Page 1

33rd Year

Name change

a problem

Ian

James

let

By Tracy Ford

Inside

— No. 32

The Doon Student Association, as Conestoga Students

go

by college

acting

Incorporated, has until Oct. 2 to collect 2,700 student votes approv-

By

name change.

ing the

Julie Porter

Brad Whiteford, vice-president After some discussion, Ian

of operations for the student association, said he is confident that

of the director James, Conestoga recreation centre for

enough students will hand in the proxy form to approve the name

was relieved of his on July 19. “The college felt James and the college were going in differsaid Jack directions,” ent

three years,

change.

duties

“I’m not planning on having a am 99 per cent sure it is going to happen.” Last spring the former DSA executive decided to change the name during a board of directors (BOD) meeting March 29 on the

Fletcher,

vote for no,” he said. “I

LRC

is

giving

away

free books.

PAGE

v

\

-

:

:

H

r*'£

;

3

.

the

also public use of the facility.

“We need someone who does have much more connection with this particular community. The community connection didn’t seem to be part of the role he was playing,” said Fletcher James could not be located

dents.

“They

(last

year’s

Keanu Reeves

bombs in new thriller.

executive)

PAGE

ing the last

still

stands in limbo.

last

we were

as well

year of the legal

requirements we’d have to live up to when changing our name. It’s

said Whiteford. The association was told the acronym CSI could be used in place of DSA until the voting is

“We were under the we could use CSI, of stands

for

impression course that

Conestoga Students

Inc.,” said Whiteford.

He

said the association has

had

no students raising concerns about the name. “We branded everything with CSI now because our experience has been so far with the proxy, that is ho real discussion when

there

11

comes up,” he said. The association approached most

this

He

anyway. need to approach 50 per cent of the student population and I need to approach who I can, where

to get their student cards “I

I

when I can,” said Whiteford. Now, he said, the association has

can,

to

approach the second- and third-

wouldn’t have made

sense to

to the orientation session as

and three weeks later when we finally get this proxy out and all of a sudden being CSI,” said Whiteford.

would have preferred the vote had been held at the end of last year but he said the only times when students are together

is

during exams

and orientation week. “I agree that it’s odd

many

staff.

go ahead with the branding, the logoing and the name change for a public

Students using

wrong lockers

to

appearance, but I could put that down in confidence that we are going to get 2,700 to 3,000 prox-

Whiteford said. actual proxy form has two

ies,”

and third-year students. Those are the people I need right now,” said Whiteford. “It’s up to the next month and a half. If I have to go door to door to sell this, It’s not going to be a I’ll sell it. hard sell. I haven’t had a hard sell

sections that the student associa-

By Michelle Goring

New and returning students should check their locker numbers to ensure they have accessed the right one.

Security

The tion

wants students to vote on.

Only the first section outlines the name change from DSA to CSI

services

is

becoming

concerned with the number of students reporting they cannot get into their lockers because locks have already been placed on them.

while the second section includes changes to bylaws. The DSA wants to reduce the

“It’s usually a case of a student having misread the locker number

visor of security services A1 Hunter. To deal with the problem, securi-

ask-

number, of BOD members to 50 and they want to change majority voting from half plus one to two-

to approach their Whiteford said he might have to send forms to program co-

thirds of board members. They also want to change the written notice of upcoming meet-

ordinators to reach

ings to each voting

yet.”

He

said the proxy forms will be

sent out with

ing the

BOD

members

members

classes.

all

the students.

no vote the associawould have spent money on T-

In case of a

shirts,

the change.

the student

year students before Oct. 2. “We are not letting out of our

received 1,000 proxies approving

DSA

because dur-

week of August they would pass through the Sanctuary

tion

come

first

despite

change the association’s

bylaws.

said the first-year students

comment

attempts by Spoke

(Photo by Tracy Ford)

of this year’s first-year students during orientation week and

“It

of, operations for

sights second-

completed.

PAGE

name and amend

name

not as simple as filling out a form and sending it to the courthouse,”

Ultimate Frisbee new college sport.

Brad Whiteford, vice-president

association, signs his proxy form to

were approached

informed

9

for his

and advertisements were purchased before the mistake was identified and now the CSI logo appears all over campus but the “I don’t think

we needed

felt

where we want to be.” He said he feels the college must have a strong connection with the community and should promote not only student use but

change

decided that changing the name would be worthwhile for the future growth of the student association,” said Whiteford. T-shirts, student day planners

of student

was

a different leader to get us to

understanding could be approved by a vote of the members of the board of directors. A new lawyer was acquired to review the situation and she advised that the DSA must have the change approved by 51 per cent of the student membership which is made up of full-time stuthat

director

services. “It

day planners and the logo which would then be no longer valid.

BOD from

seven days to 14 days.

name change.

Whiteford.

first

it

were possible Whiteford

of the

Each section of the proxy is voted on separately which means a student can approve the bylaw changes without approving the

“We have taken a big risk by coming into this new school year by operating using CSI,” said If

member

make up

minds,” said Whiteford.

their

own

it,”

said super-

ty services has issued warnings all

on

the reported lockers. If the lock

not removed within a amount of time, the lock

is

sufficient is

cut and

removed. If any students have a problem getting into their lockers, they are to report to security services, is

which

located beside the cafeteria

well on Level 2 just inside Security

“I’m not telling anyone to vote yes or no. They have to look at the section and

and putting a lock on

would

4.

remind car doors and

like to

students to lock their

close their

stair-

Door

windows when parking

on campus as parking decals as well as other items can be stolen.


Page 2

— SPOKE, September

18,

2000

PRESENTATION Dress and conduct yourself professionally

Exude enthusiasm

WHO SHOULD A TTEND? Everyone should attend!

&

First,

second and third year students arc encouraged to attend

and self-confidence; be positive

PREPARATION Visit the Student

Employment

office for a

of

list

participating organizations

Research employer information available

Employment

Student

in

office and on the internet

Target potential employers Prepare a

list

of questions

ÂŁ<

Transportation!

opportunity for students and alumni to network with potential Employers opportunity to investigate and research career options

An event

to obtain information

ask employers

FREE

WHAT IS IT? An An

to

from employers on:

Career Opportunities

Job Requirements

Salary Expectations

Industry

Educational Requirements

Industry Trends

Corporate Culture

Skills

Leaves from Door #2

Leaves the Auditorium

am

9:30

Growth

1 1

:00

am

pm

10:30

am

12:00

:30

am

2:00

pm

3:30

pm

and Qualifications 1

1

1

:30

pm

iV

vVFree admission with

WGet

acquainted with over

Student/Alumni ID from sponsoring

250 North American

institutions

employers

(Conestoga College, Wilfrid Laurier,

U of Waterloo, U of Guelph)

AFree v^Learn about career

transportation throughout the

day

opportunities

^KITCHENER & Start your job search by networking

MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM

COMPLEX


SPOKE, September

—Page 3

2000

18,

Student applications

up 7.2%

at the college

There were 10,221 full-time applicants By

Petra Lampert

entrance standards. Leith said the majority of pro-

Applications

Conestoga

to

College have increased, according

done by the Ontario

to a report

College Application Service.

OCAS

687 more

reports

appli-

cants, resulting in a 7.2 per cent

increase, over last year in full-time

grams

Conestoga are full. have room in the general metal machinist program at Guelph and the general arts and science technology stream program at Doon,” she said. At present there are 14 spaces

“We

at

still

applications to Conestoga.

were

There

10,221

applicants this year,

9,534

full-time

compared

to

last year.

Jennifer Leith, associate registrar applicants to Conestoga

is

annual

surveys

of

Ontario’s 25 colleges that establish

benchmarks

in

excellence.

Conestoga has maintained a No.l

two years in a row. “Our reputation has been excellent for years,” Leith said. “Our No.l status is out there and people position overall

know

about

associate registrar

its

Key Performance

Indicators survey.

are

for

Jennifer Leith,

a result

of the college’s reputation and

KPIs

been excellent years.”

increase in

at the college, said the

ranking in the

“Our reputation has

She said Conestoga also has one of the highest academic

between 1996 and 1999. During the same time period training and development programs had 627 more applications, resulting in an increase of 500 per cent.

Leith said the large increase in applicants to these programs part because

is

in

Conestoga recognized

an increased demand

in

industry

and began offering more computer training programs for students. Many people from local industries and businesses come to Conestoga to take these programs. Training and development programs are less than a year in duration and include Web design spe-

remaining in the metal machinist program at Guelph and nine spaces

cialist,

and science technology stream program at Doon. Leith added traditionally the business programs fill reasonably

professional and

well.

development students at the college and over 30,000 registered part-time

in the general arts

The

college saw a 15 per cent

more

increase (2,537

full-time applicants

cent increase (403

it.”

year

this

students) in

and a 15 per

more

students)

Microsoft certified systems

engineer,

information technology

CNC

Leith said there are about 5,000 registered full-time and training and

students.

“Now our focus

will switch to our

January and February intakes,” said

in applications for continuing edu-

Leith.

“We have

programs

grams

that start then.”

cation

(part-time)

programmer

operator.

a number of pro-

coming a monitor near you

Virtual college Anita Fortes-Wilkinson, library technician, goes through the 1 ,500 books that will be free to students. (Photo by

LRC

some

Tammy

Somerville)

ment and

For students looking for a baron books, the Learning Resource Centre is giving away roughly 1,500 deletions. gain

six

.smmmmmMmmm.

Kostal

college,

ty in the future.

Larry Rechsteiner, Conestoga College’s director of planning,

book give-away

By Tammy Somerville

By Paul

A virtual college may be a reali

cleans house

with

to

of

computer

said

new five-year plan

col-

be a move towards the creation of an

stations.

Returning students might notice the database Newscan is missing

from the LRC. The Canadian

one of the goals for the

lege’s

data-

will

online college.

That would mean students would be able to take part, or all of their program on the Internet instead of

base consisting of 17 English lan-

attending traditional classrooms.

and some French language papers ended its year-long trial in March. Cathy

pick and choose through the mountain of hard and soft cover

Potvin, co-ordinator of information

texts available.

gram was not renewed because of

change would be gradual and would likely take many years to implement based on results of an environmental survey taken from students, faculty and administration last

the cost.

winter.

“The price was more than two times what we were quoted,” she

“We’ve found that most people still want a bricks and mortar building to come to,” he said, “but as children are more exposed to the

Monday,

Starting

Sept.

18 at 9

a.m., the centre will allow students to

They will be located in a room next to Roasters gourmet coffee shop.

The books

are either older

newspapers

guage

services for the

LRC,

says the pro-

editions, are obsolete or are donations that the LRC already has or

says.

has no use

student feedback during the

for.

Included in the treasure trove of publications are research, reference

books and a few how-tos. There are volumes on taxes, tax laws, tax tax

shelters,

rebates,

tax

deductions,

reductions

tax

and tax

write-offs.

Books on anything and everything you wanted to

know

know

or not

about physics and marketing

are also available.

In addition, there are plenty of

books for nursing students that deal ^'ith everything from the pharmacological aspects of nursing to surgical and psychiatric nursing. Space has been made in the LRC for an array of new books as well as

some new

audio-visual equip-

The

centre had been asking for trial

Rechsteiner

Internet at

said

younger ages,

but even though there was little, Potvin says the majority of it was

change.”

positive.

diate changes could

The

LRC

began using Proquest

on trial at the same time as Newscan. Although its trial period ended Dec. 1, the LRC has decided to continue using

Newscan

it.

except

It is

its

similar to

databases

index magazine articles on many different topics ranging from business, nursing to technical areas.

The

variety the system offers and

LRC budgeted for were reasons to keep Proquest. Another reason was that different databases can be added to it so staff and students will not have to learn the fact that the it

another system.

the

that could

Rechsteiner said the most imme-

be

in the

con-

tinuing education department of the

where individual courses

could be offered online. Kevin Mullan, Vice-president of finance and administration operations,agreed with Rechsteiner.

He

said the biggest gains in

implementation would immediately come from the continuing

he said. “The Internet may not meet some people’s needs. Some people still need contacts.” differ,”

Mullan foresees an online gram where certain parts of a

propro-

gram, or even parts of a single class are available to the student online.

The first step the college is taking new direction is letting the

in the

“We’ve found that most people still want a bricks and mortar building to

come

to.”

students telnet into the college’s

network from home using

their

existing Internet connections. This

should be available in the coming

months.

According

to

Mullan, the college

Larry Rechsteiner,

currently spends about $3 million a

director of planning

year on information technology, and that amount would increase dramatically to set up the neces-

education division of the college. Mullan said the creation of online courses

who want

would benefit those

to get a college educa-

tion but can’t

afford the

trans-

portation or time requirements of a

sary network to organize the online classes.

Rechsteiner stressed that the college

is

only starting the process of

creating an online college.

When

the

new

five-year strate-

completed

traditional class.

gic plan

Mullan also stressed that the college would never go completely

this

online.

ation of an online college

“Certain people’s learning styles

is

finally

later

year more concrete information will be available, but the cre-

many

years away, he said.

is still


Page 4

— SPOKE, September

2000

18,

Name change

offers

student input

little

to change its name Conestoga Students Incorporated because it now represents students at Waterloo and Guelph campuses as well as Doon. Full-time Conestoga students have to approve the name change by filling out proxy forms and sending them to the student association by Oct. 2. The DSA needs 51 per cent of the student membership, which includes all full-time students at Conestoga College, to agree with the change. This represents approximate-

The Doon Student Association has decided

to

ly

2,700 votes. also outlines changes to bylaws

The proxy form

which

stu-

dents are asked to approve.

The association has already collected one-third of the proxies from first-year students who were told to fill out their proxies at orientation and is

Students are not being asked on their choice of a

'renaming

to vote

new name

51 per cent from second- and third -

for the association,

year students. Students are not

being vote on their choice of a

new name

asked

to

New

for the association.

names including Conestoga Students Association, Federation of Conestoga Students and Conestoga Federation of Students were discussed at an open meeting of the DSA board of directors in March. Students who attended that meeting brought forward suggestions but the fact the association was choosing a new name was never

made known

to students through a story in

Spoke or ads

advertising the board of directors’ meeting that said the

name

TV

Reality Reality

beats sitcoms minded the demise of

ner Richard Hatch.

tele-

And

vision seems to

while In Style magazine and

Hollywood moneymakers make the public more of the Friends cast by

change was

to

be discussed. Letter-size posters were displayed students would have come forward with suggestions had they known about the meeting. Perhaps a contest to choose the new name, as was done with the name for the new FM-radio station, would have allowed the stu-

have

but perhaps

more

some among

harassed-over-

showcasing their lifestyles and make-up

dent body more participation in the process. Permitting the students to vote on their choice of name would also have allowed

paid celebrities

the era of pre-fabricated celebrities

social

and Hollywood

com

become involved in the process. The board of directors chose the name Conestoga Students Incorporated and the association is now asking student member-

students to

ship to rubber stamp

it.

Student involvement in piece of paper.

What happened happened to the

The

this

process

is

this process?

What

association asked first-year students, during orientation

week, to

out the proxy form loaded with legal jargon. The executive says students haven’t had too many concerns over fill

CSI the name change, but

the average first-year student

who, during

more concerned with OSAP and parking doesn’t really understand what the proxy is about.

orientation week,

desperately try to

the

think

paparazzi-

in

Hollywood.

It

seems some

stars figure that

decadent

maybe

tips,

stars are

coming

to

all

the hype

human

Reality television allows

At

the

may be

be argued that reality television

left in the dark.

Emmy awards on Sept.

10,

way

a couple of stars including the host

a

Garry Shandling, voiced their

script

dis-

dain and repulsion for the shows,

never quite saying why.

Perhaps they think there

is

a con-

spiracy brewing in the networks,

is

a

rather acute look at society today, in that the painfully contrived

on a sit-com just cannot.

Take

in

the less important they will be

and more

And

how

they are there for the students, they represent the students, and they are the student’s voice.

Asking the student membership to rubber stamp this name change in this manner makes those statements ring a little hollow.

more

may be

they

sit-

Survivor’s

homophobic navy

What

is

Rudy

seal

por-

duke

it

psychologi-

out for a million dol-

And

the public responded. With

went crazy

for reality television, in a

way

that

hum

most

drum world of scripted television. It made stars of ordinary people without expecting them to get breast

integrity,

decency and plain

In short,

it

was

the excrement that

rose to the top. Hatch’s corporate

castaways’

won

out over the other

summer-camp mentali-

implants

injections

In fact, the surviving four are a

foul-mouthed truck driver with a propensity to shoot things, a

And maybe Survivor.

It

is

is

what the shows like

stealing their stage

contrived

terribly

Garry

guide

Emmys,

Shandling

and has been accused of biting her

vision.

with the real

ex-partner’s nose almost off, and

ple like us

credit card fraud

who

master-

television

is

these days.

who

the corporate trainer

that

celebrities hate about

homo-

seal, a river

wanted for

lip

and allowing us a glimpse of how

ty of ‘let’s all get along.’

is

silicone

or

first.

on Friends, and the dull and ever emaciated cast cannot compete conniving and

any

massive ratings and water-cooler

phobic ex-navy

life

than

better

could.

lars? Certainly the tired plot twists

bulbous white ass of Survivor win-

and tribulations of

trials

has rarely happened for the

interesting than watching real all,

trayed the

one by one the castaways with the

strategizing

right. Reality

addictive.

is

people, warts and cally

to the point, perhaps their

television

association executive last year and again this year

to.

discussions, the public

Survivor where

point,

overly-inflated egos and salaries.

The student

could ever hope

homosexuality

could also

no concerns over the name change, presenting students with a fait accompli doesn’t really give students a say in the choice of

talk at length about

with

deals

issues better than any

episode of Will and Grace ever

It

Hatch.

for their association.

top.

television

voyeurs while taking away the

perhaps they think that the more

new name

Reality

peeping-tom stigma.

successful Big Brother,

less

of being

brilliance

popular reality television becomes,

the

be these days to be on

and

the

Returning students will be asked to sign their proxies following the board of directors’ meeting later this month. Despite the CSI executive’s assurances that the students have

passes, likely

cious and conniving a person has to

beings

humanity were weeded off by the ever-scheming villain Richard

is

It was a divide and conquer and it was an excellent look at how mali-

openly gay Hatch dealing with the

an end. with

but him-

and hoopla surrounding CBS’s enormously successful Survivor that they

involvement in choose?

to student

right to

merely a signature on a

other

ruffled

feathers

all

self.

said

at

Real people should not be on

worked

It

the

“I hate reality television. tele-

should be for special peo-

to

who have

trained and

appear to be real.”

SPOKE

is mainly funded from September to May by a payment from Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI), formerly called the

Spoke

Keeping Conestoga College connected

Doon Student

Association, in exchange for the insertion of

The views and opinions expressed in newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the CSI unless their advertisements contain the CSI logo. SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising advertising in the paper. this

SPOKE

is

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Tracy Ford;

Student Life Editor:

News

Julie Porter;

Editor: Petra Lampert

Photo Editor:

Tammy

out of errors in advertising beyond the

Somerville

Advertising Manager: Petra Lampert; Circulation Manager: Julie Porter Faculty Supervisor: Sharon Dietz; Faculty Adviser: Christina Jonas

SPOKE’s

address

Phone: 748-5220,

is

ext.

299 Doon Valley

Dr.,

Room

4B14, Kitchener, Ontario,

N2G 4M4.

691, 692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

amount paid

for the

space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor byi

9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or* rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect

or

MS

tain

Word

file

would be

Submissions must not con-

helpful.

any libellous statements and

may

illustration (such as a photograph).

be accompanied by an


*

SPOKE, September

This student

is

buying a

I#

18,

2000

—Page

5

car.

FHHBXtW

mwwmia

What’s

your card done

In fact, Get down of

Frosh

The

1, 2,

GM

Card® booth on campus and sign up. Just

3 and the 80’s CD*t

the purchase or lease of a

nua tn

Trade Mark te

80’s

of

General Motors Corporation,

TD Bank

CD at no charge. Applicants applying via

The GM Card

he’s just earned $1,000 to help him pay for

to

new

Upon

vehicle and

$10

hi n/ nrnrpri<=><; for

off

in

your next on-line purchase

instance. vou’ll aet

it

for applying, you’ll receive

approval, you’ll also receive $1,000

5%

in

GM

GM

at

the Internet

will

1

HMV.com. Then, whenever

Card Earnings™. And there

applicants applying in oarix. **AII mi w>ui»r> or TD IU Bank. Mark of raae Marx of Marks. * Trade *TD Bank and GM are licensed users ot applicant. The Best of Frosh 1 2, 3 and the 80 s CD upon approval, at no charge. Limit one copy per

receive a copy of

a free The Best

Card Earnings towards

person

licensed user.

for

for

The

GM

Card

at

s

no

on-campus booths

will

receive a copy of

I

,

'Applies to full-time students only. "Subject to

The

The Best

of

Prnnram GM Card Program

Frosh Rules Rules.


Page 6

— SPOKE, September

2000

18,

Students express reluctance to leave campus for food New shops

across street don’t pose threat to cafeteria

By Sanja Musa

McDonald’s

will not offer anything

that the school cafeterias

Opinion among Conestoga

stu-

new Tim

dents on the effect the

Hortons coffee shop and McDonald’s restaurant, which are being built across the street from the campus, is going to have on school cafeterias seems to be divided. Ten students surveyed on this issue predict the business will not significantly affect the school cafe-

“I will

ing

my

Lee Abbott, a and drinks here, closer and because

it’s

McDonald’s

Harvey’s,” she said.

when we have

thought there was one here on the

campus and I was really disappointed when I found there wasn’t,” said Colin Wood, a first-year computer programming student. “I think the

to

same choice Dulmage. “Especially, I wouldn’t go there in the mornings on the way to the the

inside the school,” said

school, because the drive-through

going to be packed with dents.

It’s

pop

easier to

grab a coffee.”

go down, but McDonald’s will not have that much of an effect on

change.

all

and

student,

Web

first-year-

also

thinks

site

said,

“I

management

student,

said will

have

their share

of business, but that

will

not affect

school cafeterias’

“It’s

while,” Mlanski, first-year a mechanical engineering student.

rate

much

in

New program

terms of their profits.”

women

to give

and evidence-based informa-

when

tion is important

it

trol

comes

as a hospital have a long

women

it anywhere these days, but Sunnybrook and Women’s

history of providing health infor-

sions.”

find

College Hospital wants to make sure that the information out there

from

is

accurate and available

reliable sources.

mation

for

women,

experts in the field

audience

through

A new web site, womenshealthlaunched Sept. 5, aims to provide comprehensive information on birth control and sexual health along with a wide range of health issues, including

menopause, cardiovascular health and nutrition. Sheryl Mitchell, director of diabetes, cancer,

the

Women’s Health Partnerships at Sunnybrook and Women’s College Hospital, said that accu-

greater responsibility

web

who may

The web

site is

find themselves,

which

birth

site also offers a sec-

on frequently asked questions and keeps up-to-date

is appropriate for them. “Sexual health and birth con-

students

to

ment and

familiarize

said

Mitchell,

hope students and

the

“one

I

general

public will use.”

one hour

this

year compared to

PASS

The

funded through the Learning Opportunities Task Force of the Ministry of Training, Colleges and

life...

m hetof

ow bout,

you could

ttooot,

SiOffMKto® in

yooV©

Canada

as to

many

tout trvos

btood ftvofy 56 day®

fetood avoty twtouto ot

avoty day

According

to

,

}

******

~

CAKtoBUN 1 1000 St# VlCtS Blood

you

to give.

saying

themselves.”

Academic requirements

for stu-

transi-

chances of acceptance into any program of study offered by the college are not

made

easier for

them. Prior to attending the

all

PASS

pro-

is

a

new component

make

each student had to be already accepted into a program of study at Conestoga College beginning in September 2000. Casey said he’d like people to understand that new ways to help students with learning disabilities

post-secondary education. The program is in its second year.

don’t lower the college’s standards

students

also

obtained and prac-

hands-on computer skills tised self-advocacy skills to increase awareness of what’s causing a block and to find effective ways around it easier than if they chose not to attend the PASS program. “Elementary data’s showing that students with writing disabilities,

who

are

working with

more successful than those with

similar disabilities

not to

Casey

work with said.

the

“That’s

pretty rudimentary statistics at this point,

Ifs in

because we’re subjectively it works, but because we have some data and research that is substantially based on the students

just

the transition from high school to

program,”

1

said.

gram,

who choose

!

Casey

dents with learning disabilities are not lower in any aspect and their

1

the four-year Learning

to

students

Fat elinte information, •*

Rick Casey,

usage,”

“Overall, we’re very pleased. Not

to

event, 24 participated through

us, are

call!

understanding of what services are

at

services, from 31 students who committed to attend the four-day

for example,

Ptoast? help by aivtog btood.

t,m#y '««•***» l & W

held

Conestoga College from July

The

Would y id fust

was

Universities,

specific learning disabilities

someone’s As & btood

last year.

1 1

program,

Opportunities Project, a pilot proj-

could save

the stu-

program

ect designed to help students with

of your time

PASS from

dents shows they have increased

Twenty-four students have approached special needs services

four days.

you knew

“If nothing else, the overall eval-

uation of the

offered and increased sense of the

The program

I

them with the them was held

tion counsellor with special needs

are a Canadian resource

evaluation.

in July.

added

M

college environ-

the

The students were also asked to complete a pre- and post-program

accommodate

fields.

focus,”

method

to

July 4.

“We

control

program

after a

accounts of news surrounding developments in health related

for the first time, in a position of

deciding

their

tion

especially useful for college stu-

dents

in

partner’s reproductive choices.

from dubious sources.

Conestoga’s special needs services has doubled its intake of students with learning disabilities,

services available to

has expertise in the field of women’s health, but it hopes that men also access the site and take

Because women often look for information on the Internet about their health, it is important that the information does not come Mitchell said the

can make informed deci-

pital

Internet,” said Mitchell.

matters.ca,

think

The web site is geared to women’s health because the hos-

we could reach a much

health felt larger

and as of women’s

We

important that

incredibly

is

it

get the keener picture what hap-

pens in the process.”

are very important issues for

to health issues.

breaks

students’ learning barriers By Sanja Musa

college-level students.

Students looking for information on sex and sexual health can

“We

(Photo by Petra Lampert)

especially with the

wants

Julie Porter

Kitchener, places

going to be more convenient, new gas station close by,” he said. “But, I don’t think our cafeterias will suffer that

a

accurate sexual health info By

from Wakenhut Ltd., a security company in a warning on a car while patrolling Lot 8 by the student/client services building on Sept. 7. The previous day he issued approximately 100 warnings.

Clint Tennant,

sales.

Mike Mlanski welcomes

Still,

third-year business

student,

McDonald’s and Tim Hortons

is

the stu-

in here

Tim

Preet Kochar, a third-year busi-

ness

“Stuff here gets boring after a

Karen Muhlbock, a nursing

we

“I don’t think I’ll go out to purchase food and beverages so far

coffee sales in school cafeterias will

Harvey’s.”

kind

opinion

similar

at

But I might go to McDonald’s every now and then.” The most impact the competition could have on school cafeterias would be during hours when people are coming to school or returning home, according to Abbott. “A lot of people have enough time to go out for lunch anyway,” said Mike Pangman, a first-year materials management student. “Yes, I’ll go too, but I don’t think it’ll make business in here suffer too much.”

Jonathan Dulmage, a first-year engineering student, a

buy

coffee.

electronic

the college. I

“It’s just

to

wouldn’t go over there just for a

as

of a hassle to go over there when can find everything here.”

shares

stuff.

same

the

is

Muhlbock’s.

Tim Hortons’

management

food

because

go

Hortons and McDonald’s.”

probably just keep on buy-

Another seven students predicted Tim Hortons and McDonald’s would affect cafeteria business at like

said. “I’ll definitely

have not

offered yet.

terias.

“I

Ticketed

because

we now have

to

track the next group of students to

in

any way. “All the students with learning

must have a level of competency and admission established in the college as any other student. How they get there is what makes a difference,” he said. disabilities

He

also said that a majority of

students don’t want to water

down

the worth of their diplomas.

They

want to meet the same standards as any other student. “If their diplomas were not the same quality and their cours as demanding as anyone else’s, then we would be robbing our students of their independence.

would be Casey said. that

And

the worst of all,”


SPOKE, September

18,

2000

— Page 7

CSI gives away 1,200 burgers at party By Dwight

Irwin

Members of

the student associa-

and board of direcwere not the only ones flipping

tion executive

Over 1,200 Conestoga students were fed and watered at CSI’s annual Pond Party, on Wednesday,

burgers.

Sept. 6.

vice-president

Tracy Evans, vice-president of life, with the Doon Students Association acting as Conestoga Students Inc., said 1,200 burgers purchased for the Pond Party were sold out by 2 p.m.

administration operations, Kevin Mullan and other Conestoga employees helped serve the hungry

student

“We

had

“We had

great

attendance, and everybody had a good time,” the

agement

good

the

great

first

well attended.

The

Sanctuary was full when comedian Rick Bronson entertained

the

crowd,

on

Thursday, Sept.

“He

are.

week of

school were also

vice-president of CSI

said.

To help

events held during

Tracy Evans,

know who we

people

Evans said the other orientation

time.”

studies

The purpose of the Pond Party is to “let

students.

everybody had a

student said.

Evans

College president John Tibbits, of finance and

attendance, and

man-

second-year

tors

7.

up the audience, but they loved it,” Evans cut

said.

some of the cost of alcohol was served at the

alcohol sales, Evans said students

Casino Day, on Tuesday, Sept. 5, gave gamblers a chance to win big at blackjack and roulette. Each student was given 10 chips and when finished gambling, they redeemed

went through “a

them

offset

the event,

Pond

Although not sure how

Party.

much money was lot

raised through

of beer.”

Cliff

Condor

the

welcomes back Rebecca Carley and Becky Olsen, both second-year law and and Sarah Walters, a first-year early education student, during the CSI’s pond The CSI gave away 1 ,200 burgers to hungry students during the three-hour party.

(left)

security students,

party on Sept. 6.

for prizes.

(Photo by Dwight Irwin)

Parking problems minimal By Michelle Goring Parking has always been an issue

Conestoga College, but thanks to newly built parking lot, this year began without any major for

the college’s

And Parking Lot 2 has been changed to annual because drivers using lots 2 and 10 (which were interchangeable) were overflowing Lot 2 because it was closer to the

Parking Lot 1 2 during the first week, had a problem with a number of stu-

school.

dents

“Thanks

to

the

year,

we came

“Thanks

360 additional 1

this

year as

to

360

“I

additional parking

many

parking

in

this year,

lot

we came

drive around me.

everyone.”

Students

security supervisor

of the parking lot designations.

This means a student must have

which had previous-

purchased an annual pass to be allowed to park in either Lot 2 or Lot 3. Parking Lot 1 is designated

Survival

week

By Derek Lester Conestoga College students at will get the chance

Doon campus to

participate

week

in

a

new theme

September. This is the first year for College Survival Week at Conestoga. The College Survival Week was created because every month has some type of awareness week except September, so the Doon Student Association acting as Conestoga Students Inc. decided September should have one as

Doon

hits

Some even tried to

drive through me.”

There was some confusion, however, due to changes made in some 3,

said.

people got really angry and tried to

Al Hunter,

been designated as daily parking, has been changed to annual parking.

Macy

they could park for the day. Other

accommodating

students are taking

ly

had a lot of students trying to get

“Most people were pretty good about it and I just told them where

very close to

the bus rather than driving.

Parking Lot

stationed at the entrance of

ing pass,”

spaces 1

Amanda Macy,

Security guard

who was

into this lot without the proper park-

very close to accom-

modating everyone,” said supervisor of security services A1 Hunter. “It was a fairly normal start-up.” New Bus Route 61 from Cambridge has also helped to keep the parking situation under control this

semester and daily parking.

who did not understand the parking lot designations.

problems.

parking spaces in Parking Lot

Trimming away

planned to inform students on issues to be aware of. The week’s activities are also planned to allow students to have some fun.

who

hold a parking pass

for Parking Lot 3

may have been

confused by the presence of parking

machines in the lot. The machines from Parking Lot 1, which were placed in Parking Lot 3 temporarily, have since been returned.

Barry Gurski, from physical resources does pruning behind the student/cllent services building on Sept. 8.

for first time voted out of the hour,” said

Ramy

game every Michael, CSI

vice-president of student affairs.

A

money management theme

voted out of the

be held on Tuesday. Wednesday will have a sexually transmitted disease awareness theme, and Thursday will have a date rape awareness theme. Friday will consist of a movie or

game

some other fun

“It will

be

will

similar to

this

the television show,

except people

will

be

every hour.” Ramy Micheal, CSI vice-president

activity.

More information will be posted on the CSI Web site.

During the College Survival Week, which runs from Monday,

is

Other theme weeks planned for year include Drug and Alcohol Awareness Week in October, Eating Disorders

planned.

Sept. 18 to Friday, Sept. 22, a different activity or awareness is

be similar to the television show, except people will be

Awareness Week in November and Sleep Deprivation and Exam Prep Week in December.

of student affairs

well.

On Monday

a survivor

“It will

life is short, (ret

aw

Live longer with daily physical activity, healthy eating

game

(Photo by Petra Lamport)

this

extension and following your doctor’s advice

4

pafmapsmmi 3mm W, www,jj©rieipecM .com

com

i O-

wmmm

MM :


8

Page 8

— SPOKE, September

18,

2000

Pool shark

Group tackles debts By Tracy Ford The average student loan debt of Canadian student graduating this year will be over $19,000, according to the Canadian Alliance of Student Associations, a group of 1 student associations which try to bring post-secondary students’ a

association

was formed

in

response to the need for students to be legitimately represented to fed-

and inter-provincial levels of government.

eral

CASA

announced

transfer after the government’s cut-

decision to augment the tax deduc-

backs to core funding to post-sec-

tion

$500 to $3,000. Accbrding to CASA a child born this year will end up with a $100,000 debt if tuition keeps rising at the rate that

available

to

“Our American

Canada

student leaders from

across the country meet in Ottawa to

speak with cabinet ministers, opposition critics, MP’s and education Kissel said the

sector stakeholders.

meeting will be the biggest grassroots student lobbying event of the year.

more than doubled

adding in some Kissel provinces tuition has tripled since 1990.

said

association,

which

1995, has already

CASA

Kissel,

national director

said

ondary education institutions will continue to rise,” he said. CASA recommends the govern-

ment supply an infusion of funding and colleges to repair and upgrade campus infra-

made

a large

Kisel.

CASA

was

Kissel said schools need

$1.2 million urgently. association also wants the fed-

government

to help

minimize

“Quite simply, there time than

now

is

no better

for the federal gov-

more

to take

steps towards

American counterparts spend over $300 more per student than government in Canada does,”

creating a student loan program,”

he

Canadian students with the legacy of an unmanageable debt loan.” Kissel said the government needs to

“Our

said.

In 1993,

Ottawa spent $143 per

student on post-secondary educa-

Washington spent $360 and the gap increased by 1998 when Canada spent $144 for each student while Washington con-

tion while

tributed

To

$500 per

tackle

the

problem

CASA

education system.

The association wants

the feder-

government to start rebuilding campus infrastructure and restoring the Canadian health and social al

“A program

said Kissel.

accessible to

commit

all

that

is

and does not leave

to instituting interest rates of

Prime +2 per cent for a fixed rate student loan. He said the government also needs to

service

student.

compiled a list of concerns postsecondary students have with the

started in

impact on the federal education policy,

cost of repairing Canada’s post-sec-

student debt.

Mark

from coast to coast since 1990,”

The

“If urgent infrastructure issues are

not addressed in the near future, the

ernment

holding a national campaign con-

“Tuition has

tion,” said Kissel.

The

does.”

students

CASA is

decreased government

support for post-secondary educa-

structure.

with real

Oct. 30 to Nov. 4

ference where

in the face of

over $300 more per student than the

solutions,” he said.

'

“The cost of delivering an education to students is constantly rising

to allow universities

in

stretched

institutions

resources thinly.

eral

forefront of the federal agenda.

From

ondary

counterparts spend

government

ondary education concerns to the about real

compared

Canadians.

year’s strategy will bring post-sec-

is

more

cation

ciation’s national director, said this

“CASA

has over the

United States, the Canadian government isn’t doing its fair share to make post-secondary edu-

campaign to fight rising tuition costs and student indebtedness on Sept. 1 and Mark Kissel, the asso-

tackling real problems

it

past decade. Kissel said

year’s

this

scholarships from

for

limit

to the

concerns to political leaders.

The

instrumental in the government’s

commit

A

night of fun to stop

and

drinking

to selecting a

bureau that has a proven

By Paul Kostal

Michael

track record ana the infrastructure

available to provide students with

and effective service, clear communication, a genuine interest in helping students and a commitment to administer the new federal government direct lending efficient

student loan program.

was supposed to be a fun night welcome new and returning stu-

It

to

dents to Conestoga College.

“There will usually be one pub month,” said Ramy a

night

pulled into an adjacent parking

Association acting as Conestoga Students Inc. “This is our first of

confusion came

was supposed

It

be a night to

to

and help stop

this to try

a

C

was supposed

Zs rjrir LAr>f»-

%

1

'

Physical Actii/ity Guide

j

the col-

is

other

said.

you nuts dirt

if the dirty

dishes are

still

in the sink the next

drive

morning? Or do you have a “high

end of September? tolerance” that will have your roommate gnashing her teeth by the

Some

areas to discuss include:

space: private versus

but Living with a roommate isn’t all about rules and compromises, nerves. other s each set guidelines now, before you start getting on

A

Message from Student Services

(Room 2B02)

be

much

easier to

to pick

up the

scheduled.

Michael said he ran the buses

last

year and never saw anything like

Thursday night was also Wilfrid pub night. And the Laurier students had already filled the bar and lined up outside the

Waterloo and Guelph campuses, buses were not contracted to pick up and deliver students from either

Laurier’s

here to meet them,

Thompson, a student. “They

LASA

away.” According to Michael, when the buses arrived at the Waterlbo bar,

began exiting the bus, even though they were told they were on their own as far as entry into the bar was concerned if they students

left

Doon

counterparts in an organ-

However, because

location, said Michael.

Whether or not the

bar.

first-year

it’ll

The buses returned

students at midnight and at 2 a.m. as

of lack of interest from both the

just drove

guest policy

Loose Change

door.

Waterloo

the bus,” said Keri

food costs: shared? designated fridge space? quiet hours for morning, study time and at night

the road from

Louie’s.

ized social event.

at the

and then they never even got off

areas

to a

their

they arrived

“We drove

common

go

and made arrangements with the bus to be dropped off and picked up at Philthy McNasty’s, just

extending metres outside the front

just that

from the colresidence carrying around 100 left

bar,

it

students decided to

into

dreds of university students already

when

can you ease the transition from family life to living with a roommate? does One way to avoid conflicts is to establish some ground rules. For instance,

Some

let

Loose Change Louie’s, they were greeted by a lineup of hun-

lege’s

Two buses

college students around 9 p.m. but

how

stayed on the bus was

what happened on Sept. 9. Because the student association now represents students from Guelph and Waterloo campuses as well as Doon, Thursday’s pub night was to mark the first time students from the satellite campuses joined

more complicated than

though.

different from living Sharing living space with a stranger, or even a friend, can be quite shower or where to keep with your family. Things as simple as how long you stay in the to living together. So used aren’t who the potato chips can cause tensions between people

who

down CSI is campuses,”

the first year that

‘There is a bus leaving from the Waterloo and the Guelph campus.” Thursday, Sept. 9 ended up being a lot

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: Roommates

to be the start of

lege’s campuses.

Michael

rM

;

in.

“The buses were never sent home,” he said. Mike Harris, student vice-presi-

different bar

new relationship between

representing i

lot,

where the

the bar through a side door.

“This

r

is

dent of academics, said everyone

It

it

Michael,

that, said

“There are two buses leaving from the residence at 9,” Michael said.

“We do

Get

and

help stop drinking and driving.

drinking and driving.”

How often ?

and

wristbands

said

stamps were then given to the students who remained on the buses. Students who attempted to get back on the buses were denied access. The buses, in order to avoid a traffic ticket for obstructing the road then

Michael, vice-president of student for the Doon Student affairs

the year.”

driving

the bus.

puses will take part

ment

activities

in

satellite

cam-

in entertain-

the

future

remains to be seen, said Michael. Representatives from those campuses were more concerned about

academic

representation

social events

student

tha^

when they asked

association

to

represent

them, he said

The next bus

trip

was scheduled

Thursday, Sept. 9 to Fiddler’s Green, a bar in Cambridge. for


SPOKE, September

18,

2000

— Page 9

The Watcher not worth watching Latest

Keanu Reeves movie

By Petra Lampert

game of

The Watcher, directed by Joe Charbanic and released by Universal Pictures, hit movie the-

on Sept. 8. Although the film and rated AA, it’s about

atres

a

is

cat and mouse with Campbell. Before each murder the killer taunts Campbell by sending a photograph of his next victim and dares Campell to find her before he

beating pulse. The story line

is

weak and

to

strikes again.

dictable.

thriller

to see on on video. After the second murder one feels as though remaining in the theatre to watch the end of the film would be a huge waste of time. And it is.

After years of pursuing killers in

The only

start over.

film

Unfortunately his hopes of leadare

life

resume.

The cunning and deviant Griffin, has managed to elude the agent for years in Los Angeles,

who

once again begins playing a deadly

is

finally

highlight in the entire

a chase scene

comer

Marisa Tomei plays Polly, a psy-

who

chologist

help a shell-

tries to

when

is

about as exciting

as watching grass

grow and

good throughout the

save Polly.

despite the fact that he

The Watcher ing,

not worth watch-

by anyone with a

least

at

is

will

leave audiences wishing they had

shocked Campbell get back on his but ends up being one of Griffin’s victims. Campbell must play Griffin’s game if he hopes to feet,

police

Griffin.

The Watcher

thwarted

David Allen Griffin, played by Keanu Reeves, follows him from Los Angeles to Chicago and the gruesome killings killer

serial

boring and

is

money

the big screen or even

Los Angeles, Campbell is burned out and moves to Chicago in an

when

much

thrills

be desired. The characters are shallow and underdeveloped, and the ending is disappointingly pre-

not worth paying

James Spader plays traumatized FBI agent Joel Campbell who has gone into hiding.

ing a peaceful

the plot leaves

Overall this film

as thrilling as a trip to the dentist.

attempt to

deliver spine-chilling

fails to

stayed home.

The one

star rating is for

who amazingly manages

Reeves to look

entire film is

portray-

Keanu Reeves

ing a demented and haunted psy-

terrorizes Marisa

Tomei

chopath.

in

The Watcher.

(Universal Pictures Internet photo)

YukYuk’s club

groups and Workshops schedule

Kitchener delivers big laughs

Fall Semester 2000

in

Gay / Lesbian/ Bisexual/ Transgendered Discussion

By Jody Andruszkiewlcz

trips to

Lennox Lewis

fight, the

Mark

comediBreslin’s

masturbation to women.

“I’m never going to be a PG comic,” Collins said in an interview after the show. “I want people at the show who won't be

Yuk Yuk’s at the Walper Pub in downtown Kitchener are really

offended.”

something to laugh

sonal experiences, and there's always an element of truth in his

And

laughter

is

at.

the one thing in

abundance in the 140-seat room, which features pictures of all the performers that have graced the stage in the world’s largest

dy

come-

He

act.

also said he relies on per-

fortable with his act than

“I’m not a one-liner comic. I bringing people into my

world.”

and at one point, they expanded from London to

and-talk-to-the-crowd Collins,

Hawaii.

as his idol,

The Kitchener

location,

one of

14 located across Canada,

opened in 1985 at the Conestoga Inn and operated at the same location until its move to the Walper Pub on Feb. 4 this year. Over the years, Yuk Yuk’s has opened its doors for Canadian comedians Howie Mandel, Jim Carrey, Norm MacDonald and Mike Bullard as well as American comedians Jerry Seinfeld and Roseanne Barr. On Saturday, Sept. 9, comedians Sean Collins and Chris Quigley brought their talents to the stage, eliciting raucous laughter

a native

of Carleton

opened the show and quickly had the audience laughPlace,

ing at his acidic wit in dealing

34-year-old Collins, nomi-

nated for the 1999 Canadian Club

Comic of

Week

of Oct. 2

Relaxation Group

Week

of Oct. 9

Public Speaking Anxiety Group

Week

of Oct. 23

Test Anxiety Group

Week

of Oct. 30

Week

of Nov. 6

Suicide Prevention

the Year, wasted

little

time in dealing with topics rang-

Group

Workshop

Stress

Management Workshop

his laid back, sit-down-

who

style,

Richard Pryor easily accomplishes cites

Study

Skills

Workshops

the task of bringing people into his world.

After Collins

left

the

left off,

keeping the

stitches.

But where

predecessor

crowd

in

Collins

is

laid back, the 27-year-

old Quigley

is

Oct. 2

11:30-12:30

3A621

Listening and Note-taking

Oct. 16

12:30-1:30

3A616

Multiple Choice Tests

Oct. 25

12:30-1:30

Oct. 30

12:30-1:30

3A621 3A616

Effective Textbook Reading

Nov. 6

12:30-1:30

3A616

Multiple Choice Tests

Nov. 15

11:30-12:30

3A616

Dec. 4

12:30-1:30

Dec. 6

12:30-1:30

3A616 3A621

anything but.

Relying on sight gags in his act, the Oakville native dealt with subjects ranging from strip clubs to eating out to Dr. Seuss. Saying his act has gotten better over the past seven years, Quigley also said he

Time Management stage,

Quigley picked up where his

keeps practising.

“None of the jokes are ever comThe work is never done.”

Preparing for Final

plete.

while he didn’t have to contend with the heckler Collins did, Quigley said he tries not to talk to them.

“Each heckler

is

pretty

the same. There are not too

a heckler.

^Pne

With

of Oct. 2

And

from the crowd.

Collins,

when he

started nine years ago.

Mark Breslin opened Yuk Yuk’s comedy club in Toronto in 1978 for $50,000,

Week

Multicultural Support

more com-

Collins said he’s

like

chain.

the

& Networking Group

ing from drug use during camping

Funnier than a Scary Movie, and delivering more jabs than a ans that frequent

TBA

much many

original hecklers.”

on Fridays at 8:30 10 p.m. on Saturdays. Admission is $12.

Shows

start

p.m. and

at

8 and

Exams

Please inquire about and sign up at least one week in advance for the above groups or

workshops

in Student Services,

Room 2B02.


Creating artistic funk Local group

audience with sounds

thrills

Piggot,

By Jody Andruszkiewicz

who

left

work on a cargo

ship to join the band, said he has

when when he’s

parts for the band.

Starchuck added staying motivated about moving around to dif-

Sept. 6.

played

group

Kitchener-based selections

from

ferent venues without getting

their

apart and

upcoming six-song EP, scheduled to be ready on CD by the end of

band Hardden Creek

fell

23-year-old bassist

Liam

October, and other original works,

and 23-year-old guitarist-vocalist Ian Starchuck were added to round out the new band.

plus

some covers

for the

25 people

at the concert.

30 minutes behind schedule, the band quickly set up. Ready for their 90-minute set, they began to jam and generally play around with sounds for the now-

Pigott

Arriving

captive audience. live

together, played with intensity

and

displayed ingenuity and creativity in evoking a wide variety of sounds from their instruments leaving the audience completely focused on '

those standing onstage.

And

this stellar effort did

Opus Creo played with intensity

not go

and

displayed ingenuity

and

Opus Creo, whose members

creativity in

envoking a wide variety of

sounds

let

loose with brilliant and vibrant guitar

work, vocals and drumming.

Opus Creo was formed when Chris drummer 25-year-old Pachereva and 25-year-old guitarist-vocalist

Brandy Miller’s

life,

place

Opus Creo has ever played

to

God

is

dying from Huntington

an inherited brain disorder

asked us to leave after one set.” Even though the band was paid in full after their one set, the night started off on the wrong foot. The group realized they had left mucy-needed equipment at home and had to spend over $100 to

mind. ..her body.. .her soul.

it.

It’s

that is slowly chipping

away

they develop the disease, then their

if

may

before

it

disease

take 10, 15

may not go

And

Just like

with

odds.

gift

of

my life.

mother,

I

What have

wanted

to give

done instead?

1

years

But there

even then, the

to the grave

fifty-fifty

her

at

- even 25 -

finally kills her.

same

children face those

the It

not true."

it's

her.

is

hope Recent research

breakthroughs have brought us closer than ever to finding a cure.

You

see,

once you develop Huntington

disease, there’s a

will pass the

With your support, we

50 percent chance you

gene responsible for

And

Huntington’s along to your children.

disease once

and

for

all.

will beat this

Please call the

Huntington Society of Canada today.

We need your help

over 500 bikers were in attendance. “We had to hold off on the rap.”

when their selfCD, recorded at Small Dog

Starchuck said

four attended Cameron Heights high school in Kitchener All

from 1991 - 96. According to Miller, “doing what you want, when you want, is

The money

mother

was Cagney’s in Hamilton. “It was a total hick bar. They

titled

the best part.

My

disease.

an orphanage run by the biker gang Satan’s Choice. Miller estimated

onstage.

hope

"I

Miller said the worst

band

completely focused

applause between songs but the audience saved their loudest ovation

band

is

Starchuck said their most exotic gig was playing a benefit party for

on those standing

the

com-

one spot for too long

another challenge for the band. In addition to the hardships of

replace

The band received loud cheers and

when

fortable in

from their instruments leaving the audience

unnoticed by those in attendance.

for the last song,

not.

Pachereva said packing and unpacking are one of the hardest

brand of alternative funk rock in the Mecca, at the Walper Pub, on

The

he’s working and even

fun

Opus Creo, Latin for “to create a work of art”, artfully displayed their talents with their homegrown

is totally

a bonus.”

Studios in Kitchener,

is

Huntington Society of

released,

Canada

HUNTINGTON Canada

1

they want to go right back into the

Society Huntington du

studio to begin recording again.

Opus Creo can be found Thursday nights playing at the Circus Room on King street in downtown

-

9 9 8

Charitable Registration

-

7 3

Number 11896 5516 RR0001

Kitchener.

Now

just $ 9.95 for installation. And

to round out your

education even more,

we've got a great offer

on Rogers™ @Home®, The Internet on Cable. Call

SOME THINGS YOU CAN ONLY LEARN ON CABLE.

1-888-ROGERS1

ROGERS CABLE

connection/relocation fees extra. This offer cannot be combined Valid student identification required. PST/GST and logo are trademarks of At Home and the with any other promotion. Offer expires October 31, 2000

©Home

Corporation and

may be

registered in certain jurisdictions

™Rogers

is

@

a trademark of Rogers Communications Inc


SPOKE, September

18,

2000

— Page 11

Get ‘ultimate’ with frisbee sport New By Dwight

Irwin

game of

This

Frisbee doesn’t

belong on the beach. Ultimate Frisbee

new co-ed

Each game, which is played in two 20-minute halves, starts with a coin flip for possession. One team starts

Conestoga College.

year’s

this

is

intramural

sport

at

“We

We

opposing

said.

enough people

(for touch

football).

thought we’d give Ultimate

Frisbee a try,” Conestoga College athletic co-ordinator

is

so

much

better.

You throw teams on a field, say, ‘Here’s a Frisbee’, make sure somebody has a stopwatch and go

Each game

I

One team

Frisbee cannot run with the disc.

ing

to a

teammate,

who runs around the

field to get open. is

on defence

block or intercept pass-

tries to

it

who

team,

There are no

Teams

The defence counts down

the 10

opposon

starts

officials.

are responsible for

calling their

es.

end zone

to the

offence. I

The opposing team

in

starts with the

their

in

the

to pass

played

is

two 20-minute halves.

The person has 10 seconds

and

game

I

and throws

Marlene Ford

said.

Frisbee facts

Frisbee

The person who catches

didn’t have

“This

to the

it

who starts on offence. “It’s much like a kick-off,” Ford

team,

schedule.

flies

with the Frisbee in their end

zone and throws

replaces

It

touch football on the intramural

showing up

game

co-ed intramural

own

fouls

and

out of bounds.

‘one-steamboat,

seconds, in the

A

two-steamboat’ fashion.

team can have

as

many

play-

out and play,” she added, referring

The offensive team keeps pos-

the extras required for touch

session until the Frisbee is dropped, intercepted, or thrown

team members can be on the field at one time .Substitutions can only

out of bounds, or until a touch-

be made after a score or an injury. Ford is hoping there will be four to eight teams sign up for Ultimate

to

football,

and

like

first-down markers

officials.

Ultimate Frisbee, which

is

a cross

between Frisbee and football, is a non-contact sport where two teams try to score on each other. Players throw the Frisbee to teammates and try to work it down the field to the other team’s end zone.

One

point

is

received for

each ‘touchdown.’ “You get a good workout playing Ultimate Frisbee,” Ford said. “There is a lot of running and jumping. It takes athleticism, but it’s

also a laid-back sport.”

down

scored.

is

Possession then changes hands, and the other team starts from where the disc hit the ground or went out of bounds. There are no officials. Teams are responsible for calling their fouls and

when

own

the Frisbee goes

out of bounds.

ers

as

it

Frisbee. It will run for five or six weeks, depending on the weather. There will be one game a week, and it will be played behind the

tennis courts,

Games

and for their team’s behavior. If the teams don’t agree on a call, instead of arguing, it will be replayed,” Ford said.

Sept. 18.

Baseball

which are next

to the

recreation centre.

captains are responsible

“Team

fouls

for calling

wants, but only seven

start

tonight,

Monday,

Playoffs will be held to deter-

mine the Ultimate Frisbee champion at the end of the season.

Marlene Ford, athletic co-ordinator at Conestoga College, is excited about this year’s new intramural sport, Ultimate Frisbee. The sport is a cross between football and Frisbee. Games start (Photo by Dwight Irwin) Monday, Sept. 18 .

back

is

But college’s women’s softball team

desperate need of new pitchers

in

By Trevor

Hilker

workload

heavy

and

jobs

at

school.

The Conestoga women’s

softball

This has been an unusual year for

a pitcher.

losing players, however. Keirstead

The only legitimate pitcher they

said players will always be lost to

have couldn’t make it two games because

graduation, but not usually to part-

team’s biggest need

is

to the first

she

was

time jobs.

wedding so new head coach Mitch Keirstead told the players any player was welcome

try-outs), but

to pitch.

season,” Keirstead said, “Our short

attending a

“We

should be thinking of win-

ning, but without pitching

it

will

be

“I

had an

infield in

when some

girls

had

He added most of the players who are trying to pitch now could

to short stop.”

her

first

before and had a

good season,” he

to

change

it

couldn’t play this

to

Only three players are returning from last season, including outLindsay Harrison, outfieldKnox and first baseman Lori Walden. Keirstead said he would have to

fielder

er Korri

use

season.

“Leigh Marostega learned on the job last season. She never pitched

mind (before

summer and can’t play, so move the second baseman

I

when they were 10 or 11. Once in a while a player can become an effective pitcher during

had

stop from last season changed jobs

over the

hard,” said Keirstead.

have been effective pitchers if they had started throwing like a pitcher

I

Knox

as catcher for the first

few games because they

are

in

need of a catcher. Keirstead said the team’s offence

but the ques-

said.

and defence

Marostega lost the first four games of last season and won the last six. She is now an assistant

tion

coach for Conestoga. Conestoga had only 13 of the 16 players Keirstead wanted going into the season opener against Cambrian. Keirstead wanted 16

the team’s schedule because of the

ers

»

at

each game, but

may some

ind

the

ers

only want to play part

full

roster

if

time.

The unfortunate

is fine,

will they survive without

is

pitching?

Keirstead

is

not impressed with

four road games to start the season.

“This

is

a rotten schedule,” he

Conestoga played a game on Sept. 8 and 9 against Cambrian and will have a game in North Bay against Canador on the 15th and 16th.

part about this

league, Keirstead said, is that they lose a lot of potential players to

www.beatgoeson.com

said.

Their

does

385 FAIRWAY ROAD

W, KITCHENER FOOD BASICS PLAZA

S.,

KITCHENER CANADIAN TIRE PLAZA

402 KING STREET N., WATERLOO BETWEEN HARVEYS & BURGER KING

first

not

against

home game, however, come until Sept. 19

370 HIGHLAND ROAD

Mohawk

at

4:30 p.m.

415 HESPELER ROAD, CAMBRIDOE ACROSS FROM MCDONALD'S

744-1011 893-2464 884-7376 622-7774


4

Page 12

— SPOKE, September

18,

2000

Big things expected from soccer rookies By Derek Lester

be a rebuilding season,”

“It will

This is DenHaan ’s first year as the women’s soccer coach, so she is not

Sept. 6,

too sure of what to expect this sea-

The

teams to have good seasons

son.

Rookies will have to step up

in

this

DenHaan played

year.

Geoff Johnstone, coach of the men’s soccer team, said he has only eight returning

players this year,

"while the women’s

soccer coach,

Stephanie DenHaan, said there are only three returning players this year

soccer

who

Johnstone,

women’s team

coached

said the team’s

strong point will

probably be their defence.

first

session of

intramural sports at Conestoga College will keep students’ hearts

Marlene Ford,

the time to

athletic co-ordina-

Conestoga, said she hopes programs will be well received

this

week, said DenHaan. will be cut to 18

players from over

40 players who

have come out. The team has been strong the

by

out,

is

game

of

and meet other people interested

in

the time to go out, have a fun

basketball

the sport.” Marlene Ford,

intramural sports

pickup basketball, which is being and Monday every .--held Wednesday, from 11:30 a.m. to

athletic co-ordinator

is

1:30 p.m., in the

gymnasium,

at the

recreation centre. Student participa-

is

team

is

This has a

is

happy with the coming together and

also

lot

of

talent,

will

The men’s regular season started Wednesday, Sept. 13 in London against Fanshawe. They lost 2-1. Johnstone has coached the men’s varsity soccer team for the past 28 years.

a young team, but everyone

hopes the team last

middle of October. For people more comfortable on the hard court than the diamond, a tennis tournament will be held on

students.

One of the new

the

gelling so quickly.

The men’s team

tor for

new

way

Anybody who wants to play can show up,” Ford said.

just

A

co-ed slo-pitch league, starts Monday, Sept. 18 and runs

today,

Canada

Tuesday, Sept. 19,

at the college’s

tennis courts.

Sign-up sheets for the tournament are posted around the college, the

and he said he have a good sea-

son.

His teams have won 23 Ontario medals during his time as coach, and he would like to see this talented team win one as well.

active

CSI office and the recreation centre. will either be a single or doubleknockout tournament, depending on the number of registrants. It

an extramural men’s fastball team,

Which

Fly

higher

will face other colleges in a

tournament, on Friday, Oct.

6.

The

tournament is being held at Conestoga College. Try-outs began on Sept. 14 and will continue on Sept. 20 and 26, at at Diamond 3. The try-outs are also open to women, whether they are on the

4:30 p.m.,

varsity fastball team, or not.

cmrtftnt loans

changes are important there )0 Loans Programla student plan to g ctudent Loan or information now. letthe^ateso

800 0 CANADA v^/w^anlearn.ca

a

an exhibi-

5-1 defeat.

Try-outs are also being held for

“This

pounding.

go

have a fun game of basketball and meet other people interested in the sport. is

added.

lost in

game, however, Tuesday, Sept. to the University of Waterloo in a

tion 5,

be together for two years, so next year should be a good season, he Johnstone

be cut to 20 players

until the

tion is free.

“This

The semester’s

last

after this season.

loss.

will

sure,

This means the team will basically

women’s regular season kicked off Monday, Sept. 11 in London against Fanshawe with a 32

one player, for

will lose only

Doon keep students

Intramurals at Irwin

the

for the past 12 years,

it

the under- 17 Kitchener Spirit.

The team

year being two years ago.

The team had a rough season

for her team.

By Dwight

varsity

with Conestoga for four years, her last

game Wednesday, the women’s team lost 3-0 to

In an exhibition

order for the Conestoga Condors men’s and women’s varsity soccer

The men’s team

couple of years, said Johnstone, and

year missing the playoffs.

she added.

Canada

Read Spoke

Digital Edition - September 18, 2000  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you