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33rd Year

— No. 41

shop employees patient

Print By Tammy Somerville

Conestoga’s print shop employstill awaiting a decision on whether or not the college plans to

our second presentation, he said a would be made within three or four weeks. That evening at the board of governors meeting, he again said a decision would be

contract

made

decision

ees are

out the college’s print

services.

The employees were expecting a decision after the academic operacommittee (AOC) meeting Nov. 15, but were disappointed when they found out the issue wasn’t on the agenda. tions

Ed

who has been working shop for 16 years, said they have been dealing with the prospect of outsourcing for the Riehl,

in the print

past

three to

would

Support

on

staff vote ratification.

PAG!

like to

four months and

have closure.

“We made two

presentations and

were given five days notice each of them. deadlines. I

to

do

We always made our

want them

to,”

he

said.

Riehl said a decision was expected after the Nov. 15 meeting because of things said by Kevin Mullan, vice-president of finance

in three or four weeks.” Riehl added that on Nov. 6 Stephen Case, manager of material services,

told

couldn’t after the

tell

the

employees he

them anything

AOC meeting Nov.

Riehl said that the combination of Mullan ’s repeated comments on the timeline for a decision and Case’s statement led the employees to believe the end

The

was

near.

Lynn Knowles, Kathy McManus and Riehl, found out there had been no decision made by calling human resources Nov. 16 where they were informed nothing was settled and were told to call back the next week. Debra Croft, manager of human resources, told Spoke there is no formal communication protocol print shop’s employees,

according to the support staff colagreement. On Nov. 16

and administrative operations. “At the information session Oct. 18 Kevin Mullan said they’d come

lective

to a decision within three to four

cations and regular updates.

weeks.

On

Oct. 23

when we made

until 15.

print

shop

staff

specifically

requested more ongoing communi-

See Print shop: Page 8

Snow Angel

Ed Riehl, who has worked in the print shop for 16 years, goes through the stacks of work done for the college Nov. 16. Employees are still waiting for a decision on whether the college is going to (Photo by

outsource the shop.

VIP Day

attracts

Tammy Somerville)

2,500

high school students By Tammy Somerville An

estimated 2,512 high school

from 15

students

different schools in

Conestoga College’s catchment area attended VIP/CIP Day Nov. 15. The annual 12th Visitor Information Program (VIP) and

career path earlier than Grades

Day held at Conestoga College Nov. 14 - 15 is an opportunity for high

and 12 as had previously been the

programs offered by Conestoga as well as 23 other colleges. VIP/CIP Day, open to senior level high school students, gives students the chance to find out about college

programs and colleges.

They

talk to representatives

colleges and narrow

down

from

choices

1

case.

Nov. 15 began with the

arrival

students at the rec centre.

of

They

browsed through displays from the 24 Ontario colleges and decided which colleges they would like to learn more about during the afternoon sessions. After visiting the college displays at the rec centre, students

had the

more about

of colleges and program options.

opportunity to learn

They

Conestoga programs with two 45-minute sessions provided by college faculty at the main teaching building on Doon campus.

learn

requirements,

about tuition

financial assistance.

It

admission fees and also gives

them the opportunity to learn about student life by talking with college

specific

The VIP

sessions are designed to

faculty and students.

provide in-depth information on

The two-day event began with an evening for parents and the general

full-time

public to view the displays from 24

programming, graphic design, preentry firefighter and woodworking technician. There were 34 sessions

colleges in the rec centre Nov. 14

Michelle Lemieux, 3, enjoys her first toboggan ride of the year Doon Child Care Centre Nov. 20. The preschoolers get out (Photo by Tammy Somerville) twice a day for fresh air and fun.

lum,” she said. Students are required to choose a

College Information Program (CIP)

school students to find out about

at

from Grades 8, 9, and 10 as well as 1 1 and 12 were invited for the open house evening, Nov. 14. “The decision was made to introduce them to the colleges because of the recent changes in curricu-

from 7

- 8:30 p.m. Carol Pease, on-campus liaison

officer for the college,

was the

first

said this

year that students

programs including archicomputer

tecture, civil engineering,

in total that explained the different

programs Conestoga offers. See VEP: Page 8


Page 2

— SPOKE, November 27, 2000

Quiz Bowl competition shakes up cafeteria By Kyla Rowntree About 250 students from 14 colleges

ferent

shook up the Blue

across

Room

dif-

Ontario cafeteria

with opening cheers as the Quiz

Bowl kicked

off the province-wide

2000 Ontario Colleges’ Marketing Competition.

annual competition was hosted at Conestoga this year Nov.

The

16-17.

Marketing participants competed numerous marketing events such

in

as

retail,

entrepreneurship,

sales

management, marketing, marketing research, advertising and direct marketing case studies.

The Conestoga team comprised of 14 students and six faculty

George, third-year marketing, participates in the Quiz Bowl in the Ontario Colleges’ Marketing competition on Nov. 16 in the Sanctuary. Below, Kim Meyer, second from left, a thirdyear marketing student, answers a question during the contest.

Meyer and her team made

it

to the finals.

(Photos by Kyia Rowntree)

place team.

The 14 Ontario

tied for

College

second with and St.

Lawrence came in first for the second year in a row. Centennial and Conestoga have agreed to share the trophy and silver medals awarded. Conestoga agreed to let Centennial wear the silver medals as long as they buy Conestoga a trophy and Conestoga has

the

trophy

as

Centennial buys them

long

as

some

silver

has

won

medals.

many

College

events in the history of the

14-year competition and has placed first

overall

two consecutive

years.

were taken

directly out of the

Each team scored 10 points for answering each question correctly, however if they buzzed first and gave an incorrect answer, the other team had a chance to steal. Local and national companies sponsored the event and provided judges for the competition. The primary sponsor for the com-

“The faculty at Conestoga did an amazing job preparing and organizing

the

event,”

said

Chad

Allison, third-year marketing stu-

Conestoga College and winner in the marketing case. “It was a lot of work and at

dedication.”

The popular Quiz Bowl is just one of the challenging events in the competition. Fifteen teams competed by answering various questions related to business and marketing.

The teams were chosen by randomly selecting students and every team was comprised of four students, each from a different college.

Conestoga

ferent in that previous years’ ques-

tions

competition.

third place

Conestoga

were

definition index of business text-

dent

Centennial

who par-

and Alicia Fraser George. Ed Brooker, of the marketing faculty at Conestoga College, wrote the questions for the Quiz Bowl. This year’s Quiz Bowl was dif-

Algonquin, Niagara, St. Clair, Seneca, St. Lawrence, George Brown, Centennial, Georgian, Fanshawe, Durham, Sir Sanford Fleming, Mohawk, Confederation and Conestoga. The out-of-town competitors stayed at the Four Points Hotel in downtown Kitchener during the

various competitions.

all

colleges

ticipated in the competition

from marketing sported denim shirts and competed in the bers Alicia Fraser

mem-

In the 1999 competition, hosted by George Brown College in Toronto, Conestoga placed second overall only one point behind the first-

The

four

Conestoga

College

third-year marketing participants in

Quiz Bowl were Kim Meyer, Colleen Murphy, Michael Pootz the

books.

This year, to challenge the participants,

asked.

many

up-to-date questions were Questions such as how products will the Eaton’s

Web

site sell this year was one of 10 questions asked of each team.

the

McGraw

was

petition

sponsors included Labatt, Harcourt Canada, Pearson Education Canada, AIC, Conestoga

Business Students Association, Conestoga College, Basics, Sara Lee, J.M.

K/W

Irwin,

Schneiders

Tim

Club,

Inc.,

Hortons,

Home

Hardware,

Canadian Marketing Association and the Canadian Business Magazine.

A cocktail party in the grand ballroom

at the

Four Points Hotel con-

cluded the event.

College rp

Quality Policy Conestoga College continually seeks opportunities for improvement to Conestoga

meet and exceed the needs of our students, employees

Izard

Sales and Advertising

Conestoga

College rp

Hill.

Secondary

and communities.


5

.

SPOKE, November 27, 2000

News Support

staff

By Tammy Somerville

mended acceptance of the went

settlement that

Support

staff

Conestoga

at

College has voted overwhelming-

new

ly to ratify a

three-year con-

tract.

The Nov.

1

5 final vote had 8 1 per

cent of the 214 ballots cast accept-

results

Unofficial

it.

provincial

show 84 per cent in favour of

the deal and 16 per cent rejecting Official after

results

Nov. 24 when

all

mail-in bal-

lots are tabulated.

The high

was not

voter turnout

a

effect

pay

a sub-

raise as well as

more

$200 the

They

receive

will

a

wage

on the wage

grid, a

new

between

premium

steps, shift

staff including those

who work

in

the learning resource centre, phys-

nology services and early childhood education (ECE), increases

result of the final vote.

totalling close to 13 per cent.

resources,

ical

“The (negotiating) team recoin-

information tech-

The second year of

Two alumni

the contract

awards

By Kyla Rowntree

Witmer had

not attend the meeting due to it on the eve of the municipal

falling

election.

business admin-

and

studies

MacKay is

Conestoga College.

director of building and chief

building official with the planning

Staff

ECE

contract Nov.

worker, votes on the ratification of the 1

(Photo by

.

Tammy Somerville)

STRUGGLING WITH A COURSE

?

REQUIRE ONE TO ONE ASSISTANCE?

the

WANT TO REVIEW COURSE MATERIAL?

of

the

in

Anne MacKay

KitchenerWaterloo area.

Kitchener. said

his

experience

at

She

supervises

fund-raising

a

Conestoga was excellent and that he gained the tools and knowledge at

group of seven

the college that he uses in his job

goal reaching $5 million.

and 3,000 volunteers with an annual campaign

MacKay

today.

He said he found when hiring people for a job that university graduates don’t really know how to put their hands to work practi“I find the best

grads

James Witmer

are

from

Conestoga College for the honour.

“The

faculty

Conestoga

at

College have an outstanding level of expertise and it is really great.” representatives

from

Johnson

presented the Alumni

Insurance, meeting.

One

Conestoga grads aspire to be better and take on

$3,577,

went

initial

responsi-

bility.

They

are

of the cheques, for to

the

Johnson Insurance also donated a cheque for $2,120 to the Conestoga Scholarship Fund. The company

money by

raised the

more

a fund every time an alumni

and

said in the letter,

Alumni

Association.

motivated to do

the annual meeting.

He

to thank

Association with two cheques at the

Zehr said Witmer was a deserving candidate with an outstanding career.

THE SEMESTER IS WINDING DOWN, BUT IT’S NOT TOO LATE !!

wanted

said she

Conestoga,” said Witmer. “I find

be more and they are the best with customer service.” Witmer added that the future of the college is in goods hands and he was proud to be a part of it. Kitchener Mayor Carl Zehr honoured Witmer’s contribution and dedication to the community as well in a at

staff

Lena Bauman and Donna Kidd,

cally.

read

support

pro-

gram.

development for United Way

letter

Monique Schenck, an

employment.

management

ogy program

Witmer

She added the holiday package is wonderful, starting with 15 days a year and increasing each year of

a graduate of Conestoga College in 1987 in the

director

of

ly

MacKay was

1981 of

department

would be being able

to use famidays when your kids are sick. Now we have to use holiday days,” said Schenck. it

Services

istration

development

improved.

Peer

the construction engineering technol-

and

she voted Nov. 15, but she added there are always things that could be

lucky to have his contribution. Zehr said he was sorry he could

field.

at

was a

excellent leadership

The two recipients of the alumnus awards were James Witmer and Anne MacKay.

is

ECE work-

years, said the deal

and the community was

qualities

He

1

receive

distinction

in

1

“If anything could be improved,

Overall, the deal gives support

lower than usual. Wallace who expected the deal to be ratified was not surprised at the

Witmer was a graduate

deal raises that by $100.

Monique Schenck, an

fair one, at least for her, after

tional step

1

for prescriptions glasses, but

new

of the three-year contract, an addi-

increases and improved benefits.

ing in their

retro-

er for

tial

nus of distinction at the annual general Alumni Association meeting on Nov. 13 at Conestoga College. The alumnus of distinction award is given by Conestoga College to graduates who have been outstand-

receive

increase of two per cent each year

Employees Union Local 238. She said Conestoga has always had a good turnout, but added the provincial numbers were a bit

honoured

will

130 sick

Other amendments were to benefits. Optical care previously allowed members and their families

ment.

payband, increases in the differen-

2000 alumawards were

Members

equity with faculty and manage-

surprise to Ann Wallace, president of

recipients of the

two more paid on top of the eight they already had and members are now sick days

active pay dating back to Sept.

The union was seeking

contract

gives support staff

Negotiations resulted in a tentative settlement reached on Oct. 5. stantial

new

favour of

allowed to accumulate days instead of 57.

the college’s Ontario Public Service

Two

in

About 5,500 community college support staff have been working without a contract since Aug. 31.

known

be

will

it.

tentative

into

Sept. 1,” she said.

ing the deal with only 19 per cent rejecting

vote

—Page 3

putting $20 into

member

phoned in for a quote or an estimate on auto or house insurance.

A TUTOR MAY BE THE ANSWER PROVIDES 5 HOURS OVER 6 WEEKS

HIRING $15.00

Application deadline

December

Kidd also said that another cheque of $1,250 will be on the way in the next couple months. Kidd added that this was a way of giving money back to the alumni members and that it was a good

way

to contribute to a charity.

Pat Gilmore from Ross Dixon financial

$355

services

to the

also

donated

Alumni Association.

Applications Available

in

1

,

2000

Student Services

Room 2B02


.

Page 4

— SPOKE, November 27, 2000 DUE TO THE POLITICAL PROBLEMS EXPERIENCED TO THE SOUTH, CANADIANS DEVISE A FOOLPROOF PUN TO ELECT THE PRIME MINISTER OF CANADA.

owes

College

employees closure I WON.

\ ffl

Conestoga College has repeatedly pushed back deadlines on the decision of contracting out the print shop services at the college and this is unfair to the three print shop

The college

employees whose jobs remain

originally notified the print shop

tions to explore outsourcing the print

in limbo.

employees of

shop on July

19.

At

inten-

its

that time

were

to

it

which

sent out requests for proposals to large print shop organizations,

specified that proposals

AvGEEZ...

be received by July 31.

A short list of possible companies was to be made, and presentations by bidders were to be held on Aug. 2. On Aug. 4, the print shop employees presented

their first proposal to

the college.

was accepted by

proposal

If a

new

the college,, the

contract

was sup-

LAEATT BLUE

on Oct. 1 The print shop employees were told by the college on Oct. 23, when they presented their second proposal, that a decision on whether or not to privatize the print shop services would be made in three to four posed

to

go

into effect

LOOK OMDER THE CAPI You Could * 8E THE NEXT '

\

W

PRIME MINISTER !!!

weeks.

The college nors

at their

restated this deadline to

meeting

The employees were then al services, that

members of the board of gover-

later that night.

told

by Stephen Case, manager of materi-

they could not be given any information until recom-

mendations were presented to the academic operations committee at its meeting on Nov. 15. But the issue was not even on the agenda for Nov.

ftSJt

You would think the employees would be told this before the meetThey weren’t. You would think someone from the college would

ing. call

them

after the

meeting to inform them that the issue hadn’t been

addressed. This didn’t happen either.

The employees heard rumours that the issue had not been discussed and had to phone human resources for verification on Nov. 16. Kevin Mullan, vice-president of finance and administrative operations, said agendae are not typically sent out to non-committee members, so the employees would not have been notified that the issue was not going to appear before the meeting occurred. But a Spoke reporter inquired about the AOC meeting agenda the morning of the meeting and was told that the issue was not on the agen-

someone from the colshop staff to inform them the issue

U.S. votes count

All

By Reni Nicholson With

this, the tightest presidential

race in history, the American people have realized

how

will

1

5

AOC agenda.

shop employees informed on

is

responsible for keeping the

this issue.

But

this

only officially

applies to keeping the staff up-to-date on presentations they

make, or any

So

may have

descriptions will change. All three employees

bumping

rights, instead

if,

or when, their job

still

Debra

possible that

chance

to

group of

electors official.

that a

classifications, to

inform

weekly of any developments regarding the

print

shop. This happened only after the employees called that day about the issue not being

on the agenda

at the

AOC meeting.

Croft says the college hopes to have

some recommendations before

end of the month, but the process

new

It’s

new employer,

manager of human resources, said

the print shop staff

being delayed because the

is

support staff collective agreement contains changes in salaries--

which must be provided

to the bidders in case this

changes their pro-

there is

no

solid deadline

on

this issue,

and

that

they are looking for the right answer, not the fast answer.

With the decision now more than

a

month

who

we

hope, for the sake of the print shop employees, that an answer will be

their opinion it

would

power

to

more American they had the

and not for the

vote for the elected

find

it

opinion,

should count. Though

create the need for a con-

amendment,

stitutional

toral college in depth.

the

elec-

should be scrutinized

This election has raised

concern about the right of

The

all citi-

difficult

because their vote doesn’t

to

take

the

responsibility of organizing elec-

each county. This

within

year’s

election

presidential

proved to the world

and easiest way

to

has

that the safest

go

is to select

the next president

or senator or even local

mayor on an

electronic system, a computer screen.

This computer automatically the

human

Punch-card ballots are cheap and are

still

in

use by about one-third of

American voting

centres, but obvi-

to the polls is

American find out

weeks

citizens waited

who would be

dent.

The mess with

the “pregnant chads”

“hanging

and

punched or

chads”,

slightly

ballot cards, will

partially

poked holes on

show

governments

fied throughout the country.

be done about the way Americans

lot,

well as adopting a unified balthe

United States government

that

something needs to

elect their candidates to office.

Something must be done

to reinstate

big

do the

ballot counting.

minds of American

scheme of things. Why vote for the guy you want to see run your coun-

The

hassle in Florida might have

must come before the next opportuni-

really

try if

mean anything

in

the

your vote and your neigh-

bour’s vote doesn’t

if

punch-card ballots

were considered obsolete.

mean any-

thing? electoral

college has

three

even though

lost the public’s

The popular vote

who

that candidate

lever machines

on old-fashioned are

that

manufactured. There

is

no longer

a trend toward

paper ballots that are scanned optical-

popular vote.

ly

elects electors

of American counties are using

state to the electoral col-

by machinery, but only 25 per cent this

an election to result in such a

An outcome tion

such as

this past elec-

would cause most

countries’ cit-

izens to throw their hands civil unrest,

in

not this time at least.

The

election

uproar has taught Americans that

laws were made to be changed

The newest and most updated way

ken.

is mainly funded from September to May by a payment from Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) in exchange for the

Keeping Conestoga College connected

The views and opinions newspaper do not necessarily reflect the

insertion of advertising in the paper.

expressed

tain the

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College.

Photo Editor: Tammy Somerville; Production Manager: Kirsten Fifield Advertising Manager: Reni Nicholson; Circulation Manager: Lisa Hiller

in

this

CSI

Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz; Faculty Supervisor: Christina Jonas is

ext.

299 Doon Valley

Dr.,

Room 4B14,

Kitchener, Ontario,

N2G 4M4.

691, 692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke @conestogac. on. ca

logo.

CSI unless

SPOKE

shall not

arising out of errors in advertising

in

SPOKE

their advertisements con-

be

liable for

any damages

beyond the amount paid

for

the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor

by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject or rejection

Phone: 748-5220,

up

but not in the U.S.,

and tradition was made to be bro-

method.

then choose the president

ty for

mess.

About 19 per cent of Americans go to the polls to vote

times in the past elected a president

had

been avoided

Change

voters.

views of Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers

address

American

local

with a national ballot, a ballot uni-

are not endorsed by the

SPOKE’s

to

the next presi-

SPOKE

Spoke is

for

error.

the expected level of fairness in the

lege

SPOKE

tallies

room

eliminating

votes,

ously these cheap ballots are so cheap,

government allows

federal

governments

local

tions

if

individual

to

have

should invest in updated machinery to

to vote

from each

forthcoming.

right

As

to office,

past the initial deadline,

that

vote directly for the

Many Americans

The

posals.

The college maintains

and use

would vote

if

of voting citizens

zens to have their vote count.

their vote count.

elected official,

Linda Krotz, manager of labour relations and

the

right to vote

citizens

of moving to a

the

Next time, hopefully American

resources and financing staff decided on Nov. 16 to designate

Croft,

think twice about the dif-

intend to exercise

the print shop services are contracted out.

human

didn’t

citizens will pursue the democratic

have

final decisions that are reached.

the employees have been left wondering

their layoff or

now

who

ference their vote can make.

According to Mullan, human resources print

it

With only about one-half of the Americans

lege should have contacted the print the Nov.

important

to actually cast a vote.

is

casting a vote, those

was not on

and vice-president. In a country where

da. If the information is available to the public,

to

L

\ i

15.

to acceptance

and should be clearly written or typed; a

MS Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not contain any libellous statements and may be accom-

WordPerfect or

panied by an illustration (such as a photograph).


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a $750 rebate

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8

Page 6

— SPOKE, November

27,

2000

Students returning to school go on learning By Reni Nicholson

paths, learn job search skills, get

work experience and The number of

students

who

academic level. Focus for change is a program designed strictly for women and

fin-

School of Access Preparatory Studies at and Conestoga College and go on to ish a course in the

The study shows

Mclver

each program is around the students enrolled at any given time. “Some students need more time to focus on themselves,” he said. “The courses are more driven by

Bob

health and science programs with

studies,

and preparatory holds a General Educational Development certificate,

diplomas or

which

equivalent to a high school diploma.

Mclver, chair of the school of access

is

Most

Bob Mclver,

chair of access and

preparatory studies, said the courses

offered at the

services building,

student/client

on Doon cam-

pus, give students the requirements students

attending

access

and preparatory studies have not been in school for several years. A

minimum

age of 19 years

is

an

admission requirement to the access

and preparatory studies programs.

said

they need to enter college programs.

Three programs are available at the School of Access and Preparatory Studies.

Academic upgrading, an access

learners

students have to accomplish in set out

They

need to get back into the academic swing of things and we help them do it.”

The

GED

is

recognized in

of

as the equivalent to a high

tries,

school diploma.

Each student entering the program is entitled to take the academupgrading pretest which estab-

ic

lishes results that will advise stu-

dents regarding the amount of aca-

demic upgrading they

will need to complete to attain various goals such as skill training and writing

the

GED test. GED test

The

concentrates on

the core high school subjects of

writing skills, social studies, sci-

ence, literature and the arts and

math.

The

test

measures knowledge and

skills that are usually

acquired dur-

ing a regular high school program

of study.

The

School

of

Access

and

in lengths of

eight to 12 weeks, depending on

students’ skills before they pay the

The courses range

what needs

the students and

focused on Mclver.

The

in

the

studies,

to

be

said

tuition for the

Mclver

program

academic

in

program

academic

said the pretest

is

the per-

fect opportunity to give students

assessment of their

employment/training readiness can help students to expand knowledge of job opportunities, identify career

Development

GED

test.

in

upgrading.

upgrading offers preparation for high school equivalency tests, such as the General Educational

for

all

Canada, except Quebec, in the United States and some other coun-

Preparatory Studies offers the upgrading pretest to analyze the

general public.

program

what they have

for themselves to accomplish.

and preparatory studies program, is meant to improve written and verbal communication skills, update skills in mathematics and science and gain or improve computer skills. This program is open to the

The

than the instructors.

the

The

the courses

(Photo by Reni Nicholson)

1999, 53 students graduated

pletion.

personal

in

designed

preparatory studies graduate from

from 29 programs at the college. It was the first year students were tracked from access and preparatory studies to college program com-

training

ing.

that the majori-

certificates.

offers

development, career planning and strategies, self-esteem and confidence-building skills, English and math assessment and job shadow-

of students from access and

In

The pro-

specifically for mothers.

gram

complete a program at the post-secondary level is on the rise. A followup of the 2000 convocation of students who have finished an access and preparatory course and have gone on to graduate from a program at Conestoga shows that 33 students have graduated from 1 different programs. Of the 33 students who completed programs at the college, seven earned awards and scholarships. ty

assess their

$30, and

if

skills for

an

only

they pass, most times

the student is advised to take the test.

Student debarred

©v <

PE'E'R.SE'RpICES

CfflJSTMJLS

mpp-w

following forgery By Quart La

A student in Conestoga College’s program documentation following a unanimous decision by the School of Health

JOIN PEER SER VICES TO SA Y THANK- YOU TO OUR PEER TUTORS AND HOSTS FOR ALL THEIR HARD WORK AND DEDICATION THROUGHOUT THE FALL SEMESTER

early childhood education

in

was debarred

for forging

Standards of conduct are acceptable behaviour and performance

Sciences and

Community

WHEN TUESDAY DECEMBER 5™, 2000 DROP-IN ANYTIME BETWEEN 11AM- 2PM :

that preserve the integrity of the

Debarment means the student is discontinued from his/her program

sciences’ handbook.

and not permitted

to reapply to the

college unless certain conditions are

met such as counselling.

learning, according to the health

Jeffrey said the agency

was upset

about the student’s actions but was pleased with the committee’s deci-

The

semester-four student changed her marks to threes from twos and forged her field place-

sion to debar the student. The agency has continued to accept Conestoga College ECE students for

ment supervisor’s

field

initials to

avoid

failing a field placement.

forgery

was

placement despite the incident.

Jeffrey said the ethics committee

discovered

met about

six times last year to

program

address complaints of students vio-

instructor became suspicious because the student had been failing so she called the agency to verify the student’s marks. The ethics committee, chaired by

lating ethics in their programs. This was the only incident where a student was debarred, he said.

the

student’s

Bill Jeffrey, the dean of health sciences and community services, and comprised of six or seven faculty

members and health

six students

sciences

from the

and community

continue the student from the early childhood education program immediately because of the severity

of the offence.

Jeffrey said the student violated the ethical academic standards of the cal

WHERE: ROOM 2B09 (A CROSS FROM STUDENT SER VICES)

programs, said Jeffrey.

academic community and promote an atmosphere that fosters students

Services

services programs, decided to dis-

REFRESHMENTS AND SNACKS WILL BE SERVED

these

ethics committee.

The when

COME AND MEET THE STUDENTS WHO WORK FOR PEER SERVICES

aging impact on their clients. Students are taught to mirror the professional standards of conduct

ECE

Complaints addressed by the ethics committee also include plagiarizing, cheating, lying and stealing. The ethics committee deals only with

matters

that

pertain

to

the

School of Health Sciences and Community Services programs. Jeffrey created^the ethics committee about 12 years ago after he received complaints from students complaining about their peers who were cheating. He said the committee meets within 48 hours after a complaint is

program. He said unethibehaviour cannot be tolerated

duct. Jeffrey gives the student in

received regarding a student’s con-

and commu-

question the opportunity to relay

nity services programs, because the

his/her side of the story verbally or

programs are based on relationships with people and dishonest traits in students will have a dam-

present his/her facts

in the health sciences

in written

form to him so he can at the

meeting.

See Student: Page 10


— Page 7^

SPOKE, November 27, 2000

The

grinchiest of Grinches

By Reni Nicholson

Grinch back to Dr. Seuss’ intenof the Grinch destroying Christmas for all Whos. The Grinch is a perfect stage for Carrey to release that crazy, almost insane whirlwind of energy. tions

The Grinch’s idea of Christmas is in the updated movie version of the season’s most loved vengeance

Seuss’

Dr.

tale.

How

the Grinch

Stole Christmas.

Rumous have been

Along with his physical drama, Jim Carrey’s rubber mask and mounds of body and facial fur make him the grinchiest of Grinches. Carrey’s comical styles help to elaborate on the original depiction

of the Grinch written in 1957 and made into a half-hour cartoon television special in 1966.

originally

zens of Who-ville help to fill in gaps about why the Grinch is so mean.

The Whos of Who-ville developed

are

more

in the film than in the

book or cartoon.

flying about

wanting “the Joker”,

Jack Nicholson, to play the Grinch, but Carrey’s rambunctious style

and outrageously spastic antics would outdo Nicholson in this role, any day.

Cindy Lou

Who

(Taylor

Momsen)

gets a lecture from the Grinch.

Hundreds of

(Internet photo)

Whos

with animal-like noses parade around Who-ville celebrating Christmas, but the main Whos stand out from the

Who

(Taylor

Cindy Lou

rest:

Momsen),

of Who-ville

the

(Jeffrey

mayor

Tamber),

May Whovier (Christine Baranski), and Cindy Lou’s parents (Bill Irwin and Molly Shannon). Martha

The film jumps back and forth from Who-ville to the Grinch’s cave, with roller-coaster trips through the garbage shoot to Mount Crumpit. The Grinch makes visits to Whoville

incognito with the intent of

terrorizing

quents”

who

“Who-venile taunt him.

delin-

He makes Whos and

prank phone calls to causes havoc on their joyous overbuying Christmas tradition on the day before the holiday. Interaction between the Whos and the Grinch is taken on by Cindy Lou Who who wants the Grinch to spend Christmas with the town’s people. Her questioning the

Jim Carrey is at his zany best in Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas.

(Internet photo)

antic, frantic, grabby, gift-giving holiday sparks Cindy Lou’s interest in the Grinch. Since the Grinch is the only creature who seems to

loath Christmas, she ventures to his

The idea classic

to

remake the

tale

of the

Christmas “bah-humbug”

came from

director

Ron Howard

and producing partner Brian Grazer. Highlighted with narration by Anthony Hopkins, the movie goes into further detail than Dr. Seuss’

book.

Howard answers some

lin-

gering questions from the book, like why does the Grinch live in a cave just North of Who-ville, why is

the

Grinch so grinchy about why does he hate

Christmas and

the Whovillians.

Flashbacks to the Grinch’s child-

hood and interviews with the

citi-

Hollywood

cave in search of answers. Cindy Lou’s character is developed in the film. The scene at night when the Grinch is dressed as Santa is included, but she takes the Whos and the Grinch to new levels of Christmas cheer. The give-and-take between Cindy Lou and the Grinch is delightful. Along with his dog Max, the Grinch is fooled into being befriended by the Whos. He goes into town, only to be laughed at by all Whovillians but his childhood love Martha May.

These antics and more lead the

Music

Fashion

Adventure

www. myfw.com

-


,

Page 8

— SPOKE, November 27, 2000

CBSA

needs chocolate lovers

By Quan La Chocolate sales for the Business Student Association annual

Conestoga

fund-raising

been low ing

to

drive

5

The

CBSA

400 cases

many don’t

want to around

sell

chocolates college

the

feel juvenile.

promotions

accord-

executive, Jessica Kunkle said she doesn’t want to

do chocolate sales anymore because she says they are overdone and annoy the students.

purchased

to raise

money

for Conestoga’s School of

Bentley said his inexpe-

Business but only 75 cases have been sold. Bentley said there are about 75 cases still out with students and he hopes they have

been

said

students

New CBSA

dent Joe Bentley. •*

He

vice-presi-

this year,

CBSA

Bentley,

business

because they

have

Print shop: Undecided destiny Continued from Page

group made up of human resources and financing staff then designated Linda Krotz, manager of labour relations and classifications, to contact staff weekly.

Another reason for the delay in is the newly ratified support staff contract, which gives employees pay increases. The college has to go back to the companies who placed bids to see if this will change their final bids. a decision

The

rience might have been a factor with the

low

sales

because of his lack of marketing skills. His focus has been on the five Biz Bashes because the CBSA held one more than usual

sold.

Each case has 20 boxes covered chocolate of this year. almonds and each box is He said he should have for with a sold $2 Domino’s Pizza two-for- CBSA vice-president Joe Bentley holds one of concentrated more on the the 325 cases of chocolate-covered almonds yet chocolate sales because one coupon. The fund-raising drive to be sold by students to raise money for the the sales are more prof(Photo by Quan La) itable for the School of began on Sept. 28 and school of business, Business. ended Nov. 23. The CBSA makes a 100 per cent profit on each box Money raised from the chocolate sales is used to make purchases to benefit Conestoga’s School of sold, said Bentley. The chocolates are purchased from World Finest Chocolates in Campbellford, Ont., a regBusiness. Bentley said students and faculty from the ular supplier of fund-raising supplies. ^business programs are polled to determine what will He said the CBSA ships back any unused boxes to be purchased with the money raised. In past years, the CBSA has purchased a Digital the supplier and receives a full return. The CBSA is Video Projector for the sole use of business students planning to keep about 100 cases for another fundraising drive in February, just in time for Valentine’s and provided support for Conestoga’s marketing competition team. Day. Bentley said the chocolates have a long shelf life The CBSA was still able to support the marketing so the CBSA can keep boxes available at the CBSA team this year despite the low sales. office. Anyone interested in purchasing a box can visit Many things could be factors in the low sales, said the office in Room 1D14-D. ,

college originally requested

to

presentation Aug. 4 and the

first

college put off a decision until

indicates that in

equipment, the

college printing department has

managed increasing

to

keep pace with the a growing

demands of

educational institution.

Riehl said Conestoga College

Key

Performance Indicator surveys for the past two years and with that comes extra funding from the

was

the proposals

to find efficiencies in the col-

lege’s operations

and explore

all

The

cy and effectiveness of various

tional

operating

with

the

modes

to

better deal

college’s

continued

Preliminary investigations of

in

the

college received an addi-

$690,000 for

its

standing in

top three for the past two

years.

KPI surveys

growth.

1

provincial government.

options to determine the efficien-

establish

marks of excellence

at

benchOntario

other printing operations indicat-

colleges.

ed the college could possibly save money with modernized equip-

the quality of service,” said Reihl.

ment and new printing

“Privatization doesn’t offer

tech-

niques.

Bidders had to agree to provide

:

Dawna

with it?”

Adam

& Conestoga Students Incorporated

All students and faculty are invited to attend this presentation

Speers

brutally

is

No.

We’re No.

Kills

Drake was

2000

“The college

service.

,

Time: 2:30 - 4:00pm

in the future.

made in October. The request for

mother Dawna Speers, shares her story with the hope it will help other young people.

30,

now and

has been rated No.

y

When: Thursday, November

with the demands of the college

second presentations were to be

,

Event sponsored by the Women’s Resource Group

equipment leases and printing. The print shop staff submitted its second proposal Oct. 23. It contains eight recommendations, most requesting phasing in updated equipment needed to keep up

spite of its aging

stabbed to death by her ex-boyfriend s

The bidder had to include commitments to current staff,

be complete by July 31, and a review of bidders was to be completed and decided on by Aug. 8. The print shop staff made their to

7, 1991 , nineteen-year-old Monica

Monica

with the same or improved services.

The proposal

Conestoga College!!!!! Guest Speaker

On October

year contract as well as keep the print shop on site and continue

proposals from possible bidders

Love That Coming

upgraded equipment and a 10-

1

A

I,

1

because of

good

why tamper


SPOKE, November 27, 2000

— Page 9

m

Indoor soccer teams seeing lots of action By

Lisa Hiller

Goals were scored by Jose

6-3.

Jamie Sherifali and Rivas,

As of Nov. 21 Conestoga’s men’s and women’s indoor soccer teams

On Nov. 16, SNP United

to

back and

The women’s team plays Tuesday division.

to

be

forth

men’s team lost The score went seeing lots of

Geoff Johnstone said the team

letting

coming along

think that

well.

He

said

is

SNP

United has a team that has played

checks get in behind us sometimes and I

6-5.

Despite their second loss, coach

tighter defensively.

We were

the

and physical play. Neither team was ahead by more than two goals at a time. The SNP United goalkeeper was excellent. Both goalkeepers enabled their teams to come back after a goal by the opponent with some great saves.

nights and there are 10 other teams

“We needed

Viveiros.

aggression

sions.

women’s only

Jeff

IUiasTsatsas scored two goals.

had played seven games. The men’s team plays every Thursday night in the premier division. There are five other teams in the division and two other divi-

in the

Derhan

Scott,

together since the league started sev-

ago and they have won the championship three or four times. eral years

was

Johnstone said he was pleased

the fatal thing.”

new team played an estabteam so well.

that his

Men

’s

Geoff Johnstone, indoor soccer team

lished

He the

The other teams in the league are made up of non-students, but in some cases, as in the men’s division, the

“We needed

said.

ting checks get in

times and 2,

the

defensive discipline, he

it is

to

Condors men’s

I

be tighter

“We were

defensively,” he said.

teams include Conestoga

Nov.

him more about what to work on. For his

team has

team,

alumni.

On

also said that as a coach, the

loss teaches

coach

was the

fatal

Johnstone said his team needs to get themselves between the offensive player

Conestoga.

ing off the route to the goal.

SNP

Derek Castro and Larry Victoria

United scored a few of then-

need

to

do

more

Krista Deruiter scored Conestoga’s

Women’s coach Stephanie Den Haan will hold six more tryouts

only goal.

The Kitchener Spirit defeated the girls 5-1

.

31. Holly Beitz

scored their only goal in that game.

The team was shut out a

team Alumni on Oct. 17 and were

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

on Oct.

sec-

lost

ttime on Nov. 7

13-0 to the

be made before the tournament season starts. final cuts will

Addictive Relationships

Do you feel that your relationship Does

is

“bad for you” but you cannot seem to end

it?

Do you

the idea of ending the relationship

make you

give yourself

harm

the

feel anxious or fearful?

attempt to end the relationship cause “withdrawal symptoms,” even physical discomfort, which relieved

by

Does any is

only

re-establishing contact?

If you have said yes to most of these questions, you may be in an addictive relationship. The first steps to overcoming an addictive relationship include recognizing that it is a problem, and understanding what beliefs and feelings are influencing you to stay in the relationship. Robin Norwood’s book. Women Who Love Too Much, gives a ten-step plan to help in overcoming the pattern of addictive relationships. Her suggestions, which are equally valid for men, include the following: Focus on getting your needs met more effectively; make them a priority. Recognize and work on your own problems and shortcomings. Leam to stop controlling others by concentrating on your own needs and efforts. Develop your spiritual side; spend some time daily in an activity that increases your sense of peace and tranquillity.

Leam to

avoid relationship games and unhealthy roles such as rescuer, blamer or victim.

who

Find a support group of friends

understand, and share what you have experienced and learned.

may be especially helpful in the following circumstances: You are very unhappy in the relationship but unsure whether to accept it, improve it or get out of it. You believe you should end the relationship but are having difficulty doing so. You suspect you are staying in a relationship for the wrong reasons (e.g. guilt, fear of being alone). You recognize a pattern of bad relationships you have been unable to change.

Counselling

daughter,

Dawna Spears’ presentation of the video “A Love That Kills.” She who was murdered by her ex-boyfriend.

Thursday,

November 30

2:30 to 4:00 p.m.

will also talk about her

Room2A301

A Message from Student Services

(2B02).

Countdown

o o G) O c

o

l-i

to <0

ISO Registration ,1? fe lr

^

to Conestoga College

m

Days

The

registration audit

is

they

on Nov. 29, Dec. 6, Dec. 13, Jan. 10, Jan. 17 and Jan. 24 when the

reasons to stay in the relationship that aren’t true or are not strong enough to offset the relationship causes?

when

WRSC Spirit 82’s.

of,

according to Johnstone. “We’re not following in to get

the team defeated the Admiral Crew

ond

Plan to attend

goals off rebounds, something the

Condors

The Condors women’s team has played four games and lost four games while being outscored 322 They lost their first game 4-0 to

defeated 10-1 Jack’s Girls defeated the Condors 10-1 on Oct. 24.

and the goal thus block-

Jeff Viveiros scored the goals for

scored two goals each for the Kabana Boyz. In their second game on Nov. 9,

the

Talk to a counsellor.

thing.”

team lost to the Kabana Boyz 8-3. Herb Zelaya, Dersoy Sherifali and

at

let-

behind us some-

think that

rebounds well enough moment,” he said.

to

Go!

February 14, 2001 Join the celebration!


Page 10

— SPOKE, November 27, 2000

Condors lose

home opener

VIP:

By

od, Stinger

The Conestoga Condors varsity hockey team pounded in two goals in the last four

the

third, but

slid

4-3. real story of the

in the outstanding play

game

lies

of Condor

goaltender Ryan Knettner, who stopped 41 shots to keep

Conestoga

While almost a

game. teammates

in the

his full

spent

period in the penalty

box, and the rest of the time trying to

pull

together

a

struggling

offence, Knettner pulled out t

stops to give his

all

the

team a chance

at

victory.

“Without our goaltender we would have been out of the game long before we were,” said Condor assistant coach Greg Rickwood, game. At the other end of the ice

after the

it

was

a different story. Stinger goaltender

Arthur Strojny was tested with only 24 shots. Rickwood said some of the Condors’ offensive trouble resulted

it

main teaching

at the

building.

Colleges which participated

Cambrian, Hunger,

include Confederation,

Mohawk,

Northern, Seneca, Sir

Sandford Fleming, Canador, Lambton, Michener, St. Clair and Sheridan.

flat in the

up about midmaking for

the period,

Seneca rushed up the ice on a two-on-two about 15 minutes into the period and beat Knettner up top on a shot from Brad Cripps. But the Condors were not going down without a fight. With just over three minutes left in the game, Trevor Shody snuck in a rebound to narrow the gap to one. Less than 40 seconds later the Condors’ efforts at crashing the net

death overtime period to win the

But the

presented in different classrooms

an exciting 10-minute finale.

one into the corner just

1:53 into the five-minute sudden

game

picked

way through

Stingers regained their

and

comer on a

The Condors came out

however as the composure

late,

Willett buried

the top

second period 2-1 for Seneca. Knettner made three key saves in the final minute of the period to keep the Condors alive.

minutes of play dur-

home opener against the Seneca Stingers on Nov. 15, to send the match into overtime. The effort turned out to be too littoo

Andrew

in

1

ested

the peri-

short-handed breakaway to end the

ing their

tle,

puck

Continued from Page

After lunch students learned

more about programs that interthem at the other 23 colleges during CIP college sessions

About midway through

Kirsten Fifield

promotion

of

Outstanding goaltending keeps struggling offence alive

Day

Conestoga Condor captain Greg Thede battles with Seneca Stinger Ryan Prestan Nov. 15 at the recreation centre. The Condors lost their home opener 4-3 in overtime despite pounding in

two goals

in

the last four minutes.

(Photo by Kirsten

Fifie id)

frustration

with

5:29 into the second period

until

having to concentrate mainly on

when Seneca opened

defence due to penalties.

with a goal from Jason Sugimato,

“When you the box,

it’s

finally

do get out of

hard to immediately

switch to an offensive style,” said

the scoring

Carol Pease

on-campus

At 2 p.m. the high school

less than a

us mentally.” The score sheet remained empty

led one by

minute and a half

Condor Matt Turcotte

trick-

Strojny to even the

score.

stu-

dents headed back to the rec centre where there were draws

win

to

prizes donated

by

differ-

community businesses.

game

Conestoga’s liaison office also gave away a portable stereo/CD player as a grand prize. Pease said the annual event benefits Conestoga College as

at three.

But the Condors ran out of luck,

game,

in overtime, to seal the

win

for Seneca.

well as those participating in the

After the game,

“He was

CIP college

Seneca coach

played exceptional in

But

,

liaison officer

on another rebound and knocked one through the five-hole to tie the

of the later

to spotlight

ent programs at Conestoga and

Jim Wells said he thought Knettner

Rickwood. “The game was hard on

way

paid off as Ted Albrecht capitalized

who deflected a shot into the comer net.

an excellent

the college.”

as Cripps scored his second of the

from the team’s

“It’s

sessions.

an excellent

“It’s

way

to spot-

and have us out in the community. It promotes new programs and gives stulight the college

net.

really impressive,” said

“Other than Cripps, who scored the winner, he was the star of the game.” Wells.

dents as well

as

councillors

more information.”

Student: Identity s

not revealed

Louises

Continued from Page 6 The student is not permitted attend the

nor

his/her

is

to

committee meeting

name

revealed at

the meeting. Jeffrey said he

is

the only person at the meeting

who knows the identity of the student. He said this creates fairness for the student because

the student’s peers or teachers

cannot be biased with their decisions.

The ethics committee is fair and consistent with their deci-

^^nmumscholarshjpsxa

sions, said Jeffrey.

He

said the

consequences stay the same for each offence because the committee looks to previous incido

/

same nature and mimics the same penalty. Not every student is deemed guilty by the ethics committee. dents of the

9et

?

bursary

>

If

the

student

has a

logical

explanation, no penalty will be assessed, said Jeffrey.

~~>

When get

do

/

Spolle: takes you higher


SPOKE, November 27, 2000 .

:

mss

s

sm

— Page

Weir didn’t win golf tourney, others lost By Paul Kostal •

Let’s get

one thing clear

He

is

in

many

of the players

Mike

an excellent golfer, and

improving every year, and as a Canadian he gives me someone to cheer for every time he plays. But some things need to be said in wake of his recent victory at the

Championship World Golf American Express Open recently at

That position gives him a threeyear exemption for qualifying, and automatic invites to every major for the next three years as

chip to be played better, a sand trap

well.

only beat the other golfers in the

So even

if his

game goes on

vaca-

tion for the next three years he will still

get to play in every major tour-

to avoid.

There

is

always some-

thing.

To succeed,

a golfer must not

but he must conquer the demons inside himself. Weir was the best golfer at field,

Oh

is.

That’s

where golf games are won and lost. Tiger and the other golfers knew they should be able to get to the

game about pride. You compete not so much with others, as you do

but he and virtually everyone else,

ously,

beat themselves.

the water just a quick roll away.

ahead of his nearest competitor.

with yourself.

The win gave the boy from Bright’s Grove a cool million, American no less, and put him in sixth place on

Golf is a game where you can never say you were as good as you could have been. There is always something to be bettered. A drive to be hit longer, a

sure, Tiger

The so

really a better golfer,

victory at Valderrama wasn’t

much a

was a

is

victory for Weir, as

loss for the field.

It all

goes back to that infamous

17th hole.

For a par-five,

it is

Lots of discussion

meeting of rec centre committee Kirsten Fifield

An abundance

of ideas and con-

Brad Whiteford, CSI vice-president of operations, agreed that the

at the college, created the

advisory

students living in residence

be a good core group

“We need

tie

by members committee’s member-

Fletcher began the meeting

introducing the various

everyone

The only

access to the rec centre. that has yet to

with

be appointed

to deal with,

we

5,000 students

who go

He added

the committee needs to what it is doing into what the col-

new development manager, will

eventually

take over chairing the committee.

“Students need to buy into our ideas in five years, not just now.” .

Jody Andruszkiewicz, the repre-

from the Student Athletic

sentative

said he has to put towels

the

floor

we

also a teaching golf profes-

“If

Westmount Golf Club and

centre,

needs a

order to take

immediate action and says he will begin cosmetic changes right away

show

to

the college

community he

and the recreation centre

staff are

improve the facility. He told the committee he is look-

trying to

ing for a lot of input so the centre can

meet everyone’s needs. Jay Funston, the resident adviser at

Rodeway

from

Suites, said students

the residence find

it

hard to book ice

time at the facility because

it

needs

two months in advance. He added that the centre only has three hours a week open

to

be

to

He

down on

other golfers couldn’t.

booked

for student bookings.

Funston also said the student

resi-

dence had enough interest in the intramural ice hockey league to

two teams, but were limited to half a team because the league had a limited capacity. enroll

Fletcher suggested using the resi-

• .

new we can do is

are not going to build a

the

least

Barry Milner, manager of physihe will support whatever he can within the confines that his department has to cal resources, said

BENEFITS . . .

offer.

He

.

SECOND OR THIRD YEAR STUDENT - PREVIOUS POST SECONDARY EXPERIENCE MAY QUALIFY 75% OVERALL PROGRAM AVERAGE, 80% IN COURSE TUTORED RECOMMENDATION BY FACULTY STRONG COMMUNICATION SKILLS ENJOY WORKING WITH PEOPLE

slip.

upgrade,” said Andruszkiewicz.

runs Conestoga’s golf program. facility

is

during intramural ball

hockey games so players don’t

is

in

all

weekend. Tiger himself had a triple bogey on that day, ending any chance of winning the tournament and becoming the first man

QUALIFICATIONS .

years.

sional at

Martin said the

Other golfers could have done would have been closer. But congratulations need to be given to Weir. He won the tournament and secured his future. But more importantly, he beat the other golfers, and he beat the demons the

TUTORS CURRENTLY REQUIRED FOR SEVERAL COURSES

lege has planned for the next 10

get the leaks in the roof fixed.

short-term plan

in two.

for birdie.

here,” said

Fletcher also introduced the col-

Martin

on 17T

chipped to the back, and safe, part of the green, and then putted in

Whiteford.

Council, said his top priority

Tony Martin, who

it

He

don’t leave out the other

an academic representative.

lege’s

front of the green

that. It

dropping 17th

in

to align the goals of the

rec centre with the goals of the col-

found.

is

were

the water on

up

instead of trying to reach

lege.

lege, so

member

in

did.

Weir, with a two-stroke lead, laid

ATTENTION ALL 2 nd & 3 rd YR. EET & MET STUDENTS

would

but voiced his concern about forgetting the other students at the col-

committee to look at how the rec centre can be better utilized as it stands, and what could be done in the future if outside funding is

represented

Professionals balls

be done. Too stubborn to do what

students to join.

Conestoga College were discussed by the 11 members of the newly formed rec centre advisory committee at its first meeting at the Roost on Nov. 14. Jack Fletcher, the director of student services and recreation centre

ship

But the green is sloped dangerand the fringe shaved, and

because he was

dence as a core group for intramural sports and then inviting teams of

cerns about the recreation centre at

to ensure the

rather short, at

green in two.

failed, lost,

Peer Services

at first

By

it

He

Weir

That’s where the trap

Weir won with an aggregate score of 11 -under par, two strokes

2000 season.

to win 10 tournaseason in almost 50

two, and try for the eagle attempt.

Valderrama on the weekend.

standings for the

in a

too stubborn to do what needed to

nament. Golf is, and always has been, a

money

Snead

ments

only 537 yards. The great drivers, like Woods and Vijay Singh, should be able to reach the green in

Valderrama, Spain.

the final

since

it

years.

to start,

not a column to knock

this is

Weir.

Infamous 17th hole does

11

\

-

added

the

Ministry

of

and Colleges Universities does not allow for capital resources to be used in

.

Training,

major renovations. Fletcher said he would look for commonalities in the discussion at the meeting to discuss at the next meeting on Nov. 28. Martin will also give a presentation on his short-term plans at that meeting.

Martin said he thinks the rec is a great facility even though it’s a little old and worn centre

around the edges. He added that he likes to do things quickly and if the committee works as a team, he thinks they can reach their goals.

.

$10.50

HOURLY WAGE

EXCELLENT REVIEW OF COURSE MATERIAL BUILD MEANINGFUL PEER RELATIONSHIPS INCREASE SELF CONFIDENCE AND ESTEEM GREAT ADDITION TO A RESUME

FURTHER INFORMATION/APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE IN STUDENT SERVICES ROOM 2B02


Page 12

— SPOKE, November 27, 2000

Cdnestoga Students Inc. Academic Sub Cdmmittee

2000

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Digital Edition - November 27, 2000