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.

— No. 28

33rd Year

shop may be contracted out

Print

What’s

By Tracy Ford

Inside

same or improved

Conestoga College may contract its print shop to a private firm. out requests

The bidder must, along with

July 19 asking companies to sub-

other specific requirements, provide comparable full-time employ-

sent

mit proposals to operate the print shop for a 10-year term.

ment and

Kevin Mullan, vice-president of finance for Conestoga College, said the college

is

looking

uing running

it

“We have

the

way

The request

at all its

option

to large print organ-

students.

izations.

PAGE 4

fied

speci-

It

the

college

must receive proposals by July 31. short list of pos-

A

companies

sible

is

offer.

it is.

look at all our options,” he said. “That would be normal in most of our large invest-

among

also states that this

exploratory and the college doesn’t have to accept any

Mullan said

to

ment situations.” The request for proposals was sent

advancement for cur-

rent full-time print shop staff.

department or contin-

tract out the

benefit coverage with the

potential for

options before choosing to con-

Anxiety and depression on rise

current

all

commitments, including current staffing and equipment leases.

out

The college

The

service.

bidder must assume

was

was

sent out

fair.

only

“It’s

“We

employ-

telling the

ees before the request

could

to

fair

the

let

employees

understand if we were over staffed

know

and there were

lege)

you

before col-

(the

ever

mailed that (the

people with nothing to do, but

we

request for proposals) out,” he

all

said.

work hard.”

be made and This is the presentations by the Lynn Knowles, first time the bidder will be held reproduction operator college has on Aug. 2. If an attempted to agreement is made, the contract contract out a department, and will go into effect on Oct.l. “We Mullan said there aren’t going be will

may

Student services helps abuse victims.

PAGE

5

may

or

not accept anything,”

“The primary reason is we know there will be a need for a signifi-

with the staff there,” said Mullan. “All I can offer is the assurance

cant investment in print equipment,” he said.

that the

The

shop needs several hundred thousand dollars for equipment and the college is looking for

ways

now,” he

He

also

On July 19 the print shop staff were informed of a meeting where

“If we have no we have to look

they

print

is

years, said,

“We said.

outside of the college

are

all

communi-

ty-

in,

then

to run the

“We knew something

dedicated workers.

all

work hard

They

Conestoga College’s Literacy attracted attention from

how

WLU

from

Lab has

at

called).

the print

7

proposals

was wrong (when the meeting was

ask-

By Jes Brown

college’s

has worked at the college for six

We

Staff

the

shop with the funds available to invest,” said Mullan. Cathy McManus, a printer who

ing for an outside

Michelle Pfeiffer stars in What Lies

came

together,” she

to

see

how

She said similar situations had happened at previous jobs. She said if the print shop employees are no longer employees of the college but employees of the contracted company, they will no longer be protected by the union.

Lyttle,

ice

we

give them,”

Lynn Knowles,

for the Literacy Lab,

said the

went well. “Our three visitors came

Poverty stats

Lab

ed

how

to see

the adaptive software and

with thr

;

that r

we have might

gel

situation in a library

setting

Gill ir

iid

she was interest-

-racy

Lab and what

copies in 1999-00. “Impressions have tripled with the

same

McManus

award

this year, said the print

“We

could understand

ees

who work

in the department

“No one

'

were over-staffed and there were

said

has quit; they just Alviano said. A collective agreement letter of understanding says contracting out any department where public service employees are employed has retired,”

shop

we

staff,”

are satisfied with their jobs.

said.

if.

of

The print shop has always been a pleasant place to work, according to the staff, and all of the employ-

a reproduction

offers a valuable service.

amount

Alviano.

operator for years, 11 who received an employee of the year

specific guidelines.

An employee

who

people with nothing to do, but we all work hard and the figures have

has completed a probationary period cannot be fired if the department is contracted out. The

increased,” she said.

new employer must offer compara-

According to Vince Alviano, an employee of print shop for 20 years and now the supervisor, production increased from five million copies in 1995-96 to seven

ble

the

“I

computer consultant

million

“One of the reasons the college is number one is because of the serv-

library

staff

was

Gillham

Wilfrid

at

it.

very

said.

“It’s a

study of special needs. Lyttle told them about learning

opportunities

terms and employment.

The current Ontario

project,

which funds the Literacy Lab at Conestoga. She suggested the visitors talk to Cathy Potvin

contract

Public

of

with the Services

Doon

from

Conestoga’s learning resource centre, because Lyttle and Potvin often work together and share ideas, and if anything ever happened to the lab, Lyttle hopes the

LRC

would take

it

over. “It

the

conditions

Employees Union expires Aug. 3 1

lab at

impressed.” wonderful facility.” Wilfrid Laurier University is looking into renovating its library and is doing a

Su

hardware

July 18.

(Photo by Tracy Ford)

technology.

Gillham and Sophie Bury and information technology specialist Rene Paquin - visited the Literacy librarians Virginia

the print shop.

Laurier could learn from

Page 2

staff

in

visit literacy

visit

Three

press

Conestoga works with adaptive

members from Wilfrid Laurier University -

alarming

said

replies.

company to run shop on campus with the

are

response to the proposals depends upon the number and quality of

to cut costs, accord-

first

just

said.

ing to Mullan.

In the request, the college

COMMENTARY

is

employees will be in good a position as they

as

print

four employees directly affected by the change were given copies of the request for proposals and were told no final decision had been made.

PAGE

should be made no dissatisfaction

“It

clear there

heard of the possibility of contracting out their work. The

Beneath.

any others.

said Mullan.

Lynn Knowles, a reproduction operator for 11 years and this employee of the year award, works with a

year’s winner of the

was

fruitful,”

Lyttle said.

how

they take on

“I’d like to see

any of

this information.”

said she hopes rates

some of the

in their library.

WLU

She

incorpo-

lab’s resources


,

— SPOKE, July 31, 2000

Page ^ 2

....

...in

nniiiMMirnmimillffllllMIIIIII^

Children

still

go

hungry in the year 2000 I* years ago to Federal politicians passed a resolution 10 2000. It’s year the eliminate child poverty in Canada by hungry. school to go to 2000, and children continue Region and Guelph still have numerous break-

""" L

Waterloo of children who arrive at fast programs feeding hundreds school hungry because of poverty. country has According to the latest poverty fact book, our years ago. did it 25 than households $1.3 million more poor consurprising, not is it startling, is Although this number sidering the ever-increasing

Single parents tend to be the

number of government

cut-

province in 1995. The poverty fact book was released July 19

because more than

Canadian Council on Social Development (CCSD) and by

80 per cent are women who earn

by

Violence won’t just stop

the

standard you’re considered poor if you are a family of three its

less than men.

living

on

less than

What an Canadians

$24,252 a

year.

household income In Waterloo Region the average $61 244.

The council found poverty

rates are highest

is

»

among fami-

been

at

past

two months,

in southern Ontario

slain

by

There are about 56,000 adults and caseing degrees of poverty in the region and the welfare

Faced with enormous cutbacks, these shelters are doing what they can, but they can really only hope to keep the women safe; they can-

not end domestic violence. Our judges don’t consider

much

different

six

The overwhelming

have

evidence

shot execution-

being dragged naked into her home after delivering her infant to safety, another was

collected

in

data

shows

that

strangers.

four children.

Another

in

woman was

is often not If someone is making minimum wage, it when surprised government our is enough to get by. Why

the

word “Welcome”

written

on

them.

on welfare rather than work?

Studies have

the cost of everyday living continues to rise it is becoming increasingly harder for some, especially single-

are five times

As

from minor crimes and police are not adequately equipped or educated to deal with the deeply complex psychology of battered women and

shown that women more likely to be

spouse than by a killed by stranger, yet women cannot walk a

make ends meet. 1997 Canada Mortgage and Housing survey showed Waterloo the average rent for a two-bedroom apartment in Region was $636 while the welfare housing allowance for a

parent families, to

A

family of three was $554.

the streets at night alone without

fearing horrifying dangers.

According to demographer David Baxter, the overwhelming evidence in data collected shows that women should always hang out with strangers.

is

Battered

women’s

shelters in the

Kitchener area report a flood of crisis calls from women after the Luft

their batterers.

children are inundated with

Our

violent images daily, and pornogra-

means of sexual education, is chock full of demeaning images of women.

phy, often a boy’s

first

Our female children

are taught

early to be afraid or cautious, and children of both sexes are made to

understand that divisions between the sexes exist, unquestionably,

and

that

males are genetically

women

have

It is

not a

new phenomenon and

yet, despite these horrifying acts,

another in vote Conservative government, whose massive cutbacks have left facili-

Ontarians

ties

— whose job

it

is to

protect

- floundering and

sputtering.

Anselma House

in Kitchener has

an area where work

is

desperately

Canadians have their priorities wrong. Society is only as strong as point its its weakest link, and at this weakest links are the boys and men

women

as violence against

are conditioned to give in to

urges of violence.

We

be

should

pouring

our

educating our young, on rehabilitation programs for first-time offenders and shelters

resources

for

into

women and

children.

demand from our government, our law-enforcers and

We

should

our criminal justice system, that we put issues of domestic violence in the forefront.

Canadians boast that we are recognized by the United Nations as being a country that is the best to live in, but if many in our country face the daily threat of violence,

can we really speak with any

wired with violent tendencies.

And

done by

in four

violence in their lives.

who

stabbed

within the confines of her house with its cutouts on the porch with

poverty.

partners.

study

needed.

should always hang out with

by her husband

their

a

faced cutbacks in public education,

women

then went on to shoot their

who

of to

those victims

after

viciously stabbed

about 26,000.

country.

their partners.

One woman was style

hands According Baxter, one

experienced some sort of threat of

domestic violence

in sad, docile heaps.

the

In

children living in vary-

not doing enough to help fight poverty in this country.

up

women

to cover the bare

Rent for a three-bedroom unit was $800 while welfare allowed $602 to house a family of four. From these latest statistics it’s evident that government

being

not

curl

necessities

to stay

Gillian

Tim Hortons. But when we are faced with a lethal and horrifying epidemic we

covers the bare necessities such as rent, food and clothes. Waterloo Region surveys show more than half of poor

some people choose

the

long line up

than wealthier children. An average poor family earns only $18,050, which only

The gap between the rich and poor continues to widen because even if people are working they can still be living

Hadley - that they too would end up as a good front page story in newspapers across the

our

for

allowed to smoke in bingo halls, when the Leafs lose the Stanley Cup, the arrival of royalty from a country across the sea, or perhaps a

lowThe council’s report concluded that children from skills develop to able income families are less healthy, less and more destructive. They are also more likely to endure more humiliation

is

Domestic violence is not new. In 1999, 55 of the 164 homicides in Toronto were women who died at

get us riled up

from 1981 to 1997.

load

off about taxcuts.

workers that their partners threatened to do to them what Ralph Hadley did to Ontario, telling crisis

Certain things

families doubled

employed but not paid enough

arrived at shelters around southern

passivity.

parents tend to with parents under the age of 25. Single cent are per than 80 more because partly poorest, be the women who earn less than men.

among young

are

we

known worldwide

lies

national poverty rate

seems not to be stopping any time soon, Canadians clutch their wallets and our political parties spout

are.

family were found dead in their home, worried that they too will end up that way. In droves, they

apa-

bunch

thetic

In fact,

families are

/'N

l

backs. Welfare cheques were slashed by 21.6 per cent by the

poorest, partly

The

nil 'Uu

integrity?

mainly funded from September to May by a payInc. (CSI). formerly called the of Student Association, in exchange for the insertion

SPOKE

is

ment from Conestoga Students

Doon

The views and opinions expressed in newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of

advertising in the paper. this

Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers

SPOKE

is

of Conestoga College. published and produced weekly by the journalism students Lampert Petra Editor: Editor: Tracy Ford; News

Photo Editor: Jes Brown Advertising Manager: Julie Porter Jerry Frank Circulation Manager: Julie Porter; Faculty Supervisor.

SPOKE’s

address

Phone: 748-5220,

is

ext.

4M4. 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G spoke@conestogac.on.ca E-mail: 748-3534 691, 692, 693, 694 Fax:

in

SPOKE

are not

contain the endorsed by the CSI unless their advertisements arising CSI logo. SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages

amount paid for the out of errors in advertising beyond the sent to the editor by space. Unsolicited submissions must be to acceptance or 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject WordPerfect and should be clearly written or typed; a would be helpful. Submissions must not conby an any libellous statements and may be accompanied

rejection

or

MS Word file

tain

illustration (such as a photograph).


SPOKE, July

2000

31,

— Page 3

College receives $1.2 million for

maintenance work By Tracy Ford

now,” he

said.

“There are a

lot

of

buildings and a lot of mechanical

A modernization and renewal program, established by the government of Ontario, has’ allotted

systems.”

Conestoga College $1.2 million to go towards maintenance and

has

The money

program,

announced

as

SuperBuild

which

part

was

of

the

was

initiative,

designed to help the province’s aging colleges and universities revitalize their

“By giving

campuses.

money for that we don’t have to

from our regular operating

versities to

government plans

upgrade existing

facili-

ties.

Most of

the province’s colleges

and universities are 25 to 30 years old. Conestoga College is 32 years old.

Tibbits said the change won’t be visible to students

money the

and

staff but the

will help the college

campus “It’s

WATERLOO

“It’s

said.

will

be spent.

like

running a house,” he

“You have

He

to

make

sure your

up-to-date.”

is

said

Conestoga’s campuses

are well maintained and haven’t

job

modernization of the province���s 25 colleges and 17 uni-

BETWEEN HARVEYS & BORGES KING

money

dent of Conestoga College.

to invest in

402 KING STREET N„

government can any time and the

shown any major need of repair. “We have always done a good

it

lion the Ontario

CANADIAN TIRE PLAZA

at

college sets priorities on Where the

furnace

The money comes from $95 mil-

ST.

is

budget,” said John Tibbits, presi-

-take

385 FAIRWAY ROAD

money

grant

us

(maintenance),

FOOD BASICS PLAZA

the college

case such a grant

Tibbits said the

The

370 HIGHLAND RD. W.

in

list

awarded.

repairs.

ms?.-:

made

be delegated

will

through a priority

keep

up-to-date.

very hard for colleges

it

at

maintaining (the college) but

just ensures others that -our elec-

trical

system

isn’t

down,” Tibbits Tibbits

said

going to break

said.

the

money

is

by the government depending upon the number of stuassigned

dents a college or university has.

The college $14.2

million

will

also

receive

of the SuperBuild funding, announced in as

part

June, to help build another wing

with more classrooms and to reorganize the maze of corridors in the D wing, close to where the new

wing

will

be located.


— SPOKE, July 31, 2000

Page 4

m

Stressed out Anxiety and depression on rise among Conestoga students By Petra Lampert

seek help with issues such as academic stress, heavy course loads,

you’re a student at Conestoga experiencing anxiety or depression,

relationships, family

If

She said students seem to be facmore demands in and out of

you’re probably not alone. According to college counsellor

Lynn Robbins, there’s been an increase in the number of students

ety

school.

nature of anxiety.

she

seeking help.

She said

it’s

good

that

men

in

they want to concentrate on.

anxiety

Students interested in the course

and depressant

an increasing numwith these symptoms

men

symptoms

that are

presented

in

can come to student services in the fall and sign up. One of the teachers will

our

Lynn Robbins,

for help.

college counsellor

who’s a student,” she said. Robbins said counsellors help

to

see

that

some

stu-

dents also feel anxious about their

nosed with depression and anxiety. She said staff have received calls

from students’ doctors

work term placements because they know they’ll have to perform.

if

counselling

“To support that, we designed an anxiety course,” she

college offers.

said.

is available and to find out what other types of services the

Robbins said students come

in to

have

The course

is

called anxiety and

Starts this

Certificate

Starting in the fall there will also

shops available to students.

Program

September

dllUII Call for more information

519-748-5220, ext 656

ga Conesto ° - ^

^

stress

man-

agement, time management and effective textbook reading. Some groups include relaxation, public speaking anxiety and test anxiety. For further information regarding groups and workshops, or coun-

can

schedule for College counsellor Lynn Robbins displays the by Petra Lampert) (Photo workshops. and upcoming groups

student

visit

room 2B02.

services,

Students needing help can turn to counsellors

Second Language

A One-Year

to

suitable

is

be a variety of groups and work-

selling, students

Teaching English as a

the course

Workshops include Robbins added

are clinically diag-

who

if

for them.

office.”

“We’re available to anyone

meet with the student

determine

are

starting to feel comfortable asking

students

teaches the

it

ance, test and public speaking anxiety. Students can choose an area

noticed an

increase

said, including

ber of

since

the course

“I’ve

that

are presented in our office,

identified

The course focuses on perform-

“I’ve noticed an increase in anxi-

and depressant symptoms

who have

Students

anxiety as a barrier to their success in school may benefit from taking

ing

from such problems.

suffering

problems and

financial concerns.

personal performance, and will be offered in January as an elective.

11

College

By Petra Lampert During one college year, counsellor Lynn Robbins has counselled over

200

students.

From September 1998

to

May

1999, the student services counsellor saw 221 individuals.

Robbins of stream September to

said

4

tenant mnmmm

mer

is also

students April, but the

from sum-

busy.

Robbins said the

when

steady

a

it’s

summer

is

staff

student services

is

busy preparing for the fall semester and completing tasks like filling out reports, compiling statisand delegating teaching tics duties.

and

She said during the winter semesters there’s more fall

staff,

but in the

summer

there’s

jSSSS&t

\

V

.

•,

j

www.paguide.com mi

hi i iim nn niiimiiriiiaMlMMMlMlMiyiMBftfiiintMBlBii ii

coming

ple

to student services

seeking counselling. She said student services counsellors already work with a lot of

people

who

are in abusive rela-

continue students at that time than

what

Christmas.

at

“It’s

good

ities are at

Student services counsellors are required to have a masters

tionships and trying to get out, but it impacts the office when

level degree.

these incidents occur and are por-

sellors

trayed in the media because peo-

Robbins said three of the counhave their masters in social work and two have a mas-

ple identify through numbers.

ters

“Their fear increases during

room 2B02, make an appointment.

student services,

this time.”

She said

of education. Students needing help can go to

for the

week of July

17

A

effective

summer she

students

usually has

per day

that

are

good idea to fall

come

in before the

semester begins, since testing

to

counselling contract usually weeks, but if

that’s affecting their grades, it’s a

in a typical

know

and responsibilthe college,” Robbins

said.

week dur-

to ensure at least

for students to

their rights

one

summer

five

•'

domestic violence, like the Luft family murders, has also caused an increase in the number of peo-

more help

ing the

'

drop in to

ask questions, look for resources, or use the housing registry. Robbins said the recent rash of

have a learning disability. Robbins said if students think they have a learning disability

She said

1-888-334-9769

that a lot of students

take turns working during

is available.

,

several drop-in students, adding

According to Robbins, another busy time for staff is May, when there’s an increased need for counsellors to sit on appeal boards, since more programs dis-

she also had several students come in who suspect they may

the

Get it UYR

takes a fair

usually only one counsellor. Robbins said all five counsellors

amount of time.

booked for appointments and

lasts for six to eight is

needed students can

receive additional counselling. Summer hours of operation,

May

Monday to to

4 p.m.

1

to

Aug. 31, are

Friday from 8:30 a.m.


SPOKE,

July 31, 2000

at student services

Abuse victims get help

to help not only the

By

Julie Porter

Women who

^

—Page

woman but

also

the children.

“Prior to March 31, 1999, there was nothing there to really protect children from witnessing family

experiencing

are

violence or are afraid of their partners can seek support at the stu-

said

violence,”

“Parents

Kalau.

dent services department. According to Lynn Robbins, a

often just lost children to foster

counselor with student services, many women seek the aid of counselors to gain support that they

through the cracks.

need

to get

being in

of

them through

Robbins,

to report simply

lence.

Duty

that

professionals

to

must

ters

abuse or the witness of abuse, in

most important thing. “The issues are so different with each woman,” said Robbins. “Some women just want to know that they are not worthy of such abuse; some are fleeing, and we options. and support offer

fear of re- victimizing the

Sometimes we work

ter for fear of losing

the

at

women

not their fault what

is

“It

couple ot the pampmets avanaDie Lynn Robbins, a counselor at student services, displays a talk with her. in trouble will feel that they can come and It is her hope that women

happening to

r

women, but

for the

home, society often turns a blind

Conestoga

eye.

woman

Cambridge areas

has happened. The media, however, is not in the living rooms of

women

an

women who

homes. can develop separate

live in violent

“Women

from her, Robbins said the policy

Women

outdoor

Walk to pre-

run by Conestoga Students Inc. and campus security. Walk Safe operates

are

aim

is

to provide people

escort carries a radio

immediately

lots.

who

that those

witness abuse tend to be abusive,’

Safe

The

and can reach if the need

Monday

runs

be

to

is

grant,

and may expand

cover more “The purpose of the cameras make sure Conestoga College safe place, and

“We had year,

to

-

is

it

is to is

a

said Tribe.

is,”

not a lot considering

the population.”

is

Tribe said that Conestoga College fortunate to have few incidents of

Tribe said 16 closed-circuit TV cameras watched by security guards security

office constantly

“We had which

She said

that

is

often take risks off

they

campus

helps children.

It

ices get into the

helps social serv-

home and

get -the

to

Kalau Said that last year Anselma house had a 105 per cent occupancy rate, and fielded 6,000 crisis calls.

children to safety.”

According

tion.

Mary Kalau,

co-

ordinator of volunteer, outreach and

services

at

Anselma

House in Kitchener, a battered women’s shelter, the act is striving

“Every time something happens

we

are inun-

dated with calls,” she said.

“Women

like the Luft scenario,

worry the same thing will happen

to

them.”

three not a

that

“The campus may be the

safest

place for them to be,” said Radigan.

Radigan said

that there

have been

several cases of women whose spouses or ex-spouses were stalking them at the college. She said school

women by

gives out personal information on students, so that a stalker would not

lot,

school.

John

in

ng people, but in preventing

happens,” said

Tribe,

security representative

reactive,” he

to

be pro-active, not

said.

Tribe said that

when an

incident

is

brought to the attention of security, starts

immediately.

Criminal offenses are handed over

Kim

Radigan,

Radigan said the harassment

poli-

cy protects students. The harassment policy, written in harmony with the Ontario Human Rights Code, works to preserve

co-ordinator of

Conestoga health and safety College, said that A1 Hunter, head of an excellent resource for

the

Roger Sharpe, a Conestoga College security officer, monitors cameras at Doon Campus that are used to keep the students (Photo by Julie Porter) safe of

all

harassment for anyone

on

affiliated

feel that

they are

policy through student services, the health and safety office or security.

Radigan

is

proper education. She

Conestoga students, has a section preventing and identifying

said she feels an impor-

tant aspect to consider in the safety

Radigan said

Campus the

that

Safety For

women’s

through the

Women

Grant,

resource group has

able to purchase many resources to deal with issues of vio-

been

lence against

Videos such as Domestic Violence Substance Abuse and A Love That Kills and books for the learn-

&

ing resource centre are intended to

educate

men and women

about vio-

lence.

domestic violence.

with the college.

Women who

women

said that she believes that strategies for success, a mandatory course for

equal treatment and freedom from

being harassed can get access to the

at

security, is

keep people safe

to

aren’t too wise.

population.”

to the police.

it

Robbins said the policy “really

away

time,

first

be able to obtain the whereabouts or schedules of any student at the

ment.

^ mcident before

needs help with? Will she still feel comfortable talking then?”

Despite the policy, many women find themselves at Anselma House after fleeing an unsafe situastill

because Conestoga

students often find themselves

considering the

an investigation

catc’

-

woman

watching out for the person and getting them off campus. Radigan said that the school never

assaults last year,

monitor the school in another effort to make Conestoga a safe environ-

“We are not so much interested

what the

is

one of

freely report violence without worrying about losing their children.

students in need of safety tips or aid

security can help these

violence.

“We want

Walk Safe every week.

the

the interests of the child and mother are dealt with, and so women can

in dealing with a situation.

from home for the

three assaults in the last

which

Thursday 6:45 p.m. to 10:45 p.m. According to John Tribe, security representative, several people use

in

if

agen-

effectively

coming to sit down with me and what you’re telling me is confidential unless you bring up

What

Women

and Family and Children’s

Services to find a way to more work together so that

policy

the

that

to say ‘you’re

Doon designed

at

arises.

Walk

Kalau said that programs are being" implemented to bring togeth-

could be a double-edged sword. “We have to be up front. We have

children’s

“Research shows

who

intimidated with

buildings to the parking

security

Walk

an walk them from the college

feeling

escort to

five.

is

important.

dis-

areas of the school.

women’s safety at Conestoga. Walk Safe, which was partially funded by the Campus Safety For Women Grant, is a program that is

Safe’s

woman

updated partially through funding from the Campus Safety For

serve

one and

student services

a counselor. policy, if a

Robbins said

her kids,” she

-

Several programs designed to help women be safe exist at the college.

outside door

counselor with

policy could be a reason a woman may not feel comfortable talking to

The monitoring system

and programs Safe have been implemented

Lynn Robbins,

closes that her children (under 16) are ~ witness to abuse, or if the

Julie Porter

lighting,

me

cies

the three things

woman.”

new

that relatively

Many programs

like

in

said Robbins.

these three things.’

scared of reporting her situation for fear her children be taken away

Under the

where what they do is valued.” not speak could uv/w mat omshe vuuiu said that OllC She aaiu

phones,

may be

‘The issues are so different with each

but that often issues of

remain behind closed

Robbins said

phere away from their troubled homes and gain self-esteem through being in an environment

Emergency

and

she refers

that

legislation called the duty to report

ties from their partners here,” she said. “They can thrive in an atmos-

By

Children Services. Although a woman

doors since some women don’t seek help because they do not feel comfortable or are embarrassed about their situation.

every home.” that school is

to,

must Family and

self or others, student services

many

K-W

the

in

facilities

violence

is in a situation to hurt her-

report the situation to that there are

homicide) because something drastic

woman

that she feels

to be.

of domestic violence that turn to

Robbins said

a worry that an abused to the shel-

said.

(Photo by Julie Porter)

a safe place for a

is

Robbins said

there (at incidents

important place for

is

er Violence Against

prevalent in society, but because happens within the confines of a

“The media

blame,”

woman might not come

office

is

that is not placing

said Kalau.

Robbins said domestic violence it

way

in a

them.”

is

we

mom

is

it

woman.

“In terms of children’s issues, are now trying to support the

self-esteem

see that

report

Kalau said that in the past, shelwere reluctant to report child

provide information. She said finding out the needs of the woman is

issues to help

means

abuse.”

be supportive and

to

is

the fear of

according

process,

fall

The amended

child welfare act includes protecting children from witnessing vio-

situation. Part

an abusive

the

homes, or the children would

women.

The women’s resource group was also able to

have speakers

at the

school to talk about gender relations, and pamphlets which address violence issues are put out around the school.


Page 6

— SPOKE,

July 31, 2000

Online learning

Dust-off

Students can use Internet to receive course credits By Tracy Ford Online learning alternate

way of

is

becoming an

getting an educa-

tion as people , desiring to earn course credit head to their computers and not classrooms.

Formation of an advisory committee

for

online

learning

was

announced July 20. The committee will advise post-secondary institu-

tions

how

on

to give students the

courses,” he said. “Others prefer do it via the Internet as opposed coming to class.”

The

college’s

to to

focus for online

courses has mainly been business oriented, according to Clow.

years). Contact

ative of

South is a co-oper20 other colleges that help

each other through the four or five

“Commitment and distance are reasoning for opting for Internet

courses.” Andy Clow,

learning.

dean of business

Chaired by David Johnston, president of the University of Waterloo, the

committee consists of presidents from various universities and

and 2 as well as business law, compen-

colleges, including the vice-presi-

sation,

dent of Sheridan College, Sheldon

nomics, and health and safety. Some of Conestoga’s newest

Courses include accounting industrial

relations,

1

eco-

establish

courses

Normally students would be in Internet.

each online learning class, a number that can not be sustained by an individual college due to the costs. “The reason Contact South was created

opportunity to participate in online

Levy.

created five years ago (Conestoga has been involved for the past three

was because any one

col-

lege generally couldn’t support

it

based on student numbers,” said Clow. “I think it is something that is slowly developing,” he said. “Still,

method of learning is with a teacher in a classroom.” Online learning fees are the same the preferred

as regular tuition and information

Andy Clow, Conestoga’s dean of

Internet courses include qualifying

about courses can be found in the

business for part-time and full-time

mathematics, for entry into college, and continuance improvement

continuing education catalogue.

processes, a quality assurance pro-

ing

gram for ISO. The college belongs

distance education

studies, said there are various rea-

sons for a student to want to earn a course credit through the Internet.

“Commitment and soning

for

distance are rea-

opting

for

Internet

group called Contact South, which was to a

Clow is

said he feels online learn-

better than correspondence, a

course taken though the mail, because students can get more feedback quicker.

Tracy Oksman, of housekeeping, dusts out lockers outside

room 2A101 on July

20.

(Photo by Tracy Ford) V.

'

V

Quality Policy Conestoga College continually seeks Conestoga College rp

opportunities for improver. ent to

meet and exceed the needs of our students employees ,

and communities.


SPOKE,

Smile teaches fans about love and unemployed boyfriends

How to

Learning life, The

from the dynamic and

fourth offering

band Everclear

as

is

life-touching as

its

to Smile, is full of

how

songs that will be hits. Their first single off the new album, Wonderful, is already

up

zooming

charts.

the

of the single, Father

Reminiscent of Mine, off Everclear’s previous

Much

So

album,

the

for

Afterglow, Wonderful is a heart wrenching song from the point of

view of a young child

in the

own

when he was

Artist of the

1998 by Billboard

sound infectious and

makes sonal,

is

music

to

roll

down the windows of your Everclear’s new album gives listeners and car to and crank up the vol- more of what they’ve come to expect

ume on

Alexikis

explored

in

songs on the first albums are explored again in Learning How

could count to 10, make everything be wonderful again,”

to Smile. Drug abuse, suicide, broken childhood and sexual antagonism are all themes of

of the fragile nature of childhood when promis-

songs in all four of Everclear’s albums, but that’s what makes

door. I

I

remind

listeners

more

her best friend during the course

it

sound more and excitement make the guy’s promises sound more and more plausi-

of the song

per-

and the emotion

Songs From an American Movie Vol. One: Learning How to Smile was released on July 15 and by July 22, more than 10,000

hit.

copies had been sold in Canada.

Girl,

This is not the last listeners will hear of Everclear in 2000. The band is planning on releasing the follow up album, Songs from an

Boyfriend, which starts off with a young woman calling her best tell

an amazing to her

American Movie

Time

story of at

it

ble.

one of them was already a

what happened

make

realistic; the girl’s disbelief

is

Learning How to Smile were written by Alexikis and

friend to

the girl to

The comments from

this as

The remake of Brownby Van Morrison, is a surprising but welcome addition. The song that catches interest Unemployed is most the

Eyed

his

Lyrics like “I want the things that I had before, like a Star Wars

my bedroom

(internet photo)

enjoy from the band.

the car stereo with.

The same personal themes

five

the albums

and never be her unemployed

boyfriend.

evident in the music. All but two of the songs on

from

offering

what you

well with his songs, and

that

wish

see,

her win,

let

her like a queen, go to all the chick flick movies she wants to

treat

writers follow

know.” Alexikis does

years old.

poster on

Many book

energy.

The

he will always

that

of

full

He

Alexikis was 12.

recovered from a serious drug problem, survived a divorce and is now a father. the adage, “write

harmony between Alexikis and fellow band members Craig Montoya and Greg Ekland makes the group’s

experiences. His par-

ents divorced

in

when

magazine. The group dynamic and

Everclear

Art Alexilris, the frontman for the band, wrote Wonderful based his

named Modem

mid-

dle of a divorce.

on

critics,

Year

ken home. His older brother died of a heroin overdose

new song

and composers by and Everclear was

writers

unemployment office when a guy came up to her and said, “This is gonna sound a little obsessive.” The song goes on to tell how the guy professes his love for her and

songs so intriguing. Alexikis came from a bro-

their

meant everything. Alexikis is hailed as one of

es indeed

the most brilliant

predecessors.

The new album, Songs From an American Movie, Vol. One: Learning

— Page 7

July 31, 2000

for a

end of the

the

Bad

Two: Good by the

Vol.

Attitude,

year.

Spine-chilling flick hits the theatres i: The realism of

.

A

new movie

hit

movie

theatres

July 21 in the spirit of The Sixth Sense, creating a spellbinding tale

of action and consequence. Dr. Norman Spencer, played by

Harrison Ford, betrayed his wife

Michelle by played Claire, Pheiffer. He cheated on her with one of his students and now he is trying to get his life back together. Claire is oblivious to the truth and

director

whom have been in a horror flick in

twisted tale of true love and obses-

over a decade, couldn’t get away from the lights and cameras enough to portray the characters thorough-

of Forrest Gump, the movie takes control of the viewers’ senses and drives them along the sion.

With excellent cinematography, movie has a free-flowing script and totally believable acting,

the

although the plot could be better. Hollywood insists on producing

movie

after

movie dealing with the

craze over

Norman, begins to hear voices. who has almost forgotten about his affair, isn’t sure whether to believe

and The Sixth Sense, the public can’t seem to get enough of it. In its mega craze to punch out

creature

and sees a ghost-

who resembles

young, beautiful

a

more

woman. piece things

Claire begins to

together and figures out the ghost’s

connection to her family.

Norman

begins to remember and he too,

wrapped

in the twists

and turns

is

that

movie to the climax. Directed by Robert Zemeckis,

drive the

many

suspenseful

directors

flicks,

and writers are

apt to leave gaps.

As a regular couple, Ford and Pheiffer play their roles with amazing believability, but as they become

twisted into the horrific

aspects of the story, the pair begin to lose their believability a little. It is

big empty house lake outside - creates a picture-perfect setting and the irony of the sit-

impression.

This movie is not appropriate for young children - as if a parent would allow their child to watch a horror flick at a young age.

uation

is hilarious.

The previews

audiences up for a life less ordinary and that is what they get.

have

set

However, it can definitely keep the chills coming for the adults who can appreciate the suspense and

Viewers shouldn’t be fooled by the seemingly straight forward plot; there are enough twists and turns to

reality.

keep them on

their toes.

The

and

horror

night with the

and now, Blair Witch Project

supernatural,

extra-curricular activities until she

like

- rVi the movie _

the at

after the

knows nothing about her husband’s

that his wife hears

popular as its horror counterparts, but is sure to leave a lasting

feasible that the actors, neither of

Or it could be that audiences have seen so many cheesy horror flicks with screaming young girls and shower scenes that the expectation of such a movie

is limited.

Nonetheless, the cast

is

able to

muster enough acting ability to portray a regular married couple and the horror associated with paranormal occurrences. What Lies Beneath will not be as

College Graduates Join the leading edge of a

Conestoga

new breed

of professionals!

unique full-time Post-Graduate Programs

offers a variety of

now

Apply

for

September

Career Development Practitioner

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Michelle Pheiffer

own house

in

and

What

Harrison Ford try to figure out clues to

Lies Beneath.

why they are being haunted

in their

(Internet Photo)

Conestoga College

jj


Page 8

— SPOKE, July 31, 2000

vs

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$

sv

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&

long distance

Colour Photocopier 8.5” X 11” is $1.10/ copy

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Digital Edition - July 31, 2000