Page 1

— No. 29

33rd Year

Project to benefit rural youth

What’s Inside

By

the Rural Job Strategy fund was started after many public

Julie Porter

A

new

initiative

Affairs,

by the private government

sector and the Ontario

aimed at creating graduates

is

will bring

new

skills to the

who

work-

need

employment

You can

for

obtain

nomic growth. The Rural Youth Job Strategy

‘This

ing youth in rural areas

technology

are on equal par with

diploma/certificate training pro-

their

grams and 10 courses at Conestoga College developed for students in and Region Waterloo the Wellington, Perth, and Huron

Food

and

Web

Affairs

Rural at

site

gov.on.ca/omaffa, the Rural Youth Job Strategy will pave the way for and entrepreneurs businesses, entire communities. It

will allow rural youth to get

of agriculture, food and rural affairs

student exhibits his photographs.

home,

at

your college e-mail or listings from your

mark

computer.

It’s

LeBeau. “If a teacher is going to be absent for a class, instead of the whole class showing up, the teacher can

them

let

know,” said LeBeau. John Tibbits, Conestoga College allowed

was important because

it

students to stay in their

communi-

ties

and contribute

He The

project will

work

to

make

and partnerships for Ontario rural youth aged 15 to 29. alliances

Through

initiative,

the

Conestoga College will expand information technology program-

ming

to allow students to access

said

it

to the high-tech

was valuable

in rural areas,

the country

is

to invest

and that the future of dependent on creat-

ing a strong technology base.

“This is how Canada will move forward,” said Tibbits. “We need to provide

keep

to

wise have access to,” said Tibbits. Tibbits also said that the

our

programs like

booming

this to

economy

“They (CSI) recognize is

that there

a tremendous opportunity for

growth,” said Tibbits. At the press conference, Ernie

Hardeman, minister of agriculture, food and rural affairs, quoted author Alice Walker, famous for writing The Colour Purple, saying that we must keep in mind that the present is

we

are constructing today

the future

Hardeman

we want

to live.

said that the rural

youth job strategy and Conestoga College will create the skills sought after in the future, and will greatly enhance the opportunity for learning. He said it was an incredible opportunity for students.

“This is not just about creating jobs but ensuring youth in rural areas are on equal par with their

the skills to contribute to their

the school through the Internet.

strong.”

communities, and will allow them to seek jobs closer to home. According to the Ministry of Food and Rural Agriculture,

Conestoga Students Inc. contributed $625,000 to the project. CSI president Phil LeBeau said that he felt the initiative was

program will develop new Web-enabled programs that will be available to all

urban

Ontario citizens.

workforce.”

Tibbits said that the

CSI had

an enormous role in getting the initiative started, a role he said was even bigger than the Royal Bank’s.

a great oppor-

tunity for students,” said

industry.

Surprise death claims student

Former Conestoga

take classes

president, said that the initiative

conference at the college. According to the Ministry of Agriculture,

at

sometimes home, and the

e-mail the students to

Ontario minister

The announcement of the programs was made Aug.l at a press

PAGE 4

PAGE

urban peers.” Ernie Hardeman,

counties.

tree-planting event in Waterloo Park.

home

not just about

creating jobs but ensur-

project will include seven full-time

KWCC holds a

is

how

arises to access the college.

access

rural youth.

force and contribute to rural eco-

information

“You know when you are

consultations which resulted in participants raising concerns about

opportunities

“Rural citizens will have access programs they might not other-

worthwhile for students.

peers,” said Hardeman. “Ontario as a whole will share in the dividends of a highly skilled

Keeping watch

6

40-year-old dies of heart-attack both of them entered Conestoga’s

By Tracy Ford

general arts and science program at

The name of another Conestoga

the Sanctuary after he suffered a

neering/robotics

a 40-

year-old student in the engineer-

later graduated.

ing/robotics and automation pro-

ten about

gram and was completing placement

this

his co-op

summer before

returning to college in the

fall,

according to Casey Johnson, a

and boring watch.

PAGE 7

COMMENTARY What \

the

close friend of his for six years.

“He

did nothing but bend over

backward for me,” Johnson said. She described an incident where he lent her his computer after she was accepted into York University. She was a struggling single mother and

when

came at was most needed. She said he figured it was better if she had it because he could do his work at the college. “He never asked anything

the computer

a time

it

Page 2 bill

deal about pot?

and automation Johnson was accepted into the journalism program and

program.

on July 27.

A father of four, Logan was

Crowd a shallow

After completing the program, into the engi-

Logan was accepted

heart attack

In

Doon.

College student, Ralph Logan, will be added to the memorial plaque in

in return,”

Johnson

said.

Logan and Johnson met while attending upgrading classes at the Waterloo campus in 1994 and then

In an article writ-

him by Johnson

in

Spoke

June 1998, he said he would be happy with any job as long as it enabled him to work with machin-

in

ery.

Logan suffered attack in 1997 and

his

first

heart

had a learning

disability associated with attention deficit disorder

“A lot of people at the college knew him,” Johnson said. She also said his family loss.

one

“He

is still

grieving his

did everything for every-

else.”

he could help someone he Once Logan would,” she said. drove to York University from “If

Mount

Forest, a two-hour trip, to

take Johnson to see her

mother.

me

“He knew

it

ill

grand-

was upsetting

that I couldn’t see her.”

Andrew Jozefowicz, from

security services, sits beside a

barricade that blocks the colleges main road while workers

complete maintenance work on Aug.

3.

(Photo by Tracy Ford)


— SPOKE, August

Page 2

14,

2000

High gas prices help wrong people Someone is making money off the increase in gas prices and you can be sure it isn’t someone who really needs it. It isn’t

as

if the

gas cartels are a lowly lot - they aren’t the ones

make ends

meet. They aren’t single mothwork on time in the morning. No. They are the ones driving the swanky cars, living it up in first-class seats on flights bound for Madrid, Morocco, or the

working two jobs to ers trying to

make

it

to

Bahamas.

own

Just look at the Maritimes’

- the

masters of the monopoly

one of the Maritimes’ richest families who own just about every gas station from the New BrunswickQuebec border to the farthest tip of Newfoundland. Do you board

Irvings,

pumps has them

think the price hikes at the

eating half-price

bologna from the local comer store instead of their usual prime cuts of beef. Think again.

In St. John’s,

In

motorists paid a whopping 87.9 cents per litre for regular gasoline in June. have

left

standing in

St John’s,

Nfld., motorists

paid a whopping 87.9 cents per

Nfld.,

litre

of regular gasoline in June.

This, in the poorest province of

Canada, where an unstable fishery has led to the saddest of all economies.

whom the federal govern-

Those

ment’s moratorium on fishing welfare lines and living in outposts that

look at best like shanty towns are always,

Seems

are paying the highest gas prices.

it

seems, the ones

strange

mously successful Hibernia Oil platform

when the

lies

just

who

enor-

off the

province’s shore.

But bureaucracy and

political

debauchery have seen to

it

that

only a very small margin of Newfoundlanders see any of the benefits of the country’s largest oil refinery and the massive

of Hibernia are certainly not reflected in the prices of

profits

Newfoundland’s gas

One

bars.

oil analyst attributed the

increased

What’s wrong with pot?

demand during

the

Don’t

high price to consumers to an

summer

season. Truckers in

Ontario have faced a 60-per-cent increase in the cost of diesel

afraid

since February. Premier

Mike

he’d look into

that

Harris responded to the problem

it,

but added that the public might

as well just give up on trying to change the 14.7-cent flat tax the government scoops up from every litre of gas. Oil companies are blaming the spike in prices on a worldwide drop in oil production that has depleted inventories. Others think that perhaps gas and oil bigwigs are taking the humble consumer for the ride of their lives. Shell Canada reported that it reaped second quarter profits of $168 million. It reported that its earnings were up 90 per cent in the quarter that ended in June. Right about the same time that Newfoundlanders were paying 87.9 cents a litre. Prime Minister Jean Chretien replied to pleas to the federal government to put a cap on the rising pump prices by passing the issue off as a problem that no one has any control over. Chretien said, “We live in a market economy. These prices have increased around the globe. In fact, the level of taxation by the federal government on these products is the lowest in the

Deverell expects that Canadians will be happy about

in

gas prices by car-pooling, but that didn’t

happen. People kept driving single-occupant cars. Truckers created blockades, activists gas stations, but nothing created any a perfect example of

how

this

Chretien extols the virtues of makes

simply

Generation Xer

clear thinking

up

the

much

tried to

boycott certain

in a while. It is

‘60s

a

has-been

richer, but a lot

And

use of alcohol and ages

and

more

it.

to

We

wind

who

find themselves on the

wrong

side of the law.

Deaths caused by the combination of alcohol and a vehicle have anti-drinking and

dollars are used to float. like

Groups

MADD (mothers against drunk

driving) have formed to stop the

people so intoxicated and stupid

Often

one

in

cab home.

domestic assault cases

hears the phrase “alcohol

involved” uttered, and ly

in

one high-

the pain of terminally In

use

it

up, all the while

their

to bars to drink

know-

(paying

ers

cabinet

liquor

the lives of the suffer-

tolerable.

down

yet while the uptight

gin and tonics after

to

make up a “jungle juice” to get them wasted on a Friday night. Which

make

more

And

and children raid

prices)

parent’s

it

120,000 people

from cancer, 280,000 suffering from epilepsy, 50,000 suffering from HIV and AIDS and 50,000 suffering from multiple sclerosis, all illnesses where marijuana can be used to

go obscene

people.

suffering

water.

We

ill

Canada, according to medicimarijuana lobbyist Bernard

Bigras, there are

even encourto wind down

it

could get us into some very hot

violent

Instead of poisoning one’s body,

marijuana has been used to quell

nal

and destructive

the

behaviours of members of society

because they regularly

body’s head off?

yet our culture condones the

ing that the use of the magic liquid

alize

children

of high-school and college kids.

hears alcohol being used to ration-

market economy that Jean

some

simply

lost in a haze. It is

message from someone who is confused about what all the hoopla and fear is about marijuana. Listening to the news, one often a

someone? Were

smoked a joint and then blew some-

aren’t so foreign to the vocabularies

a

once

that they don’t take a

poorer.

and makes us throw

the next day.

from

joint

kill

the flower children called flower

poisons

not a message

good

they wanted to

in excess, alco-

at the liver,

“He got so drunk he didn’t know what the hell he was doing” and “She was so wasted that she passed out in the cab on the way home”

of

virtues

senseless slaughter of children by

results.

away

extolling

driving campaigns which our tax

this.

Environmentalists hoped that Canadians would react to this

summer’s increase

When consumed hol eats

lost

spumed massive

world.”

It is

from a

juana makes nobody angry or bitter. Did Cheech and Chong look like

used intoxication as others use temporary insanity as his plea.

be this is

not another diatribe

by saying

work

to “take

off the edge” and then get into their cars, another set

demn

brings us to the lowly mar-

of the uptight con-

the use of marijuana as an

ijuana leaf. When was the last time you heard of someone smoking marijuana and then becoming violent? When was the last time you heard of someone getting into a car

evil

under the influence of marijuana and then ploughing down a family

pot-smoking' to mellow out

of four. Probably not recently

intense nausea and vomiting that accompanies many serious illnesses

most probably, not

publicized rape case, the accused

It is

fairly well

gal

ille-

While alcohol is rampant and it seems hardly fair that

lethal,

those

who wish

to indulge in a little

way

non-destructive

ever.

known

drug which should be kept and in the ghettos.

that mari-

or stop

in

a

the

are considered criminals.

SPOKE

is mainly funded from September to May by a payment from Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI), formerly called the

Keeping Conestoga College connected

Doon Student

Association, in exchange for the insertion of

The views and opinions expressed in newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers in SPOKE are not advertising in the paper. this

SPOKE

is

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Tracy Ford;

News

Editor: Petra Lampert

address

Phone: 748-5220,

is

ext.

CSI

logo.

SPOKE

shall not be liable for

out of errors in advertising beyond the

any damages amount paid

arising for the

Photo Editor: Tracy Ford

space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by

Advertising Manager: Julie Porter

9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or

Circulation Manager: Julie Porter; Faculty Supervisor: Jerry Frank

SPOKE’s

endorsed by the CSI unless their advertisements contain the

Room

4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. 691, 692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

299 Doon Valley

Dr.,

rejection

or

and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect

MS Word

tain

file

would be

helpful.

any libellous statements and

Submissions must not con-

may

illustration (such as a photograph).

be accompanied by an


SPOKE, August

Project

—Page 3

2000

14,

Coffee Break

work

Cafeteria

may

lose business to

Tim Hortons and McDonald’s

By Tracy Ford The

construction

Hortons

coffee

McDonald’s

much.

difference.”

fast

across the street

of

a

Tim

and shop food restaurant from the Doon

John Kast, food service director for Conestoga’s cafeterias, said he hopes the effect of a closer Tim Hortons and McDonald’s to the school’s cafeterias

“We

already have very competi-

campus could mean more students will be venturing off campus for lunch and coffee during class

tive prices,” said Kast, “ so our

breaks.

places.”

lots

prices are already in line with those

Kast said the types of food avail-

of students bring coffee onto

able in the cafeteria are different

I

engineering

When

much

“I’d

summer

half

she has a three-hour class with robotics

a kilometre

at the

Tim Hortons

coffee chop in

the Pioneer Park Plaza

Watson

on Homer

cup of regular coffee

Bugescu, a robotics engineering student, works on his third-year project in room W9 in the woodworking (Photo by Tracy Ford) building on July 28. Florin

'

to

Jay Connely, student

of choice (in the cafeteria),” Charles said. “I am sure it (a closer Tim Hortons) will make a big lot

to find out in September.”

student

Charles’s

in

should be open

said he feels the cafeterias

much

choice

expensive. “I think

he (John Kast) needs to

rethink his

than those offered

at

“We

major food have a wide

variety of deli sandwiches, wraps,

a different line

than what they would carry,” said

isn’t a

“We’ll just have

open, said Kast.

He

and a medium cup of coffee at Tim Hortons cost $1.10 for 10 oz.

summer there

There is no way to tell how much two restaurants will affect food

the

during the summer.

stir fry.

“I find in the

is

will

Kast.

class, said Roasters

in the cafeteria costs $1.10 for 12 oz.

more students

and he said he finds the prices

service chains.

blvd.

A medium

or

engineering

food.”

three hours she finds a lot of stuto grab a coffee

some

don’t leave students

minute break in the middle of the

campus

go

rather

get good, cheap

students.

she gives her class a 20-

dents leave

nice,

Jay Connely, a third-year robotics

campus,” said Anne Charles, a politics teacher at Conestoga. Charles said during the

it,” he said. suppose while the weather

services at the college until they

find increasingly

“Certainly,

“I

venture across the street,” said

minimal.

is

“Roasters will be affected, no

doubt about

It’s really

Kast.

He said the students who love Tim Hortons coffee will travel to get it no matter how far it is, so a closer Tim Hortons won’t change

situation,

especially

“I’d with the prices,” he said. much rather go half a kilometre to

get good, cheap food.”

who

Connely,

grabs a coffee

from Tim Hortons on his way to the college and then another coffee during his break, said he only goes for a hot chocolate. “Their (Roasters) coffee isn’t that

to Roasters

great.”

Choclair to perform at

Conestoga College By Petra Lam pert Hip Hop to

at the college’s recre-

During the meeting the CSI also its clubs policy. At present, the CSI does not sanction any

on

cultural,

artist

perform

ation centre

raise funds for the cause.

Choclair

is

booked

Sept. 13.

Conestoga

of supporting cultural or religious groups. The CSI allots $800 for a

at

Students

Doon

Student

Association) board of directors meeting on July 26 in the Cross

club budget.

Roads Room.

teered to tend bar for a

Choclair fellow

is

artists

perform with

set to

Kardinal, Jully Black

and Baby Blue Soundcrew

at the

annual

if

CIBC bank

they would be

Run

in

the

for the Cure.

The run would take place on the college’s campus on Oct.l and money raised would be used to support cancer research.

Student

volunteers will be needed to help

^ ^ j 'www.paguide.com

-

college on Aug. 12.

the

CSI

CSI

are not yet trained in

program were to be It’s mandatory that

servers

receive

training

before legally serving alcohol at college events like concerts and banquets. In order to fied in smart serve,

become certiCSI members

must watch a video and complete a test marked by the Alcohol and Gaming Commission.

The next board of directors meeting will take place Aug.

16 at 8

p.m.

<

In the July 31 edition of Spoke, in the front page story titled, Print shop may be contracted out, print shop employee Vince Alviano was quoted as saying production increased from five million copies in 1995-96 to seven million copies in 1999-00. In fact, Alviano said the increase was from five to 1 1 million. Also, Michelle Pfeiffer’s name was incorrectly spelled on page 7 in the review of

U

CSI volun-

RCMP ban-

CORRECTION

1-888#

IttHi) Mti ft IMitj

at the

members who

trained July 31.

interested in participating

m

held

the smart serve

has asked the CSI

the

quet which was scheduled to be

advance and $15 at the door. $10 In other meeting business, Brad Whiteford, the CSI’s vice president of operations, said the

r

Members from

licensed event. Tickets will sell for in

1

political

clubs but discussed the possibility

Inc.’s (formerly the

it

or

religious,

Final concert details were dis-

cussed

Get

discussed

Spoke

What

Lies Beneath.

regrets the errors.


Page 4

— SPOKE, August

14,

2000

Winners announced awarded

Keith Pritchard scholarship

who

exhibit strong motivation

By Tracy Ford

keen students

to

and a desire

Jeremy Ladan of Waterloo, a

to learn

stu-

following year of study, as well

dent in electronics engineering

as the student’s demonstration of

Conestoga College has named

technology - telecommunications

creativity

year’s winners of the Keith

systems, receives the $700 runner-

peers.

this

up award

Pritchard Scholarships.

The awards usually

are presented

that will

go toward

his

third year of study.

annually to one first-year student and one second-year student, but this year three students were chosen to receive cash awards to be used for further tuition. “We did have some extra money in the fund, so we decided to have a runner-up,” said Carol Walsh,

sarily high

academic

achievers.

What we

are looking for

is

a

administrator offinancial aid, student scholarships

and awards

program),

- computer systems

won

the

first-place

award of $2,000 to be put toward his second year of study in the 2000-01 school year.

Mark

Peeters of Zurich, a student

The scholarship was

memory

established

of Pritchard, a grad-

engineering technology program, after his

The award, which was created by company along with the

sudden death

in 1996.

Pritchard graduated in 1971 and

began

won

(formerly the electronics engineering technology

rounder.”

uate of the college’s electronics

Carol Walsh,

David Poidevin, a student from Cambridge enrolled in the computer engineering technology program

demic standing. “They are not necessarily high academic achievers,” Walsh said. “What we are looking for is a good

in the

rounder.”

administrator of financial aid, stu-

dent scholarships and awards.

The winning student must show a need and have good aca-

financial

‘They are not neces-

good

and leadership among

his career in business.

Pritchard’s

S-S Technologies, an international-

money

ly

received from the Ontario

Student Opportunities Trust Fund, is

presented to Conestoga’s elec-

tronics students

who

demonstrate

recognized firm in communica-

tions

and simulation technology for

the control automation industry.

“He

(Pritchard)

had a keen

in the, computer engineering tech-

creativity in the learning process

est in learning,” said

nology - telecommunications program, received the $700 runner-up award to go toward his second year

and leadership

that the winner’s qualities

ty of the

of study.

student’s promotion to the

.

He

Canada Award for Business Excellence - Innovation. In 1992 he became president of a

The

qualities.

decision,

made by

program,

is

inter-

Walsh, adding

resemble

the facul-

the qualities Pritchard possessed,

based on the

including strong motivation and ability to obtain

Richard Hoover from maintainence does some weeding flower bed by the recreation centre on duly 25.

good marks.

(Photo by Petra Lamport)

"

...V

V

Quality Policy Conestoga College continually seeks opportunities for improver/, ent to Conestoga College rm

meet and exceed the needs of our students, employees

in

a

and communities.


SPOKE, August

14,

2000

—Page 5

Tree planted to recognize youth employment support By

Julie Porter

city councillor

To give recognition to the community that supports

Ward

Wettlaufer, Kitchener South

it,

the

K-W Career

Galloway, and

MP

Centre

Kitchener

Redman

Tom

Karen

attended the event.

Connections (KWCC) planted a maple tree in Waterloo Park on July

About 20 youth from local summer programs were there to witness

27.

the planting of the tree and eat pizza

This

new

tree-planting event

was

at the picnic afterwards.

Nova Scotia branch of

Wettlaufer began the ceremony by

Career Connections to show appre-

asking the assembled youth what

started

by

the

ciation for Canadians

who

support

the goal of increasing opportunities for youth.

their parents’

He

parent

Several local dignitaries, including Kitchener Centre

MPP Wayne

job were.

anyone present had a in the plumbing or electrical fields. He went on to ask about teachers, doctors and finally computer work. “High-tech is the future. The asked

if

who worked

future of this country lies in the

technical

trade

said

area,”

recommend that you consider technical work and that Wettlaufer. “I

you develop your communication incredibly important to

skills. It is

your community that you know how

communicate.”

to

Galloway,

who was

representing

Kitchener mayor Carl Zehr, said

he

that

opportunities

felt that great

for youth

were available in the

K-W

From

He

employ 40 students every sum-

mer,” said Galloway. “

minimum

wage, so he knows what it is like to be a student looking for work, and wished the youth good luck.

Redman stantly

said

Canada must con-

support initiatives to find

good employment

employment

officers,

for youth.

Chris Bates, co-ordinator of stu-

dent employment for Kitchener-

Waterloo,

address

said

that

the

KWCC

elected to participate in the tree-

the crowd gathered at the

planting because

KWCC’s

event that represented Canada’s

July 27.

tree-planting event on (Photo by Julie Porter)

it

young people and

was a symbolic

their future.

tree in

to visit the

Waterloo Park and remember

future’s opportunities.

his youth, including a

Kathyrn Verhulst, Kitchener

that those in

come

dents.”

job at a golf course for

Kathyrn Verhulst, student

he hoped

it

summer of

and

said

attendance would

can attest to the benefit of employers hiring stuI

Galloway said he worked every

Kristi Griffiths (left)

Griffiths,

city councillor

Tom

Galloway, Kitchener Centre

Karen Redman and Kitchener Centre MPP Wayne Wettlaufer, plant a maple tree for KWCC’s tree-planting event in Waterloo Park July 27. (Photo by Julie Porter)

area. “I

left, Kristi

MP

was planted Kathryn

to

symbolize the

and Kristi Griffiths, student employment officers, planted the maple tree after the speeches and then started the group Verhulst

in the singing of

O Canada.

According to Griffiths, the tree planting was important to draw attention to student employment. “Having a tree-planting event is a

way of getting nity

and

out into the

being

commu-

visible,”

offices across Ontario participated

We have 20 computers with Internet

and that in planning the event, organizers looked for something that could be done on a

cializing in

national scale.

work in everything from lawn mow-

“The event needed to be something that could be easily adaptable and done just about anywhere in Canada,” said Griffiths. “The Maple Leaf was chosen because it is easily

ing to a job as an administrative

recognizable as Canada’s national

who

in the event,

KWCC

offer students looking for

is

register

Job Squad that

work

for students

with the service. Once

KWCC will

dent can follow up. Often, Griffiths

you come

into the office lookfirst

thing

said, these

we’d do

said Griffiths.

Griffiths said

you

needed help putting together a resume, we can help you do that.

“If

jobs are one or two days

of labour:

take you on a tour of the facilities

promotes environmental awareness.

40 youth employment

Odd

phone them and tell them of the work possibility and then the stu-

work

offered,”

said

KWCC offers a serv-

finds temporary

has a lot to

benefits the

She

She said the ice called the

year-round. ing for work, the

She said that tree planting not only community but also

assistant:

a student signs up, the

She said the

“If

resume writing.”

Griffiths said students could find

symbol.”

said

Griffiths.

access and a special program spe-

it is

possible for a

work in the becomes a part-time

student to find full-time

summer

that

position during the school year.

College Graduates Join the leading edge of a

new breed

of professionals!

lonestoga offers a variety of unique full-time Post-Graduate Program

Apply

now

for

September

Career Development Practitioner

Computer Numerical Control Environmental Engineering Applications (Optional Co-op)

Human Resources Management

(Co-op)

Systems Analyst Teaching English as a Second Language

Technology Marketing

Woodworking Manufacturing Management For information

call

748-5220, ext 656

Jamie Holdam, from

ICI

Steel-Tech

Inc.,

puts

new

siding

on the recreation centre on July 25. (Photo by Petra Lampert)

*

Ask about our part-time

s->

4

COneStOga ("VaIIpOP r~m


Page 6

— SPOKE,

August

14,

2000

Former student exhibits photos Local photographer By

Petra Lampert

A

former

Conestoga

College

journalism student’s photography is on display at the Kitchener Public Library.

Darko

Zeljkovic,

Kitchener,

is

month’s guest

this

artist at the library.

of

36,

The

exhibit, his

month’s guest

is this

Zeljkovic.

other places in town.

hear anything about the Gypsies.”

good place for local artists to showcase their work because there is a wide spectrum of people coming into the library

is

Zeljkovic said he hopes his photo

pretty amazing.”

artist series.

“His photos are pretty amazing,” she said.

Green was the

first

person

library to see Zeljkovic’s

brought

it

other staff

at the

work and

to the attention of the

who

decide which

artist

they will feature.

Green said the guest

artist series

library

began

its

a couple of years

planning at the

awareness

increase

will

among Canadians and

co-ordinator of events

guest

hosted

opening night of Zeljkovic’s exhibit, said she admires his work.

essay

semester transferred to the photojournalism program at Loyalist College in Belleville. He graduated in May and is now freelancing at the London Free Press. Georgina Green, co-ordinator of events planning at the library, said she likes Zeljkovic ’s work and a great addition to the

graphic

who

the

“His photos are Georgina Green,

it’s

senior

the Gypsies’ story well with his

after his third

.thinks

a

at the library,

portraits.

Zeljkovic studied print journal-

Conestoga and

Pat Fiskvatn,

designer

She added Zeljkovic has captured

library.

opened Aug. 1 and will hang in the Concourse Room, in the lower level of the main library, until Aug. 30. at

them. They’re hated. In 10 years of conflict in Yugoslavia you never

a

first,

ism

“A lot isn’t known about

ago because staff realized that there were wonderful local artists who don’t get a chance to exhibit in

She added the

Kitchener Public Library

artist at

that

it

will

help people see beyond the existing stereotypes about Gypsies.

He

KPL

said he took

the photo-

all

graphs for his exhibit in three weeks and used almost 100 rolls of Zeljkovic said his exhibit library is only

“This

is 'just

one step

at the

the beginning,” he

said.

During

December

film, including slide film.

Zeljkovic said his ultimate goal

in his goal.

and

1999

work

to

for National

magazine, or a similar publication. “I’m a journalist before anything

he

January 2000, Zeljkovic travelled to Bosnia and Yugoslavia where he

else,”

photographed Gypsies.

Zeljkovic and

He

said the crushing poverty

and

the colourful misfortune of Gypsies shocked him so much that for the first time he wanted to try to help someone with his photographs. “I

wanted

to tell their story,” said

is

Geographic

said.

Equinox

has

approached

shown an

interest in

publishing his photos and a 5,000-

word

story

Darko Zeljkovic stands

in front of

one

Gypsy photographs

of his

at his exhibit at the Kitchener Public Library. (Photo by Petra Lampert)

on the Gypsies.

Zeljkovic said he also wants to do

book on Gypsies and track them from their place of origin. He said his main interest lies in documena

want

“I

myself as a war at least one

to try

photographer, shoot

December 1992 and has

war.”

Zeljkovic

tary photography.

Bosnia, but immigrated to Canada

during the Bosnian civil war in

originally

is

from

Kitchener since

1

lived in

996.

Conestoga turns

down

the heat

By Petra Lampert

All the other buildings on

cam-

pus have rooftop units that supply

Changing the college’s air system over from heating to cooling

summer

for

flicking

In

is

simple as

not as

on a switch.

resources manager Barry Milner,

an involved process that can

it’s

two weeks. He said the changeover from heating to cooling was done in May this year and is normally done the same time each year, depending on the temperature and the longtake up to

range forecast.

Milner said

week

or

more

it

usually takes

“It it

a

just for the water in

down.

the system to cool

depends on how warm or cold Milner. “It depends on it’s

the water will cool

He on

it

said

once the

usually takes

cooler outside,

down

faster.” is

turned

two days

for the

chiller

370 HIGHLAND RD. W„

cool air to be

KITCHENE

Milner said it normally takes a of five to complete the changeover.

FOOG BASICS PLAZA

744-1011 385 FAIRWAY ROAD

ST.,

KITCHENER 893-2464 402 KING STRICT N„

WATERLOO

CD OUTLET

884-7376

VKitmatWWW.bMt90M0n.C0m I

water to cool

down

same water

used.

is

first,

since the

Milner said there’s about 30,000 gallons (about 120,000 litres) of water in the heating system and about 15,000 US gallons (about

US

60,000

litres) in

the air condition-

“There’s a great amount of water

down,” he

to cool

out of the water and the

need

to

and other work like snow clearing. Water is cooled or heated at the boilerhouse, across from Door 5, and pumped over to the main building. classrooms

adding that

pumps

also

be changed over.

The same process

is followed in around the second week in October, except reversed, said fall,

water

changeover

said,

the heat has to naturally dissipate

The physical resources department keeps track of the weather, especially from mid October to

air to

change from maintenance must allow the pump

workers

Milner.

Fans circulate the

pumps, boilers

the

said in order to

staff

The

boilers are fired is

up and the

brought up to temperature

to heat the building.

He

said

cool

water

can

go

through the boiler and by that time the water temperature has risen.

Milner said in a year the college spends about a quarter of a million dollars for utilities.

From 1998

to 1999, the college

in the college.

spent $1 17,278 on water; $834,384

There are three large boilers for whole building that heat the water and one chiller that cools it.

and $243,175 on gas. major part of our budget,” he said.

and offices

BETWEEN HARVEYS & BURGER KING

He

all

chiller are inspected.

heating to cooling,

the

felt.

April, for the heating

CANADIAN TIRE PLAZA

Each year and the

ing system.

is,” said

the weather. If

be controlled somewhat easier in these buildings.

according to physical

fact,

and heating. Milner said the temperature can

the cooling

the

for hydro;

“Utilities are a


.

Kim Stockwood rocks Elora Quarry with songs By Jes Brown

of eating bugs on stage.

bilities

She Canadian singer

Kim Stockwood

also said she thought the

liked Off and

wondered why

says that the strangest venue she

couldn’t smell like strawber-

ever performed at was playing pri-

ries.

vately for 12 millionaires but the

most intriguing venue had

to

be the

Elora Festival.

On

27, Newfoundland Stockwood and her band

July

native

were

anchored floating stage in the middle of the Elora quarry to play for the assemferried out to an

started off with her current

and went through

single, Still,

The ated

hit

throughout the night.

after hit

with

Then she looked up

Stockwood confided that was just what

at

the audience, sitting over

30 metres above her at the top of the quarry, and said “You guys are gonna go home tonight and say

she

humor

as she told stories,

teased her band and swatted mosquitoes.

After singing her hit

great but

when

since,

You and

Me, Stockwood took a break to get “Offed again” - one of her band members sprayed her with bug spray - and she commented that she’d been warned about the possi-

she’s

nervous she will still follow his

So

advice.

her

in

short,

purple

tight

dress,

her

Stockwood

was

Suspicious Minds.

have been out of her mind between songs but each one was as good as the last and her segues kept everyone laughing and excited. She relayed one story

The

venue of the quarry

was

interesting

but

made

difficult

it

Stockwood because she was 30 metres or so below the audi-

to see

Kim

about her gig playing

Way.

fine, as there

Before playing the song that skyrocketed her career, Stockwood

reverberation off the

little

quarry walls.

Stockwood wore her bathing

told another personal story about

suit

how

under her dress for the performance and was quite pleased that it gave her a place to put her guitar pick, though she asked that no one tell because her mother might find

The band was almost

all

Newfoundland. She asked God for a sign, something to keep her in the business. Not long after that, Stockwood’s best known song," Jerk, began climbing the charts. “All I can say,” said Stockwood, “is thank God for each and every

in

bathing suits under their concert

Foxy

clothes and guitarist Kevin

was the

first to

show

the audience

Jerk.”

To end

why.

Stockwood gave Foxy sing a solo or

ry.

she was about to give up on

Toronto and music and go back to

out.

sang —

may

She

ever

she’s

of

out

and

did

Kim

‘yeah,

songs.

Elvis

sing

The sound was

ence.

She asked her father what she should do and his advice was to wear a tight dress and

mind.’”

music was punctuStockwood’s quirky

fantastic

sense of

it

for 12 millionaires.

Stockwood was

bled crowd.

She

bugs

Foxy

the choice

jump in the quardown to his

formed on

bathing suit and chose the water

made him

I

Bachman and

per-

New Year’s Eve 2000 in with her father

St. John’s, Nfld.,

Stockwood

Stockwood

Ever, a song she wrote

with Randy

stripped

over the microphone.

the concert

sang Will

playing accordian.

Then she and

sing anyway.

Stockwood made every member of her band sing and each of them had to come up with a popular song to add to the growing medley. The audience was serenaded with everything from Jingle Bells to Sexual Healing to I Want It That

all

but two

bers of her band stripped their bathing suits,

water and

swam

jumped

made an encore

ble

but definitely as

to

into the

to shore.

It

impression,

mem-

down

pretty impossileft

a lasting

does Stockwood

herself.

Shallow teen movie won’t impress anyone By Tracy Ford

these types of movies

Morgan Creek movie producdone

tions has filled its

it

again.

It

has

niche in the motion pic-

is

minimal

and the producers seem

to bring

them together quickly, but moviegoers would be better off not seeing these poor excuses for films.

ture industry

Not only

except

flaw but the lack of believability of the situations and the decadence of

by creating another shallow teen flick with no merits the

characters’

fashion

is

the plot’s dullness a

these children

sense.

a

The In Crowd movie about

woman,

Scene

a

scene

Adrien,

played by Lori Heuring, who is brought into an exclusive social of

circle

students

these at

their

rich kids half the age.

who is the boyfriend of the girl who brought her into the in-crowd. And so, like

ter off

a tennis professional

teenage suspense

thrillers,

from the in-crowd begin show their darker side and seek

the girls to

while

effort

trying to portray

Raving jealously ensues when Adrien begins dating

all

and

showing no actual

country club.

in

cast

in

out of character,

high

while working

after

this

wanders

university

class

is

hard to ignore.

is

revenge.

The plot, which contains no originality, is dull. The success of

If

whiney

actor’s

actual

This movie would have been bet-

being produced directly for

cable or video rental stores,

if

made at all. The cast, a bunch of dreary-eyed and lip pouting girls, barely succeed in bringing this horrible script to life, and give terrible performances to complete the never-ending stream of pathetic teen genre

(left), Nathan Bexton (middle) and Mathew Settle star decadence but the script is unbelievable and shallow.

Laurie Fortier of lavish

life

movies.

There

is

nothing worse

empty performances.

The

in

entire

The

Crowd, which shows a (internet photo)

special

than a group of wanna-be Jennifer

cast should look for another line of

dollar

Love-Hewitts and Drew Barrymores parading around a ritzy set acting like they should be given an academy award for their

work.

isn’t

The merits of this movie are minThe cinematography is fair-

In

effects

movies

and multi -billion this

recent release

going to impress anyone, nor reel in

any legitimate posi-

will

it

imal.

tive

reviews no matter what the

ly straightforward, so in this age of

movie poster

says.

you knew] one hour

Read Spoke

of your time

could save

someone’s

life—

Teaching Englis h

Would you help? In just one- hour,

you could save as many as'lour

As a blood donor, yet

someone

in

lives.

you're eligible to give blood every

Canada needs blood every minute

56 days-

of

every day.

as a

Second Lariguage

Please help by giving blood.

A One-Year

For clinic information, -7201

Starts this

call: 1* 888-871

Call for

Certificate Prograim

September

more information

CANADIAN BLOOD SE RVICES Blood.

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s

in

you to

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r

Conestoga ,

^College

[j


Page 8

— SPOKE, August

14,

2000

m m

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