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33rd Year

— No. 22

Student handbook will outline rights One of

By Mike Radatus

the

major recommendaCSI be listed as a

tions is that the

neutral party in dealing with con-

For the first time, a procedure guide which outlines the rights of students and what students can do if treated

wrongly will be

between students and faculty. the procedures guide says students should contact a counsellor from student services

flict

Currently,

in the stu-

dent handbooks this fall. Mike Harris, vice-president of education for Conestoga Students Inc.,

way

CSI

the

ensuring

more

Doon

formerly the

Association, said

all

with complaints. Harris said this would help students get the best possible practices

Student

implemented

one more working toward

it is

is

just

“We want to work with faculty, management and other stakeholders to make sure student rights are being acted upon in the most pro-

treated

are

students

fairly.

In a key performance indicator

year which asked what

Joe Williams

survey

award - winner

services the

Eleanor Conlin.

important to students, 37 per cent thought academic support was

Harris.

most important. “Whatever the students want the CSI to be more involved in, we will try to do more in,” said Harris.

comes

last

CSI

said

Harris

offers are

most

starting

that

fessional

way

Preston Manning speaks at the Canadian Alliance

Harris said that it

will

to the

to help students

have had the system

fail

executive will help as

Harris has brought forth some recommendations to the college

have a

He

like to

be added in the book.

student

membership

CSI with a complaint

sible,” said Harris.

registrar

when a

said that

it

much

as pos-

New

is

begins

their rights.

By Tracy Ford

demonstrate the radio equipmen and understand what is expected

Tim Goebel has been hired as Conestoga’s new technologist for the broadcasting - radio and televi-

of students. Goebel, who’s been in the busi

sion program.

demands a good combinations

with conflict because sometimes students don’t know all

nationally

PAGE 4

LeBeau. Supercon 2000 took place this year at Memorial University in St. John’s, Nfld., and five Conestoga Students Inc. representatives were

be made up of six representatives, instead of the normal five, including: British Columbia and Alberta, the prairies, Ontario, Quebec and

Every year Supercon is put together and attended by representatives from

eastern Canada, and one

member who

Previously, colleges had

cost

for

$6,632,

the

flight,

Doon

Student Association, put

LeBeau

because

Beaumont

said

he

felt

“John’s a good guy and will do a great job.

He’s really excited and

for

“This

is

my

those things before,” he said. “I kind of like the idea of takin

is

FM,

a radio station in Kitchener-

Waterloo.

“He’s a production whiz,” said

Mike Thurnell,

who

the

program co-ordi-

participated in interview-

ing the candidates for the position.

Thurnell said Goebel was chosen from numerapplicants

ous with

similar

skills.

“I

like

what I’ve learned over the past 2 years and hopefully give it to th students so they don’t have to spen

20 years learning

I

learned over the past

20 years and

and

and the delegate fee for five persons.

fied

and

had

the students.”

lots

of

Each

members had

day, executive

on anything

others to

said the

main focus was

to motivate yourself

work

was

the

strongest,”

said

The

as

and

a team to get

was

lat

accepted.

interesting job.

Thurnell.

Dan

he

sai

position

became open when

Fisher retired in

May

after six

years at Conestoga College and over

they learned.

on how

the industry but

Tim

to

f<

he

He said he war ed to be in rad Tim Goebel, since high schoo radio and broadcasting “It seemed lil television faculty it would be a re

in

skills

enough money tuition,”

it

pr<

gram. “I worked f< year and g a

have

hopefully give

all

broadcasting

the idea of

taking what

it.”

applied to Conestoga Collej in his last year of high school h didn’t get into tl

He

were very quali-

at the university

experience. I’ve done a

es

the Conestoga

40 years in the broadcasting industry.

“Dan Fisher was very much

I

always changing. You get to mt and talk to interesting people a

you get

to

have a

Everyone

in

lot

the

of fun.” broadcasti

department is going to be involv with the college’s new station to air in the fall.

at

other student executives and talk to

well.

“I think there is a lot of opportun

to colleges

them about different problems they have run into and different problems you’ve run into,” said LeBeau.

essential to the position because

for

the

position,” said LeBeau. LeBeau said he feels that having a

colleges

Supercon is beneficial across Canada.

on Aug. 1, graduated from program in 1981 and currently an announcer at Kool

c

the things he likes to do. “It match

loved by the students,” said Thurnell, adding he is sure the students will love Goebel as

was extremely motivated

representative

time

“Most people

LeBeau

job.

starts the full

ness for 20 years, said the positio

dorm

arrangements

from public relations to strategic planning to 25 tips on a successful year. Executives had to take notes on the speeches and at the end of the trip hand in a detailed report on what

Beaumont would do an excellent

embarrassing

student unions

of president LeBeau, Conestoga Students Inc., formerly forth the nomination for

APEC incident

make

successful in working as a team.

to attend conferences

the

Page 2

an attempt to

more

sentative for colleges.

Phil

COMMENTARY

in

Canada

universities across

no represen-

nated by Conestoga to be the repre-

7

colleges and

living

on the committee. John Beaumont, president of the Fanshawe Student Union, was nomi-

PAGE

May 30 to June 4.

Attendance of CSI representatives

tative

House.

there from

who

in

position

nator

Canada.

will represent colleges across

Martin Lawrence stars in Big Mama’s

be

said

recognized,”

one seat on the advisory committee of Supercon, an annual conference held for college and university student council executive members. The advisory committee now will least

at

August

dealing

third party for students in

right direction for colleges to

Colleges will have

technologist

important to

Goebel,

By Mike Radatus

June 5 at Conestoga College’s recreation (Photo by Laura Czekaj) on page 3.

who

them. The

College students to have representative on committee Ecstasy drug use growing in region.

rally

centre. Full Story

be kept confidential.

“We want

in

said

possible,”

September the policy and procedure book would be revised.

on items he would

Conestoga

at

College.

a really small step in the

things done in the

way

most

efficient

possible.

“You have a chance

to

talk

to

Thurnell the

said

technologist

radio

is

skills

required

are

to

Goebel said he doesn’t have ma details about the

new

radio

there,” he said. “I think there

of potential there and to getting involved.”

I

statii

is

a

look forw:


-

New

curriculum

ii too advanced and

is

unfair for students The Ontario Ministry of Education’s new Grade

1 1

and 12 cur-

too ambitious. Since eliminating the Ontario Academic Courses (OACs), the Ontario government has condensed the subjects in those courses into the other four years of high school. The new Grade 9 and 10 curriculum was introduced last year,

riculum

and

is

now

new Grade

the

11

and 12 curriculum has been

intro-

duced.

Not only is the province adding the OAC course load to the Grade 11 and 12 curriculum but it is making it tougher. This means trying to cram too much into the system and students can’t handle

The new Grade

11

and 12

.

and molecular genetics.

.

Tins

is

Grade

Up

until this year,

and

11

12 curriculum includes an thr °P ol °gy> humanities

curriculum includes anthropology, humanities .. and molecular genetics. ,

it.

The new Grade

1 1

too ambitious for

and 12 students.

Ontario was the only province to have an

OAC

or Grade 13 year. Not only are the subjects taught getting tougher but the way they are being taught is being changed as well. Where there used to be advanced, general and basic courses for almost everything, there will

college

classes,

preparatory

now

be university preparatory workplace preparatory

classes,

classes or other classes.

These classes are taught on either an academic level or an applied level. Both are equally difficult but are taught in different ways.

This leaves no courses for the 10 to 15 per cent of high school who used to take courses at the basic level. Grade 9 students who have already started the new curriculum are having trouble and teachers and students fear that the drop out rate is going to go up. Premier Mike Harris is unsympathetic to the plight of the stu-

students

dents

who

are finding the

new curriculum too difficult. apparent in the new Grade 9

curricuProblems were already lum in March, according to an article in the Toronto Star. At that point, 16 school boards had sounded alarms because their top students could not handle some portions of the new curriculum. that Harris was quoted as saying: “It’s absolute nonsense some people are saying it’s too tough. Well, the fact of the mat.

.

.

tough out there.” Putting in a new high school curriculum before putting in a new elementary school curriculum is what is nonsense. Expecting 14-year-old students to be able to learn DNA replication and genetic engineering is nonsense. Richard Payette, a high school teacher at Cameron Heights

ter is the

world

“You start at

If the

in

Grade 9

is

much lower

you have

to

grade,” said Payette.

government wants to initiate a new curriculum in Grade 1 and worked up from there.

it

should

have started

Payette said that the failure rates for this year are astronomical.

yesterday

images of

the

APEC

new

we

We

with.

disagree

are allowed to speak

freely.

had a

right to be

The

Economic

there,

Cooperation)

and police didn’t want them

protesters

even

the prime minister

if

protests

haunt-

The question

ed

televi-

have the right pepper spray?

the

sion screen and

newspaper.

One may not soon forget the grim determination on the police

who

officer’s face

let

loose a tor-

on protesters University of British the at Columbia campus. One can remember the images of asking the slogans and signs Canadian officials not to welcome

President Suharto, a

human

man accused

— did

the police

them with

to blast

American

States

The 2,000

(OAS).

protesters

included

Bolivian mothers against domestic violence and Mexican priests asking for social justice.

The OAS has been blamed for a myriad of social crimes, from clear-cutting

down by

kidnappings

forests

in

Brazil

to

not

armed policemen. Allegations that Prime Minister Jean Chretien

high school curricu-

ordered police to use force in order

one

Suharto embarrassment

tion

is

Indonesia

to

spare

surfaced In

not going to work.

later.

a democratic

Canada,

torn

we

live

country like

with the notion

in

to protest violence are unclear.

in

Windsor

lies in the

escala-

of violence and anger in Windsor. The details of whether or not police used force to quell a situation that had the potential for

It is

reported,

however, that some protesters threw homemade smoke bombs over the barricade separating them from the building where the meetings took place.

While violence is perhaps not a good way to enact change, protest is

definitely important.

We

Recently in Windsor, dozens of demonstrators were arrested during angry protests focusing on the meeting of the Organization of

rights violations

— being

is

there.

Colombia. The difference between the pepper spray incident at APEC and the

Starting education reform in the middle of an education sysis

are free to protest issues,

(Asia-Pacific

in

The government has to work up lum through a new elementary school curriculum. to a

we

policies, or events that

that

the

of massive

has to be a gradual raising of the bar,” he said. The way to improve the education of Ontario’s students to dump more information on them than they can handle. “It

tem

that

rent of pepper spray

unfair.

can’t immediately initiate a higher standard,

a

new

must be free

seems only

It

is

collegiate institute in Kitchener, said he thinks starting the

curriculum

Citizens

in order to see

need protests

both sides of the issue and to make sure that the people who call the shots in the world

know that their human lives.

decisions will affect

We need protests to alert the world to injustices, because as Martin Luther King Jr. said, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere”. We must be wary of police intervention and force used at protests. We must be sure that it is being used to keep the peace, not to keep silence. We should encourage safe and non-violent protest and make sure that we protest can truly say we live in a democratic society that honours and

— —

cherishes our fundamental rights as citizens.

is mainly funded from September to May by a payment from Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI), formerly called the Doon Student Association, in exchange for the insertion of

SPOKE

Spoke SPOKE

is

Keeping Conestoga College connected

The views and opinions expressed in newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the CSI unless their advertisements contain the CSI logo. SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by advertising in the paper. this

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Laura Czekaj;

News

Editor:

Ray Bowe;

Photo Editor: Donna Ryves Production Manager: Mike Radatus; Advertising Manager: Mike Radatus; Circulation Manager: Sherri Osment; Faculty Supervisor: Jerry Frank SPOKE’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 691, 692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect or

MS Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not con-

tain

any libellous statements and may be accompanied by an

illustration (such as

a photograph).


!

SPOKE, June

Nurses honoured by college By Donna Ryves

recipient also

Management Committee Award,

Mutrie Chapter

has to demonstrate personal and

which is a professional reference book on nursing. The Snider award acknowledges student improvement over the course of program studies, academic achievement, clinical practice and personal and professional growth. The management award recognizes leadership displayed through academic and

Committee Award which goes

clinical settings.

The

Conestoga College’s nursing students were rewarded by community organizations that support

professional

health-care education through the

program, won the Lillian Brown Nursing Award, which was established by Murray Brown, a former University of Guelph professor, in memory of his wife and in recognition of the exemplary level of nursing care she received during her illness. For many years the award was only

presentation of awards for academexcellence.

ic

Six students

who completed

the

nursing program and

three-year

one student

in

second year,

the

along with two practical nursing

have been given achieve-

students,

ment awards. The nursing students

are

Linda

Down

of Kitchener, Shirley Foster of Waterloo, Shannon Gibson of

Holden Kitchener, Jennifer Lyne Simcoe, Claire Walshe Kitchener and Anita Willms Darlene

Guelph,

of of of of

growth during the

program.

Down,

a second-year student in

nursing

the

given to a university-level nursing student.

Three years ago, the donor transit exclusively to Conestoga in recognition of the high calibre of ferred

students in the college’s nursing

worth $500, were given to Holden and

program. The award gives recognition for initiative, care and compassion in patient service during clinical placements along with aca-

Down. Holden won

demic achievement

Waterloo.

The two

largest awards,

the

Mary-Joe

Halliwell General Proficiency Award, which is given to the graduating student

who

achieves an

A

average in theory courses and per-

forms

an exemplary manner in

in

Summer

travel

in

program

studies.

Walshe won two awards, the $130 Myrtle Caswell Snider Bedside Nursing Award and the School

Health

of

Sciences

clinical

skills,

leadership

student colleagues,

among

motivational

and participation

school

the graduating student

Sherri

Osment

Conestoga College’s part-time program will offer two of its courses during the sum-

The work placement will begin with a two-hour workshop on July 6. The following nine weeks will

mer

be used for students to complete their required 42-hour work placements. The workshop is used to discuss where the students want to do their placements. Carol Roehrig, co-ordinator of the travel consulting program, said

This

the first time the travel

is

consultant program’s

ment and the fourth

work place-

travel consult-

ing classes will be offered during the

summer

the

program are required

semester. Students in to

com-

the

plete four travel classes.

The

fourth

consulting

travel

main reason

courses over the

to participate in postgraduate edu-

who has a solid record of achievement in theory courses

By Mike Radatus

and

Conestoga Students merly the Doon

of theory.

Association, has spent $10,000 on four new computers to be sit-

completing theoreti-

gram. “It is

much

easier to get students

Manning challenges

organization’s capital develop-

both practical nursing graduates,

ment fund,

pated in student activities associated with nursing professional devel-

opment. Gibson won the $300 Guelph General Hospital Auxiliary Award, which is given to the graduating student who has achieved the best overall academic average throughout the nursing program. Foster won the $100 Robert

achievement

received

Barnes

won

awards.

$250

the

Sister

Schnarr Award, which recognizes academic excellence as

were donated attraction at the

the

main

Canadian Alliance

to the

event by local

companies.

placed in the summer time,” Roehrig said. “We do some of the foot work for them, we help them get the placement.” Roehrig said she had already found placements for two students as of June 1. The second reason for offering the course during the summer semester was to maintain the flow of the program. During the spring

program was cancelled because there were only six semester,

the

ahead to the next part of the program.

Manning

Although

was

the

speakers at the event, which was

centre June 5.

Manning was one of

the

guest

held as the official starting point of

entertainment

Reg Petersen’s campaign to become the Canadian Alliance’s

entertainers

Cambridge candidate

to

election

in

the next

and provided the party

with the opportunity to recruit

vari-

the event exciting for

displayed in both nursing theory

courses and nursing practice in

organization.

Zettel

clinical

settings.

Chair’s

Award,

won

the

local vol-

who

recruited

were

unteers

through Petersen’s acquaintances, according to Davis-Lauer. Conestoga College was chosen according to the venue, as Petersen, because of the size of the gym in the recreation centre and

of coalitions.

He

also

addressed questions from the audi-

ence of 300 Cambridge residents,

ranging

from

and

abortion

euthanasia to the Alliance’s promises to

maintain a balanced budget.

Petersen’s

campaign

was

the

highlight of the evening but the

purpose of the event was to sign up Alliance memberships. Apetizers,

dessert

and

coffrr

were catered by local resteraunts, including MenuAtHome.com and Unique Coffee. The PowerPoint

The computers, which

include printers, were purchased

through academic achievement and application of theory to clinical practice and lead-

system.

leadership

ership

among

student colleagues.

to

upgrade the CSI’s current

Phil LeBeau, president of the

new computwould give students easier access to a computer when they want to use one.

CSI, said that the ers

more

summer

fall

when

there are

students you’ll always see

students on the computers

CSI

the location of the college.

the student/client services building in room 220 and both will be taught

by Roehrig.

available for students to get

Both the classes are being held

The

travel

offering a

program

new

will also

in

be

course, called the

World of Cruising,

in

November.

This will be a one-day workshop that will introduce students to the

world of cruise travel. Roehrig said this workshop is being offered because of student interest in the area of cruises. An instructor for the course has not been found yet, Roehrig said, but looking for someone

the college

is

who works

in the cruise industry.

were there keep an eye on things. “They have provided their own security and we only have to assist if they were unprepared,” he said, adding that everything went

said

office,”

work done.” The old computers will be sent tothe Waterloo and Guelph camtheir

puses for students there. “The other campuses pay only about half as much of a student fee as the students in the Doon campus and there is not even

amount of students on the campuses so it is important for us to help them as much as possible,” said LeBeau. close to the

all

students

needing

money

!

smoothly.

Classified teach English:

5 days/40 hrs. (April 3-7, 2000)

TESOL teacher certification course (or

by correspondence).

“The college falls under the Cambridge riding and we wanted a

1000s of jobs available

space that could hold a lot of people but wasn’t an arena,” he said.

NOW. FREE information

Davis-Lauer added that college maintenance and security staff were helpful in setting up. Conestoga security guards Roy Trunbull and Andrew Jozefowicz were present, although they were

package, call toll-free:

1-888-270-2941

in. the

LeBeau. “With four more computers the executive can have systems to work on to get their duties done and there still will be computers

lege, Trunbull said they

-

also

recognition plaque for general proficiency and a

not required to be there by the col-

Travel

The event was run by

as their

organization generat-

all

generations..

Manning challenged the audience to vote for someone who is a builder

money the

was presented

members.

leader of change, a democrat and a

known

slush fund, which consists of

at the event, said all

were local and a

ety of entertainment

make

also

the

ed through activities. The CSI has to spend this money each year to remain a non-profit

Beatrice

to

undisputed main attraction, the audience was entertained by a variety of local talent ranging from gymnastics to dance. Beth DavisLauer, organizer of the food and

rally at membership held Conestoga College’s recreation

The money came from

local voters

projector and various other items

Manning was

Preston

office.

Two are for use by Doon cam-

Also, Caryn Barnes of St. Jacobs and Christine Zettel of Kitchener,

successfully

Attention By Laura Czekaj

CSI

uated in the

Willms won the Registered Nurses Association of OntarioWellington Chapter Award of $150. Willms’s work was consistent in theoretical studies and clinical placements. She also partici-

was not offered during the summer no students would be moving

the benefit of students in the pro-

Student

River Hospital Award, the other postgraduate honour, which is given for maintaining a minimum B+ average in theory courses and

pus students and two are for use by CSI executive members.

in

students enrolled. If the travel class

for

Inc., for-

cal concepts in clinical settings.

skills

for offering the

week period beginning on

and ending Aug. 30, with classes

clinical application

Lyne earned the $200 Grand

—Page 3

committees.

summer was

course will be offered over a nineJuly 5

to

intends

2000

CSI spends $10,000 on computers

“In the

hours.

this year.

who

program

every Wednesday night for four

travel consultant

Education

cation and

Travel courses offered through By

IODE

19,

Be

Tour Guide!!

a Conestoga College Talk

to

Melody or Carol,

Information Centre,

Or

call

SCSB

748-5220 ext 730


Page 4

— SPOKE, June

19,

2000

«

The

effects of

Drug popular with youth By Ray Bowe The drug

ecstasy, although not

seen as a problem at Conestoga College, has been producing huge

waves in the news, in Kitchener courtrooms and across Ontario over the past two months. The drug has been blamed for the deaths of at least nine people in Ontario

last

year,

year-old Kieran

including

Kelly,

21-

last

summer near

a Sauble

Beach campground where a rave party had been held. Ecstasy, or

MDMA

(methylanea hal-

dioxymethamphetamine), lucinogenic stimulant, according the Centre for Addiction and is

Mental Health. Some users experihallucinations, ence paranoia, insomnia, muscle stiffness, an increased heart rate, spasms in the chewing muscles and grinding of the teeth. Regular users may experience

weight

loss,

exhaustion,

flashbacks, irritability, memory loss and panic attacks. The positive effects users crave

jaundice,

said they find about 10 peo-

fluid levels in the body.

ple per night with small personal

A1 Hunter, supervisor of security at Conestoga College, said he has encountered no ecstasy use at the

amounts, but the larger amounts, about four doses, are detected about once a week. He also noted that ecstasy is less of a problem in the 19-and-over crowd, which seems to prefer drugs

He

college.

attributes

to

this

Conestoga’s location, as it is not an inner-city college, and the fact that

few funcwhere strong drugs would be

the student council holds tions

used. that “no place such behaviour,” and

However, he said

a Wilfrid

Laurier University student found

dead

Ward

age the kidneys’ ability to regulate

is

immune

to

security has confiscated paraphernalia.

Although

the

at

would be absurd at the college

is

it

college,

not a problem

he added

that

to believe

no one

it

does drugs.

“Over the

such as marijuana and heroin. He said staff catch about four or lighting five patrons per night joints in the club, but pot is

much

due to its potent smell. Ecstasy, most often in tablet form, is much harder to detect and

easier to detect

is

more

“We don’t want to attract the bad element,” said Ward. “They (non-

also

all-ages

to

According to the Centre

for

Addiction and Mental Health, there have even been reported cases of water intoxication causing swelling of the brain, leading to

coma and

even death. Ecstasy can also dam-

at a local

behaviour, jerking arms and a loss control, he said.

training

lems.

that the club only offers

for alcohol-related prob-

The bouncers

drug and only

deemed a destroy

down

confiscate the

call police if

it

is

amount. They drug by flushing it

trafficable

the

easiest drug to obtain at such par-

specializing

(Internet photo)

drug users) won’t come out if we have rampant drug use here (at the club).”

Derek Roussy, who frequently

ties.

The drug, coupled with long

said

$3 a

one of the

bottle.

scariest things

tablets

its

can be

laced with anything from cocaine

An

inquest recently into the death

Computer Numerical Control

tions included

Environmental Engineering Applications (Optional Co-op) Human Resources Management (Co-op)

Systems Analyst Teaching English as a Second Language Technology Marketing

Woodworking Manufacturing Management

Ask about our part-time Post-Graduate Programs too!

Conestoga College

pp

making raves sub-

ject to permits, providing an unlim-

water supply, having well-

ited

U.S. for that crime.

According

clients,

London and Guelph, sell$60 per gram, an

amount capable of providing about five or six “hits.”

science, will serve his .

two years at mum-security

:;|f’

attention

'

a

Scotia to

be closer to his par-

Edward

frequency and patterns

Ecstasy

among

have cute cartoon

Island.

characters imprinted

had been seeking

on them.

four-year sentence.

its

patients.

common

among

its

patients

are

The

drugs adult

pills

and alcohol are most desired drugs

,.

that

although

Crown

The

May,

a

researchers

Spain were given the goahead by ethics and research committees to

19 years of

age and younger, Penrose said. Centre for Addiction and Mental Health literature says

ents on Prince

In in

ecstasy, pot

for people

often

crack

cocaine and alcohol, whereas the

.

mini-

farm

Nova

prison in

the

to

graduated

UW

with a bachelor from of mathematics with honours in computer

pays

also

clinic

who

Crane,

few years.

The

article in

ing the drug for

the

become more common among teenagers in the past

30

said he distrib-

uted ecstasy at raves in Kitchener,

Toronto,

has

it

May

to a

The Record, Crane

not

is

of

resident

a

but

facing charges in the

is

conduct the py study

w

MDMA,

first

according

ecstasy.org, a

devoted

Web

to site

providing

to

information on

accurate

it

thera-

involving

trained staff on hand, educating the

discourages

admission to those 16 years and older and hold-

supports providing accurate infor-

researchers

mation about the drug, including how users can reduce harmful

women survivors of sexual abuse who are suffering from post-trau-

effects.

matic stress disorder to reduce and anxiety. The research

public,

restricting

ing raves at city-licensed venues.

One of

the touchiest

recommen-

was

implementing a mandatory search at the door by a

dations

For information call 748-5220, ext. 656.

Ho

recommended a variety of ways to try and prevent any more needless deaths. Ho collapsed at a rave in Toronto last October after taking ecstasy. The 27 non-binding recommenda-

of 20-year-old Allen

Michigan

main drug used by

most

alleviate

the problem.

Career Development Practitioner

the

become

to

at

of ketamine

that

said

although ecstasy

close

fashionable,

addiction

in

Kitchener,

and speed. He also said the speed makes users grit their teeth, which is why soothers have

to

of professionals!

accept pleas on lesser charges. Police also found 6.4 kilograms

Regional Addiction and Family in Counselling Centre

its

not knowing

is

ingredients, since

new breed

17 charges, including production of narcotics and exporting drugs, but the Crown agreed to

June 2 Canadian

to a

a

faced

.

Julian Fantino said that raves

common among

is

ravers.

about ecstasy

Join the leading edge of a

to Detroit.

attends raves, said ecstasy is the

Ecstasy

He

Conestoga offers a variety of unique full-time Post-Graduate Programs Apply now for September

moved

police late

was subse-

party

were “threatening the very fabric of Canadian life.” Toronto city council has also implemented a temporary ban on all raves in the megacity, even after the inquiry’s suggestions were released. Deb Penrose, an intake worker

selling for about

College Graduates

The

According

hours of dancing, tends to dehydrate the body and event organizers usually have skids of bottled water

the toilet.

year.

Press article, Toronto police chief

is

14 and 18 years of age. Symptoms of use include erratic

down by Windsor

last

MDA,

and

to traffic in ecstasy

drug similar to ecstasy. Federal drug prosecutor Gerry Taylor said Crane produced 1.1 kilograms of ecstasy and 100 grams of MDA. Crane’s lawyer disputed the amount. He originally

police late

shut

quently

year

most prevalent on nights with kids between

He added

mall. Crane pleaded two counts of conspiring

guilty to

last year.

(ecstasy use) increased about

of muscle

in a lab located in a Victoria Street

industrial

bouncer at local nightclub

diagrams and explanations. The immediate effects of ecstasy are caused by a flood of the chemical serotonin in the brain. Regular

damage

CD

release party for his

Daniel Ward,

and

was recently sentenced to two years in jail for making ecstasy student,

in

EFX, and 909 shut

10-fold,”

esti-

mating it is up five-fold last year. Kitchener court, Matthew In Crane, a University of Waterloo

known as

down by

it’s

“very prevalent in the region,”

DJ

years.”

an extensive slideshow featuring

use can cause long-term

had the CD release party for his new album Decks, EFX, and 909

between 14 and 18

last

sedative

a

is

In a June 3 article in The Record, Waterloo regional police Det. Const. Daryl Goetz said ecstasy is

known

also

new album Decks,

of ecstasy on the brain by means of

brain neurons.

DJ

nights with kids

at dancesafe.org shows the effects

GHB

surgery.

alcohol.

starts.

it

Richie Hawtin, a

Windsor, had the

Daniel Ward, a bouncer nightclub, said “over the

Internet harm-reduction site

ing

before

Richie Hawtin, a

closeness to those around them.

An

heroin, cocaine and marijuana.

which induces euphoria and can be lethal when combined with alcohol, leading to respiratory arrest in some cases with the slightest amount of

most prevalent on all-ages

increased sex drive, enhanced senses and a feeling of

K or ketamine, crystal meth,

event in order to give out the location or set up a bus to take people to the locale. This prevents the authorities from busting the eVent

is

include an

(gamma-hydroxybutyrate),

Special

K is a potent anesthetic drug designed to anesthetize animals dur-

Rave organizers usually release a phone number to call the day of the

Plastikman, based

and

at

(phencyclidine),

Special

as Plastikman, based in Windsor,

easily hidden.

PCP

GHB LSD,

secret location.

increased about 10fold

Other drugs sometimes used raves include

any connection with raves, and only one, that of Ho, involved an underground rave meaning at a

(ecstasy use)

it’s

ther deaths.

1998, only three have had

since

past year

in

National Post stated that of the 13 ecstasy-related deaths in Ontario

year

last

9 deaths

tied to

paid duty police officer.

Many feel

it

type.

is

A

in

the rave music scene

getting a negative stereo-

June

2

article

in

the

The

ecstasy

centre says in

its

use,

the

it

information

drug. The

controversial

use

will

MDMA

on

fear will

packet that making raves illegal will not eliminate the problem, but

involve five groups consisting of a total of 29 women taking dosages

providing

a safe environment, including the presence of emer-

ranging from 50

gency personnel, could prevent

jected to placebos.

fur-

with eight of the

mg

to

women

150 mg,

being sub-


SPOKE, June

Award-winning campus dining Conestoga’s Waterloo campus recognized fied in safe food handling; and pro-

medical officer of health, said Eat

Conestoga College’s Waterloo campus dining room was presented with the Eat Smart Award of

ing, in

vide 100 per cent smoke-free seatcompliance with Waterloo

initiatives in the region that

smoking bylaw.

Sixteen local restaurants, includ-

Smart

complement

will

aim

Eat Smart has been launched in 17 other regions throughout the

mony

officially

at the

at the

award cere-

5.

Eat Smart

is

sultant at the college, received the

Joe Williams

program

nutritionist

tomers request more nutri-

increase in the past five years.

campus

tious selections.

Conlin has co-ordinated the college’s United Way campaign for the past three years making jt one of the cornerstone accounts because more than $25,000 was

spaghetti

restaurants

offer

as

cus-

Restaurants are also ideal

sponsored by the Ministry of

places to support healthy

Canadian Cancer Society and the Heart and

increasing access to safe,

changes

lifestyle

nutritious

by

foods in nonenvironments,

Stroke Foundation to pro-

smoking

mote healthy eating habits public,” said Beth Beth Esenbergs, co-ordinator of the food and in Esenbergs, co-ordinator of beverage management program at Conestoga’s the food and beverage man- Waterloo campus, accepts the Eat Smart award agement program at the June 5, presented by Regional Chair Ken Seiling. Waterloo campus and mem- (Photo by Petra Lampert) ber of the advisory commit-

said Prange.

tee for Eat Smart.

reservations to eat lunch or

restaurants

must

offer a variety of

healthy food choices on the

menu

and by request; possess a proven track record in safe food handling and sanitation, with at least one full-time kitchen

employee

certi-

Room, received

“It’s

key

a recognition of the three

factors. It’s

“Our task

an important award

and we’re privileged to get said Esenbergs. Dr. Hanif Kassam, the region’s

for us it,”

raised

the

’97-’98

up teams

including

at

each cam-

students.

Team

activities included selling college

served

and holding a luncheon, which was

kits

by

employees.

Other

events such as a wet sponge toss, a golfing contest and telephone

bingo were held. The proceeds from the creation of a cookbook will go towards the United Way.

Teaching English as a Second Language

From October through make

April the public can

A One-Year

Certificate Program September Call for more information 519-748-5220, ext. 656

dinner in the college’s dining room.

distributed throughout the region.

^

^Oilege

A listing of Eat Smart restaurants on the Eat Smart

rnnpstnra MOgd.

Starts this

lists

the winning restaurants and will be

site at

In

to set

for next year is

Esenbergs.

in Ontario is

annually.

year, the college raised $29,606,

promotion in the community and the restaurants,” said

The Eat Smart Dining Guide

the award.

through direct giving. Part of Conlin’s involvement

was

such as heart disease and

ing the Conestoga

funded agencies and provides funding to other organizations

pus,

healthier options

In order to qualify for the award,

The United provides financial support to

zations,” Conlin said.

Way

This year the college raised $34,443, which is a 40-per-cent

department, said

incidence of food-caused illness or chronic diseases,

Health,

from

“One of the reasons the college has selected the United Way is because it supports many organi-

the fundraising campaigns.

ty health

is

May

displayed significant service to

health

many

“The program

in

at

Ellen Prange, pub-

designed to help reduce the

cancer.

Award

Waterloo region communi-

lic

restaurant

’99.

the Kitchener-Waterloo area United Way. The award is given to a United Way volunteer who has

Mary

a provincial

while $32,683 was raised in ’98-

Eleanor Conlin, chair of academic research and prior learning assessment and recognition con-

province.

Waterloo cam-

pus on June

By Donna Ryves

to

Healthy Ontario’s Restaurant Program, Eat launched

honours

Conestoga volunteer

reduce the incidence of chronic disease rates and food borne illnesses.

was

—Page 5

existing

Excellence.

Smart,

2000

for healthy fare

By Petra Lampert

region’s

Way

United

19,

Web

11

Qp

www.eatsmart.web.net.

Thursdays ^SUCKS NO ^ ALLOWED!

am e ^

Westmount Place Shopping Centre 50 Westmount Rd. N.

WATERLOO

Ph.(905) 844-8558

100

%

CANADIAN OWNED,

OPERATED AND TAXED!

HOME

OF.... DONOVAN BAILEY, JARRETT SMITH, JOANNE MALAR, MIKE M0RREALE, STEVE RICE, PAUL MASOTTI, MIKE O’SHEA, VAL ST. GERMAIN, STEVE STAIOS, MIKE VANDERJAGT, CHRIS GIOSKOS, JEN BUTTON, AND COLIN DOYLE

Oakville

.

Burlington

.

Barrie

.

Hamilton Waterloo .


1

Page 6 SPOKE, June 19, 2000 mmmmmmimmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

Way

Millennium cookbook helps United By Petra Lampert

A

millennium edition college cookbook which raises money for the United Way will focus on aealthy eating this year.

Once again, proceeds from this cookbook will be donated to

year’s

the Conestoga College United Way campaign, which will take place in the

fall.

“Give us your healthy recipes and let’s share them,” said Eleanor Conlin, who has been the chair of the college’s United Way committee for the past few years. Conlin said that no changes will be made to submitted recipes. For example, if a recipe calls for butter, it will not be changed to margarine. However, Conlin hopes that the recipes shared will focus on health-

The cookbook’s first edition, Conestoga Cooks with Class, sold 401 copies at $5 a copy and raised $2,005 for the 1998 United Way campaign. The cookbook included nearly 100 recipes submitted by college staff, faculty and students. “Between 60 to 70 people contributed recipes and some even submitted two or three,” said

of their services,” said Conlin. Some of the services that are helped by the United Way include,

Conlin.

Anselma House, Mary’s

“We’d

more healthy,”

it

said Conlin.

Recipes for this year’s edition have already started to come in and

Conlin hopes

students

that

will

share their recipes as well.

“We’d

more

like to see

administrators

faculty,

and students con-

tribute this year,” said Conlin.

Conlin said that the

last

time

more employees than students contributed recipes,

and support

staff

United

Conlin said she expects fewer recipes will be submitted this year, but thinks book sales can once again raise another $2,000 for the

Way

campaign. A cookbook wasn’t published last year because Conlin and other

members

Way

college raised

at

the

felt

that

“We had last year,

set

$30,000 as the goal did exceed it,” said

so

we

Conlin.

For the past three years, Conestoga College has had cornerstone status with the United Way,

meaning the college has raised more than $25,000 each year. Conlin said the campaign is always fun and students can volun-

campaign activiThere were close to 150 volun-

Dianne O’Neil (left), cookbook co-ordinator, and Eleanor Conlin, chair of academic research, hold the 1998 cookbook that was sold to raise money for the United Way. (Photo by Petra Lampert)

teer to help with ties.

another one done so soon would lose its impact.

teers last year.

Dianne O’Neil, cookbook coordinator, said the first book consist-

hold events

Conlin said the committee hopes to

Conestoga College Past campaigns have

campaign, including the good feel-

at

ing they’ll get from helping some-

Roasters and the cafeteria.

one

such

locations

Dooners,

as

who

Students, staff and faculty

else.

are

This year’s cookbook will be avail-

interested in submitting recipes can

able on the first day of the campaign, probably around Thanksgiving. As of yet, a campaign date has not been

forward them to Dianne O’Neil, administrative assistant in the

useful tips for the kitchen will

included a spaghetti dinner and a pizza lunch.

be added. Some additions include food tips, substitution tips and tips

Conlin said there are a lot of ways students can benefit from the

interested in purchasing a copy of the cookbook will find them

more

said.

students take advan-

Last year’s overall United

Way committee

dents shared their recipes.

submit as well,” Conlin

our contribution

goes towards any

cies,” Conlin said.

campaign

chair of the college’s

committee

it

$34,388.

ed of only recipes, but

that the students will

and

more

contributed the most. Very few stu-

“We hope

“A lot of our

Eleanor Conlin,

United

Way

United

tage of the services of these agen-

healthy.”

taken one of their favourite recipes

and made substitutes to make

it

“When we send to

Friends).

favourite recipes

someone who’s

like to see

see

taken one of their

made

Conlin said that since the cook-

books were printed on campus there were no production costs and all of the profits were able to go directly to the United Way.

Place, Big Brothers of Kitchener- Waterloo and ROOF (Reaching Our Outdoor

someone who’s

ier foods.

“We’d

like to

for the hostess.

this

time

campuses.

at all

set.

Those

training and

development depart-

ment. The deadline for submissions

is

June 30th.

Recreation centre offers safe

equipment

for students By Tracy Ford

are interested in using

James

it,"

said.

The

recreation centre

than just a building

-

it

is

more

offers lots

of activities for student use and

community use, according to Ian James, manager of athletics and an excellent job provid-

ing varsity athletes with equip-

ment

that is safe

and make sure

they’re participating in the varsity sports

in

a safe manner,”

said

James.

He said each student’s athletic and recreation fee of $98.50 set by the college’s athletics and recreation department is based on equipment cost, facility maintenance and staffing as well as travel expenses and hotel accommodations for varsity teams.

Any

370 HIGHLAND R D.W.,

student can join a varsity

team, intramural team or use the

KITCH

program. “There use.

is

for

the

an increase in drop-in bit of a struggle

So we have a

with courses interested in using

recreation.

“We do

James said using the facility program use is beneficial to

the facility throughout the day and

the drop-in students to

use the

who come

facilities as well,”

in

he

said.

He many ities

said

it’s

hard to

tell

how

students are using the facil-

but estimated about 100 to

150 a day use them involved in sports.

who

The

are not

sports bar

can attract 75 to 100 people a day, depending on the day. ‘They come in the morning, in the noon hour and during the evening,” he said. All that is needed to use any part of the recreation centre is a student card.

rom mtcs ms*

facility for a personal game, said James. The $15 deposit the recre-

744-1 01

ation centre staff asks for while

“Anyone can walk off the street. Walk into the dressing rooms and

reserving the facility

steal things

m

FAIRWAY R0A0

ST..

that the

think

group

it’s

fair to

book

to ensure

it.

“I don’t

the facili-

show up,” he said. “Once you come and use the facilties... and

893-2464 402 mm siRigT

ities,

not

you get your deposit back.”

Student use he said.

»<,

snwtsB H6RVEVS *

is

will use

mmm king

QOT'/a/D

Visityiatwww.beatqoeson.com

|

is

extremely high,

door

(if

and walk out the back

the staff didn’t check for

student cards),” said James.

The

staff is instructed not to let

anyone

in the facilities without a

card.

The recreation centre is booked on a first-come, first-served basis so James suggests booking early.

“1 think one of the major areas is program use - for example, law and security, police foundations,

tre

wellness elective programs that

includes birthday parties.

The college also rents out the cenfor community use, which


SPOKE, June

The Innocent Years one By Jes Brown After three long years of waiting, country singer Kathy Mattea has resurfaced with a dynamic new album, The Innocent Years.

May

released on

The new album, full

16, is

written

track

well taken.

As with her previous albums, the threetime female vocalist of the year from both is leading off with a and the the

Jon Vezner and

about Mattea’s wish to

ing with in the three years since her previous album came out, including helping to

faster

a nostalgic look back

herself,

Sally Barris.

The song

talks

when

return to the innocence of youth

boy down the

street

The melodic piano

was her

intro

care for her parents, both of whom struggled with serious health problems, and Mattea’s

the

best friend.

by Matt Rollings

40th birthday. The song represents a test of faith, explaining that the trouble with angels is that they are never around \vhen you want

is

reprised later in the album.

Mattea’s rich voice

is

showcased perfect-

her 12th album. Her wide vocal range shown off in the songs Prove That By Me,

ly in is

Kathy Mattea’s

rich

voice

is

showcased

per-

on her 12th album. Mattea’s ballads are thought-provoking and touching.

fectly

(Internet photo)

Big

and Callin’ My Name. Unlike Mattea’s last album, Love Travels - which was full of quick-paced sharp songs like 455 Rocket, the title track Love Travels and Patiently Waiting - many of the songs on the new album are slower in pace. Songs like I Have Always Loved You and Out of the Blue have intricate background

Momma an

who

took his ex and ran off to L.A.” Another asset to this album is that it comes on an enhanced CD. It includes multimedia images, including several well taken photographs of Mattea, and the addresses of Mattea’s own Web page, (www.mattea.com) and her album, Mercury Nashville’s

Web

Momma’s

House. To catch an escaped convict, FBI agent Malcolm, played by Martin Lawrence, undergoes an make-

Malcolm, himself in

ment

Big Momma, finds one difficult predicaas

after another, including deliv-

known Big

ering a baby.

He

Momma was

a midwife.

hadn’t

also tears

up the basketball

court while in disguise, proving

“Granny’s got game.” Of course there is the inevitable love interest, Big Momma’s granddaughter. Malcolm even finds him-

that,

past offerings and offers a reflective look on

from people as varied as the eyes of an wife has had a stroke, a jilted lover, and innocence. Anyone should pick up this album for a relaxing trip through life and love. life

(www.mercury-

old

As usual with Mattea’s albums, the photography in the book and on the cover is

same bed with her while Momma. With

man whose

of

Big

Momma’s House

is

the sort

of film that gets a laugh in the theatre but is forgotten by the end of

spends a very uncomfortable night. The film is basically a series of

the drive

predictable, yet still amusing, blunders, near misses, and sexual con-

of the film

While it is hardly up for any Oscar nominations, there are still

many

scenes that

worth seeing,

make

this film

at least for

a few

Some of the jokes are funny at the moment but aren’t that

laughs.

laughs

great in retrospect.

only the bulk of his disguise and a flashlight between them, Malcolm

fusion.

He

them. Mattea’s bound to take the country world by storm again now that she’s back from her The album is definitely up to her hiatus.

nashville.com).

disguised as Big If you’re looking for a no-brainer with lots of laughs, head to Big

page,

easy bunch self in the

By Sherri Osment

over that turns him a larger-thanlife southern granny with attitude.

ACM

CMA

strong single.

The Trouble with Angels is one of the songs on the album and represents some of the struggles Mattea has been del-

is

by Mattea

— Page 7

The cover photo on this album was done by Mattea’s father, John.

music woven in with Mattea’s gentle vocals. A hidden gem on the album is the CD’s bonus track, BFD, which stands for something akin to “big flipping deal” where Mattea plays on acronyms. A sample line: “At least he ain’t no SOB, like that PhD

lads. title

2000

remember

to

of thought-provoking and touching bal-

The

19,

home.

The only

really exceptional part is

the

make-up used

to

make Lawrence look like Ella Mitchell, who plays the real Big

Momma. It really is

convincing.

you liked Mrs. Doubtfire, this is something to see. Big Momma’s House is like a Mrs. Doubtfire with an action movie flavour. If

Martin Lawrence goes through incredible transformation to

an

catch a bad guy. (Internet photo)

Conestoga lit

§

or>

o GO

O-C

O'}

Conestoga College

fjp

Quality Policy Conestoga College continually seeks opportunities for improver/. ent to

meet and exceed the needs of our students, employees

and communities.


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