Page 1

33rd Year

— No. 26

Plaque planned for Sanctuary

What’s Inside

Memorial

to

honour students who die while attending college

By Tracy Ford

Catharines to drop off fishing gear, before coming back to Kitchener.

The recent death of a Conestoga College student has inspired the

travelling

college’s Student

the accident occurred.

install

commemorating while enrolled

The

students

who

die

at the college.

student to

latest

die

Brenner was rushed to Hamilton General Hospital, but died around noon on Sunday.

A

was

native of Kitchener, Brenner

Terry Brenner, a mechanical engi-

attended

neering (automated manufactur-

before entering his studies at the

ing) student

who was car he

Security supervisor Al Hunter comments on crime.

association to

a plaque in the Sanctuary

At about 3 a.m. as the group was back to St. Catharines,

on summer vacation,

fatally injured after the

was

in with four other

men

swerved and went off Highway 58, near the Welland Canal tunnel, on the Canada Day weekend. The 20-year-old had gone to St.

St.

Mary’s high school

college.

Lebeau, president of Conestoga Students Inc. (formerly Phil

Doon Student Association) said Brenner’s death inspired the group the

to install a plaque

commemorating

Brenner and other students

PAGE 3

who die

while enrolled

“We

at the college.

decided

(to

do

this)

would have a lasting effect. Lebeau said the CSI will donate $50 to the charitable organization. The plaque will cost $100 initially. that

after

hearing about Terry’s death,” he '

said.

The plaque, which will display name and program of the

When

a student dies during the

the year,

school year, the registrar’s office

student, will be displayed in the

and then the program coordinator and faculty of the program in which the student was enrolled. A faculty member can ask for counsellors from the student

Sanctuary to remind other students

about the ones

who

died.

The plaque

will

be continually

added to as each year passes. Lebeau said three students died last

is

notified,

services office to talk to the class if

The option of planting a tree was also discussed by the CSI. In the past the CSI has donated

they are having difficulty dealing with the loss.

money

to a charitable organization

make

individual appointments for

of the family’s choice but this year

those

who

year.

the

CSI wanted

to

do something

If necessary, the counsellor will

are taking the loss par-

ticularly hard.

program gives special needs students head start on learning for coming semester Pilot

By Jes Brown

successful people.

Then there was a question and answer period with a panel of three

Thirty-one students attended the special needs department’s second post-secondary accommodation

students with learning disabilities

who

support strategies (PASS) program

4 to 7. The program provided an oppor-

at the college July

Focus

change graduates head

tunity

for

PAGE

to use its resources.

with specific

students

The

day students were back computer literacy lab completing hands-on exercises to learn writing skills and learning strate-

learning disabilities to get a head start

towards the future. .

for

on learning for the coming

“It’s an opportunity to get on campus, meet staff and learn about resources,” said Rick Casey, a special needs transition counsellor. “It’s an -intensified orientation

nology specialists

process.”

ual learning needs.

The program gives

gies as well as tive

students

“The numbers are up considerhe said, “We were able to

ably,”

into contacting students earli-

Pamphlets went out to 22 high earlier this year so stu-

with

diagnosed

learning disabilities

COMMENTARY Page 2 The huft family tragedx

accepted

last

day,

territory

in

September,” said Casey.

schools in Kitchener- Waterloo and

dents

unfamiliar

into

er this year.”

Cambridge

the

to complete assignments on the adaptive technology. Casey said the program was a lot of fun and helpful to students. Students had the chance to voice their concerns about disclosure issues and to get comfortable with the college and staff. “They don’t feel they are walking

attended last year.

PAGE 7

meet individ-

to

was given

store.

Storm.

lab.

day was spent on indi-

evaluation took place and free time

special needs office and the book-

jump

last

The afternoon of

the students a

12

use the adap-

vidual training with adaptive tech-

Centre, literacy lab, writing centre,

Casey said only

how to

technology in the

The

chance to get acquainted with the college staff, services and supports such as the Learning Resource

George Clooney stars in The Perfect

third

in the

year.

5

currently attend the college.

The afternoon on the second day was spent in the LRC learning how

into

specific

LRC

information services co-ordinator Cathy Potvin helps

Duchesne work on a

project

The program kicked

programs

off

at

up.

graduate of the college

The underlying theme for this summer’s PASS program was success. “The students have shown success by getting here; we want to build on

provided on the

Casey said

(Photo by Jes Brown)

beginning in September could sign

on July 4

10 a.m. with a speech from a

who has a diagnosed learning disability, and an overview of the learning opportunities project. It

was followed by a

that success while they are here,”

Doon campus

said Casey.

resource areas and staff

to

tour of the

key members.

identify

The afternoon was spent computer

in the

literacy lab “to get peo-

ple familiar with the computer

eracy lab and

its

cost the stu-

dents anything and a free lunch

on the LRC computers using computer programs Ebscohost and Newscan participant Laura

who have been

college

The program did not

PASS

lit-

adaptive technolo-

gy such as voice-to-text software,” Casey said. The second day, learning disability specialist Barry Cull gave a presentation on the attributes of

lege

is

first

and

last

was

days.

that next year the col-

looking for ways to accom-

modate long distance students, possibly having them stay in residence.

The PASS program learning

is

part of the

opportunities project,

a

four-year pilot funded through the learning opportunities task force of the Ministry of Training, Colleges

and Universities.


Page 2

— SPOKE, July

17,

2000

Local tragedy turns into media circus famspread about the murder-suicide of a local street of small the to flocked Ontario ily, media from all over Mooregate Crescent. homicipe rate The startling event sky-rocketed Kitchener’s of the city. resident down the spine of each

When news

and sent chills years to three Four children, ranging in age from seven Luft, Bohuslava mother, their with months, were killed along Jr. on July 6. Luft (Bill) Vilem and her husband, semi-detached home late Their bodies were taken from the the family s court file that night. Justice Gary Hearn sealed notified of the murders. just hours after the public was media specuBefore the police called it a murder-suicide, gun on himthe turned then family, lated Bill Luft killed his was self. It was believed that he

The

experiencing financial troubles and battling a mental illness. Without speculation, there

public can’t

hear enough about the worst

would be nothing to tell the onlookers, whether they were on

multiple murder in the history of

the

or

street

in

homes

their

that the pub-

watching the news wants to know. Photographers shot the bizarre scene in front of the house as

lic

the region. reporters tried to gather as

much information as possible from

clock was ticking neighbours and friends because the press incident. and police were revealing little about the situation gets tricky

The

and the privacy of the collide. It

was the

reporters and the

when

the public’s right to

know

remaining members of the Luft family

of curiosity of neighbours, the speculation duty of the officers that turned the already

tragic situation into a free-for-all. Three pages of the local paper the following

day continued

coverage of the situation, dissecting the family’s history. street as dusk Flashes from photographers’ cameras lit up the selling sandwas house the canteen van parked outside fell.

A

wiches and soda pop. occurred It was a major tragedy that

normally sub-

dued community of K-W. A tragedy that was across Canada. The spotlight is on Kitchener now. The actions of the will be police, as they try to investigate the murders, all

regional

The conclusions drawn by neighbours, longer media professionals and outsiders will be remembered investigators. than the final conclusion drawn by the

closely scrutinized.

reminiscent of the car crash that killed Princess Diana crashed into the or the death of JFK Jr. when his plane about the worst enough hear can’t public The Atlantic Ocean. It is

multiple murder in the history of the region. of the murders or that It may be because of the proximity of a quiet community. backyard the murders happened in the the way a driver will to similar human curiosity,

A

public

at the

is

scene of an auto accident. by the horrific nature of a crime unthink-

fixated

able to most people.

shake their heads in disbelief, wipe lingering tears four from their eyes and stand in silent awe at the idea of

Many

small children killed for no reason. The media is a necessary evil. It

may

infringe

on the

pri-

but vacy of the family and take over an entire block for days, without it the public wouldn’t be satisfied. Media tell their community what they can and look hard to people more. They are the voices for a community the find

with

all

the questions trying to find

all

Toronto

sounds strange. In fact, it sounds downright

being invad-

the answers.

city

filled

moose. seems there

with It

like

a corner.

Some

guard the entrances to banks and stores, others are standing in front

of Nathan Phillips Square and the old Toronto City Hall. They are part of Toronto’s continuing millennium celebration.

The 325

statues

around Toronto

is

will be auctioned off

both live and on line, with the proceeds going to support local charities and Toronto’s Olympic ath-

Toronto gave a call to artists in February seeking designs and sponsors for 300 moose. The response was overwhelming.

sponsored by a

Labatt Breweries of Canada headed up the charge and was followed by hundreds of other sponsors each paying $6,500 for one

moose

or $30,000 for a herd of

four.

artist.

There’s everything from the Olympic Moose, sponsored by the Toronto 2008 bid committee and designed by Charles Pachter, that stands in Nathan Phillips Square, to the Moosepaper, sponsored by the Toronto Sun and designed by stands in the

Toronto exceeded the goal of 300 by 25 moose. The moose were intended to bring attention to Toronto and it seems to be working. There have been articles in USA Today and the

Chicago Tribune. Inspired by Chicago’s Cows on Parade

event

summer,

last

Keeping Conestoga College connected

Photo Editor: Jes Brown Julie Porter, Production Manager: James Campbell; Advertising Manager. Frank Jerry Supervisor. Circulation Manager: Julie Porter; Faculty

Phone: 748-5220,

streets

in

strange statues aren’t limited

to animals, either.

Norfolk, Va„ has had a mermaid population explosion and there has been a drastic growth spurt in 111.,

six-foot ears of

where there

com

are

decorating the

streets.

The unique,

or formerly unique,

idea began in Zurich with cows and was aped in North America originally by Chicago, which naturally would have a strange attachment to

cows

after the tragic events started

by Mrs. O’Leary’s fateful beast. The moose in Toronto are definitely works of art, and give the interesting, off-

downtown core an beat attitude.

But

how

long will

it

be

until there

are large fibreglass animals invad-

ing every

town?

What could be

next?

on parade Waterloo? pigs

in

Six-foot

Kitchener-

is

this

Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers

of Conestoga College. published and produced weekly by the journalism students Lampert; Petra Editor: News Ford; Tracy Editor:

address

the

ment from Conestoga Students

Spoke SPOKE’s

The

stalking

mainly funded from September to May by a payInc. (CSI), formerly called the of Doon Student Association, in exchange for the insertion expressed in advertising in the paper. The views and opinions newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of

SPOKE

is

moose

Bloomington,

letes.

corporation, individual or organization and designed by a local

Margaret Glew, which

multi-coloured cows in New York; five-foot New Orleans, La.; and more

more

son each patron will be invited to donate their moose to an auction.

not be cows, but the city will milk them for all they are worth.

There are

six-foot -hares in Saginaw, Mich.;

Whitefish, Mont.

Yorkville village park.

SPOKE

are not the only

that event.

fish in

may

Each moose

moose

from

But the moose are for a good cause. At the end of the moose sea-

The moose

moose on every

spin offs

Manhattan,

Toronto.

is

is

silly

moose to have over 300 fibreglass on display around downtown

The downtown core of the

Toronto’s

It

is

ed.

in the

reported

Maybe it’s slow down

Herd of moose let loose in downtown Toronto

is

ext.

N2G 4M4. 299 Doon Valley Dr„ Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, spoke@conestogac.on.ca E-mail: 748-3534 Fax: 694 691, 692, 693,

in

SPOKE

are not

contain the endorsed by the CSI unless their advertisements arising CSI logo. SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages

amount paid for the out of errors in advertising beyond the sent to the editor by space. Unsolicited submissions must be acceptance or 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to a WordPerfect rejection and should be clearly written or typed; must not conor MS Word file would be helpful. Submissions be accompanied by an tain any libellous statements and may illustration (such as a photograph).


1

SPOKE,

Crime not major problem Students and By Tracy Ford

Conestoga College

staff at

— Page 3

Doon

at

feel safe

July 17, 2000

on campus

Hunter said in each assault case were injuries, but they were

there

Students and faculty feel safe at Conestoga’s Doon campus, according to A1 Hunter, director of security services.

“There

is

certainly a feeling of

safety here,” he said.

A recent

study conducted by the

Canadian

Centre

for

Statistics reported that

Justice

Canada’s

crime rate fell 22 per cent between 1991 and 1998 and is at its lowest rate in 19 years. Experts are also seeing the same

hensive measures.

“The most common crimes would be theft - we have some mischief problems like willful damage but not a lot,” he said. Security services also responds

such as fighting,

some

swearing.

To the

mischief prob-

eighth

lems

straight year.

like willful

age but not a

But even with lower

the

instances

dam-

students

lot.”

feel

especially

safe, if

security supervisor

The study said the majority of is committed by people between 18 and 25, the ages where most of the population pur-

has

up ways to help staff and

of

crime is rising, according to a 1998 Environics poll. Three-quarters of Canadians feel that crime is getting worse.

deter crime

college

set

Al Hunter,

crime, the fear of

and

yelling

— we have

theft

rate

has dropped for the

disturbances

to

where

crime

the

There were 307 incidents that services responded to last year, but Hunter said he wants to concentrate on preventative measures rather than appresecurity

“The most common problems would be

results across the

border,

not serious.

they are leav-

ing

the

school

late at night.

The walk safe program under which students can get an escort when travelling across the campus runs from 6:45 p.m. to 12:45

crime

p.m. Students can contact security to request this service.

sues post-secondary education. Hunter, who retired from the

the

Waterloo Regional Police after 3 years, said crime isn’t a major problem on campus. “There is a general level of maturity here.”

The most common crimes com-

is also a camera system in main building, which moni-

There

tors the halls.

The study

also said the youth

violent crime rate

is

still

77 per

cent higher than

10 years ago, mostly because of youth fighting

mitted on campus are thefts of vehicles, books, equipment or

each other. Half of youths charged in- 1998 were charged with property crimes and 21 per

wallets, but the security office has

cent with violent crimes.

responded

“We

some vandalism.

to

don’t really have a lot of

crime,” he said.

There were four assaults reported at the college during 1999 and two incidents this year to date.

years

Ten 10 per cent were

ago,

Al Hunter, supervisior of security services at

itself

is

preparing

new

graduates of the

for

Ontario high school curriculum

who

the province

is

described as a des-

tinations-based curriculum rather

than an ability-based one. It

asks that students determine

where they think they

will

ing in the future

college, uni-

versity or the workforce

be head-

and

phere partly to the fact that the

campus,” he said. He did say, however, that because the campus

the

college,

said

that

from time to time students or staff have raised concerns about feel-

colleges were consulted in

new

cur-

riculum and the ‘C’ level courses were designed by college academics to

meet college requirements.

“The biggest concern will be dealing with all

the

new

secondary school applicants who have graduated from the

new OSSR

worth 30

curriculum and the

ate.

Partial

credits

granted for

are

transition courses that will allow

students to cross over to different

streams In

if

20003/2004, when students taken the

lum

arriving

start

new

at

curricu-

graduated from the old one.” Jennifer Leith, associate registrar

Conestoga,

they will not have taken the level

one who have

they wish.

who have

OAC

and will have either graduat-

ed with a ‘C’ level (college level) or a ‘U’ level (university level).

we

dents

then asks them to take courses, credits, that are appropri-

are not situated in the core

of transient people walking on

will start arriving in 2003.

The controversial new curriculum designed and implemented by

‘We

ing unsafe, but generally every-

atmos-

at

The weighting that has been done in the past, when colleges evaluated courses high school students have taken, like adding 20 extra

fills

out after security

(Photo by Tracy Ford)

one

the development of the

Conestoga College

though reports he

charged with violent crimes. Hunter, who keeps a log of inci-

The

Julie Porter

sifts

during 1999.

comfortable on campus.

is

He

attributed the

Doon campus

is far

safe

from the

(of the city),

city

centre.

marks

new

advanced course level

to

marks, will no longer be done.

According

Jennifer

to

Leith,

associate registrar, problems will arise

so close to

is

College prepares for grads from By

Doon,

services responds to an incident, on his computer. Security personnel responded to 307 incidents

when

trying to select students

from both programs. “The biggest concern

be dealing with all the new secondary school applicants who have graduated from the new OSSR curriculum and the ones who have graduated from the old one. How do you compare the two? They are so difwill

don’t have a lot

Highway 401,

the

auto theft.

family

“It (the college) is like a

or any other

one has

community; every-

to participate to prevent

crime.”

high school system

“The Waterloo board was concerned about problems Grade 9 students were having

with the these

new

curriculum,

were

students

but

literally

plunked right into the new curriculum of course, they have to learn to adapt, and of course it’s going to be difficult initially.”

She said she has hopes

new curriculum to

parking lots are perfect targets for

will

determine the

English

skills

that the

make it easier grammar and

of applicants.

“Perhaps the new curriculum be back to basics,” said Leith. Leith said the college has had to begin promoting the college programs to younger and younger students, as students will be asked to will

make

decisions about their futures

earlier.

“There are

now

recruitment ses-

sions for kids in Grades

8, 9,

said Leith, “I’ve had requests

Grade 8 teachers who are up career displays.”

setting

ferent,” said Leith.

be a challenge to make a comparison between the two.” Leith went on to say that a lot of “It will

fair

important information about the old curriculum was unavailable.

“The

jury’s

still

out on

how

many Grade

were having the

new

this

systerm

Second Language

to

judge the two programs because this curriculum is so new. We have to judge its difficulty,” said Leith Leith said that there is an assumption that the new curriculum is more difficult and cited the difficulty

Teaching English as a

9 students

year adapting to

A One-Year Starts this Call for

Certificate

Program

September

more information

519-748-5220,

ext.

656

10,”

from

Conestoga College fi

r


Page 4

— SPOKE, July

17,

2000

Confederation College

released

recently

summary

report of key performance indicator statistics, used to rate colleges’ per-

formances, shows

gram

at

how each

pro-

Conestoga College stacks

up against those

in the rest of the

College

Conestoga

Confederation College in

and Thunder

of Conestoga’s programs exceeded the provincial average by

academic support for Conestoga, said a KPI sub-committee estab-

up

how

to

the college meas-

provincial

Some

much

as

as 17 percentage points,

while others fell below the provincial standards by 14 percentage

tied for first place overall in

The

lished at the college council’s May 8 meeting met recently to brain-

storm ways to use KPI results to improve the college.

recreation and leisure servic-

program and the early childhood education program ranked highest

es

satisfaction

student

at

“KPI’s will

and ISO

improve

2000 KPI survey. However, Conestoga failed to place first in

in

Conestoga, with 93 and 92 per cent

inter-departmental

any of the four survey areas - graduate employment rate, graduate

respectively, while the provincial average was 77 and 80 per cent.

systems, which

Conestoga’s management studies program (89) and graphic design

will

the

satisfaction,

employer

satisfaction

and student satisfaction. KPIs are annual surveys which are compiled by the provincial government to rate Ontario’s 25 community colleges and consist of 95 mutual and

five

college-specific

program (83) ranked high but the provincial average was low at 67

provincial standard.

and facilities. The an accountability and excellence benchmark that the government uses to determine which

Some programs at Conestoga that ranked lower than the provincial average were civil engineering technology, at 59 per cent, broad-

schools should receive additional

casting

funding.

per cent, and electronics computer systems, at 42 per cent. In those

services

survey

The

is

five

college-specific ques-

improve

communication and feedback.”

— radio and

television, at

67

co-ordinator of

academic support

Some

of the items that were dis-

meeting were publiand working with faculty to improve programs and schools that need work.

cussed

at the

cizing

KPI

Bamford

Conestoga’s competition was

standards for constancy and qualiThe college is trying to become

for faculty to confer with stu-

dents to get a better understanding of what students expect.

ty.

“If we better understand each other, we can do a better job help-

in the

ing,” he said.

at the college.

said the college received low scores on questions about students

Ways to improve communication between students and faculty, which Bamford said are on the

ISO 9001

results

said another suggestion

certified

sometime with-

next year, which will result in clarifying workplace procedures

He

receiving feedback from faculty

committee’s agenda, include estab-

and the college. Ideas compiled from the subcommittee’s meeting in June and an upcoming meeting scheduled for August will be summarized and

Web sites to post program information and modernizing faculty computer systems.

lishing

Incentives for faculty to improve low on the survey

presented to college council in

areas that ranked

August.

are also being discussed, according

Bamford, including possibly rewarding teachers on a monthly

said he has high hopes for improvements in the college

to

Bamford

obtained through analyzing

KPI

basis.

to the survey are cur-

Changes

results.

Bob Bamford,

and 66 per cent. All of Conestoga’s mechanical engineering programs exceeded the

questions regarding programs, faculty,

is

standards.

ures

points.

province.

Bay

Thunder Bay

programs the provincial averages were 64, 77 and 56 respectively. Bob Bamford, co-ordinator of

determine

A

in

called capstone questions,

tions,

By Laura Czekaj

KPI survey

ties for first in

Conestoga

works, said Dave Ross, media spokesperson for the Ministry of Training, Colleges and

rently

“KPI’s and ISO (the International will Organization) Standards

improve inter-departmental systems, which will improve communication and feedback,” he said. “We will improve relationships with students by focusing on the

Universities.

The

Ross said

due

that

question pertaining to the program’s usefulness for life outside work, the ministry will be issuing the next

the question and will

a group that establishes documented and definable is

Fresh coat

KPI

survey with a re-worded version of

Standards

International

to

of the capstone

misinterpretations

college as a whole.”

Organization

the

in

remove

it

as a

capstone question.

Six faculty enrolled

in

teaching program

upgrade

to

gram

By James Campbell

skills an employee to

entitles

progress to the If

become

to

who wants

you’re a teacher

what you

better at

do, not to mention get paid more, then the In-Service

Mr

Teacher Training Certificate Program may be for you.

The program, by

offered

College

which

was

Confederation

Windsor.

program

salary grid.

three years

is

self-directed and

a

who

it

don’t

formal education in

Tellier

said

that

there are six faculty

j une 29

who also works in physical preparation for the esthetics class on (Photo by Petra Lamport)

currently

members

from Conestoga and 98 others enrolled from 17 colleges from within Ontario.

1996-2001 collective agreement states that this pro-

The

can up

the

teaching.

in

between

progress to the maximum step on the

appeals to teachers

2C9

module can

program

officer,

of operations,

self-directed

18 and 54 agreement hours in states that this program length the entitles an employee to and entire

According to Kathy Tellier,

resources during the summer, paints room

Each

collective

have

delivery,

instructional evaluation and content update and integration.

The 1996-2001

course

plan-

educational

instructional

ning,

started in 1987

the

step

in

and is now being offered St. through Clair College

Brad Whiteford, the CSI’s vice president

strategies,

Thunder Bay,

in

maximum

on the salary grid. The program consists of six modules: introduction, learning

take to

to

complete. Tellier said the

more

experi-

ence someone has as a teacher, the fewer modules they would have to take, though the first and last modules are compulsory

and each can cost from $425

to $880.

Internet

required course.

access to

is

complete

also the


SPOKE, July

17,

2000

—Page 5

2-week program 1

women

helps

get their

back

lives

on track

Danijela Ninkovic, a focus for

change graduate,

immigrated to Canada from Macedonia with her two children 11 years ago. (Photo by Julie Porter)

Loretta Morrison holds her focus for change graduation Morrison plans to work with computers in the future. (Photo by Julie Porter)

certificate.

Focus graduate says course changes lives By

Focus

for

change

grads plan

Julie Porter

Kim Crane

calls herself a strong

advocate for focus for change, the 12-week Conestoga College course

women

geared for single

for

with chil-

dren. their tragedies,”

“Everyone has

their futures

graduated from

who

said Crane,

the focus program

in

December

1999 “but everyone should have a chance to move on from them.” Crane understands tragedy and moving on very well. ,

By

their plans for the future. All

Julie Porter

plan to pursue post-secondary

Twelve people graduated from Conestoga College’s focus for

education.

change program June completing a 12- week course re-evaluating to devoted

interested in pursuing careers in

my

social work. Others listed jobs like administrative assistant,

the

30, after

out goals,

figuring

strengths,

Focus

are raising children

prepare

themselves

by

helps

change

for

for

school and work. Debbie Cox, co-ordinator of

focus

change,

for

women and

the

told

children gathered at

the Waterloo

campus she was amazed

for the cer-

emony that the immense challenges

women have

at

the

taken on in such a

short period of time.

have a tremendous respect “ All for all of you,” said Cox. you kids that are here with your moms, listen. your moms have worked very hard. They’ve done “I

.

.

it

to provide

you with a high

“I

12 very empowered

see

women

today,

who took

a risk

and gave themselves permission to grow.

You have demonstrated what focus for change

is all

about -

seeking knowledge, empowering each other and growing,” said Cor.

women

When Cox asked the how many of them felt 12 weeks ago,

when

they started the pro-

gram, that they would one day go to college, only three raised their hands.

Upon cate,

receiving their certifi-

each graduate revealed

were

computer software analyst and as

assistant

employment opportu-

potential

One

said she

wanted

to

go

to

university to pursue sciences.

Bemie Billson, an academic upgrading teacher, said that he wanted to congratulate the graduates on being brave and for handling the course with such patience.

hoped the graduates would make new discoveries that would challenge Billson said that he

and delight them. Carol Sampson, program co-

employment servicof Waterloo, Region the for es said when you are working in ordinator of

it

is

sometimes

hard to see that what you’re doing is worthwhile.

“Focus graduation makes me feel as if I’m in the right field. I feel immensely glad knowing that

“I thought I

had met the man of

dreams. I thought I’d get married,” said Crane. “Then one day

man

my dreams came home me with a shovel. That

of

and beat

was

it

— one

day for

me

day.

to

It

took only one

become a welfare

People don’t understand it can be.” With no support, no home and no one to look after Crane’s two toddlers, one of whom had a disabilijob ty, going out and looking for a

victim.

nities.

social services,

quality of life.”

they

that

said

physiotherapist

and preparing for the future.

women who

Some

women

are

really

head

challenges

taking said

on,”

Sampson.

Kim Crane, a 1999 graduate of focus for change, told the graduates that for her, the classroom they were sitting in was where her life started to change.

“This

from.

I’ll

strength

Crane.

where

is

it

never

it

all

started

forget

the

took to get here,” said

how

easy

was impossible. “At

that time, $3.15

was mini-

mum wage. It was like, why bother giving up welfare,” Crane remembers. “The thing is, though, the

longer you stay on welfare, the

more beaten down your spirit self-esteem Your becomes. declines. You think you’re not going to get out, like you’ll always

be on welfare.” Crane said she knows what it is like to try to stretch one dinner’s hamburger so that it can last over three days.

But the hardest thing came when her daughter’s daily medicine cost

$600 a month. “Mike Harris wasn’t going to help me. I could only get $110 covered, so I couldn’t afford to give

my

baby

medicine,”

her

said

Crane.

When

Crane heard about focus

for change, she thought she’d give it

a

“When

down

at

the desk

I

was no room for failure,” she said. “I had lives depending on me. It was both empowering

realized there

and

Crane finished focus for change and then went on to complete upgrading and a sociology course. Now Crane is planning to take social

the

terrifying.”

work

program

at

Conestoga.

She aspires to be in a position one day to challenge politicians and decision-makers on policies for people in poverty. She said she wants people to know that not everyone on welfare

be there. “I’ve never met anyone on wel-

wants

to

who’ve said ‘Oh, I love being on welfare.’” She volunteers at the Salvation Army, where she often recom-

fare

mends focus

try. I sat

(Photo by Julie Porter)

career goals.

for change.

“Focus is the first step to success. out of It lets you get all your fears the way and lets you get down to your goals.” Crane said her whole

life

has

changed since she attended focus for change. “I

speak differently.

myself

I

present

so that

differently,

when

my

door and says ‘let’s sleep together,’ I can say ‘you’re not good enough. You re

some

loser

comes

to

not even near good enough.’” Crane said she has been known to

even give out the phone number for Debbie Cox, focus for change’s coordinator.

“Debbie gets you up and going,” said Crane. “Focus instructors are not only teachers, but support systems for people who don’t have anyone.” Crane said she is happy about the messages she is sending out to her children.

“Children learn what they see. My children’s chance of success

becomes greater success becomes

as

my

chance of

greater.”


— SPOKE,

Page 6

July. 17,

2000

Job market good By Tracy Ford

months

completion of their

after

studies, according to a survey con-

When

comes

it

after college,

ates

to finding jobs Conestoga’s gradu-

have a high success

com-

rate

first for

grad-

uate job placements in a survey

taken

year evaluating

last

all

25

Ontario colleges.

The most recent key performance 1999-2000, Conestoga placed eighth, with a surveys in

indicator

graduate employment rate of 91 per cent, two per cent less than the two tied for first place Sheridan and Georgian - and one

colleges

per cent less than five colleges with

92 per

and Colleges.

“A

pared to other Ontario colleges.

The college placed

ducted by a company hired by the Ministry of Training, Universities

cent.

Mary Wright, manager of student

of our grads stay fairly

lot

great opportunities,” she said.

She recommended students focus on a specific target or field, and keep in contact through profession-

going a

al

further afield as

little bit

well, but there

is

a lot of local sup-

really important

you are prepared ahead of time because you don’t want to miss out on some great that

employers.

student

It

(the service)

couple

last

we

we

employment

office

Wright,

port for our grads.”

said

it is

Wright said the best time to start is during your last

you are

professional associations.

There is

no

is

treating

it

similar to

you are putting into you put a bit of energy

six

said

gy),

which everyone hears so much

about,

is still

a very strong area.

ness

we have had a lot of job oppor-

a course,

seen an increase in opportunities for

if

a long period of time, chances are

first

with

tunities,” she said.

each week into your job search for

found jobs within the

boom

opportunities,

the energy that

Last year the office posted

Wright said Conestoga graduates are doing well in the job market. Figures show 91 per cent of Conestoga’s 1998-1999 graduates

specific job field that

hitting a particular

“Certainly in the school of busi-

4,269 jobs through the entire year and 2,983 during the 1997-98 graduating year.

from networking.” important to expand

Wright. “IT (information technolo-

looking for a job “If

find that a lot of our

still

get are

the grapevine and establish links to

Mary

year of school.

has posted 4,538 jobs so far this year, with July and August still to go.

get,

employment

of years.”

The

we

jobs

She

able to graduating.

has really grown in the

who

“Even though it’s a healthy job market and there are lots of live jobs out there that people are aware of, in the newspaper or the postings

opportunities.”

employment

employment opportuni-

with people

associations

might have information on job opportunities.

“It’s

college’s extensive resources avail-

ties for

the ending dates for specific programs may recruit people in January to start work in May. “It’s really important that you are prepared ahead of time because you don’t want to miss out on some

- Kitchener- Waterloo, Guelph and Cambridge area,” she said. “Certainly, some of them are area

gle

manager of student

post

know

local to Canada’s technology trian-

employment, co-op education and alumni services, said some of the success could be attributed to the

“We

graduating students

for

you are going to find it pays off.” “If you leave it to the last minute then you are probably going to be a little bit

out after graduation.”

She said resources

in the office

are helpful in job searches.

Wright said

that

employers

who

She

said she has

managers, buyers and purchasing department personnel as well as an increase in the health sciences area.

“There are

still

some

great oppor-

Wright said. “People sometimes have a bit of a negative connotation about the trade opportunities and I think that is really old thinking about what tunities

in

Mary Wright, manager of student employment, co-op education, and alumni services, looks through pamphlets displayed in the Student employment office. (Photo by Tracy Ford)

trades,”

mean.” Wright said that more students

trades really

are pursuing further education after

receiving their diploma.

“We have

seen university graduates coming

to the college to get a

complement what ies are

“You

diploma

and vice versa,” she said. are always going to be

learning.”

Quality Policy Conestoga College continually seeks opportunities for improver, ent to Conestoga College

[-j

meet and exceed the needs of our students, employees

to

university stud-

and communities.


SPOKE,

Special effects steal the True story of Perfect Storm By

is an odd adjective to use describing a storm so hostile,

Perfect

when

so full of rage that

it

left

a

woman

without a lover, children without fathers, and a Massachusetts town

unable to bury six of their dead. It is an odd adjective to use unless you love storms, or if you are telling the story of the Andrea Gail,

fishing

a

who

ing boat captain

Julie Porter

found

end

When

Clooney

film,

based on the selling is

crew

tells his

water,

all

are

Mark

reluctant.

Lane.

The

who

characters find them-

selves cast in the

in

story

sec-

are

the

ondary;

incredible character

The is

New York Times best-

book by Sebastian Junger.

It

the real life account of the 1991

of culmination a storm savage a and Grace, Hurricane nor’easter, a term fishermen and those living on the battered northeast use for massive Atlantic

storms like the one that wreaked havoc on the poor souls who found themselves on the Atlantic that role of

Billy Tyne, a seasoned sword-fish-

of

the

storm,

which

special

effects

make incredibly alive, overshadows their performances, no matter

how

It is

only after the crew leaves the

dock that the real story is played out on screen. It is then, after the crew of the Andrea Gail has loaded a successful catch into the

doomed

boat’s ice

hatch, that the audience meets the mighty and ruthless protagonist of the story, the storm.

the audience

is

taken aboard

Andrea Gail and forced to fear its own demise. The audience rocks with

the

Junger and is the real Storm is based on the New York Times best-seller by Sebastian (internet photo) crew. its and doomed the Andrea Gail fishing boat life account of a 1991 storm that What the movie forgets is the aspect of the movie, the real story of waves so enormous it can almost feel the Andrea Gail is the men who intuition of two rough and tumble

The

Perfect

seasick in the cool of the ater. It is

brilliant.

Then

October.

George Clooney plays the

that

Wahlberg’s character is particularly hesitant, having to leave his lover, played by Diane

meteorologists.

The

left

they are to go back out on the

one of the worst ever storms by recorded

Perfect Storm,

which

richer than

him and his crew hardly when they set out.

which its

the big screen

decides to

for a poor-paying catch,

Gloucester, Mass.,

come through on

show

play with fate and voyage past the Grand Banks in the fall to make up

from

boat

fails to

— Page 7

July 17, 2000

movie

forced to almost

the-

swim and

cry and feel the ice cold water of the freezing Atlantic hitting

But what

this film

its

misses

face. is signifi-

fishermen

who

agreed to swordfish

on the Andrea Gail

that fateful mis-

sion but walked off the boat seconds after getting on it, days before the left the

dock

saying that all they

cant.

boat

Anyone who has read lunger’s novel knows that what the film for-

One man could feel was doom. spoke of a cold chill spilling down

gets to include is the

through his body as his foot hit the

nitions

many premoof doom that made the

Andrea

Gail’s very exit

deck on the Andrea Gail. This is an important aspect to the

shore that day

all

from the the more horrify-

story that the

movie leaves

While the storm

ing.

is

out.

the strongest

fished the seas and died on

it.

It is

about the families whose fives are put on hold from the time their father’s boat

made

its

harbor, until the time

way

it

out of the

docked again

month later. While a small boat being thrown around on a savage sea makes for a

a

great action movie, the true and

interesting

Storm

story

fails to

of the Perfect

come through on

the

big screen.

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|


Page 8

— SPOKE, July

17,

2000

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