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33rd Year

— No. 40

Conestoga College, Kitchener November

2000

20,

Bidders battle over hot babe

What’s

By Kyla Rowntree

Inside

The highest bid

Conestoga

at the

College Student Date Auction went guitar-playing

a

for

who

singer

sang a song he had written himself. Instead of strutting his stuff down the red-carpet

who

ers

runway

like the oth-

participated in the auction

on Nov. 8 in the Sanctuary, Steve Bounsanga, a second-year mechanengineering student, got out his

ical

PAGE

2

broadcasting students raised

the

the auction.

went battled

dug through

money

it

out as peo-

and

their wallets

them so they

to

The $600 to

downtown

to

got a date with the student being

less rate

auctioned off and two tickets to benefit concert for Mary’s Place sponsored by broadcasting

dren.

Sammy’s Garage on

Nov.

8.

Wade

Tannis

a first-year journal-

ism student, who won the bid on Bounsanga, said, “He is hot and he has a good voice.” Bidders had the option of bidding on 12 students who volunteered from programs including journalism, mechanical- engineering, broadcasting-radio

and

tele-

The

vision and law and security.

were dressed for the occasion - women in dresses and men in shirts and ties - and most participants

Kitchener.

Mary’s Place is currently at a 140 per cent vacancy rate and is in desperate need of funding in order

could increase their bids for a date with Bounsanga. Winning bidders at the auction

students at

raised at the concert

Mary’s Place, a homeless shelter for women and children in

accommodate

Amy

the

Conestoga expands

The cost of the was about $800 and in total

cost of the concert.

concert

just over $1,400.

donated

at function.

Garage on Nov. 8. The Student Date Auction raised $339. A Loose Change Line fundraiser was also held to offset the

and sang a tune in front of about 75 people who gathered for

Two bidders

Sammy’s

concert at

benefit

the

guitar

ple

Tobin evasive

appeared nervous. Broadcasting students sponsored the Student Date Auction and aH proceeds went to offset the costs of

nalism

the high homeamong women and chil-

Fleming, a first-year jour-

and

student,

Tanya

Gafoor, a third-year broadcasting student, planned and organized the event. Fleming thought of the idea and presented it to Gafoor who agreed the Student Date Auction was a

good fund-raising idea. Ginny Hawkrigg, a broadcasting student tioned

off,

said she

first-year

who was

had a backup

bidder just in case no one bid on her

when she was up on

Students disrespect By Kirsten

an

I

was up there dying without a bid,”

said Hawkrigg.

“I’m recently single so

it

would

The ceremony consisted of a poems and

Fifield

minutes

five

Conestoga

essays

into

College’s

their

Remembrance Day ceremony in the Sanctuary on Nov. 10, many of what the

seemed ceremony was

PAGE

be really nice to get back out there and dating again. This is somewhat of a boost for me.”

six

service

“(To me) those

it is

paying homage to

who gave up

their lives for

freedom and the freedom of

their

others,” said Dallas Schlitt, a sec-

ond-year microcomputer administration student.

He added

that students

showed

a

asked to stand and observe two

lack of respect by talking during

minutes of silence and the playing of the national anthem.

the

The ceremony was presented

unfortunate that people can’t

in a

two minutes of

silence

and

playing of the anthem.

“More people

are paying atten-

movie playing now, than

serious tone

remember,” said event organizer

an attempt to relay the emotions

were

Kerri-Lynn Kit, CSI vice-president

by those who lived through war in Canada. Those who attended observed one true moment of silence near the end of the ceremony when

management studies student Sabrina Ganesh said to her Remembrance Day means remem-

She added

that

when people

one positive

entered the Sanctuary

during the two minutes of silence they stopped

the

ceremony was not taken

ously as

it

Third-year broadcasting student

In

Flanders Fields at the

Remembrance Day ceremonies in

the Sanctuary Nov. 10. (Photo by Kirsten

as seri-

Fifield)

I

had three students

He added

that

it

is

sometimes

hard to give a fresh face to something that happened so many years

been involved

ago.

in the war.”

listening to the

ceremony.”

First-year

bering the courage and bravery of those

who

fought in the war. ceremony, students

were invited

Fields a cappella.

planting next to the pond behind

Saywell

said

and performed college’s

come up and thank me for doing it because they knew people who had

tion to the

broadcasting student Janice Saywell sang In Flanders

she

has

been

singing the song since high school

has been in the past.

“Last year

in

third-year

Janice Saywell sings

at the door.

Steve Coleman, who has been the master of ceremonies at the event for the past three years, agreed that

by those involved,

felt

aspect of the ceremony was that

8

guitar

take half an hour out of their day to

of student services.

executive member.

loved ones during the war,

After the readings students were

evision set could be heard.

CBSA has new

and

soldiers

students.

about, as laughter, chatter and a tel-

“It’s

written by

which were read by a group of

the students in attendance to forget

song and plays

Remembrance collection of letters,

About

original

Student Date Auction in the Sanctuary Nov. 8. Bounsanga got the highest bid of $53 from Tannis Wade, a first-year journalism Student. (Photo by Kyla Rowntree) at the

stage.

asked one of the guys in my program to come down and watch and I gave him $50 to bid on me if “I

student residence.

PAGE 3

auc-

Highest bid recipient Steve Bounsanga, a second-year mechanical engineering student, sings

it

last

year at the

Remembrance Day

cere-

the

the

to participate in a tree

main teaching building. 10 students, mostly

About

those involved in the presentation, braved the cold and took turns shovelling dirt around the

mony.

Some

After

students

in

attendance

observed the spirit of Remembrance Day throughout the ceremony.

purchased by the CSI, had been planted earlier tree,

morning.

that

that


— SPOKE, November

Page 2

20,

2000

Tobin doesn’t answer the questions By Tammy Somerville Many

Harris has kind of taken the lid off

students will be thousands

of dollars in debt by the time they graduate;

some

will

owe up

istic

me

or honest for

While Industry Minister Brian Tobin was not clear on how a Liberal federal government would help current students pay off the

are going to

pay down the student It is

just not realistic.”

He repeatedly avoided directly answering how a new Liberal government, serving a third term, would help those now enrolled

in

post-secondary institutions.

When pressed on

the issue, Tobin

government should be looking more into debt relief. “If I were to stand here and tell you that I’ve got a plan to pay down your debt, I’d be lying through my teeth and you’d be said

he

said.

est rates are reasonable proposals

loans that you are driving up.’

massive debts they are incurring, he did agree that the federal government has to do something to keep the costs of post-secondary education down when he was interviewed by Spoke after he attended the CSI election event at Conestoga College Nov. 7. Tobin was reluctant to say exactly what a federal Liberal government would do and passed the blame on to the provincial government. “There is no question that Mike

it,”

real-

it is

because Mike Harris allows institutions to double tuitions that the federal government is going to step in and say, ‘Don’t worry, Mike. We

$75,000.

you believed

He

to say that

said Tobin. “I don’t think

to

foolish if

agreed that students require debt relief. Having a longer time to repay loans, as well as lower inter-

and allowed institutions to set whatever tuition fees they want,”

the

he

The Liberal platform does

said.

not have any such plans in

and

it

doesn’t mention student debt at

all.

When

he was, premier of Newfoundland, Tobin promised the people of that province he would stay until the end of his term, but yet he resigned days before the federal election

was

called.

He was

appointed industry minister by Prime Minister Jean Chretien to court the Maritime vote. Asked whether or not he thought this move would create cynicism

among

students voting for the

first

or second time, Tobin said he has

support among strong Newfoundlanders. “People recognize that when you have an election campaign when one party has a platform that is very detrimental

know

to

Newfoundland,

as premier, the best use

I

I

can

be is to get into the fight,” he said. Tobin expanded saying that the prospect of negative feelings among young voters is why he came to Conestoga College to talk

ARE YOU LOOKING FOR SOME EXTRA SPENDING MONEY?

to students.

Bingemans

is

now

The minister was informed of the recent random survey of Doon stu-

hiring part-time banquet servers

for our Catering dept.

team-oriented people

We who

are looking for flexible

by a member of Spoke staff, which revealed a lack of interest in the issues and lack of dents, conducted

enjoy working with the

public in a fast-paced environment.

HOW TO APPLY If

you are interested please

resume to 1380 Victoria fax 519-744-1985 e-mail;

fax, e-mail or

St.

drop off a

N. Kitchener or

CJIQ By

speak 7.

Liberal supporters in the

Sanctuary Nov.

(Photo by

that things haven’t

changed because the same mentality was around when he was a young student. “It doesn’t matter what element of society you’re talking about, you always have some people who are

Kirsten Fifield

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: Unsure Abomt You Profnun Choke? fall

tnn, root sctkkcte

are

ruling

into a routine

and beginning

to

aaD«o of bariHftrity with, their daus. However, some ftndcms may feel untaiy, and wonder ifthay tov* choaen flu eoune of study beat foiled to them. If you arc having ffeel ft

these thoughts, try odring yourself the following

qratkma:

Wliy did yixi decide to come to coDa^Ajrcyoiilooldiifi to gam qunHficatkiukr a specific career goal? Are you living tg> to die expectations ofparent*, family or friends? Did you oome to college because you weren’t rore what else to do after high school? to identify

what you

wen hoping to Irani How to ytnir course* differ from ytxr tetpociMkms? Are they not challenging icme pranaydiltc ikiUe or knowledge to be mcceasfU l? What aipccti of your coqraee Jtre you interested in? Are tbcae itrcaa to be cxwiTTn cd in enough, or are yon locking greater depth Ills,

a arc they mtn akady related to i diffcnnt program of study?

Are then odn iaus may be inta faring with your nrrolvttneut with school? Do spcod more time you thinking about your social life, your family, aports or ofitcr 1

Bctiyitiert

r

nl flm ac Lukoly tmc an

in ymr mutiiftlkn to Aidy, seek dot

taftpHonaodhefr Your ftretty oat be trick razee cf tuftinnlton about tab JM4 o4 (tv variety of joba The flfaritlt Empl&jwwat Ottia ka nfamikm akat d^ojcd ant the world, rrfwatk after to BfnrfwW Bwii iho mkt wtt gqiks iftuu. oductof l diotaa an betp rfarffy yin clarify yarn gwh. these jnJ fttoeBE pak Talking

rmwinm

w km

taw

m

said that

is

why

is

it

leaders

political

to

important

come

to

places like the college to speak directly

students

to

and present

their platforms.

proposal included a script

of a

manager Paul Osborne and programming specialist Mark

able to determine the

Burley are looking for student volunteers who want to work with the

contain.

any capacity. Although journalism and broadcasting students will be working at

CRTC

Station

mock show

so that he will be

amount of spoken word each show would

CJIQ the

will operate according to

which means programming must

regulations,

station’s

the station as part of their curricu-

contain 40 per cent Canadian content each day and 31 1/2 hours of

lum, the opportunity to become involved with CJIQ is open to

spoken word and three hours of ethnic content each week.

everyone

at the college.

And you

“It’s

don’t have to actually

promote local talent because the station will focus on content from Waterloo

side of broadcasting. station

send a signal

will

antenna above Door 4, out to the Global Television tower in Ayr. This will give CJIQ a broad-

from

a great

opportunity to

go on the air to be involved. Osborne and Burley are willing to provide one-on-one training to anyone interested in the production

its

Region.” Paul Osborne,

range from Hamilton to Lake Erie where listeners can tune

casting

FM.

88.3

in at

“It’s

mote

Osborne,

local talent,” said

said students with ideas for

shows

for the radio’s

programming and

should prepare a proposal bring

it

to

his

office

located

in

3B15.

The proposal should include full

a

explanation of the idea includ-

show,

would

in the stu-

and any related experience the it

all

students involved, as

well as their phone numbers and e-

mail addresses.

Osborne said students with ideas shows should submit them even if they do not want to go on for

the

air.

“Someone may have a great idea and we could get someone else to host

it.”

Students

who

are

interested

in

Osborne because the station will need people to do newscasts, weather and other speaking roles. Osborne said the station needs a

be pre-recorded or live

Burley said

names of

how many peowho would be

featured, whether the talent

may

manager

on-air positions should also contact

ple will be involved,

individual

station

who

ing what the content will be, will host the

CJIQ

Proposals should also contain the

a great opportunity to pro-

“because the station will focus on content from Waterloo Region.”

dio,

A Messagefrom Student Smvtces (Room 2802)

He for

ful if the

He

Are you atill unwira of whit truly interests you, what you feel able to do and whit you would find moat rewarding? rul«p« ifar faring nrprnmt ti mfry wnri hr nwj jaiaM hiKtin ym ac anadsk^ awffacr am erf be life to explore study. Pwhapi you Just <k»*t hrro QBcnjk nrtwiwrtnw about Ike path you bore chows Tf yrw.

issues,” said Tobin.

for the station has already begun.

The

Whit did yon think would be infau cwUufl about tbs jKDgnm? Try

sary to think and learn about the

the search for student volunteers

station in

At tbk point in the

Tammy Somerville)

not going to invest the time neces-

trust for politicians.

He responded

to students

requires student talent

Conestoga College’s new FM radio station, CJIQ, won’t begin broadcasting until December, but

hr@bingemans.com

Industry Minister Brian Tobin waits his turn to

and

have.

would also be help-

lot

of student volunteers because

it

broadcast 24-hours a day, seven days a week. will


SPOKE, November 20, 2000

Rodeway 206 new

Suites gets six-storey addition be ready

units should

now

September

for

there

is

only one for each

The $1,875 per semester a television,

By Tammy Somerville

will

evaluate occupancy and the

tion to

contain

Rodeway Suites 206 new units. '

The student residence

is

located

Although the college has legally

owned

residence

the

since

early

September, the Ministry of Training,

Colleges and Universities didn’t

approve the purchase

Kevin Mullan, vice-president of tions, said the college

ly

50 units or 100 beds.

Rodeway addition

Suites

now

has 230

now under

construction,

it

will bring Conestoga’s total resi-

dence capacity to 436. Mullan said the residences are self-sustaining so students who do not live there will not have any costs added to their regular fees for residence operation or maintenance.

The only source of income and the increases

is

rent

will coincide with

The timing of

the deal couldn’t

many

be better for the college since

million, also gives the college the

per cent, the general arts and sci-

programs increases

have in

seen

student

“The six-storey addition now under construction added another

were up 105 per

the

Mullan.

There

is

up 61 per cent and admissions

.Jack Fletcher, director of student

services,

Spoke was right

said in a recent

interview that the timing

buy the residence because the risk of owning it is less now than it was six or seven years ago. Mullan expired that the cost of to

is

no

set date

third parcel of land will

oped. The college construction

is

when

the

be devel-

waiting for the

now underway

to

be

completed, and then in three years

land and construction as well as interest rates were higher in 1992.

The investment

benefits students

in the future, said

that as

increasingly scarce in the region, students won’t have to worry about

skyrocketing rent.

The new residence space means

units that

have both beds

in an

deal

open

Students already in residence get

on the new accommoda-

but Mullan said he expects

everything to be

full

by the time

students start classes next

now

Kevin Mullan, vice-president of

fall.

There will be no changes for

stu-

except for

with students regularly regarding

Throughout the summer of 2001 the original residence will undergo renovations. Mullan said more quiet study spaces will be built and a main floor informal lounge for students will be created. The rooms will also be refurbished and the basement area that holds the laundry, storage and existing lounge

not going to have to

who want

finance and administrative

There are also mature students

operations, holds the layout for

who want to come back to full time who can’t afford it

the

new addition to Rodeway Suites. The purchase of the

have to pay for an apartment, said Mullan. Residence is now an

student residence by the

option for them.

college received ministry

approval Sept. 21 (Photo by

Tammy Somerville)

and game room will have

air condi-

tioning installed. to students

living in residence will not increase

and Internet access the

hookups

new in

is

is still

included,

have each bedroom where units

will

school if

they

also an issue for

They don’t

want to spend 1 fi hours on a bus and most can’t afford to buy a car. “The college looks at it as a student service,”

Mullan said the cost

but

Transportation

students, said Mullan.

said.

buying Rodeway

Mullan.

“By

we’re ensuring it stays a residence and doesn’t become a hotel. There was no guarantee in the long term; now we have a guarantee.” Suites,

College fi

yllttiuy Conestoga College continually seeks opportunities for improvement to Conestoga

meet and exceed the needs of our students, employees

to

Mullan added that with specialty programs like the wood-skills training program Conestoga offers, students need to be assured they will have accommodations and now the college can do that.

area.

tions,

is

with students

Conestoga

College np

Mullan.

housing becomes

enroll but are unable to find housing.

progress.

cent.

own

attract students, unlike the current

some disturbances with the construction. The manager of Rodeway Suites will be meeting

ence program

their

the college

ing program admissions were up 35

the aviation program

said

enrolment.

bring

and computers.

be ready for September 2001, will have two separate bedrooms to

dents living there

roughly $400,000.

bill to

massive

Students

now and He said

slated to

This year alone the practical nurs-

option of a third parcel of land for

was $14 million,”

The new residence units,

first dibs

inflation.

bought the

$8.5 million. Overall the

furni-

toasters, linens

student residence and more than two acres of additional land for phase two of the construction which is currently underway. The deal, which cost approximately $5

college

local

and

ture.

in the

unit.

includes

cable service,

service, utilities

$6 million range,” he said. Mullan said the new residences will fill up before they open because the existing residence is full and there is a waiting list. “There isn’t any real student housing in the area,” he said.

until Sept. 21.

finance and administrative opera-

phone

including the building and land was

list.

rooms with 115 beds. With the

New Dundee

original price for the deal

The next

that will

Road, across Homer Watson Boulevard from. Doon campus. on

“The

addition will include approximate-

length of the waiting

Conetoga College has started construction on a six-storey addi-

—Page 3

and communities.


Page 4

— SPOKE, November 20, 2000

MM

Students need

MJ

«<X.

TVe

-X’ 'N

to get to polls When

Conestoga College students enter the real world after two or books and bars, there are many things that will

three years of hitting the

come

as a shock to them. There will be taxes to pay, and high ones. There will be no help to pay back the thousands of dollars in student loans. When they go to the

emergency room, they

will wait for two, three,

even four hours. The

make them

Some of them

have children and will find out that

will

child care than

does for

it

air

sick and gas prices will climb higher.

they breathe will

it

costs

more

for

rent.

They will bitch and complain. They will curse and swear. They will blame everyone, except who is most at fault, themselves. They didn’t vote in the Nov. 27, 2000 federal election. Their voice was not heard and their choice was not recorded. They were too wrapped up in their own lives to worry about their own futures. With traditionally less than 10 per cent of students voting, politicians continue to ignore them. But no one seems to care. With escalating tuition costs and mounting debts, someone should care and who better than students? sit up and take note. Do we want Do we want to preserve the Earth as it is or destroy it beyond repair and then realize we were wrong? Do we want to protect those who cannot protect themselves? Do we want our children to

The

future of this country should

clean air and water?

be

safe, educated,

All

we have

happy and prosperous?

heard

(at least

those of us

who

are listening)

from the

Canadian Alliance, NDP, Bloc Quebecois and Conservatives is taxes, health care and gun control. These are important issues, but education is also important. The political parties have not made it a priLiberals,

ority

because they don’t have

Although not

to;

students haven’t

Day wants

Alliance leader Stockwell

in his platform,

to

made them.

be prime minister of Canada.

he has said he would give students

who

Mudslinging 101

OSAP a break by allowing them to pay back their loans based on payments in proportion to their salaries once they have a job. But, while he served the PC government of Alberta as provincial treasurer, tuition fees skyrocketed more than 200 per cent to become among the

Federal party leaders get

highest in the country.

By

receive

Sure he would give students more time to pay back their loans, but would they be paying back $100,000 instead of $30,000 because of additional interest? These are things students should

know and

care

A

random survey of Conestoga College students on the

Doon cam-

pus Nov. 2 showed some students were unaware a Canadian federal election was being held. How can students be so ... naive, uninformed

it

learn anything

from

always take advantage of

Gore/Bush race

Only half of a ballot.

What

er? “If only,

will

the

300 million people

who

couldn’t both-

Conestoga College. Candidates speak to students

in the

tried to

in the

Sanctuary Nov.

help educate Students

Cambridge riding were 7.

at

invited to

Federal Industry Minister Brian

to lend support to Liberal

MP Janko Peric and although

parties sent representatives, it was educational. was an opportunity to learn about the issues and whqt the Liberals plan to do about them. But where were the students? Only about 30

none of the other It

We

live in a

democratic country where

we

enough to have With our vote we

are lucky

the opportunity to express ourselves on a ballot.

choose the government that runs the country. In many countries people are tortured and executed every day

democratic

when they

try to exercise their

rights.

These people would love

to

have a say

in their

government.

leaders

make campaigning

to

about mudslinging, instead of the issues in this election, Canadians

in the issues facing this country,

are left trying to sort through

rather than the leaders’ opinions

leader’s accusations

and

tion’s issues

their visions for

on

think,

how

destroy

mudslinging

is in full

opponents

their

A prime

control.

Day

the voting population in

of

trying

to

destroy

the

willingness

to

use the notwith-

one

leaders are sending out one

made up of

They

of

If this

were net

true,

I

would

enough

“one of the worst finance ministers in recent history,” saying the coun-

tion platform to

on Chretien’s

its

tax

Clark

flat

out called Chretien a

liar,

gun and the 1989 massacre of 14 women in Montreal, Clark went on to allude that he was also an first

Canadians are too stupid

to figure

it

I,

and when Chretien made mistakes when referring to Day buying a

“Chretien’s

fear that

friends.

reaction

was

to

I

I

am capable of lis-

I

my

country to the party’s leader

and the party’s elected

MPs

I

I

feel confident

in

his/her

morals have not become

questionable as a result of dirty

as the

my

enough

I

to personal

would like to see Canadians a prime minister because

campaign enough B.S.

it.

them point out

elect

government. I’ve heard

like to see

attacks.

comfortable in trusting

not

feel

would

in their Cl C V

defend

forms without resorting

forming an opinion on whether or

that

can’t

the flaws in their opponents’ plat-

out for themselves.

for one, feel

tening to a party’s platform, and

idiot.

platform

like to see the party lead-

shortcoming of their opponents for

needs to stop gambling

resorts

nents?

they would

referred to Chretien as

try

who

else.

some-

tactics, possibly

his/her

ers confident

dollars

to elect

stand up to the scrutiny of oppo-

not feel the need to point out every

Day has

someone

want

run the country

to

because

is

a bunch of gullible

idiots.

standing clause.

really

to these kinds

believe that

Canada

make

minister should be cho-

ability to denigrate

Do we

clear message.

which

to

sen on his/her merits, not hisXher

issues in this election are

two-tier health care, tax cuts and

The

seem

most sense.

the

will

it.

Major gun

force.

I

Prime Minister Jean Chretien has accused Alliance Leader Stockwell

While Conservative Leader Joe

attended.

it.

believe the majority

Charter of Rights because of his

only.”

The CSI academic sub-committee

Tobin was there

the

eligible to vote bothered to cast

going through the minds of those

is

if

The outcome of

their right to vote.

be decided by a couple of hundred people.

hear

of Canadians are more interested

have taken the back burner, while

as simple as every vote counts, everyone counts

have chosen

I

political

may

and people should

we can

when

would begin to send out strong, clear messages about their stand on this elecparties

political

But instead, policies and issues

is

it

But since the

Despite what the politicians

the federal election on Nov.

the Nov. 7 U.S. presidential election,

If

recognize

dirty

27 draws near you would think the

Canada.

and indifferent?

how

sure

Canadian

about.

drain. Now, I’m not he’d know,” said Clark.

deny the brain

Kirsten Fifieid

As

down and

But the

life

tactics.

reality is

any of these things

will

I

will not see

in this election.

is mainly funded from September to May by a payment from Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) in exchange for the insertion of advertising in the paper. The views and opinions

SPOKE

Keeping Conestoga College connected

expressed in

this

newspaper do not necessarily

views of Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers are not endorsed tain the

SPOKE

is

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Photo Editor: Tammy Somerville; Production Manager: Kirsten Fifieid Advertising Manager: Reni Nicholson; Circulation Manager: Lisa Hiller Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz; Faculty Supervisor: Christina Jonas

SPOKE’s

address

Phone: 748-5220,

is

ext.

299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. 691, 692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

CSI

logo.

by the CSI unless

SPOKE

shall not

reflect the in

SPOKE

their advertisements con-

be liable for any damages

beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect or MS Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not contain any libellous statements and may be accomarising out of errors in advertising

panied by an illustration (such as a photograph).


SPOKE, November 20, 2000

— Page 5

News Russian journalist on a paper-chase Visits By Lisa

Canada

about newspaper business

to learn

easy for me, either,” she said.

Hiller

thought of being a journalist.

Burlachenko graduated with a

The managing newspaper

in

editor of a small

Russia

who spoke

to

Conestoga College on Nov. 6 said Canadians

journalism students are lazier than

at

she thought they

were.

Anna Burlachenko, who works

at

degree in business management to

why

she came to Canada and what

it is

be a journalist in Russia. Burlachenko is in southern

like to

Ontario to learn about the newspaper business in Canada through a

program called the Yeltsin Democracy Fellowship Program established in 1992

president

Boris

Yeltsin

been invested in a trust through the Canadian

International

Development Agency

and proceeds finance the fellowship program.

The fellowship

is

to assist

Russia

in the transition to a democratic soci-

ety and a market

economy by spon-

soring short-term customized train-

ing programs in Canada for reform leaders from a variety of sectors.

The program was

available to

only the public sector until 1998.

During

Prime

Jean Russia in

Minister

Chretien’s mission to

1997, and in response to Yeltsin’s

request

for

assistance,

Canada

announced an expansion to bring up to 500 Russians to Canada from 1998-2000 for customized management training. The program is now in a transition phase with an emerging emphasis on private and public sector

management

training.

A

Canadian private sector fellowship program was piloted in February of 1998 and launched for real in the fall

Toronto since her

teachers

university

at

she

said

should try to visit an Englishspeaking country. She originally spoke to an

“We have

five local

papers so competition subscribers)

(for

very tough.” Anna

of 1998.

The fellowship includes a sixweek training program in Canada which provides private sector man-

Ukhta managing editor

United States. This turned her off so she made some more calls and eventually chose Canada. Burlachenko’s city in Russia, Ukhta, is farther north than the Yukon. Oil, gas, mining and forestry are the major industries. Burlachenko’s newspaper was the only one in Ukhta until 1992. there are five.

The Ukhta has

circulation of the five newspapers.

“We have

and strategic change management and debriefing for one week. There are two sessions for 25-35 people in the spring and fall. The training program is managed by SIGMA VI, an education and training

management firm.

SIGMA

VI in Ottawa sends staff to Russia twice a year to interview candi-

of newspapers in Russia, which were a department of the local government during the said

Communist regime. Burlachenko said it is difficult to change minds and ways of thinking and that the newspaper must change with society and the community. What she has learned from Canada has been beneficial, she said, and she hopes to launch a pro-

gram

in

support of journalists

when

she gets back to Russia. also hopes to 1

make

the

Ukhta

in readership within the

itability

by making the paper more and increasing

interesting to readers

“We

its

overall operation.

Anna Burlachenko, a Russian

will kill our competitors,”

Burlachenko

said.

“We

will

be our

only paper.”

journalist and managing editor, spoke to journalism students abut her experience working on a Russian newspaper on NOV. 6. (Photo by Reni Nicholson)

IMPORTANT REMINDER Application deadline to request tutoring Is

December

1,

2000

five local papers so

competition (for subscribers)

is

very tough,” she said.

The Ukhta has 9,500

subscribers

Less than 10 per cent of the population subscribes to a paper. The Ukhta prints only eight pages and is published now only four in a city of 100,000.

days a week because of financial problems. Burlachenko said the relationship among the papers is friendly. She said they help each other out with stories

and never have

conflicts.

staff

research projects for three weeks

lead the democratic reform

the second biggest

of five management competencies

one day, an orientation program in Canada for one week, a core competency seminar for one week, practical attachments and action

“We

process right now,” Burlachenko

efficiency in

American representative whose tone she said was unfriendly. She said the American saw her as a competitor and as someone whose dream was to visit the

Now

a

Two

next two years, improving prof-

Burlachenko,

agers with advanced training in one

departure orientation in Russia for

and became

became her newspamanaging editor.

number

Her newspaper, which has been operating since 1941, employs a

and practical experience in how Canadian industry operates. The six-week program includes the following components: pre-

articles

years later she per’s

She

is

visited

lion has

fund

in

Burlachenko had a choice of coming to one of 1 1 countries, but she chose Canada because her

when former

A contribution of $20 mil-

Canada.

graphic

writing

arrival.

and second-

in

reporter and then an editor.

University

first-

worked

She passed interviews with a SIGMA VI representative and came to Canada in October. She trained for three days and has spent two weeks at Ryerson Polytechnic

quick and hurried in their lives and Canadians are not. She also noted that Canadians are friendlier than Americans. Burlachenko, who lives in a city also called Ukhta in northwest Russia in the Komi Republic,

spoke to about 40

first

qualify for the fellowship.

the Ukhta, said that Russians are

year journalism students about

She

design at the paper. She started

of 21.

Her main

responsibilities include

supervising eight staff journalists,

connecting with news services and researching current news issues.

Burlachenko said

it is

difficult to

work with journalists and there are many responsibilities. She said sometimes her reporters write very boring and monotonous stories.

The

news

is

mostly

local,

although Burlachenko said there

is

sometimes international news, but

Any

rarely.

comes from

international television

news

and federal

papers.

“We

are

focused on our city

maze, a tutor may be able help you through the semester

Don’t get caught

in a

to

events,” said Burlachenko.

Crime

events,

life

stories

and

dates.

biographies are most popular with the readers. “We know our readers

Burlachenko entered the training program in 1999 after passing entrance exams. ‘They were not difficult, but not

and we know whom we write to,” Burlachenko said. “I think we see more and feel more in our life.” Burlachenko said she never

Applications available in Student Services

Rm. 2B02


Page 6

— SPOKE, November

20,

2000 w'lWMiwwiiiffiimiiMim

SBBSffl&fflfflfflBS&BBi

ISO documentation passes review Despite four minor non-conforCollege’s Conestoga

mances,

Standards

International

Organization

documentation

is

detailed and well written, accord-

ing to two auditors from

KPMG,

an

Beingessner and Carolyn

(Photo by Khiam Nong)

m

The

America

Some

said

Bill

Jeffrey,

management representative. The two auditors did a thorough

tee

review of the documents to

make

be fully ISO

prove

things

more

are

abstract.

to

difficult

measure,” he said. “The preparadelivery and evaluation tion, requires a higher expertise with

The

examination of records.

They

answered during the auditing Does the documentation comply with the ISO standard? Are process:

documented procedures implemented? Are the procedures effec-

the

standard.

Jeffrey said the

SECOND OR THIRD YEAR STUDENT PREVIOUS POST SECONDARY EXPERIENCE MAY QUALIFY 75% OVERALL PROGRAM AVERAGE, 80% IN COURSE TUTORED RECOMMENDATION BY FACULTY STRONG COMMUNICATION SKILLS ENJOY WORKING WITH PEOPLE -

• .

“We need

time to regain and corany deficiencies from the preassessment,” he said.

said

rect

ISO committee

story

which appeared

in the

Nov. 13 issue of Spoke reported the

wrong date for the Kitchener Rangers’ breakfast rect date was Nov. 11.

QUALIFICATIONS

been changed to

Feb. 14-16.

Corrections A

.

Jeffrey said the date of the registration audit has

Jeffrey. “It’s really reassuring.”

TUTORS CURRENTLY REQUIRED FOR SEVERAL COURSES

.

tive?

mentation did not have any major non-conformances. “You have two experts saying we

documents,”

f

will see that three questions

are

But Conestoga College’s docu-

.

auditors will gather informa-

ed.

good

really

by observation, interview and

tion

have

we

It’s

dards,

ISO

ATTENTION ALL 2 nd & 3 YR. EET & MET STUDENTS

said.

Bill Jeffrey,

But Beingessner said the nonconformances were minor in nature and that they had to do with wording. A major non-conformance would be a failure to recognize an

rd

he

ISO committee management representative

do not comply with ISO stanwere found and document-

that

registration

reassuring.”

regards to measuring effectively.” Four non-conformances, things

Peer Services

it,”

have good documents.

turing institution because the serv-

“Some

pre-assessment

mock

“You have two experts saying

dif-

from evaluating a manufac-

ice at the college is

a

“They will validate what we have documented and see that we

certified.

was

like

is

audit.

other colleges are certified in

ferent

Conestoga College’s ISO commit-

to

audit

first

North

in

institution

now have

audit scheduled for Jan. 18-19. Jeffrey said the

college intends to be the

will

ments before a pre-assessment

Conestoga College hopes to be an ISO 9001 facility by

uating Conestoga College

their findings,”

Carolyn Macdonald of KPMG thoroughly reviews and assesses Conestoga’s ISO documentation Nov. 7. The initial documentation review is the first step in the ISO registration process.

Conestoga College

certified as

cedure,

really pleased with

and

confi-

the opportunity to revise the docu-

only certain areas. Beingessner explained that eval-

forms.

find,

more

nesses to follow.

review and assess the college’s ISO documentation of policy, pro-

and

a lot

dent.

to

instructions

now

Organization sets standards in quality and consistency for busi-

educational

“They were

that they are

Standards

Macdonald of KPMG’s Waterloo Conestoga at were branch College’s Doon campus on Nov. 7

work

not exactly sure

what the auditors would

ISO standards. The International

early 2001.

external auditing company.

Joe

members were

met

sure Conestoga College has

By Khiam Nong

for children.

The

cor-

Also in the Nov. 13 issue of Spoke, the pull-quote for the Conestoga Condors’ hockey report was wrongly attributed. It should have been

Greg Rickwood. Spoke apologizes for the errors.

attributed to

BENEFITS .

. . . .

$10.50

HOURLY WAGE

EXCELLENT REVIEW OF COURSE MATERIAL BUILD MEANINGFUL PEER RELATIONSHIPS INCREASE SELF CONFIDENCE AND ESTEEM GREAT ADDITION TO A RESUME

FURTHER INFORMATION/APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE IN STUDENT SERVICES ROOM 2B02

Get it \

Y

r-j

1-888-334-9769 ,

Yffj

www.paguide.com


SPOKE, November 20, 2000

— Page 7

Window wiper

Students benefit from software upgrades By Quan La

ed with a new operating system said upgrades, software and

has more features and learning the new version will help him compete

Conestoga College’s computer services has upgraded the college’s computer software, despite its late

Hewitt.

in the

98, the

new

operating

advanced features, drivers, improved plug and play power management, and an Internet update site which has helped computer services. Hewitt said Windows 98 caused a problem with computers shutting down, but computer services was

.system,

has

more device

arrival.

Computer

services

wanted the

upgrades for the beginning of May this year, but the software packages didn’t arrive until the second

week

of August, giving computer services only three

programs

weeks

before

new

to install

semester

fall

Wayne

able to get a patch that corrected

Hewitt, a computer serv-

support specialist,

technical

said computer services has been

working for the last three months and is still upgrading computers. He said computer services employees and students from the computer program programmer/analyst installed the upgrades.

Doon, Guelph, Waterloo and Cambridge campuses were upgrad-

on

problem

the

classes started.

ices

Windows

update

Windows

the

site.

Students can use new programs such as Microsoft Office 2000,

Microsoft project 2000, AutoCAD 2000, Accounting version 8, Visual Studio version 6 and Borland C++. Jordan Teschke, a third-year mechanical engineering student, has been using the upgraded

AutoCAD. He

said the

new

version

job market because employwho can operate their systems. Most companies run the newest software, said Teschke.

ers look for people

Rob Malone,

a third-year

com-

puter programmer/analyst student, said

it

great

is

new

invests in

students need

to

He

school

up-to-date

stay

with technology since quickly.

the

that

software because

it

changes so

said learning the skills

and programs employers require is his biggest concern because he wants to enter the business world prepared. Hewitt said the upgrades were paid with

funding from the

Strategic

Investment program and the technology fees students paid with Skills

their

tuition,

which amounts

to

about $80.

Computer services is planning the during upgrades more

Len Hbfstetter cleans the windows at Door 5 Nov. 7. been working for housekeeping at the college for six years with cleaning doors and windows being his sole job. He cleans doors in busy areas three times a day. (Photo by Tammy Somerville)

Christmas break, said Hewitt.

New program

teaches complementary care

Peer Services

Includes aromatherapy and reflexology By Reni Nicholson

A

new, part-time program in education is being offered at Conestoga College. health-care

decrease the need for drugs in treatment and aid in a more responsive healing process, said Paleshi.

“The medical profession

ing to consider the potential value

graduate program concentrating on the natural and holistic paths to

of such care, and this is beginning to be reflected in the medical

better health

and healing, has been approved by the Ontario Ministry

schools.”

of Health.

Application for admission is open to those with degrees or diplomas in medical fields such as

a

Included in the alternative methods to medication covered in the course are aromatherapy, reflexology, therapeutic touch and reiki, an

nursing,

physiology, kinesiology,

ancient healing art from Japan and

significant

experience.

The

practice of such is

methods of

not new, especially in

Europe and Asia, but the recognition of the medical techniques at the post-secondary level is still a

new concept

in Ontario.

amount of

related

are looking for more

THE SEMESTER

than the traditional medical model.”

IT’S

Marjorie Paleshi,

program co-ordinator

“The caregiver

and recipient work together, establishing a focus and relationship that attends to whole-person consideration

program

offered

at

the only college-level

Conestoga

is

program

available

in

southern

Ontario.

The program, which takes two

to

three years to complete, consists

some

of 12 required courses, tives

elec-

and a supervised lab

which

in

clinical training will take

enrolment

practices and doctors

recognize

offered

is

low,

many medical

Paleshi believes to

the

have begun

effectiveness

by the complementary care

approaches.

NOT TOO LATE

!!

Health-care professionals who complete the program are entitled to take qualifying examinations set by the Reflexology Association of

Canada and by

the

Canadian

Paleshi said career opportunities students who complete the

for

course exist in urban and rural areas, through self-employment, the forming of local health-care practices or involvement with

*

Complementary care treatments

A TUTOR MAY BE THE ANSWER PROVIDES 5 HOURS OVER 6 WEEKS

HIRING $15.00

Application deadline

December

1

,

2000

naturopathic or chiropractic clinics.

She said complementary care has potential for

place.

Though

WINDING DOWN, BUT

IS

Federation of Aromatherapy.

and care.”

The

WANT TO REVIEW COURSE MATERIAL?

“These days, people

“Complementary care involves

co-ordinator.

REQUIRE ONE TO ONE ASSISTANCE?

work

and engages the whole person, not just an isolated symptom or condition,” said Maijorie Paleshi, pro-

gram

?

psychology and social work, as well as those who have acquired a

Tibet.

healing

STRUGGLING WITH A COURSE

is start-

post-

Complementary Care,

of sports

demand

in the fields

medicine, chronic

ail-

ments, rehabilitation and palliative

Applications Available

care.

“These days, people are looking for ical

more than

the traditional

med-

model,” said Paleshi. “They

want more sophisticated answers.”

in

Student Services

Room 2B02


CBSA

Kunkle joins Accounting student

is in

executive

charge of promotions

By Kyla Rowntree

lot

of time, organization and dedi-

cation, said Thailleur.

The job involves

setting up and places and choosing events and themes, monitoring ticket sales and designing posters and distributing them for upcom-

second-year

Kunkle,

Jessika

accounting, was elected the

new

dates

promotions Conestoga

executive the at Students Business Association’s bi-weekly meeting at Conestoga College on Nov. 9. “I worked pretty hard for this,” said Kunkle, “and I put a lot of effort into the various ideas that

wanted

to plan for next

ing events.

Only two business students, Kunkle and Jen Lamorea, first-year marketing, ran for the position.

I

Lamorea performed a juggling

semes-

act with three balls.

ter.”

She added

that she doesn’t

The colour of the

want

to sell chocolates all through the

year because

it

seems

would have

be annoy-

to

Kunkle said she wants to the students to gather

to get out

some

with each other,” said Kunkle. this

little

“I

cliquish

time constraints, said Thailleur.

group thing we have going here. I want people to get to know each

FLU SHOT CLINICS

The job involves a

***Free To

Health Card

is

Room

an individual

with enthusiasm specifically towards promotions, said CBSA president

to Friday)

Anne

“We need

(Blue Cafeteria)

job,”

8:30 a.m. -3:30 p.m.

of

after-

of about 20 hours a week. position of the promotions

executive involves

Mandatory

November 20 th - 24 th (Monday Blue

The

lot

school activities and a commitment

other.”

All Students and Staff***

to juggle along with

This will be the third time the promotion executive position has been filled this term as the two other executives quit because of

do what the students want. “I want to get the school involved stop

sym-

that she

tive.

ideas

to

to

life

the position of promotions execu-

ing the students.

want

three balls

bolized parts of her

said

Thailleur.

a team player for this

accounting student, was

A computer liaison was supposed to be elected as well, how-

named

ever the class representatives

Jessika Kunkle, a second-year the

CBSA’s new

promotions executive after winning a Nov. 9 election. (Photo by Kyla Rowntree

“Someone

Thailleur.

with dedication and organization the best person for this job.”

is

to vote.

The term of from

May

to

the position runs

May

and involves a

The computer

liaison

will

elected on Nov. 23.

Countdown to

ISO Registration Conestoga College

The

rjp

registration audit

is

January

1

9,

all

agreed were not that they informed of the opening for the position and they were unprepared

2001

Join the celebration!

be


SPOKE, November 20, 2000

If

— Page 9

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Page 10

— SPOKE, November

20,

2000

Bedazzled delivers By Derek Lester

devilish delights

was waiting for him, so she him again. With his last wish, he mistakenly

lover left

Brendan Eraser’s wackiness and talent really

comes out

edy Bedazzled. Elliot Richards

in the

com-

finds the only loophole in the contract

(Fraser)

a

is

the

what the loophole

nerdy, hopelessly romantic techni-

who

cal adviser

When

Gardiner

Richards needs a

little

Gardiner, but another twist

sell

help

would

he his

soul to

be with Alison, which summons

the real Devil looked like her, I If

might

Devil.

the

(Elizabeth

Her

deal

is

some

made,

Richards had never had a real friend.

wishes.

to

Richards’ wishes turn

him

into

is

from a Columbian drug lord to the president of the United States. Richards always ends up with Gardiner after a wish, but someit all

little

twist the Devil makes.

falls apart

want

O’Connor plays

the part of a shy-looking young woman, and it is easy to see why Richards falls for her. All in all, the actors and actresses put out a dazzling and funny performance you won’t want to miss.

because of a

him

to

beautiful,

One time Gardiner cheated on left

The Devil appeared

be his friend and help him. This another reason why he is tempt-

ed by the Devil.

different characters ranging

how

to

sign the contract for his soul.

Richards’ soul in return for seven

Richards and

Richards

got

the Devil’s beauty, and after

many

devilish

beauty was part of the reason why she

Richards is almost immediately taken in by a

mind

not

going to Hell.

Hurley).

convincing,

at the

end does go in his favour. Hurley plays the part of an attractive Devil who wears revealing outfits. She lured me under her spell.

with trying to pick up his love, he

says

anyone

tell

is.

Richards doesn’t end up with

love with

falls in

co-worker Alison (Frances O’Connor).

He promises

with the Devil.

Devil he won’t

you like a good comedy, go see Bedazzled because you will also

for another

If

man. Another time he took her back to his place where his gay

T

Elizabeth Hurley

-'V'

yffll iiiaffrarTfoii

in

the

it

takes to carry a movie. Fraser stars with

wacky comedy Bedazzled. Fraser plays a hopeless romantic who

soul to the devil (Hurley)

probably be dazzled!

W%w

Canada’s Brendan Fraser proves again he has what in

order to win the heart of a co-worker.

sells his

(internet photo)

i

ilj

iTti»

I

My

mother

disease.

that

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i?

..her

to

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an inherited brain disorder

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It’s

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.

at

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not true."

it's

they develop the disease, then their

children face those same

fifty-fifty

odds.

her Just like

.her soul

the gift of

my life.

mother,

I

What have

wanted

to give

done instead?

I

1

;

:j

It

may

before

it

disease

take 10, 15 finally kills

may

her

- even 25 - years

And even

then, the

not go to the grave with her.

But there

is

hope

Recent research

breakthroughs have brought us closer

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SPOKE, November 20, 2000

Rap

Essentials

2000 not By Kyla Rowntree The title of the CD compilation Rap Essentials 2000 is completely off as the sound of rap is more of a monotonous hip-hop tone and very slow moving pace.

As ed

album is defiyou are a col-

nitely not essential if

lector of rap.

The same beat and two cords

should jump-start an album. is due to the artists as they

the rap scene.

Penitentiary in Kingston.

Credit

teurs

two inmates of the Collins Bay Black Jackal and Dirty Money originate from Toronto and the song was

Explicit lyrics and a parental advisory warning appear on the

recorded along with its video behind bars. Citizen Kane and Q-Tip are the only two well-known artists on the album. Soldier’s Story, Track 5, by

are

cover as with any compact disc

Citizen Kane, has a great rhythm

released today.

and the

The album does include a fair number of tracks. It’s not often a CD releases six bonus tracks along

chasing for this song.

on the album and you definitely receive your money’s worth on this one if you like the sound.

is

The

the cover

across

CD

which opens

CD

to short

with a picture. a great inclusion for any CD

bios of each

This is because

it

It

you

best part of the

artist

features the origin and

accomplishments of the

might be worth pur-

The slow more laid-back repetiwears thin by Track 3. By the time you hit Track 4 it can be assumed you’ll flip through until you find a beat worth moving to.

composed sounds and is

artists

CD

Child Registry

tive beat is

with 12 songs. There are 18 songs

of many different rhythms of different

691

at ext.

echo throughout the entire four minutes of the song and it is my guess listeners will proceed to Track 2 after 30 seconds. This song and its lyrics aren’t the type of song that

This rap compilation

Spoke

this track defines repetitive.

This album defines the evolution it has changed since Ice-T and Ice Cube haven’t dominated

slow but heavy beat of amaseems to be the sound of rap on the album which was released in stores Oct. 10. It includes sounds from Q-Tip and Citizen Kane.

Call

The first song RO.W by Crazy and Wild has a monotonous tone to start off an album. Rap does consist of repetitive beats, however

of rap as

A

Got a hot news

essential

at a

for the “essential” part includ-

in the title, the

the board.

— Page 11

artist.

song that and the that are supposed to be in the

isn’t until the fifth

really get into the rap

lyrics

All

in the first place.

album if you appreciate the slow sound of rap. The wide range of artists may intrigue listeners, however the

You might enjoy

this

sounds are so different turn

them

it

may

Confidential

also

off.

For

Conestoga College Students

who

are experiencing

financial difficulties. Starting

November 3 1

to

Register at the CSI Office or

come

in

November

in

and get more

24!

the Sanctuary, information!

Hollywood

www.myfw.com fordfocus %

expectmore


— Page 12

SPOKE, November 20, 2000

Condors’ comeback nets By Lisa

Conestoga had a much better sec-

Hiller

Conestoga

Condors’

Dave Stewart scored

forward

the winning

Humber with 16 seconds remaining in the game to defeat the Hawks 3-2 in men’s varsity hockey action in Toronto on t Nov. 9. goal against

After losing their

first

two games

of the season in which Sault Ste. Marie and Cambrian outscored them 21-8, the Condors rebounded with a big come-from-behind win

Westwood arena. The Condors hadn’t played a game since Oct. 28 and it showed in the first period when they came at

out slow. able to

manoeuvre

freely in the Condors’ zone and

16

shots

on

Ryan

goalie

Kentner.

made

biggest stops

some of of the game in

his

the

period, keeping his

team in the game and giving them a chance to win, but the score was 2-0 at the end of the period.

Condors kept the Humber seemed

In the third, the

momentum

going.

to lay back, content with trying to

protect a 2-1 lead.

Captain Greg Thede scored a power-play goal at 16:25 in the

some life, zip and intensity.” Coach Ken Galemo said the outstanding player of the game was Captain Greg Thede who scored the equalizer and assisted on the

winning goal.

He

said goalie Kentner had an

“Our number 1 line of Turcotte, Jeremy Henry and Stewart saw a tremendous amount of ice time and were up to the task,” Galemo said. “All four lines played extremely well.”

and Stewart scored the goahead goal just before the buzzer to earn the Condors their first vic-

point games.

tory of the season.

better. “It

third

a huge

game

for us

com-

ing after those two bad losses,” said Condors’ assistant coach

Greg

Rickwood.

Turcotte and Stewart had two-

Thede

team was

“The players were

just

going

through the motions out there,”

Rickwood. “In between

peri-

ods they were told they needed

team played a lot was a 100 per cent turn-

said the

around for the guys.” Conestoga played a great defensive game, he added.

Galemo said that the

lucky to get out of the first period only down by two goals.

said

win

outstanding effort as well.

Rickwood

Kentner first

18:55.

“It’s just

Humber was get

ond period outshooting the Hawks 12-10. They picked up their physical play and were much more aggressive in Humber’s zone. Centre Matt Turcotte picked up one of his two points with a goal at

first

said his team’s discipline

Jordan Banninga of Lambton Lighting tries to clear the puck from the front of his net during a minor bantam hockey game against Oshawa Motor Sales Nov. 10 at the Conestoga Rec Centre. Ninety teams were playing in the 30th Annual Kitchener Minor Hockey Association Tim Hortons Blueline Tournament. (Photo by Quan La)

and execution was great and they took only four minor penallevel

ties.

Humber took

four minor penal-

ties.

Conestoga outshot Humber 3633.

Re-GCect

Want

promote your upcoming to

Andrew Telegdi as

Member

of Parliament Kitchener-Waterloo

event in Spoke?

Andrew

Telegdi has been working hard for well over twenty-five years

support of post-secondary education and students

Be sure

two-term president of the Federation of Students

-

at

in

since his early days as

UW.

to place Andrew

an ad.

Telegdi

still

strong advocate for

all

understands student needs and aspirations and students and academic institutions in the Region.

has served as chair of the

Community Advisory Board

at

is I

a le

Conestoga

College, on the Senate of the University of Waterloo and on the Board of

Placing an ad

guarantees your information in

will

appear

Spoke.

Governors of Wilfrid Laurier University.

When he went to Ottawa, he became one of the founders of the PostSecondary Education Caucus, which has influenced the government to greatly expand funding for the research granting agencies, to create the Millennium Scholarship Fund,

to provide

matching grants for education

savings plans and to increase the education tax credit for full-and part-time students.

Stories only run

if

space

permits but ads always run.

Recently, with the help of MPs' Janko Peric (Cambridge), Brenda Chamberlain (Guelph- Wellington) and Karen Redman (Kitchener Centre)

Andrew made in

For rates or to place an ad call Spoke’s ad manager at ext. 691

a significant contribution to the

NUMBER ONE COLLEGE

Ontario through his tenacious work with Conestoga College and

private-sector partners to secure Federal

Government Funding

College with state-of-the-art machines and infrastructure.

to

its

equip the

Andrew was new

instrumental in securing over $4.2 million for the acquisition of

machines by the Mechanical Engineering Labs at the Doon and Guelph campuses and for the development of the new Information Technology Centre at the Waterloo campus. With friends the

like this,

no wonder Conestoga College in Canada.

is

now

NUMBER ONE COLLEGE

Authorized by the

Official

Agent

for

Andrew Telegdi

poised to be


Digital Edition - November 20, 2000