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— No. 31

33rd Year

Whafs

Tuition just tip

Inside

of fee iceberg By

Julie Porter

Plaster

work

were the most important,” said Michael.

Along with the tuition fee for Conestoga College, students must pay a whole slew of other fees. They pay alumni fees, athletic fees,

CSI

fees, a graduation fee,

The drug plan which $71.68

plan.

locker fees, parking fees, student

ID

said Michael.

ation fee

dents pay

Lots of students use CSI servichave paid for in the CSI fee without even knowing it, said Ramy Michael, vice-president of student affairs for CSI, formerly called the Doon Student

number who

es they

Third-year robotics

students

show

off

projects.

PAGE 4

Association.

The

registration student survival

guide,

a

new Web

site

which

offers car pooling services, maintaining and doing renovations on

the Sanctuary and free

some of

are

condoms

the things students

might not know they’re paying for with their CSI fee, said Michael. Doon campus students pay a CSI fee of $61.50. This fee covers the operating costs of the CSI, including organized trips, events and activities for students. Students from Waterloo and Guelph campuses pay $27.28 in

CSI

Parking problems

minor compared to last year.

PAGE

5

fees.

Included in the CSI fee, for all campuses, is a $7 capital development fee which funds grant initiatives like the Strategic Investment Fund, used for new computers and

DVP players. The Awareness Week barbecue an example of an activity that most students attend, without realizing that their fees help to provide the free food, said Michael. The cost of guest speakers, prizes and publicity for events also come out of CSI fees. Michael said students can also access information and resources which are funded by the fees at is

the

CSI

office.

Michael Harris, a CSI vice-president of student affairs, is dedicat-

De la Soul’s new album bombs.

PAGE 7

COMMENTARY Baby born

in

ambulance

ed

helping students with appeals and ensuring a student representative is part of that process, said Michael. “A kitty has been set aside (from CSI fees) to help students with lawyer fees should they need it,” said Michael. Students were asked what the most important service is that the CSI could provide to students as part of the KPI (Key Performance to

Indicator) surveys.

PAGE 2

“I think it’s totally worthwhile,”

technology enhancement fees, a drug plan fee and a recrefees,

costs

another service students pay for. It is mandatory unless a student is covered by another drug is

He

many

said even though

as long as

premiums

stu-

for a small

actually use the plan,

available for use it worthwhile to all students. “The most popular items that students buy on the drug plan are anti-depressants and oral contraceptives,” he said. The college does not receive any money from the fees of the drug plan, Michael said, but a slush fund has been developed from CSI fees to offset an increase in it’s

is

premiums premiums

if

the plan company’s

increase.

Students also pay $25.75 for

alumni fees.

According to Mary Wright, manager of alumni services, the alumni fee gives students who graduate from the college an automatic lifetime membership with alumni services. Part of the membership, according to Wright,

Cambridge students get bus route to Conestoga By

Petra Lampert

Sportsworld before going on to the college.

a free subscrip-

Getting to Conestoga College

alumni magazine Connections, which is published

just got easier for students living

tion

is

the

to

Cambridge. Buses began

in

twice a year.

“We

reduced rates on home, auto and health insurance through alumni services, as well as yearly reduced offers on season passes for places like Canada’s Wonderland and African Lion offer

Safari,” said Wright.

Students can

come

to

resources or help with a project they are doing.

telephone appropriate alumni and then have services

them contact the student requesting the meeting.

“We

connect

alumni

who

students are

with

excellent

resources,” she said.

Students also pay an athletic fee of $34.30 which, according to the college handbook, helps with the cost of running the intercollegiate athletics

program, which gives

students the option of participat-

ing on a school team which

com-

petes with other post-secondary institutions.

This

is

a different fee

from the

“The overwhelming majority

recreation fee, which allows stu-

responded they felt that special events and educational issues

dents access to the recreation centre’s facilities.

5

running

to the college

on

from Sept.

.

Jean Bourdon, assistant manager of transit operations south for Grand River Transit, said this is the first time GRT has provided

from Cambridge to Kitchener. She added the Cambridge bus is service

alumni services to be put in contact with alumni from their programs who perhaps can help them find

Alumni

Cambridge

Bourdon

said Sporstworld will

act as a transfer location

by bus. During regwould take about 45

to the college

ular hours

it

minutes.

Jack Fletcher, director of student services at the college, said he’s

glad the buses

called 61 Preston

Gateway

and

it

will provide both

are

might take some pressure off our “It

and

rush-hour regular routes.

parking

where

people can board the bus and go on to Cambridge. •Bourdon said during rush hour it would take students approximately 15 minutes to get from Cambridge

lots.”

from

running

Cam-

bridge and thinks it’s about time.

Jack Fletcher, during He said the rush hour will run college has lobdirector of student services every half hour, bied for years from 6:30 a.m. to to get 9 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. The Cambridge service to allow stuservice will run every hour from dents from Cambridge who don’t 7:45 a.m. to 9:45 p.m. on have cars to come to the college by Buses

Saturdays.

bus.

Buses depart from King Street in Preston and go directly to the col-

our parking lots,” Fletcher said.

He

lege.

Bourdon

“It

might take some pressure off said the service also will ben-

Conestoga night school dents and Preston high school

rush-hour buses will come up King Street, along Fountain Street, along Shantz Hill,

efit

and down the 401 to Homer Watson Boulevard to the college. Regular-route buses will run every hour departing from downtown Galt with a stop at

Kitchener to Preston. Fletcher also said Cambridge bus service will benefit Cambridge

said

dents

who

landlords

commute

who can now

more Conestoga

students.

stu-

stu-

from

rent to


Page 2

— SPOKE, September

2000

11,

Pregnant woman turned away from hospital

Tillsonburg Distric:t

Memorial Hospita

^

1

a

1

A baby

boy was bom on Aug. 14. But unlike other children, wonder was brought into this world in the small conof an ambulance, which had pulled over to the side of the

There's no anesthetist available

this tiny

fines

road.

The

father,

Neil Fehr, waited outside the

crammed

A y~

TV -y

vehicle as

of their first child, David. She had no painkillers and no moral support from her husband. The unbelievable part of this scenario was that the pair had his wife, Maria, struggled with the birth

London Hospital 45 minutes

been turned away from Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital. The parents are Canadian citizens. They pay taxes, vote during elections and yet they were turned away from a hospital. A public hospital which receives health-care funding from both federal and provincial governments could not assist this woman.

The couple was

They were not turned away because there were no beds available or because the maternity ward was

could not perform the delivery and it was suggested they

a display

Election

told

the Tillsonburg hospi-

of

tal

make

their

facility in

understaffed.

way

to a

London, a

the country’s pettiness

45-minute drive away.

not were They away because there were no beds available or because the maternity ward was understaffed. Maria was transferred to London because there was no anesturned

Watching h

t

spectrum.

One

things well

laws to punish them more severe-

Lewinsky

ly-

Kenneth Starr entertained and cap-

The other

need a caesarean section. This was a hospital, was it not? Could they not have offered to take her to London in an ambulance, making the trip faster? If there had been a terrible car accident, there would have been

conventions

other does not.

was almost

ish

many ways

line of celebrities

to assist the injured.

many

citizens.

Republican

on

Bill Clinton did

during his term in office, but best

Democratic

Maria, so he couldn’t be sure whether or not she would

the physician

its

American

and

And

party wishes to pre-

serve the fundamental rights of

e

call didn’t

thetist available at the hospital.

know

®

One

believes in gun control, the

the

seems

watch-

like

ing the Oscars. There

was a long

make

strives to

One

One

his tryst with the fair

all

and

his

Monica with

battle

tivated the world for months.

He

strives to abol-

cast a light

on American

death penalty, the other

that has not

shone so bright since

to

want

to nationalize the

politics

Richard Nixon uttered the words

“I

am

electric chair.

walking through

of

believes a

woman’s place

is

not a crook,” and the assassination of John F. Kennedy.

can be transported from hospital to hospital with no worries about the mother or the baby. Maria was still in the early stages of labour when she arrived at the hospital, according to Brenda Butters, chief executive offi-

the door, each fabulously attired in

out of politics and out of earshot,

In a sense, Clinton brought the

casual designer duds, each with a

bleached smile and the confidence

and denies her reproductive choice, and the other promotes women’s

soap opera, necessary to sustain the fickle minds of the American pub-

that only earning the equivalent of

participation

cer of the hospital.

the Gross National Product of a

believes in her right to her

small Third-World

reproductive decisions.

woman

Apparently, a

The brave woman

in labour

started off for

London with

contractions

On the way, Neil stopped at a provincial police detachment to ask for help. An ambulance was dispatched for the rest of the

ties

trip.

talent is

A woman

can experience contractions for hours before delivery begins, but in rare cases, such as this, a woman can proceed rapidly through the labour stages. Suppose the delivery hadn’t gone smoothly. If Maria had begun to hemorrhage there would have been no one, except the

What would

the Tillsonburg hospital

say then?

Suppose

One

Inside the conventions, celebri-

wowed

the audience with their

The Practice’s Dylan McDermott reciting the charter of

unpredictable.

paramedics, to assist her.

per

movie can provide.

growing stronger and pain increasing.

The length of labour

country

and

rights

freedoms,

Melissa

Ethridge performing a rousing version of This

Land

Is

Your Land.

This way, the politically ignorant

can cast their ballots for the party

which

is

little

David had had

difficulty, or

Who

suppose Maria had

required a caesarean section? Paramedics are not trained for dif-

Paramedics spend two years in college compared medical school. They should not be expected to complete the job a doctor is trained to do because of a bad call made by medical staff. Anaesthetists should be on call at every hospital not just the major ones. There should be no reason why a person should be denied medical assistance not even for something as natural as

know a thing or when you can

politics

ficult births.

vote for the party which assembles

to a doctor’s nine years in

the best group of stars for

fate

of

the entire world for the next four rests

precariously

upcoming

The Republicans and Democrats sit at

either side of a

wide

political

its

places

to the

White House, and

would

how

the

twist.

They say

you can

that

tell

a lot

about a society by the people that

it

chooses to celebrate.

Americans have a short attention span. Perhaps without the glitz and

shallow place. Actor Ben Affleck mused on The Rosie once O’Donnell show that he thought it strange that during the recent war

glamour of the Kennedy family’s endearing Camelot, we would have little

we where many

and the

fortably

voices,

we

are

rest

That being

on a

on-again,

live

com-

with actress

have inaudible unin-

is

seems

it

that

a frighteningly

former Yugoslavia that his

live

unmoved and

said,

North America

in the

interest in politics.

Perhaps because

off-again

relationship

Gwyneth Paltrow was

what made headlines on CNN news. “I mean, isn’t there a war going on?” he asked.

spired by politics.

Perhaps these silver-screen idols so faithfully worship are

And now,

amount _of focused on the upcoming meager

attention election.

Perhaps Americans need glam-

isn’t there

an election

race going on?

really the only things keeping the

on the

election.

back

millions tuned in to watch plot

other

the

lic,

on the rights of citizens who haven’t been bom yet. Perhaps as a society, North

con-

Unfortunately, the future of the

own

greater importance

who we

United States, and really the

result of the

delivering a baby.

its

vention?

years,

and

continent

needs to

two about

government, and

believes in the rights of

citizens

supported by the coolest

celebrities.

in

If

American media

outlets could

unglue themselves from Annette

Benning and Warren Beatty long enough, perhaps

we

could

all tell

orous or potentially scandalous

the forest from the trees and the

candidates for the presidency to

politics

sustain their interest.

haps

from the glamour. Or per-

we wouldn’t even

notice.

SPOKE

is mainly funded from September to May by a payment from Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI). formerly called the

Keeping Conestoga College connected

Doon

Student Association, in exchange for the insertion of

The views and opinions expressed in newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the CSI unless their advertisements contain the CSI logo. SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by 9:30 a m. Monday. Submissions arc subject to acceptance or advertising in the paper. this

SPOKE is published

and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Tracy Ford;

News

Editor: Petra Lampert

Student Life Editor:

Julie Porter;

Photo Editor: Tammy Somerville Advertising Manager: Petra Lampert; Circulation Manager: Julie Porter; Faculty Supervisor: Sharon Dietz;

rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect

or

MS

tain

Faculty Adviser: Christina Jonas;

SPOKE's

address

is

299 Doon Valley

Dr.,

Room 4B 14,

Kitchener, Ontario,

Word

file

would be

illustration (such as a

N2G 4M4.

helpful.

any libellous statements and

Submissions must not con-

may

photograph).

be accompanied by an


*

SPOKE, September

By Tracy Ford

means

tracted firm

Three employees of the college’s shop have responded to the

school’s request for proposals to contract out the department

own

The employees Kathy

by sub-

proposals. -

Lynn Knowles,

McManus and Ed

Riehl

prepared the proposal and sent

it

-

to

college employees on Aug. 4.

“We

just

want to get out the Knowles.

The

shop.

to

out

the

in

The

college wants

contract out the shop for

move it

10

will mini-

says

is

need-

ed for equipment. In an agreement with the college and the Ontario Public Service Employees Union, which represents print shop workers, employees can apply for a one-year leave of absence from the college to work for the contracted employer. If they wish to stay with the private

just believe

much

print

less time,

it

according to the

costs include increased

use of college photocopiers due to the lack of a true rush service at the print shop.

“We encourage walk-in service,” “We are just here to

said Knowles.

help everybody.” If the college

Knowles

certainly

against

“We

contracting

out public services, period.

“There has been overwhelming letter campaign,” said Wallace. “The faculty has supported us on that and they are very concerned about this.” Wallace said other colleges which have contracted out services, such as the bookstore, cafeterias and print shop, are rated low in the response to the

KPI

surveys,

which evalu-

ate Ontario colleges.

She

said

Conestoga

is

number

1

current

overall in the surveys because of

employees won’t work for the concompany. She said they have already told management about their plans and they will

the level of service the college gets

ny,

the

said,

tracted

exercise their rights as the union.

Being an employee of the con-

to an

Ann

of the Ontario Public

staff local

agreement with an outside compa-

do not want to remain with the company, they can exercise their bumping and layoff rights at the college.

come

said

Wallace, president of the support

annual

does

firm, they can. If they

a

is

shop employees’ proposal.

The hidden

print

“At the union we are certainly

costs.

plans to privatize the print

it

letter

to reconsider the

contract

college announced July 19

mize the investment

'

ing price increases, loss of service

committee

are

years, hoping the

*

move

George Brown College requires 48 hours to do a rush job, something that can be done at Conestoga

to

(Photo by Julie Porter) ——

tions

ding for operation of the depart-

organizations.

lift

The

Service Employees Union.

shop if a suitable proposal is received from large print shop

a pump

shop services have been conbeen print-

“We

to the union.

it

asks the college’s academic opera-

said Knowles.

that

fixing

returning

with the outside companies bid-

The

a pump repair crew who are outside Door 5 on Aug. 17.

other colleges where

and asking them to show their supby signing the letter and

port

tracted out, results have

and hidden

and support staff opposing the plan

posal to the college to compete

to present their pro-

ment.

for

at

at the college

anti-privatization,”

They plan

Rick Polkiewicz, a construction worker, operates the

proposal

staff’s

said replacing the equipment needed in the shop can be phased in over a few years. The proposal

print

the

letters to faculty

shop

print

says that

to

request for proposals by sending

good department, we work well and there is no reason to change it,”

facts,” said

system

shop

print

employees.

print

The union responded

would

the union

no longer represent the

mitting their

— Page 3

2000

shop submits proposal

Print

Pumped up

11,

members of

“The faculty has supported us overwhelmingly,” Knowles said. “We don’t plan to go to work for another company.”

from departments like the print shop and the reason why Conestoga is high on the list is because of the exemplary service the print shop gives. “The print shop is a benchmark service,” she said. they (the college) want to compromise that?”

for

quality

“Why would

i

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Page 4

— SPOKE, September

2000

11,

Students put on display By Tracy Ford

aspects of the project, including

all

design, fabrication, commissioning

Third-year robotics and automa-

(programming and debugging) and

management,

including

tion students got a chance to dis-

project

play their final projects Aug. 16, in an open house attended by

scheduling.

employer representatives from the

their

industry.

said the

observed the class had drifted apart over the last three years since they

project gave everyone a chance to

had begun the program, but the

use the knowledge they gained while in the program.

project reunited them.

Mike Wood

Class leader

summarizes all the skills that we have learned in the past three years and it puts them into a final “It

application that

we

a physical project,”

can actually see

Wood

said.

“I

one group,

1

8

in'

The

the mechanical side of

year for their final project,” said Wood. “The graduating class takes it

on for

The light-assembly system used work stations positioned on a

five

central, rotary table.

From

to station the lights

were assem-

station

and then either accepted or rejected based on quality. The jellybean packager also con-

bled, tested

sisted of five

work

stations but

was

organized on a conveyor-line, designed to package and label an assortment of jellybeans.

The

students were responsible for

was

skills

was made,

After the decision

work on

ification, as well as

the

central control unit.

Funding for the project was provided by donations from business-

work

es and the college.

as well.”

Corporations with

Mike Wood, third-year robotics and automation student

over the

To see

come

really

together

four months,” he said.

last

the projects to completion,

had

the class

including

their final grade.”

the

all

it

“We have every

involve

acquired during classes and during co-op work placements.

trailer clearance lights for transport trucks and the other sorted, labelled

it

to

but leadership and team-

built

and packaged jellybeans. “They (the students) do

criterion for the projects

had

it

each group took responsibility for one work station, which included design, assembly, testing and mod-

learned not only

two fully integrated robotics manufacturing systems. One assembled and

who

Wood

said

goal,”

another and one

class leader, designed

vote.

the technical skills and

Thirty-six students, including 17 in

ning of the final year when smaller groups gathered to disctfss ideas. Each group had to present the idea to the class for a discussion and

would say they have achieved

“We

to

their

apply their

of

said completing the project

them

not only gave

required but

skills

“If we need parts, the college will buy them for us.” The graduate employment rate for the robotics and automation program is 100 per cent.

Much of the to the

and integrated

of

it

and the mechanical side

but leadership and teamwork

attributed

final project,

which

When

the

open house was com-

pleted the projects were disassembled and the parts that were donat-

ed were given back

The remaining

project began at the begin-

to the

compa-

nies.

as well.”

The

is

release.

helped the

learned not only the techni-

cal skills

success

program’s co-op component

demonstrates the theoretical and the practical skills of the students, according to a college press

class develop soft skills.

“We

stu-

donate materials for the projects.

the technical it

whom

dents have done their co-op placements in the last couple of years

skills,

knowledge

mechanical, electrical and pneumatic systems, as well as programming and problem solving skills.

Wood

employers

for

parts

were stored

and a mem-

Joel Awde, a third-year robotics engineering student

ber of the team which designed and built a light assembly machine, displays their creation at the open house in Room

on Aug.

W9

16. (Photo by Tracy Ford)

for next year’s projects.

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2

)

SPOKE, September

Parking this year shouldn’t be chaos

11,

2000

—Page

5

READ SPOKE Ci

fimmtfixnon

More By

traffic direction

and new lot-ease woes

Julie Porter

Students will pay more for parking

but with 360 new parking Doon campus, the massive

this year,

spaces at

confusion and parking problems that happened last year as the new school year began shouldn’t recur.

Due to a clerical error last summer, 50 per cent

security services sold

more passes than parking

the school’s blue

many

could hold, and

lot

on

students parked

the road because

they couldn’t find places in the lots to park. to security representa-

According tive Cliff

pared

Lauren, the school

is

pre-

this year.

“We’ve added

additional guards to

monitor and direct

We’ve

traffic in the lots.

ongoing parking decal sales so that even during the first week, people (could) buy passes, and we’ve added a lot,” said offered

Get it

1-888-334-9769

]

www.paguide.com

Lauren.

The new parking

lot.

1,

is

woodworking

located behind the

Construction finished the

centre.

week of Aug.

14.

Lauren said

when

arises

Lot

Ph\

Lauren, a security representative, displays parking decals on sale at Security Services. Although the cost for yearly spots rose by $12, most of the decals were sold out by the first day.

some confusion

that

Cliff

students arrive at school

without decals and can’t figure out where to park. Some try to park in

si i

A<

it!

t it

it

\

(Photo by Julie Porter)

lots that are sold out.

“We have one

“We added the lot because last year the

new wing (the new infill

to the

technology wing) was added

to the school with

new

1,000

“We

Lauren.

a capacity for

Security staff will not ticket

students,” said Lauren.

first

the

“We have one

was

of the lowest

located

colleges and universities

between the nursing and

in

business

Cliff Lauren,

wing and the

security representative

recreation it’s

centre.

the only

way

goes to the

“None of

it

goes to the college, but that we can

cer

who was once

check

from

longer

last year.

According to Lauren, designated parking spots for the year have gone

“I

elooops •«>

in

stores in nine

countries and are 'm

Cambridge. i

Mississauga and Scarborom+i,

jS.CUSTOMER SE NiSTS.SAiirS ASSAKID

m

« iatomf-r

*tfk

bylaw

offi-

designated to

all

Cambridge

is

gave written 100

tickets in

Tuesday, September

Lauren said

a

Mezzanine Tel.:

that while parking

sonable.

just a

it.

one’s ever gotten little

more than

.

656

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If

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honour.

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Hill

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Teaching English

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“No

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ext.

500

opening stores

about

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DOORS DWAIII; AND

weekly parking rates rose by $1. Still, Lauren says, the rates are rea-

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that employs

41,000 associates

and

may be

Semestered parking rates rose $5 and

Starts this

renovation retailing.

company

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confusing and the rules stringent, no one has become angry

Certificate

stunning

We are a worldwide

day,” he said.

year to $170 this year. Last year’s annual general parking rates went from $117 to $125. last

A One-Year

homo

msM'&ALBS AS

the lots every day no employed by the college. Lauren said that on a busy day he tickets 25 vehicles.

Students buying parking decals

as a

»

its

revolutionary approach to

ii.oocm ANO DWAtt ANT> TC M„,fX>O StS

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Security only tickets about half

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the lots in a day, as the

in the cost

from

enue

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Lauren said there are approxi-

will notice a

rev-

Kitchener,” said. he

Ontario.”

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the ticketing

parking rates of any of the

blue lot

A:

% L.

sxmroum.s

week of classes. “All

Lauren said the most poplot

ille-

gally parked cars at least during the

had to have a place for them to

park.”

ular

of the lowest park-

ing rates of any of the colleges and Ontario,” * said in universities

addition

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<>nuh


Page 6

— SPOKE,

September

11,

2000

Residence expands New By

be completed by 2001

addition to

Petra Lampert

tant general

-Construction on an addition to the

Rodeway

Suites,

begin in September and is expected to be completed by September 2001. will

The

six-storey addition will be

joined to the existing residence,

said the best time for stu-

of $250 was required to enter the

across from the college on Homer Watson Boulevard. It will provide 200 additional beds. The present four-storey residence houses 232 students.

list.”

to live in residence.

provide a

home

plan

environment.”

await-

is

Jack Yong,

manager Rodeway Suites of

assistant general

“I like the fact that

we’re getting

ing ministry approval to buy the

the expansion,” he said. “I like

which is owned by Dacon Corp., in Kingston. The residence is managed by

because

Campus Living Centres

make

residence,

At present there

is

Inc.

a waiting

list

to

get into the existing residence.

“Right there’s

still

now

we’re

all

full,

a possibility of students

cancelling,” said Jack Yong, assis-

Life

we always have a waiting and with the addition we won’t have to turn students away. It will

residence

picked out of a

Yong

and

who

in

resi-

said the addition will have bedrooms and a lounge on each floor. Each bedroom will have its own telephone and TV. Students will share a common room and a

names

live out

He

is

said

given

residence

first-year students

easily

meet new

good

is

for

because they can

friends.

provide a

home

environ,

ment,” Yong

He

are

of town.

• •

bathroom. The existing residence is a dorm style with shared bedrooms.

said.

said the residence

is

strict

about enforcing rules, but only to the degree that permits everyone to be comfortable.

short, fret

is

living

Yong

“We

hat.

said consideration

to students

students

private

easier for students.”

A draw is held to decide who gets into

but

it

list

it

to

dence.

said.

Fletcher said the college

the end of April) is $3,750, which includes hydro, cable, phone and Internet service. It does

the college does not offer a meal

he

to it,”

cost to live in residence for

not include food, however, since

“We

for students.

“I’m looking forward

The

the school year (from September to

early as January,” said Yong.

Jack Fletcher, director of student

more housing

lottery.

as

“People have been applying as

services, said the addition will pro-

vide

in

is

soon as they know be attending Conestoga and

May, or want

was

for applications

June 2 and the lottery was held a few days after that date. A deposit

go

we’ll

to,

dents to apply to residence

they’ll

The deadline

the resito

the waiting

Yong

manager of

we need

dence. “If student residence,

Level-headed

an

Brad Stroeder, from KWE Inc. in Cambridge, does some electrical work in a room in the A Wing on the second floor on Aug. 17, (Photo by Petra Lampert)

extension

Live longer with daily physical activity, healthy eating and following your doctors advice.

Conestoga

i o>

-S

cn

O 00

Quality Policy Conestoga College continually seeks

r

C

opportunities for improvement to

Conestoga College

[

meet and exceed the needs of our students employees ,

and communities

.


SPOKE, September

De La

Soul’s latest

CD

a

real

11,

2000

— Page 7

drag

By Petra Lampert Rap group De La Soul its fifth

Mosaic Thump, on

Intelligence:

Aug.

released

album, entitled Art Official

8.

It’s

the first

volume of a

three-

part Art Official Intelligence series,

with the remaining two

low next

More hop

CDs

to fol-

year.

than any other

Beastie Boys, Tash and

artist in hip-

Tha

history, the trio has constantly 11 -year

Indeed,

career and they never follow the

Foxxx. Track

reinvented itself over

its

Soul’s lyrics tend to be

thought provoking, while the energizing. are instrumentals However, at times the sound of drums, horns and guitar are too

overpower

and

dominant

Khrist,

Busy Bee and Freddie

8, Set the Mood, featuring Indeed, drowns out her vocals and

musical mainstream.

De La

J-RO of

Xzibit, Alias

Liks,

she

swallowed up by instrumen-

is

tals.

Explicit lyrics are used frequently throughout the album, which is not unusual for the rap .

the

De La

genre.

vocals.

The album

The

consists of 17 tracks

tracks,

The Art of Getting

U

Wanna

and the best ones tend to be those

Jumped

featuring guest artists.

B.D.S., featuring Freddie Foxxx, showcase an exceptional amount of

The most vigorous, bouncy and enjoyable songs on the

Track Track

4,

CD

Busta

Rhymes; and Track 9, All Good, featuring Chaka Khan. Other guest artists include The

Wflp

De La Soul’s fifth album called Art Official Intelligence: Mosaic Thump includes hits like U Don’t Wanna B.D.S and Oooh. (Internet photo)

wifi)

/ /

ff/f-falcinj /frafe^if/

Help

wifi)

textbook reading

Effective /tudyin^/note-talSn^

/creen '<ng for /u/pect ed learning di/abilitif/ A/zi/tance

wifi)

academic complaint procedure/

/ubject-zpecific difficult'^/

/

one-to-one and ^roup tutorial/

/

Peer bo/t matcher

Lonelin e/// Adju/tin^ to a

Multicultural /upport Group

Pepre//ion Tall:

/ / / /

community newv rwmnmM

financial I//ue/

about per/onal concern/

4

/elf-e/teem Relatlon/bip/

Anxiety

An^er

GPoOP/ &W 0 PK/W 0 P/ /elf-e/fee'")

Relaxation /uicide Intervention

INFORMATION

/ /

0

Perhaps the group’s next album will be more captivating.

CMULP/WPINT/mu.

A//e//ment of learning barrier/

/ / /

0

is

mediocre.

PER/oNAL CoON/ELLING

/ / / /

0

Art Official Intelligence trilogy

cultural adju/tment & college orientation

/

0

Despite a few outstanding tracks, Soul’s first instalment in the

De La

PEER TUTORING

/

o

they interrupt the musical flow.

ACADEMIC CoON/ELLING & LEARNING /KILL/

/ / / /

3

(Internet photo)

rruDENT /ervice/

$ O

Don’t

bad language. Another downfall of the album is the abundant chatty interludes between songs. These occur fre-, quently throughout the CD and most often are annoying and intrusive as

are

Oooh, featuring Redman;

6, 1.C. Y’all, featuring

and

Soul’s lyrics are said to

be thought provoking.

^

Campu/ rf/ource/

Community a^fnrif/

/ / /

4

veiuMf

Te/t & Public /peaking Anxiety

/tudy

/kill/ (E^.

T>me Management)

Other Topic/

/ /

/tudy

/kill/

/

Wou/in^

Community event/

CAREER EXPLORATION

/ /

Di/cu// your plan/ for the future

Explore alternative career and/or educational option/

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Page 8

— SPOKE, September

11,

2000

Fax Services Send or Receive Prices vary for local

&

long distance

Colour Photocopier 8.5” X 1 1 ” is $1 .1 0/ copy L •m

a

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8.5” X 11

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Digital Edition - September 11, 2000