Page 1

33rd Year

Whafs

Post

left off

list

not ‘death blow’

V

A

By Tracy Ford

of $40,000

surplus

leaves the college in

Conestoga College

with

is tied

Confederation College in Thunder

Bay

number

for

overall in the

1

1999-2000 key performance

indi-

cator surveys, and yet the college

What does the have

future

was omitted from Post’s annual

in store for

list

the National

of colleges and

universities.

Recreation Centre?

PAGE

KPIs

6

annual

are

surveys

of

“I

was probably due

to

an over-

wasn’t very happy about

it.

I

ACCC

schools titled

The Educators

in the

National Post published on Sept. 1 1

The

.

Association

of

and

it

would

By Derek Lester is

ACCC.

which

is

off the

member, was by accident.

list

“I thought

was sort of petty,” “Other than being isn’t going to be an our marketing or

it

said.

annoyed, this

on

impact

Centennial College,

ACCC

an

recruitment.”

The

residence will remain the same.

the only

college in Ontario that isn’t a mem-

ber of

Conestoga College gets approval to buy the residence, Rodeway Suites, a major change will be more student input, says If.

iour, Fletcher said.

and hopefully a

life,

association and the National Post

drinking and partying.” Fletcher said there

supplied the

college being omitted. “It’s not a

list.

said Conestoga isn’t a the association but he

why

the school wasn’t includ-

death blow,” Tibbits said. “I don’t think

it’s

a big deal.”

a correction

made

within three months. the college’s budget

Tibbits said

was a

disaster

budget was in a deficit for a period of a couple years. “Because of that we couldn’t jus-

and

that the

tify

spending,

I

think at the time,

$18,000 to $20,000 ber of the

(to

ACCC). We

memthat we

be a felt

could better spend that money inside the college,” he said.

The decision was

appropriate for

and the college hasn’t been treated badly by the associathe time

tion for discontinuing ship,

he added.

its

member-

is

in the National

Post so Conestoga will get

government cut all college budgets by 15 per cent.” As a result the college had to downsize which meant 103 employees had to leave the college

some

coverage in the major newspaper. He also said Maclean’s magazine is featuring Conestoga in their magazine in January. “Most of our students come from within 100 kilometres except for our international students,” he said, adding most of the students know Conestoga is a legitimate college and a list won’t make a big difference in our admissions. “Lists aren’t important,” he said. Tibbits has been president at the college for 14 years and he said he isolated

takes a lot of pride in Conestoga.

students

are I

not

think

a storm,” he said.

it’s

“It’s

life that

doesn’t just involve

is

nothing

wrong with drinking, but he would up some activities, such

like to set

coming

to

a rain drop in

nothing.”

plus other activities to get students socializing.

He would

also like to get

more

use out of the recreational centre,

he added.

“My main

goal

is

to do this in a

make student life much more fun,” Fletcher

positive way, to that

The istry

college

is

waiting for min-

approval in order to buy the

college will also help the

students accused of bad behavIf students

are misbehaving,

they could be kicked out of resi-

dence and possibly their program at the college, he added. If students are busy doing positive things and enjoying fun activities, the discipline will be at a minimum, Fletcher said. “It can be done.” The college wants to make sure good housing is available for students, and college management believes residence

is

a choice stu-

dents should have, Fletcher said. In the long term the residence will

said.

be a good investment because

more

students

from outside the

Kitchener area

who need a place to

hoped

stay are registering at the college,

own the residence by Sept. 1, but now Fletcher hopes to get

he added. The timing is right to buy the residence because the risk of

residence, Fletcher said.

It

to

approval by the end of the month.

Dacon Corp. in Kingston owns the residence,

rently

cur-

owning

said

ing

now

Fletcher.

up the National Post and I see our name isn’t there and I can tell you I was annoyed.” “As far as the impact of how many “I pick

Conestoga,

dent

stu-

as a dart night for the residence,

Tibbits said he hopes that there

The

residence folks to provide a better

to pinpoint possible reasons for the

contacting the

sentation to run activities for the

residence.

staff at the residence to discipline

student is

There will be a couple of committees set up that will involve college, residence and student repre-

Jack Fletcher, director of student and recreational services. “The college will work with the

Colleges of Canada and the Association of Canadian Community Colleges

college

;

/

X.

address that the college wasn’t a

of the

rv.

behind-fhe-

Approval needed to buy residence

also said that if the association

Tibbits

the provincial

4

He

" ;

'

1111

to the newspaper.

Centennial College and Conestoga in a special report on list

used to be members of the association,” he said. “In 1995,

PAGE

what was given

a

Painter Bert Vanleur of Pollock Painting, gets door view of the Blue Room on Sept. 13.

would have asked for a list of all the colleges not a list of the members of the association, which was

left

“We

a bore?

Let’s get

said the National Post

Tibbits

their contact information, failed to

son

be

give uo one more year.

member

ed.

to

“We were going to join this year, we were so tight last year,” Tibbits said. “We thought, ‘Let’s but

have been fine. Conestoga College

also said that shouldn’t be the rea-

wants

financially.

scheme of things I don’t think it’s a huge issue,” he said. The list, which stated the universities and community colleges for every province and territory and

member of

COMMENTARY

planning to join

is

wasn’t pleased but in the grand

Tibbits

9

college

had made a note along with the

Universities

PAGE

The

again starting April 1, 2001 because it is getting in better shape

join.’”

excellence.

in

sight.

Choclair whips the crowd into a frenzy.

shape to rejoin the association.

benchmarks

list

PAGE 7

better

ourselves in better shape and we’ll

a row. President John Tibbits said the fact that the college wasn’t on the

Golf tournament brings in some cash for the college.

year

last

much

Ontario’s 25 colleges that establish

Conestoga has maintained a number 1 position overall two years in

Who

Keeping the college shiny

College being

Inside

— No. 33

The

corporation has also been

the residence,

money on than what

it,

it

is

and

los-

a lot less

was

six

or

Durham, Mohawk, Niagara and

seven years ago, Fletcher said. “The chances are we’re not going to lose money on it, and that’s the key. Colleges can’t

Seneca colleges.

afford to lose

involved with the ownership of residences

at

Fletcher said the

Algonquin,

management

at

added.

money on

it,”

he


Page 2

— SPOKE, September 25, 2000

PRESENTATION

iiV

Dress and conduct yourself professionally enthusiasm and self-confidence; be positive

AExude

WHO SHOULD A TTEND?

PREPARATION Everyone should attend! First, second and third year students arc encouraged to attend

Visit the Student

Employment

office for a

list

of

participating organizations

fV Research employer information available in Student

Employment

office and

on the internet

tV Target potential employers

tV Prepare a

list

of questions

to

a

WHAT IS IT? An An

ask employers

FREE

Transportation!

opportunity for students and alumni to network with potential employers

opportunity to investigate and research career options

An event to

obtain information from employers on:

Career Opportunities

Job Requirements

Salary Expectations

Industry

Educational Requirements

Industry Trends

Corporate Culture

Skills

Leaves from Door #2

Leaves the Auditorium

am

9:30

1 1

:00

am

pm

Growth

and Qualifications

10:30

am

12:00

:30

am

2:00

pm

3:30

pm

1

1

1

:30

pm

lYFree admission with

Get acquainted with over

Student/Alumni ID from sponsoring

250 North American

institutions

employers

(Conestoga College, Wilfrid Laurier,

U of Waterloo, U of Guelph) vYFree transportation throughout the 'iYLearn about career

day

opportunities

^KITCHENER

MEMORIAL fY Start your job search by

AUDITORIUM

networking

COMPLEX

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2000 ^10:00

-

3:30


3

SPOKE, September 25, 2000

— Page 3

Canada Student Loan changed now pay back

Students must By

Michelle Goring

risk

free

situation

in

case

of

rather than the financial institution

from which they received money.

their

“From

a

how

they

perspective,

little

will

difference

receive

their

said

business of

Conestoga

College’s financial aid administrator Carol

Walsh. “The default rate was high and banks

for the loans

have shareholders

As

to

answer

to.”

a consequence, loans cashed

have to be repaid to the Government of Canada. This also means that the pre-August 2000 Canada Student Loans and the new post-August 2000 Canada Student Loan are two separate after July 3 1 will

loans.

Loans received on or

after

Aug.

1

paid to the Government of Canada. The previous student loan(s) will be repaid to this

year

are

the financial institution

which

dis-

bursed it. For the 2000-2001 school year,

ing the previous

changes

in

also the loan

assures

the

program are

for disbursement.

The agent

will provide the stu-

with a Student Loan Agreement. Both the Certificate of Eligibility and Student Loan Agreement must be correctly completed and signed. When these steps have been completed, the loan will be processed and the money will be disbursed. Authorized agents for disbursement include the Royal Bank of Canada, Canadian Imperial Bank of dent

next seven months and forward

Commerce, Bank of Nova Scotia, National Bank of Canada and les Caisses populaires du Manitoba as well as participating members of the Credit Union Central of

them

Canada,

the

government has negotiated

with the financial institutions to take the loan documents for the

tional step to maintain the previous

release.

no interruptions in the delivery of Canada Student Loans for the 2000-2001 school year. For a Conestoga student to receive his/her loan, an arrangement must be made to have the Confirmation of Enrolment section on the Certificate of Eligibility completed by the student’s financial institution. Then, the Certificate of Eligibility must be presented to an authorized agent

the

stu-

the student’s responsibility to pro-

Canada Student Loans. This agreement was not renewed because too few financial institutions showed an interest in “Banks are in making money,”

who have a previous

Students

dent loan(s) must complete an addiloan(s) in 'interest free status.

running smoothly and there will be

participating.

Caisses

Canada Students Loan Program director general, in a July 31 news

have' been

administration of

des

money,” said Thomas Townsend,

Townsend

Since 1995, financial institutions responsible for the

student’s

there will be very in

Federation

la

Populaires Acadiennes Limitee.

default.

A change in the Canada Student Loan program means that as of Aug. 1, students receiving a Canada Student Loan will be repaying the federal government

and

It is

vide the financial institution hold-

Canada Student

Loan(s) with a valid Confirmation of Enrolment. If this is not

done, the previous

student loan(s) will lose the interest free status

and the student

expected

to' start

payments

in six

will

making

be

interest

months. For exam-

ple, if the student finished his/her

studies in April 2001, he/she

would

be expected to start making payments in November 2001. using the same

If the student is

holding

financial institution that

is

the previous loan, he/she

must com-

plete the Certificate of Eligibility

and give copy

22A to the

institution

for disbursement. If the

student chose a different

financial institution, the holder of

the previous loan(s)

to receive

is

copy 22A or a Confirmation of Enrolment and a Continuation of Interest Free Status FormHuman Resources Development Canada says it will be more convenient for students to negotiate their

same the

new

student loan(s) with the financial institution holding

Canada Student same financial

previous

Loan(s). Using the

institution will facilitate the mainte-

.

Loan(s) in interest-free

status.

As

This way, the financial institutions

populaires des l’Ontario, l’Alliance

ment

be in a

des caisses populaires de l’Ontario

Canadian and U.S.) to act as legal ten-

the federal government.

will process the loans but

Financial aid administrator Carol Walsh holds pamphlets that explain the changes in the Canada Student Loan program, in the financial aid office on Sept. 1 (Photo by Michelle Goring)

nance of the previous Canada Student

la Federation des caisses

to

government

their loans to federal

for the loan program, the govern-

has

asked

companies

(both

ders to administer the loan program.

A

final decision for the tenders will

be

made

in

www.canleam.com

February 2001.

For more about the changes

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

Canada Student Loan program, mation is available

in the

or

7377.

When we are going through difficult times, it may seem hard to believe the pain will ever end. Suicide may seem like the only answer to problems. People who have considered suicide may feel helpless, desperate, or that there is no hope in their lives. If you are thinking that life is unbearable, or you are wondering if a friend may be suicidal, here are alone, feeling hopeless or helpless, suicide,

death, or plans for suicide; • •

Feelings of - desperation, hopelessness, disconnection from family and friends; Situation

-

relationship problems,

work problems,

school/failing grades, trouble with

the law, family breakdown, sexual/physical abuse; •

Physical Changes

-

lack of interest/pleasure in

all

things, lack

of physical energy,

disturbed sleep, loss of sexual interest, loss of appetite; •

Behaviours - alcohol/drug abuse, fighting, lawbreaking, emotional outbursts, dropping out of school, prior suicidal behaviour, putting

affairs in order, giving

prized possessions to friends and family, telling final wishes to

someone

away

close, a

sudden and unexpected change to a cheerful attitude, behaviour that is out of character (i.e. a cautious person who suddenly becomes reckless); If you suspect that a person may be suicidal, ask them about it, encourage them to share what is happening with them. Talking about suicide with someone does not support suicide;

it

Suicide

is

only shows that someone cares about what they are going through. a permanent solution to a temporary problem.

If you feel that

any of this information applies

to

you or someone you know, ask

to

speak

to a counsellor in Student Services.

***Suicide prevention workshop to be held week of October *** at least one week prior.

Services

A message from

Student Services

(Room 2B02).

2,

at

1-888-432-

Suicide

some warning signs to consider: • Talk of - escape, having no future, being

infor-

2000. Sign up in Student


.

2000 — mmSPOKE, September mmmmmamaaummmmm mmm

Page 4

25,

s

s

Poor legal advice leads to problems

Your $32,000 question

The Doon Student Association was acting in the best interests of all Conestoga students when it decided to include the Waterloo and Guelph campuses in its portfolio. It was to the campuses to have a student needs and plan events for them. It is indisputable that the association had good intentions in expanding their jurisdiction to include all Conestoga students.

benefit of students at the satellite

government represent

their

Unfortunately, the idea of changing the

name from

the

Doon

Student Association

indisputable that the

is

It

intentions

in

expanding

now

their jurisdiction to include

Conestoga students.

all

would

The Canadian Edition of

be a :

represent the

satellite

campuses

was not

as simple

as the

DSA

tive

thought

execu-

A

it

An excuse

very boring Canadian attempt at

an American show

c

money has perhaps been

be, and as a result, student

Who wants to

millionaire could be described as

Students Inc. to they demonstrate

good

association had

r

Conestoga

to

to pretend

Pamela Wallin

for

)

to be Regis Philbin

spent poorly. the DSA contacted a lawyer to figthe name change. This lawyer, with ure out how to proceed according to Brad Whiteford, CSI vice-president of operations, advised them to go ahead with the name change without read-

March of last year,

In late

ing the finer points of the

DSA constitution that was drafted

A show where not a single Canadian won a million dollars

A

cry

in

the dark to bring back Reach For

The Top which

really

was Canadian

in

1973.

While the

DSA worked throughout the summer to plan for the

semester, designing the

fall

logo, the lawyer

and the

the firm

— one who In

logo, putting together the wel-

new who had once okayed their name change left file was handed to a new lawyer in early June

actually read the

glitches in

what was

thought to be a relatively simple procedure.

tially

ini-

was

One such

DSA

to

name change.

And

is

the point where the

CSI

They should have

halted the production of these items, which

cost $15,000 of student

money

to

produce and

said,

‘We need

a

strategy.’

importantly, they should have understood that in order for a fair,

options should be given to the voters.

could have been spent on making sure the vote was fair and legal. As it stands, students’ money has been spent on promotional materials bearing the CSI logo and students have been asked to rubber stamp the

al

new name.

And what happens

It

simply doesn’t leave students

to the

money

unfortunate that the

much

spent on the promotion-

materials if the students do not approve the

It is

new name?

for

CSI was given such poor

legal advice,

that they

them

student

your

to use student funds to publicize a

body was given

a chance to vote

new name before

on

At

least for

ants failed to

final

answer?

now, since contest-

make

their country

proud by not taking home the million.

the

it.

aired

and Sept. 14, delivered high ratings and already CTV is Sept. 13

planning more episodes. CTV also plans to invite back the contestants

who

didn’t

make

it

Except for one local woman, Susan Neff of Kitchener, who broke the confidentiality agreement signed by all to the hot

contestants

seat.

when she flapped her

big trap.

who was

Neff, in local

were put in a situation where they had to make a decision based on what they thought was in accordance with their constitution, when in fact it was not. It was not, however a good idea and

bolic

so bright, eh? Is that

heavily profiled

news and followed

to the

airport for her departure to

York

where

answering sur-

to

and lacked charisma. Wallin decked out

not

The two shows, which

money on items emblazoned with a logo that had not yet been approved, it would have made more sense for the executive to ask the student body for name suggestions and make a concerted effort to gather a good many. Money could have been spent on a real vote to choose the new name from those the student body had suggested and money Instead of spending student

choice.

it can be said that Canadians on a

Yes.

They should not have assumed that students would vote yes to a name change they knew virtually nothing about, and more vote to be

Canadian

are

came

audience was dull and lifeless. With broadcaster Pamela Wallin hosting the show, the Canadian Edition of the popular American program was a sad state of affairs

a

Millionaire,

whole

it

prisingly easy questions, but the

Edition,

herein lies the problem. This

should have put a hold on the production of the pens, keychains, T-shirts and fleece sweaters that sport the new logo.

new

when

Who Wants be

show

Millionaire

After watching

was the fact that under the constitution the required to get 51 per cent of the student body to approve the

glitch

Canadian

DSA constitution.

new lawyer found some

this

it,

new

ordering pens and key-chains with the

come package,

the

episodes

New are

(too

bright)

known

best for their beer

drinking, rather than intellectual Surprisingly there abilities, eh?

no

were

sym-

in her

red

are

flunks

dress,

attempted to be a cheery and perky host, but was nothing more than a poor man’s Regis Philbin. The only contestant that managed to come close to winning the jackpot was Francois Dominic Laramee of Verdun, Que., when he walked away with $64,000. No one else even came close. Curtis Arnold of Kananaskis,

regarding

questions

igloos.

The two Canadian episodes were taped at the ABC-TV studios where Philbin hosts the U.S. version. Wallin

was

and probably the

the first

woman,

last, to

host the

show being played worldwide.

When

in 31 countries

greeting contestants, the

host held up her hands with a wel-

coming gesture that appeared aloof and somewhat insincere. She proceeded to hug and kiss each player on the cheek before

them to the hot seat. Once she got contestants into

escorting

$16,000. Bill Shizas of Heaman of Victoria and Shannon Sullivan of St. John’s, Nfld., each took home

the coveted hot seat, host Wallin

mere $1,000. Although fiercely and shamelessly promoted, the Canadian edition of Who Wants to be a Millionaire, was a disappointment for viewers. At times the lacklustre game show was even (uninten-

like a

Alta.,

won

Toronto,

Andrew

a

tionally) comical.

attempted to build suspense by taking an agonizingly long time to confirm answers while she smiled

Cheshire cat and stared

at

players.

At one point Quebec contestant Laramee, who couldn’t stand the wait to find out whether or not he answered correctly, threatened to throttle Wallin. If

only he had. only then

filmed, embarrassed herself and

All questions were tailored to

Canadians when she blabbed to the media that no women had

Canadians and appeared to be easier than those asked on the

would Who Wants to be a Millionaire, Canadian Edition, have delive-

made

American version.

red

were dummied down since Canadians

excitement to live up American counterpart.

all

it

into the hot seat.

Not only were some of the contestants pathetic and clueless

Perhaps

the

questions

And

the

sufficient

level to

of its

is mainly funded from September to May by a payment from Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI), formerly called the Doon Student Association, in exchange for the insertion of advertising in the paper. The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of

SPOKE

Spoke

Keeping Conestoga College connected

Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers

in

SPOKE

are not

endorsed by the CSI unless their advertisements contain the

SPOKE

is

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Tracy Ford;

Student Life Editor:

News

Julie Porter;

Editor: Petra Lampert

Photo Editor:

Tammy

Somerville

Advertising Manager: Petra Lampert; Circulation Manager: Julie Porter Faculty Supervisor: Sharon Dietz; Faculty Adviser: Christina Jonas

SPOKE’s

address

Phone: 748-5220,

is

ext.

299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. 691, 692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

CSI

logo.

SPOKE

shall not be liable for

any damages arising

beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or

out of errors

in advertising

rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect

or

MS Word file would be

tain

helpful. Submissions must not conany libellous statements and may be accompanied by an

illustration (such as a photograph).


SPOKE, September 25, 2000

Conestoga

—Page 5

offers

university degree Partnership allows students

Bachelor of Education option By Sanja Musa

These courses can be taken at universities and the credits will be transferred to the Brock local

now

Students can

obtain a bache-

degree by entering the Bachelor of Education in Adult lor of education

Education program

Conestoga

at

The

students

who

already have a

university degree in adult education take the five core courses to

College

The program, which began month,

degree.

is

being offered

this

at the col-

earn a second degree.

There

also a third opportunity.

is

lege after David Stewart, director

Students at local universities can

education at continuing Conestoga College, initiated negotiations with the head of the program at Brock University. The program is designed for community-college personnel by Toronto-area colleges of the

transfer their credits to

applied arts in co-operation with

University to get the bachelor of

Brock

education degree. They can just

TVOntario, the and Ontario is open to anyone

study part time here at the college

of

the faculty of education at

University,

Michener

Institute

College, but

it

interested in a degree in adult education.

The program

is

offered

at

12

the

who is a graduate from program at Brock University, said he knew the local universities didn’t have any faculties of educaTherefore,

wanted

local

who

people

to take an adult education

courses

“The advantage for the students community is that they will never have to go down to Brock in this

“I think,

tunity

in

a tremendous oppor-

community,” said

this

Stewart.

Among the

31 students enrolled in

program

at

Conestoga are three

of Conestoga’s faculty members

The

applications this year.

tor

degrees.”

interview

University in an effort to take the

“Students found out about the job through word of mouth before,” said the program co-ordinator

next step so that people can regis-

Leigh-Anne Smith. “This year we

working with Brock

courses

in

ter

is

Conestoga

at

College.

Conestoga’s best interest to maintain high standards and high quality, because it also said

it is

in

the students

advertised to

orientation and ference.”

they to

will

really

The program had

made

a dif-

least

at

75

first-

dents.

in this

is

it

students during

applicants (the majority being

There are a

community

new

year students) for the five open positions left by graduated stu-

for

that

who

are chosen

go

tions in

total

of eight posi-

the

first

interview

is

conducted by

Walk Safe program co-ordinaLeigh-Anne Smith. The second

is done through the Doon Student Association acting as Conestoga Student Incorporated by John Tribe, a security representa-

positions pay $8 per hour

A CPR

certificate is not required

an asset. Although the program has fininterviewing for now, ished

but

it is

resumes are welcome for future positions.

off a

resume

at security services,

and participants, work in teams of two with four students working a

w'hich

night.

Door 4. The Walk Safe program

The program is looking for students with good people skills, who are good at working in teams, responsible and can handle themselves (although there

all.

requirement) as participants

need to be able to walk students anywhere after dark.

Interested students should drop

tive for the college.

The

cal

is

no physi-

located beside the cafeteria stairwell on Level 2 just inside is

is

a serv-

by students for students to ensure campus safety. It runs from Monday to Thursday from ice offered

6:45-10:45 p.m.

never have

go down

to

who have

Brock University

lege

get the bachelor of

certificates from the coland are moving up to the

Applicants

to hire students

through a two-interview process.

Conestoga College’s Walk Safe program has received a serge in

would

“The advantage

it’s

By Michelle Goring

“The only time when they have to go to Brock University is to pick up their Stewart.

degree had to go to either Toronto or London.

Walk Safe program looking

and the local universities,” said

He

tion.

mandatory

five

Stewart

Stewart,

for

required to get Brock degree.

locations in Ontario.

the

make up

the 10 required courses and take

to

degree. “I

would say

that the

fairly successful in

program

terms of

is

education degree.” David Stewart,

first-

time offering,” said Stewart. All students must register at

Conestoga ’s director of Brock

continuing education

University to take the program.

“We,

at

DISCUSSION & NETWORKING GROUP

Conestoga College, are

basically

the

facilitating

pro-

gram,” said Stewart. “I arrange the classrooms, advertising and

deal with any students’ problems

might be. But, the students must go through Brock that there

would help tremendously in an articulation agreement with the Brock University. In the articulation agreement, the five core courses

would be used

as

a replacement for the teacher-train-

University’s registrar’s office to

er of adults program, a certificate

be accepted into the program and to enroll in each course in the program.” To implement the program, Stewart spoke to Prof. Michael Kompf, who is heading the program at Brock University, about offering the program’s five core courses from Brock University at

program offered by Conestoga for

Conestoga.

advanced standing program.

Students in the program must take

FOR

the past five years.

An

agreement is a co-operative arrangement whereby a college and a university each delivers its own program. The completion of the college program, or the credits earned articulation

therein,

entitles

the

student

in adult education, cur-

riculum theory and design, instruc-

ing completes a degree in a shorter

approaches for adult learn-

period of time because he/she already has a college diploma.

including foundations

and learning tional

ers, the

Brock

of teaching

college context and admin-

istration

and professional develop-

ment of college

In addition to the five core courses, the students

who have no

“It is

an interesting co-operative

venture between the university and

teachers.

post-

the college,” said Stewart. “But the

next step

we want to take is articuwe have more oppormove this to the next level

secondary education must take as

lation. I think

many

tunity to

as 10

more

full-time courses

to obtain their degree.

in the future.”

STUDENTS

to

in the university

The student must apply for admission to the university and after obtaining the advanced stand-

the five core courses from

GAY/LESBIAN/BISEXUAL /TRANSGENDERED

If

you are interested

in

being part of a group, bring your timetable to Elaine Session will be organized based upon timetables.

First

in

Student Services.


Whose

rec centre

Major changes By Tammy Somerville

be a

itive.

Doon

Student

The recreation centre is going to go through some major changes over the next few years, says Jack

operations with the

Fletcher, director of student servic-

needs a major overhaul but says it does a good job servicing students who live close to the main campus.

whom

but what they are and

they are going to benefit

any-

is

body’s guess. One thing for certain is that the building is not being uti-

by students

lized

much

as

as

it

should be and it is community use that is keeping the centre afloat. to Fletcher, the recre-

According

ation centre pays for itself with 35-

40 per cent of revenue coming from students and the remaining 60-65 per cent coming from community memberships and rentals. Every full-time student pays $64.50 per year for access and upkeep of the centre but on any given afternoon,

most have

appears like

it

but forgotten

all

it

exists.

would

Fletcher says he

more

use

students

because he feels

them

it

like to see

the

centre

would benefit

in all aspects of their life, aca-

demics included. “The rec centre gives students the ability to develop in other ways. You can’t separate the mind and

Students Inc., agrees that the centre

He

has some concerns about the amount of community use and

says as a

member

of CSI, he

is

interested in the future of the rec

He

centre.

says the

CSI

is

willing

any way it can because students pay fees and their interests should be heard. There has been some controversy

to assist in

recreationally.

“We need

form partnerships

to

with businesses in the community to help sustain the facility,” says Fletcher. least

He

adds that they are

major changes but having community involvement helps support the student use.

He

says that agree-

ments with businesses will benefit employees as well as their Conestoga’s students because it will permit the rec centre to offer

more options and a

better overall

facility.

Marlene Ford,

athletic

programs

community use

very important right

now

because

access to the recreation centre.

is

Whiteford himself says that he rarely uses the facility and has

the centre needs the revenue.

never been rejected, but third-year

high and the only

marketing student Tim Lichti who uses the centre a couple of times a week, says he has been rejected at

there are

he started at the college because of community use.

Whiteford said that he expected the

CSI would deal with

the issue at

the executive meeting on Sept. 18.

After that meeting the CSI will for-

at

two years away from any

assistant, agrees that

mulate policy and opinion on the

body, the two are one.”

because most

difficult task

in recent years over community use because students have been denied

least five times since

She says community use increased

way

is at

a

could be

it

She says is in the gym. more soccer leagues rent-

now than ever before because of the explosion of the sport. ing

Although Ford agrees

that there

needs to be more student usage, she says that neither student nor com-

munity use takes

“We try

priority.

to cater to both.

to Friday, the

gym

is

Monday

strictly for

students until 6 p.m. We set ice time for intramurals and we also

Fletcher says the recreation cen-

increasing use of the facility by the

an under-used facility, possibly due to the fact that it is not as close to the main teaching building as some of the others at Doon cam-

community. Whiteford does admit, though that Fletcher has a delicate task at hand balancing the costs of the recreation centre and keeping it openly acces-

offer

sible to students.

also skate free during public skat-

Fletcher is looking at setting up a committee consisting of several to better

ing on Tuesdays from 1 1 a.m. to 1 p.m. and on Sundays from 2-3 p.m. Although Fletcher realizes that

breaking

the recreation centre

tre is

pus.

Fletcher

has

responsibilities

on

taken at

more

the rec centre

since athletic director Ian James’s contract

of the

him

was not renewed and one

first

is to

orders of business for

get

more

free weights for

the fitness centre. This

is

a priority,

nity use.

gyms vying

centre to

students and with other

for student dollars, the recreation

centre has to

become more compet-

how

which

is

even financially because of the balance between student and commu-

revamped centre would attract more

Fletcher says, because a fitness

students to look at utilize the centre,

Fund-raising

make

is

an option for the the funds to

come up with

the major changes

needs, but Fletcher says that

that it

it

will

everyone

think of colleges academically, not

Association acting as Conestoga

large

anyway?

it

future should benefit

in

Brad Whiteford, vice-president of

es,

is

pickup hockey Mondays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. which is free to students.”

Ford also notes

that students

is

may

a college

he also accepts that it is his job to keep it viable. He recognizes that students have a right to it, but at the same time, the centre needs the involvement of the community facility,

to sustain

it.

balance that

It is

is

finding the right

the hard part.

Tim

Lichti,

a third-year marketing student, shoots hoops

centre Sept. 14. Lichti says that he uses the

a week but has been refused access came to Conestoga.

in

the rec

facility at least

five or six

twice

times since he

(Photo by

Tammy Somerville)

Read Spoke “I

was always

thirsty. I

knew

Sheila,

tired,

always

Thank goodness the warning signs.”

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— Page 7

SPOKE, September 25, 2000

College golf classic

money

raises By Trevor

The volun-

that could not attend.

Hilker

for centre

teers also relieved the representa-

Conestoga College raised about $30,000 on Aug. 29 to help fund

tives

nament for the golfers. Dickson said 115 golfers

the college’s information technolo-

gy training centre at the Waterloo campus. The money was raised at the Conestoga College Golf Classic which was held at the Greystone Golf Club in Milton.

all

the donations

I

Robert

Mayor

of CKCO Dennis Watson.

A

television,

dinner was held following the

M

Bank

“Last year

I

had

estimated $30,000 and was only about

was only about $200

Group, Kuntz and The Murray Alzheimer Kenneth G. research program, among others. Rogers Krug Furniture,

A committee of Conestoga employees and other members of the community organized the tournament. The chair of the committee was Wendy Hallman, president of Hallman Property Management. Sixteen volunteers from the college’s administration, faculty and support staff helped out on the day of the tournament. Their main duties were to act as hole representatives for sponsoring companies

Inc.

Communications and Union Gas joined

I

$200

M

Financial

Electroplating

come

17 other organizations as hole sponsors

short.”

The tournament was created assistant in

development

office

where

Jim Beingessner, chair of the economic corporation of development Canada’s technology triangle, was Beingessner and honoured. Conestoga College are working together to make Conestoga tournament

in

was one

of

1 1

5 participants

the Conestoga Golf

in

(Photo by Trevor Hitker)

1996

recognize outstanding business and

to

Shari Dickson

Classic, which raised about $30,000.

for the tournament.

Shari Dickson,

K-W group in

Kitchener

G. ’Rosehart,

Carl Zehr and the general

manager

short,” she said.

poverty

John

Tibbits, Wilfrid Laurier president

and expenses are eliminated. “Last year I had estimated

$30,000 and

president

college’s

the

Shari Dickson, an assistant in the

in

partici-

pated in the tournament, including

development office at Conestoga College, said the amount is an estimate. The final amount won’t be available until

throughout the day. The col-

lege also provided a bus to the tour-

Canada’s best college for information technology education. Previous honourees at the college’s golf classic have been Owen Lackenbauer, community relations manager; for the Record; Marc and meat Voisin, president of shops; Bob and Paul Kuntz, president of Kuntz Electroplating; and Kyle Hallman, CEO of The Hallman Group of Companies. There were nine major sponsors for the tournament, including TD

acy and literacy

In

skills.

1999,

$30,000 was raised for

advance the quality of education provid-

was raised for establishment of The Mac Voisin

ed

Scholarship Series for Conestoga’s

nursing and the cardiopulmonary resuscitation and Alzheimer

School of Business.

studies programs.

community

leaders and to raise funds to

at the college.

In

$20,000 was raised then

1996,

matched by the college for creation of

The Owen Lackenbauer Literacy Lab which is a facility providing support to students who need additional assistance in developing numer-

In 1997, $37,000

resources in cardiovascular and oncological

1998, $64,000 was raised for

Registration for this year’s tourna-

equipment in an area of education deemed very important by the Kuntz

ment was $350 which covered the golf tournament and the dinner. Thirty-five people paid $150 to

In

brothers,

electro-technology

pro-

attend only the dinner.

grams.

School of business gets new VP

targets

Waterloo Furniture Components comes out of retirement to accept college’s job offer

Former president

symposiu :

of

:

By

By Sanja Musa

Julie Porter

The recently appointed vice-pres-

Opportunity 2000, a K-W group whose mission is to lower the poverty rate in the region, is hosting a symposium called Step

Ahead for low-income people. To be held on Oct. 14 at the in school Hespeler Jacob Cambridge, the symposium is free and the only criterion for attendance is that you be a person living under the poverty line. The day will be divided into morning and afternoon workshops. Sixteen educational work-

shops including Take the Distress out of Stress and Housing is a Right will be offered as well as

ident of the School of Business at

Naomi

Stansfield, administra-

for Opportunity 2000, said she feels that the workshop may be helpful for stutive

assistant

Dianne Walters, a second-year work student at Conestoga College, wants to raise awareness of the level of poverty facing people in the

K-W area.

experience into raising the profile of the school of business, develop-

nity.”

ing a number of applied degree programs within the school of busi-

He

It is

a selfa mat-

ness and further developing the opportunities of Conestoga over-

tional level as well.

arounds, marketing, strategic planning and labour relations with

of people just saying ‘I have trouble making ends meet.’”

Ford Motor Co., like Electric, General Canadian Fautless-Doemer Mfg. Co., Emco Furniture Waterloo and Components Ltd., said he treats the college as any other business. “The product of the college is the students and if the product is good, the students will go on to be suc-

“Low-income

a diverse popStansfield.

said

ulation,”

LiVCiy Wliwlv living with really

is

iuviw

little

tii

something that

diagnosis.

c

pvujjiv

resources.

Sometimes

is it is

ter

Stansfield said there are

many

Step Ahead is to give lowincome people a voice to help fix the problem of poverty. “We want to get people involved in fixing the problem and get low income involved in process,”

said

Stansfield.

issues of poverty all across the

low income. Hopefully people

country.

will

a day of networking, not unlike how business people network, but for people living with

“It’s

make valuable

contacts.”

new and

Opportunity 2000, the group

inventive techniques to involve

hosting the symposium, aims to end poverty for 2,000 people by

“We need

to

take

people in helping stop poverty,” said Walters. “This is

symposium

an example of what can be

done.”

Ahead is a great opportunity for low income people to take away information Walters said Step

the end of the year 2000. to according Stansfield, the group has exceeded its goal and has aided 16,000 people in the Waterloo region to

Already,

move

out of poverty.

before he realized there

is

seas.

giants

cessful,” it’s

he

much

said.

“So,

I

“One

of the

Ron Simmons, vice-president

business.”

Simmons served nine

president of Waterloo Furniture Components Ltd. before he came to Conestoga.

Within that period, sales

at

WFC

increased from $25 million to over $170 million and its products start-

ed selling in over 30 countries around the world.

Simmons

said that

of school of business

years as the

was

the

most

At the same time, he also faces the problem of finding an appropriate replacement for the dean of the school of business, Andy Clow, who is retiring by the end of the year.

“I’ve got a major situation here,” said. “A dean of the business

he

enjoyable part of his career so far. “What I enjoyed the most was establishing the companies overseas, establishing Waterloo over-

year.”

“When

Simmons. we were

I left,

selling to

32 countries around the world.

It’s

do

that in the university

much

as in an applied

Simmons.

in the

School of Business.

“One of the most opportune

divi-

sions in the college to develop an

applied degree

is

in the business

school,” he said.

school, a very valuable employee,

seas,” said

of them don’t particularly to

He also sees an opportunity to upgrade Conestoga’s students in the eyes of employers by developing applied degree programs with-

degree is in the business school.”

don’t think

“There are a lot of Chinese and Asian students very interested in developing their business acumen.

setting,” said

develop an applied

different than ordinary

locally.

an opportunity for Conestoga College on the interna-

setting as

the college to

peo-

sees

want

opportune divisions in

But he doesn’t only think

Many

most

many

going to be my job to get that even higher in the commu-

can give to the community. That’s when he accepted president John Tibbits’ job offer. Simmons, a man with years of turnexperience in business

J

the

is

After three weeks at his new Simmons sees a new chal-

profile

doing her social with practicum Opportunity 2000 and says she feels there is a need to address Walters

work

ple understand just what the School of Business has to offer and I think

is,

“I don’t think a great

it’s

income category. She said that the mission of

social

people.

Business

College he said.

lenge putting his knowledge and

workshops in dental health and a guid-

ed walking tour.

says he had three months of retirement to improve his golf game

Conestoga

more he

Personal Development/Fun sespottery,

Ron Simmons,

important the School of

ple recognize

About 270 people were employed with WFC at one point. Now, there are about 700 to 800

position,

people working and going to school who fit into the low-

sions that include

Conestoga College,

how

a lot of fun seeing business grow.”

is

going to

retire at the

end of

this

However, Simmons doesn’t let anything sway his concentration from his priorities.

He wants

to

make

sure that peo-

Simmons

also

emphasized the

Key the of importance Performance Indicators for the college.

The KPIs

are annual surveys of

Ontario’s 25 colleges that establish excellence. in benchmarks

Conestoga has maintained a No. 1 rating two years in a row. “That really has a lot to do with the respect other people have for said

college,” really

stays No. that

Simmons.

“It’s

important' that Conestoga

way.”

1

and we’ll

try to

keep

it

-


— SPOKE, September 25, 2000

Page 8

Tuition hikes pay for faculty salaries By Paul Kostal

says he wishes he had more to

work with. “The health science

Conestoga September This College raised tuition by the maximum two per cent allowed during

currently underfunded,” he said.

a five-year provincial government

graduate from Conestoga receives

funding agreement. » If deemed necessary by college administration, the college will be able to increase tuition by a maximum of two per cent for the next

division

is

Tibbits also said the education a

“not a bad value, for the cost.”

is,

Over 60 per cent of students enrolled at the college do not come directly from high schools and “older students seem to

exactly does the two per

demand more,” he said. The extra money goes to upgrad-

cent per student tuition increase

ing the current facilities the col-

pay for? According

believes

four years.

What

lege

Kevin Mullan, the

to

and administration, the money pays for salaries and benefits and

to its students if

it

CBSA

tickets

Business Students Association executive team are working at

one who attends has

steam to organize this year’s Biz Bash, a party held annually

selling

for the students enrolled in the

same day the Biz Bash

business programs of study at the

held.

college.

The cost is $2 per bar and the money raised from the sales is

are

the

selling

tickets

the

for

will start

chocolate bars on the is to be

intended to fund various academic

decade.

Tibbits, president of the college

since 1987, said he has seen gov-

ernment funding

needs of the business students

at the college.

The tickets will cost $5 each if bought at the college and $7 at the door at the Inner City nightclub. The Biz Bash will be held

More

last year,

a

to Joe Bentley,

communi-

per cent in the last 14 years. In 1987 the college received

according

CBSA

president.

Tibbits said the funding for the

“It

is

based upon

doesn’t take growth into con-

sideration,” he said.

For example, students

By Petra Lampert

are also

The Program

admissions at Conestoga College have increased this year.

to the college’s regis-

admission statistics report, many of the college’s fulltime programs have seen an increase in admissions this year. trar’s

office

vice-

the

to

practical nursing

college’s

if

there are 30,000

enrolled

Ontario’s

in

program were up

up

this year.

aviation

The college began offering the program three years ago. Leith said once a program becomes more well-known and aviation

respected,

its

popularity increases

which results in higher applicaand admissions to that pro-

admissions with 61 per cent at the Doon campus and 106 per cent at

that

slowly chipping away

is

if

they develop the disease, then their

children face those

same

fifty-fifty

odds.

her

at

Just like

mind. ..her body .her soul.

my

mother,

1

wanted

to give

.

the It

may

before

it

disease

take 10, 15

finally kills her.

may

gift

of

life.

What have

done instead?

1

- even 25 - years

And even

then, the

not go to the grave with

her.

“When is

high

the

program,” get

economy

we see

But there

is

hope. Recent research

than ever to finding a cure.

You

see,

once you develop Huntington

disease, there's a

will pass the

50 percent chance you

gene responsible for

Huntington’s along to your children.

And

With your support, we disease once

and

for

all.

will beat this

Please call the

Huntington Society of Canada

today.

Other

in

that

we

often

programs

particular

with

high

increases in admissions this year

were woodworking technician, woodworking technology (co-op), graphic design and journalism and broadcast.

in

Jennifer Leith, associate registrar

ing program, since

it

will

be mod-

September 2001.

The college of nurses has determined that by January 2005

Conestoga’s Waterloo campus. This year 122 students were admitted to the program, compared to 76 last year. At the Waterloo campus, 70 students were admitted this year, compared to 34 last year. Leith said the

economy

er reason for increases in

is

anoth-

program

“When

the

economy

is

high

we

see an increase in applicants,” she said.

ments.

high entrance standards and an excellent network in the communi-

Leith added the college has fairly

to

other programs

last year.

this year,

compared

(co-op) program admitted 53 students this year, compared to 46 last resulting

in

a

15 per cent

Admissions to the graphic design program increased by 20 per cent with 36 students admitted to the program this year, compared to 30

The journalism - print and broadcast program admitted 34 students this year, compared to 25 last year, resulting in

a 36 per cent

increase.

Two programs at Conestoga’s Guelph campus saw decreases in admissions.

The welding engineering

techni-

cian program had a 56 per cent

decrease,

with

four

students

nine last year.

And the welding engineering technology program admitted nine compared to 13 which resulted in a 31

students this year, last year,

per cent decrease.

We need your help

Q~

Huntington Society of

Canada

HUNTINGTON Canada

life

is

short, (ret

Soci§t§ Huntington du -

800-9987398

aw

extension Cj

Live longer with daily physical activity healthy eating and following your doctors advice. 1

1

to

admitted this year, compared to

applications and admissions.

Ontario nurses will be required to have university level require-

Admissions

program

23

last year.

applicants to the

the last intake of the existing nurs-

the

increase.

applications.”

she top

805 applications for the program, compared to 636 last year. Leith said one reason applications were higher this year is due to the fact that February will be

cent with 32 students admitted to

year,

an increase

a very popular and

“Our graduates

ified in breakthroughs have brought us closer

there are jobs,

The woodworking technology

admis-

per cent. This year the college had

dying from Huntington

“Where

The general arts and science program also had an increase in

nursing program increased by 27

is

plentiful

compared to 40 last year. Admissions to the nursing program also increased by 21 per cent. This year 75 students were admitted, compared to 62 last

The number of

an inherited brain disorder

next September.

Woodworking technician program admissions were up 39 per

said.

It's

inevitably

print

marks.”

mother

it

gram.

“We have

My

some of

tions

well-respected

disease.

business sup-

local

ty-

program had an

year.

excellent nursing program.

not true."

much of that money

Tibbits said

field,” Leith said. “However, that’s not always the case because when the economy is poor students often come to the college to prepare.”

year because Conestoga has an

it's

where.

sions. This year 35 students were admitted, compared to 17 last

sions in nursing were higher this

God

Since the college isn’t getting money it needs from the government, it has to find it else-

the

35 per cent this year with 54 students admitted to the program,

istrar at the college, said

to

ulation has increased dramatically.

see increases

Jennifer Leith, an associate reg-

hope

level,

increase of 105 per cent in admis-

year.

I

funding stays at the same even though its student pop-

tion, its

Program numbers up where jobs are

Admissions

than 800 chocolate bars

were sold

to the

by more than 50

ty colleges fall

According

event.

government, but rather that

the spending cuts have been an

ongoing trend during the past

to dress up.

CBSA members

ticular

not singling out any par-

Student enrolment increasing at Conestoga College campuses

The theme of the party will be Pimp N’ Ho, which means every-

Ten class representatives and the six-member executive team

Tibbits,

college president

is

comes from the students. Both Tibbits and Mullan said it was too early to say whether tuition would be increasing again

more than

About 500

he

that

to point out

versity funding system.

are being printed.

The

underfunded.”

Conestoga has the same 10 per cent of the overall student popula-

was quick

Tibbits

John

stu-

dent.

porters, but

Mullan said government regula-

on Sept. 28.

worth closer to $1,500 per

assume there are 100,000

student population, like the uni-

last year.

full

currently

is

Now

students in the college system. If

comes from

at Inner City nightclub The members of the Conestoga

division

amount spent was

the

if

a market share, rather than actual

plans big bash

By Sanja Musa

“The health sciences

prised

attend college.

tuition this year that gives the col-

upgrade current college facilities and college president John Tibbits

Tibbits said he wouldn’t be sur-

10 per cent of the available funding.

community colleges

it

lege around $120,000

inflation.

for

the students are helping each other

college up and running.

used to

adjusting

Conestoga has 10 per cent of the enrolled students, Conestoga gets

provides

the increased cost of keeping the

is

about

of

before

students attend college.

government funding $2,900 per student,

to the current

community college system, and

Essentially, according to Tibbits,

charged more. With roughly 5,000 full-time students paying an extra $34 in

money

about $6,000 per student from the provincial government, compared

could

college

the

improve the education

of the

30 per cent of any tuition increase be set aside in bursary and scholarship funds to help financially disadvantaged

using, and Tibbits said he

is

college’s vice-president of finance

Much

tions decree that

,

nannanairmh

w^w.porf5cipo<f?on. cow


SPOKE, September 25, 2000

— Page 9

Choclair electrifies Conestoga Hip hop

artist

rocks students during concert at rec centre

eyes were riveted on her. The crowd really got into

By Jody Andruszkiewicz The newest wave of Canadian hip

she

performed

her

He it

when

hit

song

said hip

Canadian

hop

a part of the

is

identity.

“I bet there’s

even a few hockey

hop invaded the recreation centre at Conestoga College on Sept. 13, and the crowd couldn’t be disappointed with the spectacularly executed

Rallyin’.

players that listen to hip hop.”

But it wasn’t long after Black’s almost 90-minute set was over that the crowd got to see what they

rhymes and excellent scratching from the proud Canadian artists

were all waiting for. Choclair graced the

who

crowd was whipped into a frenzy of jumping bodies. The 25-year-old Toronto native, bom Kareem Blake, had the crowd enthralled with his selections from his CD Ice Cold, which went gold in Canada in 30 days. The show ended on a high note, with Choclair bringing up all the members of the Babyblue Sound Crew and Jully Black to help him

Choclair, who says he doesn’t have a specific influence, said he sees Canadian hip hop going far and is trying to help build a hip hop scene in Canada. But he also wants to be an ambassador for Canadian hip hop, especially in the United

graced the stage.

The Doon Student Association acting as Conestoga Student Inc.

brought in the Babyblue Sound

Crew, Jully Black, and to headline the show, Choclair to entertain about 600 people in attendance. The Babyblue Sound Crew, who call themselves Canada’s Urban

Ambassadors, opened the show with wild rhymes and excellent scratching from their DJ. A lot of their songs were covers of recent hits from famous hip hop artists including Eminem, Dr. Dre and R. Kelly, but the original songs were mind-blowing and brought the groove out of everyone. After about 75 minutes, Jully Black graced the stage with her crew, and the show took off to an incredibly high level. The crowd responded quite well to the 22-year-old Toronto native,

and Black didn’t disappoint either. She obviously enjoys entertaining as

much

skills

as the

crowd enjoys her

because during her set

all

And when stage,

the

perform his hit single Let’s Ride. In an interview after the show, Choclair said he’s very proud to be a Canadian hip hop star, and the support he is receiving is amazing.

“I’m proud to represent Canada, and I will always bring my music to the world.”

He also said there’s

so

much qual-

States.

“We have

a

I

and

strong

very

vibrant scene, and

want

to further

open doors.” Jully Black said in an interview she’s proud to be a Canadian hip hop star, and that it is possible to be a successful hip hop artist. “The industry is growing. There was no industry 15 years ago for our type of music.” Black said her music life

is

based on

experiences.

“It’s not always positive. about being real.”

It’s

Citing Etta James and Mary J. Blige as some of her influences, Black said she mixes some of the

some

music in Canada, but not everyone has heard it. “Canadian music has so many

old elements of hip hop with

different angles like country, rock

artists

and pop. People need to start including hip hop because they are leaving out one of the more successful forms of music.”

approach in promoting hip hop. “Hopefully we’ll get it across to people without compromising what we’re about.”

ity

of the new.

She also said Canadian hip hop are

a

taking

Canadian

hip

hop superstar Choclair rocks the mike at in front of an audience of about

the college’s recreation centre

600 people. The 25-year-old Toronto native headlined the show, which also included Babyblue Sound Crew and Jully Black.

grassroots

(Photo by Jody Andruszkiewicz)

Choclair’s

new

CD is expected in

the fall of 2001, but could in February or

be out

March of 2002.

Black’s latest release

on Sept. More.

5,

and

came out

is titled

Say

No

Toronto native, 22-year-old Jully Black, wows the crowd at the Choclair concert at the college’s recreation centre on Sept. 13. (Photo by Jody Andruszkiewicz)

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Page 10

— SPOKE, September 25, 2000

Wax

Elvis rocks local

pub

To avoid boredom Waterloo band never plays a regular gig By Jody Andruszkiewicz

cool bands to play with

is difficult.

But additionally, he said the best

The band

that didn’t

know what

themselves until hearing the combination of their name on a local radio station, Wax Elvis to

call

rocked and grooved at the Mecca, at the Walper Pub, on Sept. 14. The Waterloo-based band played

from their self-titled and other original works for the 75 people in attendance. Having met in high school through all sorts of interesting ways, the band didn’t even have a name until they were listening to selections

CD

the University of Waterloo’s

com-

munity radio station and heard the words wax and Elvis in the same sentence.

After that,

the

name

feeling

“The hardest part is getting up work the next day,” Magreehan

said.

Wagner, who says one of his is the British rock band Radiohead, said it’s hard because people are turning into DJs instead influences

of turning to live music.

Webb, who’s influenced by

old

guitar-vocalist,

met

Jeff

Wagner, the 25-year-old drummer, at work. Wagner was a friend of 22-year-old bassist-vocalist

Adam

Webb’s older brother. The band played their first gig together at Club Abstract in Kitchener with Tristan Psionic, of Unyon fame.

Sonic

Magreehan said that while setup is a drag, the easiest part is getting up there and controlling the emotions of the audience. “Some nights you can blow them away and other nights ting

you just suck.” Magreehan, who cites Catherine Wheel as one of

the his

major influences, said getting shows to play as well as finding

the

Inner City Surfers, said the band’s

most interesting gig was at the Canadian National Exhibition, where they played with 13 Engines, Sandbox, the Killjoys, the Doughboys and the Refreshments.

On the 24-year-

talking with people after

for

stuck.

Mike Magreehan,

is

the show.

the other side,

said their worst gig

Magreehan was playing

Turret at Wilfrid Laurier Univesity for students trying to the

build the longest paperclip chain

Guiness Book of World

for the

Records.

Magreehan

won at

also said

Wax

Elvis

a battle of the bands contest

Laurier

a

in

campus rock

search.

The band doesn’t play a regular gig at a regular spot,

it’s because they don’t want to bore their audiences. The group is playing gigs right now and trying to catch the right funding for production, but the next Wax Elvis CD should be ready for consumption by those looking for an awesome groove before the

summer begins

Mike Magreehan, a member of the band Wax Elvis, doesn’t shake his hips like the King of rock and roll, but his performance at the Mecca at the Walper Pub in Kitchener on Sept. 14 was kingly. (Photo by Jody Andruszkiewicz)

in 2001.

Barenaked Ladies’ new album good despite songs about nothing By Trevor

Hilker

Once again the five guys from Scarborough have compiled a new

like Stunt. So, if you’re just a fan of Gordon or Maybe You Should Drive and you weren’t a fan of

Bom

CD.

then

Maroon, the Barenaked Ladies newest release, is their seventh CD. They’ve now had 13 songs released from the seven CDs including the newest release, Pinch Me, which was released in August 2000, one month before the CD Maroon was released.

you.

Pinch

Me

is

a

unique release

on a Pirate Ship or Stunt,

Maroon

is

probably not for

Both Maybe You Should Drive and Maroon nave quality songs on them, but only a couple songs, for example Jane and Pinch Me, jump out at you right away. But, Am I

Only

the

One,

Alternative

could be. Maroon

Girlfriend and Life in a Nutshell

features rock songs and ballads.

have eventually become favourites of mine. As an early

Although

Too

it

Little

Too

Late and Falling

For the

First

Time

Too

guess,

examples of the rock songs and a couple of

Too Never "

are

Little

Late,

Do

Anything and

because it is the only song where Ed Robertson is the lead singer. As

the

Conventioneers

First

you may recall One Week, from the album Stunt, was sung by Ed and Steven Paige. The other releases were sung by Steven only. However, Ed has had solo songs on the group’s albums before. For example When I Fall, from Bom on a Pirate Ship, Am I the Only One, from Maybe You Should Drive, and Light Up My Room, from Stunt.

and Helicopters. There are also some unique sounding songs including Conventioneers which has a late ’60s sound to it and Tonight is the Night I Fell Asleep at the Wheel which sounds like a waltz. Even though the CD is great and the Barenaked Ladies have lived up to their usual standards of greatness, I found that Maroon hasn’t had a big impact on me like Stunt did in 1998. It seems that this CD is going to have to grow on me much like Maybe You Should

could be next

Pinch sings

Me

is

the only song

on Maroon. Steven

Ed

sings the

other songs.

Although Maroon is not like Gordon, BNL fans should not worry because Maroon is much

ballads

Drive.

Falling For the

are

in

Time line

for

release.

The Barenaked Ladies have come way in the last nine years. Gone are the days when they sang a long

about spending $1 million or being in

Grade

9.

Now

they are singing

about struggling actors and driving asleep at the wheel.

Come haven’t years;

of it maybe come anywhere in

to think

they’re

still

they

nine

singing about

nothing.

But,

it

still

makes people what

it’s all

sounds good and laugh.

about?

And

isn’t that

Maroon

is

the Barenaked Ladies newest release and their

seventh album.

(CD

cover)


Six By Dwight

DJs from the Wave rock Sanctuary

The Wave, Conestoga’s campus by broadcasting students, showed students what it takes to do a radio show, on radio station operated

Sept. 12, in the Sanctuary.

The Wave’s program casting student, said

it’s

were awarded to the winners. CDs and T-shirts were also handed out

station

to lucky students.

Lantz, Tanya Gafoor,

“It’s

for

do remotes

broadcasting a radio

works.

different things

on

teria

which broadcasts

playing CDs.”

in the cafe-

every day.

The Wave handed out

who answered

students

going

the Sanctuary,

in

Tracy Evans, vice-president of

skill-test-

student

ing questions. Jonathan Purkis, a

The Wave

life

for the CSI

also gave out tickets to

Leafs tickets to a pre-season game,

a benefit concert

knowing Shayne Corson and Gary Roberts were the two major

Sammy’s Garage, on Nov. 8. The concert, which will raise money for

made

Mary’s Place, a shelter for women and children, will feature the bands Thermo Cline, Great Beyond and

for

free-agent signings the Leafs this past

summer.

Tickets for the Choclair concert,

Psychic looks By

“You

will

who

be abducted by space conduct scientific

will

experiments on your brain,” Dan Valkos, psychic entertainer, told a group of Conestoga College students gathered in the Sanctuary on

The students had congregated if

holding, at

He

accepted his intuitive psychic

ability in 1971. “It

ing

was a slow process, accept-

my own

to

Valkos could see into their

future and answer three free questions.

abilities,”

who

said

Valkos. “I believe everyone has psychic abilities. Being psychic is inherent. wife is intuitive. daughter is intuitive but runs from

My

it.”

Valkos said he had good friends and teachers who guided him

has written two books about psychic activity, the Psychic World And How You can be A Part Of It and the Psychic

through learning to accept his abil-

World Of Your Dreams, says he has

cross-country radio stations.

Valkos,

stu-

Tracy Evans, vice-president of life for the Doon Student Association acting as Conestoga Students Inc., said it’s good to hold remotes in the station radio Sanctuary.

gives good recognition to the

radio station and they helped us

promote our Choclair concert,” Evans said. “It’s good for the students to have different things going on in the Sanctuary, other than us just play-

The Wave DJ, awards Jonathan Purkis, first-year and automation student, two tickets to a Toronto Maple (Photo by Dwight Irwin) Leafs pre-season game.

ing CDs.”

Chris Lantz,

The Wave plans remotes

station

to

this

do more radio year, Cyopik

robotics

said.

and sees

into students’ future

My

Sept. 14.

see

is

been dealing in different realms of the paranormal for about 30 years.

Julie Porter

aliens

it

broadcasting

student

“It

prizes to

first-year robotics and automation student, won two Toronto Maple

third-year

all

dents.

other than just

with the voices students hear on the radio,

for the

students to have

show

Six DJs did a set during the radio remote including Chris

Mike Durdle, Andrew McLean, Mandie Young and Jessica McLaughlin. They are

in

also helps to put faces

It

good

tickets

cost $5

Conestoga students and $7 for

for

others.

director,

good

Seven Year Itch. When become available, they will

14 in the recreation centre,

Sept.

the Sanctuary, so students can see

how

Student

Association acting as Conestoga Students Inc., which was held on

Erin Cyopik, a third-year broadthe radio station to

Doon

sponsored by the

Irwin

ities.

Valkos has harnessed his ability and now gives readings on 50 to 60

He

has a line of self-help tapes

was going

I

to

aliens,” said Jaglowitz.

College.

usually asks

Valkos said he has a moral and ethical obligation not to give

going to marry my boyfriend’ is something I hear a lot at these readings,” he said.

one very bad news

I

Laura. Jaglowitz,

a

“If to

One way to

know how much

in

and wants

longer their

husband has in the hospital before he dies, I cannot answer that question,” said Valkos. “If I’m wrong then that person could be counting

first-year

computer program analyst student, said she had a few things she wanted to know about and figured asking Valkos might be helpful. “I don’t know whether or not what he said w'as right. He did say

4j

some-

in a reading.

someone comes

down the He did right

days.” say that his readings are

said. at readings Valkos gave Conestoga College for two hours and admits that the process requires

a lot of energy. “Doing readings

at three

colleges

one day would tire me out. But I have a lot of energy.” Valkqs said that being a psychic entertainer simply means he is a in

psychic

80 per cent of the time.

deal with the stress of student

it.

“(Being psychic) never gets in the way of my personal life. I don’t answer anything unless I’m asked. It’s an ethical thing,” he

finances.

how

well they will do in school.

“‘Am

they ask for

health concerns, family, career and

Valkos said most students ask their about questions

said that he never gives peo-

ple advice on their futures unless

Valkos said the general public him questions about

him

boyfriends and girlfriends and

He

be abducted by

and conducts workshops at 22 colincluding Conestoga leges,

all

life is to

who

learn

is

entertaining.

more about

RELAXATION TECHNIQUES > >

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Plan to attend Register at

this

enjoyable and informative group

STUDENT SERVICES (ROOM 2B02) FACILITATOR: Karen

by Friday, September 29

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I

Page 12

— SPOKE, September 25, 2000

Condors By Derek Lester

the far side of the net. Sherifali

The Conestoga Condors out a

1-1

against

tie

battled

St.

College Saturday, Sept. men’s college soccer.

was

goal scorer last year, said

Condor

coach Geoff Johnstone. Sherifali

in

puts goals in the net very nicely,

Johnstone added.

ing,

back and forth game that saw both teams have many good scor-

The wind played a little bit of a game as the players facing the wind could not kick the

ing opportunities.

ball

St Clair College ing,

excit-

opened the scor-

and had a 1-0 lead

after the

first half.

Forward Derhan

Sherifali scored

Condors after he made a nice move around a defender and booted the ball into the tying goal for the

as

Irwin

the

as

other players

balls.”

Geoff Johnstone, Condor coach

around some high balls.” The temperature was perfect for

and we’ve

knocked out of

learned to do the float like a butterfly stuff really

good,

start stinging like

time to

it’s

Eser Onar had a game and was probably the

Midfielder

“I’ve always been fond of the old

Muhammad Ali

‘float like

a butter-

the injuries.

when

“We

played surprisingly well considering the injuries, and it being the first game of the season,” Ford said. goaltender,

Jolene

Theriault, suffered a concussion

while racing

for a loose ball in the crease.

Fanshawe

She

player,

much of the game without rest. “(Team captain) Teresa positions and play

the

ground. She will be out of action for a couple of weeks. “She doesn’t even remember

(Hussey) played almost every during the game. She was all over the place. That allowed us to give some girls a

Ford said. Theriault was replaced by back-up goalie Holly Beitz. Conestoga player Christine the

num

play,”

position

rest.”

on its scoring chances. Midfielder Jamie Scott scored the lone Condor goal. capitalize

Maikano had

The next game

days.

she suffered a bruised sterin a collision with an oppos-

Fanshawe scored on

after

breakaway, Conestoga’s Heather Craig dented the twine. a

ing player.

Midfielder Zack Lakoseljac was

side of a 3-2 score.

Ford said the team, which conof 14 rookies and only three

sists

work on man-to-man coverage, communication for upcoming games. basic ball control and

immensely. After Theriault left the game there was only one

the score.

in learning.”

Condor available

away

other players are also bat-

through

which shortened the Conestoga bench injuries,

After giving up another break-

for substitution,

Conestoga’s Erin Frank scored on a free kick, out-

leaving other players to change

goal,

game

injury.

The Condors

hit a post

and had

going to be a tough year,

a couple scoring chances, but the

but we’ll grow as a team after

team didn’t play the type of offence it must to win games.

“It’s

St.

“We’re

Clair blasts Conestoga

The women’s soccer team to 0-2, after being hammered

still

some of

for

finding positioning the girls. We’ll

improve each game. “We just need some healthy

fell

5-0,

bodies.”

College students aren’t interested in

week

frosh

By Paul Kostal

says CSI

antics,

students.

order

With the average age of college There just wouldn’t be enough on the part of the students to justify having an organized frosh week like most universities hold every September. At least, that’s what Tracy Evans, vice-president of student life for the Doon Student Association acting as Conestoga interest

Students Inc., says. “I don’t think

there

president

coming down though,

week in the Evans cited

frosh

would be

Phil

much

higher

than the average age of university

week

frosh

also said he didn’t

to the idea of

Labour

Day weekend.

difficulty

involved in scheduling activities around the varied schedules of the different schools as another reason

Evans doubted people would even come to school before Labour Day just for an orientation

for not holding a frosh week.

week.

She said the in

September

in

universities have

“I

Lebeau lege

would

to school in August,” she

said.

is

There would have to be a fee attached to an orientation week as

said he doubted the col-

administration

don’t think anybody would

come

week

which no one

Read Spoke

having students

the school before the

at

attending class.

Lebeau

agreed, saying the average age of college^ students is

open

future.

the

He

think the administration would be

Lebeau sees a possible need for a

the luxury of having an extra

quite the turnout,” she said.

CSI

students

schedule

to

activities.

be

well,

agreeable to scheduling even a few days off after Labour Day in

Lebeau

said,

“We

charge anything for what

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by Windsor’s St. Clair College, on Saturday, Sept. 21, at the Doon Campus. “We were banged up quite a bit,” Ford said. “Had we been healthy it would have been a different story.” The team was missing three injured players and five others on the field were battling

Conestoga couldn’t hold off the Fanshawe attack any longer and found themselves on the wrong

each game. These girls pay attention in practice and are interested

Many

Condors

College, at Conestoga College.

side the 18-yard box.

Craig beat the goalie in a foot race to the ball, which was about 20 yards from the goal, and neatly chipped it over her head, to tie

tling

for the

Tuesday, Sept. 19 against Lambton

returning players, will continue to

Soon

also fell to the injury bug,

a

be

short in a 2-1 loss, as they could not

player of the game, Johnstone said, and midfielder Alfred Maikano setquickly, as

to

On Wednesday, Sept. 13, the Condors traveled to London to play Fanshawe College in its first regular season game. Johnstone said his team controlled most of the game, but fell

said.

in

was

game.

responded well to the change, he

tled

game with

evaluated on his status after the

a bee.”

Johnstone was pleased with the whole team’s effort. Some players played a couple positions and they

strong

the

possible concussion, and

only been in Canada for about nine

playing soccer, said Johnstone. The

rolled and hit her head on

late in the first half,

high

“The wind had a bit of an affect,” said Johnstone. “The wind ruined a few things in terms of blowing

Lapp

collided with a

far

could going with the wind.

Injuries played a big part in Conestoga’s women’s soccer team’s 3-2 loss to Fanshawe College, on Monday, Sept. 11, in London. Assistant coach, Marlene Ford, said the team played well, despite

Starting

“The wind ruined a few things in terms of blowing around some

factor in the

sting like a bee’,

fly,

plague women’s soccer players during Fanshaw

Injuries By Dwight

was good and the officiating was superb, the team just needed to capitalize on its chances, he added. Johnstone said, “We played some really good soccer, but we don’t seem to get the finishing touch. field

the team’s leading

Clair 16,

About 40 fans watched the

•“

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