

for the college,

very sensible because

it’s

Switzer

engineering stu-

College fp

o O) O CO

Quality Policy Conestoga College continually seeks opportunities for improvement to

Conestoga College np

meet and exceed the needs of our students employees ,

and communities.


Page 6

— SPOKE, December

11,

2000

Re-entry program gives careers direction Helps nurses maintain qualifications and psyche your career

in

An a

information session detailing

new program

She said she’s

Carley. “Help deciding where to go

By Reni Nicholson

for Ontario regis-

is

tired

of delivering

the Kitchener- Waterloo

needed.”

wants to return

Carley said the re-entry course helps to maintain nursing qualifica-

of nursing.

Marshall

as well as reinstate in the

one of the many nursto pay a $112 fee to re-certification from

minds of the students

for pursuing the particular nursing

obtain

Conestoga College’s Doon cam-

field.

the College of Nurses.

pus.

tions,

their reason

hold a current certification

“You’ve been out for a while, but in your psyche to want to be a nurse,” said Carley. Layoffs in 1992 in the nursing

from the College of Nurses of

industry forced a lot of nurses to

Ontario.

leave

The college gram,

who

RN/RPN

Mary

offering the pro-

is

re-entry, to nurses

careers.

education for the continuing School of Health Sciences and Community Services, spoke to 11

Some

co-ordinator

practising and non-practising nurs-

and

pursue

women

even gotten a start in the field of nursing because when they finly

ished school they entered a period of cutbacks and lack of opportuni-

re-entry program.

ty-

Nurses in attendance had not been in practice for four to 20 years. Only three were currently

said that the cutbacks gave

practising nursing.

were

new

at the

environment

They

said they

meeting in search of

Three women,

in the all

female

graduated from Fonestoga College with a diploma

had

audience,

in registered nursing or registered

practical nursing.

“The basics

are the

same, but

nurses need to understand where

they

fit

in

today’s

world,”

said

a nurse

as a nurse.

nursing refresher program

Mohawk

also offered at

slip.

program for Conestoga College has been running since January

The nursing

them

or

RPN

2000 The

then think about their career at a

selection

re-entry

at

.

tuition fee varies per course

and can be done

in

two-

to-three semesters for a total of

later time.

work

two doctors for a couple of years, but it was boring,” said Sue Marshall, a registered nurse who graduated from Humber College in 1993. She moved from Toronto to Cambridge and started a family and now wants to

to re-enter the

hours,

for

system

after

is

College.

Nurse Start, said Carley, is a jumping off place for those nurses who have let their certification

of the other wqpien present

went

if

may have to be written and $112 must be paid to be reinstated

the chance to start a family and

“I

opportunities.

$98, but

test

RN

Some

fee to maintain the

is

doesn’t continue to pay the fee a

present at

the meeting said they had not real-

their

The annual

A of the

is

who have

certification

alternative

today and the expectations of the

es about the nursing

es

it’s still

of

Carley,

Record and

to the exciting life

and registered practical nurses who want to return to the profession was held on Nov. 29 at tered nurses

world

for today’s

including

practice,

reflective

274

hours

Conestoga

for

those

who want

offered by

to return to the profession Nov. 29. (Photo by Reni Nicholson)

professional

forms as required prior

Admission requirements are successful completion of a recent

placement.

to clinical

Carley said the program came about because of changes in the

resuscitation (CPR), completion of

health-care system and the large

aid course within a

number of nurses are

go from there. you through general upgrading and then it’s up to you from there,” said Carley. The free information session was open to all. A similar meeting was held Nov. 30 at Waterloo campus. where

to

“We

course in basic cardio-pulmonary first

and com-

new program

of

year and immunization and health

years.

Carley, co-ordinator of school of health sciences

munity services, spoke to nurses about a

nursing and a clinical practicum.

a standard

four

174

Mary

registered,

who know

in the region

but don’t

steer

Engineering students battle for prizes

and

By Quan La

food bank

for and

a

certificate

game

Playstation

Students in the school of engineering technology are participat-

The Food Bank of Waterloo Region, which ing in a food drive for

from Dec. 1 to 15. Sharda Ramsingh, a first-year robotics and automation student, will run

game valued

a

minimum

m

m

m

your new look .

fit

ing, but has

opened

it

up

has

become

15

buy your used CDs & DVDs

370 HIGHLAND ROAD

385 FAIRWAY ROAD

402 KING STREET

W.,

S.,

N.,

KITCHENER FOOD BASICS PLAZA

KITCHENER CANADIAN TIRE PLAZA

WATERLOO BETWEEN

HARVEYS & BURGER KING

415 HESPELER ROAD, CAMBRIDGE ACROSS FROM MCDONALD'S

744-1011 893-2464 884-7376 622-7774

in

of the drive herself so most students could participate in the food

The food and donations

cash donations.

drive.

Ramsingh has received draw prizes from over 40 local business-

be taken to Highland Hills Mall for the Kool FM and Oldies 1090 Stuff

es to give to students participating

a

food drive. Each student will receive a ticket for every 2.5

an event held by the local radio

Bus Dec.

15

-

17. Stuff a

will

Bus

is

sta-

pounds of food or $2.50 donation.

which involves stuffing a Grand River Transit bus full of

Faculty will receive tickets for 5

food.

pounds of food and a $5 donation. Prizes will be raffled off on Dec. 15 at^the Society of Mechanical Engineering party at Edelweiss Sports Bar and Grill in Kitchener. Ramsingh said businesses have provided her with $3,000 worth of prizes.

Draw

prizes include a

com-

plementary overnight stay at St. Jacobs Best Western Hotel, East Side Mario Restaurant gift cates, certificates to

www.beatgoeson.com

drive organizer

She said she has organized most 2,000

is

in the

Let us

Sharda Ramsingh,

Food

who

pounds of food or the equivalent

USED CD OUTLET

in

including students.

a friendly competition

for Dec.

drive

the community,

It

most donations.

The goal

of $50.

help people

between the manufacturing engineer department and the electronic gets the

Beat Goes On

will

to the stu-

engineering department to see

a

$70.

at

The food

students of mechanical engineer-

dents of electronic engineering.

either

These are just a fraction of the prizes to be awarded. Ramsingh said each draw prize will be worth

created the drive originally for the

Ifyour old CDs don’t

for

or Nintendo 64

certifi-

Absolute Hair

and BJ Hair, Athena posters, HMV CDs, certificates for Sunoco gas, dance lessons at Fred Astaire Studio, a Tim Hortons gift pack

tions

Ramsingh

said engineering stu-

dents are excited about the food

drive

and

she

hopes

become an annual

this

will

event.

She said this food drive will help people in the community and around Waterloo Region including students because the food bank service is available to everyone who needs assistance. Ramsingh said the event is open to all Conestoga College students

who in

voluntarily

the

food

want drive,

to participate

but

aren’t

enrolled in the engineering pro-

grams.


SPOKE, December

Campus has more eyes By Tammy Somerville

The

entire

11,

2000

— Page 7

the sky

in

system cost roughly

$60,000, with funds coming from

campus

Conestoga College completed the second phase of the installation of surveillance cameras at the Doon

the

campus Nov. 24 when 16 new cam-

vary-focal lenses, which

were turned on. The project, which has been in the works for the last 18 months, began last year when the first 16 cameras were installed in the main teaching building at Doon and another 16 were installed at the Waterloo campus. Security services supervisor A1 Hunter said the object is to have complete coverage of the college therefore the system installed is one that can be built on.

sate for different lighting

eras

“We want

and not have

staff

students to

be concerned.”

to

Al Hunter, Security services supervisor

college,

women

saw

that

With the

and are

show a wider or narrower area. They also allow for images to be blown up for more able to

in or

definition.

Hunter said 10,000

was used during

feet of cable

installation of the

phase of the project. He added that amount of cable and hours of

first

labour are where a

lot

Doon campus.

the

of the costs

come

lie.

the

There are four monitors in total, with two in Hunter’s office and two in the guard office. Two high density VCRs with time and date record everything viewed by the 16 cameras for up to 72 hours while a third is used as a playback. The cameras are set up to view

had any

CSI

the cafeteria. Sanctuary,

office

into the college. If they ill-fated thoughts,

know about the cameras

they’d

and. would

be deterred.” Hunter said the cameras are in place in the college to deter crime, rather than solve

“We want

it

after the fact.

and students

staff

to

not have to be concerned. The

whole of

this is safety

and a

lot

focused toward our women.

of

is

very sprawling with

safe areas. Safe areas are nooks and

and two-level buildings.

comers where handicapped students go in case of a fire. Hunter said the cameras are for the bookstore important because of the all female staff and the large amounts of money chang-

shows how good the security is.” There have not been any incidents of sexual assault on campus in the last two years. In 1999 there were four physical assaults and this year there have been only two. Hunter said that the number of

ing hands.

overall problems at the college

is

it

type of system would enhance security by being able to view the more remote areas,” said Hunter.

Hunter approached the college with his plan and received a positive response because he was looking at a long-term five-year

He added

that access points are

very important, too.

A

Last

chance

at

By

By Tammy Somerville who

Students

left

belongings

used during the spring semester will never see their stuff again, unless they go

in lockers they

to security services in the next

couple of weeks.

Al Hunter, security services said

supervisor,

who have

students

that

not picked up their

property should go to security to retrieve their belongings.

of the items recovered

from the lockers include eye textbooks,

watches,

pagers, video cameras, clothes

and a radio. Anything that is not claimed and is still useable will go to a department of the school or CSI. Hunter also recommends students check the lost and found

low considering the

is

of the

size

when

right.

our students are number

!”

Plus

1

step to raise

money

to

improve the recreation centre at Conestoga College has been taken. Tony Martin, development manager at the rec centre, said he has 10 verbal agreements from different companies to purchase advertising signs, which will be displayed around the rink at the centre. He said there are 34 advertising spaces to be sold for $1,250 each. Martin added the signs will include two colours if ordered by the rec centre, or can be designed and purchased by the individual companies. Martin, who made the announcement at the second meeting of the rec centre’s advisory committee on Nov. 28, said he hopes to have the signs installed by the end of February.

The advisory committee was

cre-

Martin said he

is

also looking for

a long-term donor for the centre, but

is

waiting for

some of his

short-

term plans to be completed.

want them (donor)

“I

we

to see that

are trying to create a No.

1 life

centre,” said Martin.

The advisory committee

also dis-

cussed the possibility of installing a freestanding backlit sign in view

of Homer Watson Boulevard to promote the rec centre. The staff at the centre can only post events related to the college

on the existing sign on the front of the rec centre, so a new sign would allow the staff to promote other But Peter from the

Schlie, a representative

college’s

resources department,

physical said

idea had been looked at in the past

of student services and recreation centre, to discuss what can be done

but was discarded because the col-

“If stuff isn’t

it.

claimed, like

we offer it to who found it. Items

watches,

the per-

son

like cal-

culators

and

go

to student services

clothing

goes

to

the

Salvation Army,” said Hunter.

and community

at the facility as

well

improve the centre

He

stands, as

what can be done

as

funding

it

is

if

to

increased

found.

said these donations will be

make

renovations in the

used to front lobby of the centre and to hire an architect to draft two plans. One will depict a short-term renovation plan for the centre and the other will be a plan of what Martin

CMelpii

$11

Toronto

$24

let

Pete-rtoro^h

:

$s

Belleville

lege did not like the idea of the rec

that students could call to find out

occasions people have brought

use

Kszctmi&r

this

ated by Jack Fletcher, the director

to increase student

ffl)

events hosted at the centre.

tions to the facility.

He said on many

two cameras monitor various college locations including the (Photos by Tammy Somerville) Sanctuary and cafeteria.

architect within the next six weeks.

but no one ever claims

it.

below one of the

Doon campus. Thirty-

the future. Martin wants to hire an first

cash they have found to security,

would return

for surveillance at the

foresees the centre will look like in

Martin also said he has two meetings set up to discuss outside dona-

any item they may have lost, even though they think no one

used

ad space

sells

would promote the rec centre as a separate unit from the college. Martin said he will look into the idea again. Duane Shadd, the academic representative on the committee, suggested the rec centre have a hotline

for

Al Hunter, security services supervisor, stands

four monitors

“We’re doing things

access

Kirsten Fifield

The

belongings

It

the absence of problems that

sign of the times

Rec centre

to retrieve

is

facility.

“You need cameras

points so people are aware

plan.

glasses,

Hunter is shown on a security monitor in the main corridor at

corridors and entrances as well as

finite security staff here, I

Some

Security services supervisor Al

it

this

felt

zoom

compen-

bookstore and most major

“When I first came to the college, large one-

for

The Panasonic cameras have

area,

I

safety

grants and the CSI.

$11$ $11$

Ottawa

centre installing a sign that

SttdEbary V

.

Cȣf

'*3>?

-l

0o Greyhound and fearve the

driving to

use

the availability of different facilities

someone

by calling ext. 512, but Shadd said he didn’t think students were aware the extension was available.

WU370

#

within the centre.

Students can currently speak to

"\V

1

at the centre

CAMUS OkA*

5 Charles Street

W


Condor By

loss ‘heartbreaking’

Soccer team

Lisa Hiller

loses close one

The Humber Hawks handed the Conestoga Condors men’s varsity hockey team its second-straight home loss on Nov. 29 by defeating them 4-3 at the Doon campus

By Lisa

bring the Condors within one at

The Conestoga Condors men’s

recreation centre in front of about ‘75 spectators.

The Condors opened at

15:26 into the

first

the scoring

period on a

Johnston.

Conestoga was aggressive and most of the period in Humber’s end. The edge for shots on goal went to Conestoga with nine. Humber spent

managed seven. The Condors had

their best scor-

ing chances in the

first,

Humber

tied the

game

1-1

Jeremy J. Henry, left, tackles Humber Hawks player Derek Kearns as he tries to pass the puck to one of his teammates in men’s varsity hockey action Nov. 29 at the rec centre. The Conestoga Condors lost 4-3 to the Hawks. (Photo by Lisa Hiller)

with

Humber

od to put his team ahead for the second time. The score was 3-2 after the second period, which was extremely physical with both teams amassing 15 minutes in minor penalties and four 10-minute major infractions.

a^the edge in goals as well.

Shawn Kane scored a goal for Humber just over 30 seconds into Jeremy Conestoga not tie.

Henry scored for two seconds later with assistant captains Dave Stewart and Dave Longarini assisting on the goal. The score was tied through most

J.

Conestoga

in the

they had to

minor

Chris

again in

when Darren Smegal 12:41. Mike Kosterewa and

said the loss

win

this

we

heart-

game.”

Rickwood

said his

capitalize in the first

when

was

deserved to

the

team didn’t two periods

Hawks took

a

lot

of

penalties.

He

said he

thought the team

played well enough to win despite

scored at

a couple of penalty calls going

in the period.

Conestoga outshot Humber 18-13 in the third period and 40-36 overall.

McFayden

Rickwood

breaking. “I think

the third period

mark

off 12 minutes in

penalties.

Humber captain

game

Greg Thede assisted. Shawn Gibbons scored the game winner for Humber at the halfway

Humber end because kill

tied the

captain

of the period. Most of the action

was

game throughout and

Condors

scored another goal late in the peri-

assistant

coach Greg

against them.

goaltender Andy not played a game this season, played fairly well in stopping 36 shots, said

Call-up Hopkins,

who had

Rickwood. Regular goalie Ryan Knettner was out due to the flu.

said

they were

sion dropped to a win-tie-loss of

in

2-0-3 for six points.

weren’t deadly in front of the

Benfica moves out of its

first

victory.

last

the

league,

the

Condors

goal.

The

“We missed the net so many times. We are

handed out by

still

missing that kind

of hard-nosed, go-to-

the referee.

As ness,

for his team’s aggressive-

Condors

coach

the-net,

Geoff

Johnstone said he has a lot of aggressive players and he is

second-effort

type of thing.” Geoff Johnstone, Men ’s soccer coach

aggressive in working with the

team

in practice.

“It’s the way the game should be played,” he said. Jamie Scott scored the first goal of the game, and his seventh of the season, off a nice pass from Dersoy Sherifali in the comer. FC Benfica scored the tying goal near the end of the first half that was played tight defensively with a lot of the play in neither

team’s end. In

the

second

it

get a chance, you

away or at least on

half,

Jimmy

FC

Benfica.

the goalie

and look for a second chance.” Conestoga generated enough scoring chances and were doing a good job of keeping the goals out, but for the

first

time they weren’t

scoring the goals.

“We missed

many “We -are

the net so

times,” said Johnstone.

Ferreira scored the go-ahead and

winning goals for

“When you put

missing that kind of hardnosed, go-to-the-net, second-

still

effort type of thing.”

Countdown O o G) O CO

1-1

to

ISO Registration t? ,

r

Qj

Conestoga College

qp

that

playing one of the weakest teams

for a first offence

outshot Conestoga 16-13 and had

the period to break the

Conestoga’s

loss,

Johnstone

record in the men’s premier divi-

The game was aggressive throughout with four blue cards

two minutes remaining in the period on a power-play goal by Kevin Coffey. second period,

the

get.

Coach

has a win-tie-loss record of 1-1-3 for four points.

less than

In the

although his team controlled the

recreation centre.

team now

on good passes.

as close as they

Doon campus

FC

but either

was

could

place with

missed the net or couldn’t capitalize

3-1, but that

indoor soccer team fell short to FC Benfica 3-2 on Nov. 30 at the

With

goal by Jason Egan, assisted by

Adam

Jeffrey Penelas scored a goal to

Hiller

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