Page 1

— No. 21

33rd Year

What’s Tuition will rise

by two per cent

Inside

By Laura Czekaj Students will pay two per cent

more

for tuition

the

in

fall

at

Conestoga College, the maximum increase allowed by the province. The increase was one of the subjects discussed at the May 29 board of governors meeting. Other topics included applied degree proposals and key performance indicators.

The meeting approved a motion to

increase tuition for the year

2000-2001 by two per cent. However, members of the board

Conestoga staff take a swing at golf tournament.

PAGE 4

five years, the subject should be re-examined by the board next May. The Ministry of Training, Universities Colleges and announced in March that beginning in the 2000-2001 academic year, colleges and universities will be allowed to raise tuition fees for most programs by a maximum of Students

student increases.

five

for

more if

a full two per cent

for tuition

and bursaries and $24 going to

later,

the college.

fee

any year may not exceed two per cent of the 1999-2000 average fee. increases

cation for Conestoga Students Inc.

(formerly called the

Doon

Student

Association) and student representative for the Ontario

College

Community

Parliamentary Association, said during the meetStudent

ing that the increase to students

who

is

detrimental

are currently grad-

uating with a high debt.

He

said

the average college student has a

debt load between

$15,000 and that even though a two-per-cent increase $20,000.

He added

leges,

will

total

$1,285,000. But that

Paee 2 Killer

Web

site

alarming

A

from

find their trip to and

again they

may

little

less

or then

ager of transportation engineering

Region of Waterloo, there has been sortie talk of negotiating with the ministry to widen the bridge at Homer Watson and

the

college

expects to spend in

2000-2001 in salary and benefits for existing staff.

different scale.

for the

Highway 401. The two southbound

Homer Watson merge before

just

the

lanes

of

into

one lane

bridge

which

not one of the worst in the area.

He

ers going through the intersection

from 7:45 a.m. to 8:15 p.m to 5:15 p.m.,

a.m. and 4:30

when

college traffic

Despite

the

is at its

peak.

annoyances

Banks

for

said, the spot is

“Inl998, there were 28,500 driv-

24-hour period,” said Banks,

degrees

in a

the college $14.22 million.

“The intersection is rated 96 out of 500 in terms of accidents. Every time you have signals, you have collisions. This one is not severe.”

one lane was dangerous. “It’s slow getting through. There are a

into

lot

of trucks which a

tion

little

restaurant. its

own

to

The

line of cars pulls all the

Each business

Banks fic

said he attributes the traf-

problems

much

of the morning

traffic

bottlenecks on

the bridge.

at the

will increase the traffic

flow fur-

ther.

construction were the plazas locat-

many

Watson Boulevard, north of Highway 401, although a Baker’s Dozen doughnut shop has been located on the southwest comer for

ed

at

Pioneer Drive and

ing,”

Rodeway

Antigua International recently began construction on the north-

Businesses set to open include a

which serves as housing for some

tracted

Sunoco gas bar and convenience

college students during the school

also based in

and car wash, a Tim Horton’s coffee shop and a McDonald’s

year.

Boulevard,

said the further

development under comer of Homer Watson Boulevard and New Dundee Road

way

acre lot developed.

Homer Watson

He

commercial

will see 3.5 acres of the total seven-

and

pop-

college, he

said, creates

401. “It will be busy in the morn-

site

has

imity to the college and

The

The

and evening

said stage one of the construction

noted.

in the area to the

ulation growth.

have

will

advantages, such as the close prox-

he

to

open near college

freestanding structure.

Broos said the

way

the doughnut store.”

opening in the fall across the road from Conestoga College. London-based developers

store

the after-

coming home from work and

be the landlord and

New Dundee Road

in

school, the bridge can be messy.

who

west comer of

said

electrical engi-

“Sometimes

bridge.

Tim Horton’s doughnut shop will be among the new businesses

the buildings on the site,

the situa-

neering student, also expressed irritation about driving on the

Development

will also

make

frightening,”

Domingos. David Leonce, an

International

owner of

number of

the

that

felt

trucks and cars trying to squeeze

is

motorists.

Ltd.,

It

merges right on the bridge. I’ve almost gotten crushed by trucks.” Joe Domingos, a visitor to the

eastbound 401 ramp. Banks said the worst time for congestion on

which Tibbits referred to as “one of the most important proposals we have ever submitted.” is more important than the proposal for the SuperBuild Growth Fund, a provincial government fund that recently awarded

a prob-

noon, around four, when everyone

the bridge is

said the proposal for applied

is

awful.

is

motorists have to cross to enter the

The topic of the upcoming submission of the applied degree proposal arose at the meeting. The college has four months to prepare the plans,

the bridge

“That bridge

lem.

McLennan,

to Jaclyn

CPA student,

college,

not.

According to Dave Banks, man-

not cover the

kitty-comer to the college.

McDonald’s restaurant and

Cambridge

from

additional $1.3 mil-

will

Walter Broos, owner of Antigua

Commentary

may

McDonald’s and Tim Horton’s By Ray Bowe

According a

Commuters

traffic

and delays

Julie Porter

painful in the future

does not apply to applied degree programs that will be offered by the college in the future because those programs will be priced on a

Harris, vice-president of edu-

By

Conestoga College a

can not compound percentage increases for any given year and use them to increase tuition in

Mike

frustration

excellence for col-

Tibbits added that the increase

later years.

Bridge causes

province-wide survey conducted to establish benchmarks of quality and

also stated institu-

tions

6

formance indicator funding, which is a

lion

in

The ministry

PAGE

be

will

aid

any year, it is not allowed to

teaching award.

cussion document presented to board members at the meeting, that the $190,000 from the increase in tuition, $400,000 from the base operating grant and $695,000 from this year’s key per-

$10 going towards financial

in

up because

tions, stated in a tuition fees dis-

fees,

es not to increase

catch

Kevin Mullan, vice-president of finance and administrative opera-

paying about $34

an institution choos-

Greg Burns wins Aubrey Hagar

lege. This will result in a total of

approximately $190,000 available

However,

5

$34 more for tuition fees, $10 of which is set aside by the college for local financial aid and bursaries and $24 of which goes to the col-

to the college, including part-time

years.

engineering grad records local acts.

is necessary to maintain a balanced budget. Students will be paying about

increase

the two-per-cent hike for the next

year

Electronics

may not seem like much, there has been a 109-per-cent increase in tuition over the past 10 years. College president John Tibbits said the college plans to have a scholarship fund in the fall that currently contains $500,000 to assist students. He added that the

suggested that rather than approve

two per cent per

PAGE

Keeping Conestoga trimmed

There

Highway is

also

Suites across the street,

closest stores available to

those in the college area prior to the

Homer

several years.

The construction company conis

Southside Construction,

London.

The., businesses

should open

September, said Broos.

in late


Page 2

— SPOKE, June

2000

12,

water testing services failed the people of Walkerton

SAY BYE-BYE

TO INHIBITIONS

there’s ecstasy.

Ask your doctor

Critical

The

situation in

Walkerton

is

truly disastrous

Now

most

the

is

lethal

of

The

all.

monitored to the degree that

vital services are

and

it

right

damage

to

leaves you feeling

may also make you grind your teeth. You may experience a possible drug reaction which may result in insomnia. Don’t euphoric, and

— and not sim-

trust that

side effects include

brain neurons,

ply because people are sick and dying from the water they drink. The disasters run far deeper than death and illness. The implications of what this crisis really means for

Canadians

The

for you.

it’s

if

.1

our basic

the cute

let

is critically

important has been shattered. but also our It’s not only the bodies that have been wounded, vital servand resources national our of infallibility faith in the skepices that has been compromised. We are forced to cast a priand public in the people those tical and questioning eye at

loss,

1

' ,

Snoopy and Barney

little

may

Other side effects

lure you.

»

t

pictures

include weight

and, oh yeah, death.

we are vate sector who are in charge of our vital services forced to question the safety of every glass of water we drink. In Walkerton, it is not yet known what the fateful equation

Some blame

'

Stan

ed

coli oul -

10 th

f ;fus we break <ha‘ remmded

jf

are

Koebel, the official in so vulnerable. There are theocharge of Walkerton’s ries and notions. Some blame water. Some blame Stan Koebel, the official in the farmers, some charge of Walkerton’s water. blame the government Some blame the farmers,

and some undoubtedly some blame the government and some undoubtedly blame blame God. God. We feel someone must be

to

blame. .but as yet, .

What we do know

we

is that

aren’t sure

We know

thing went wrong.

whom.

somewhere along

the

way some-

that five times in the first four

PR.

months of this year, weekly water samples were sent from Walkerton to a private lab in London, and that they all came back showing bacteria in the water. We know that the provincial Environment Ministry acknowledged

that

it

received

We know that each

faxes from the lab about bacteria in the Walkerton public

-

.

* tlme the water supply in January and response was to phone the Walkerton public April. We know that each time the utilities commission, ministry’s response was to w here it was told that phone the Walkerton public utilities commission, where it was told corrective measures were being taken. The ministry

apparently

The water

that

left

tested

had contained coliform bacteria, a

officials,

Koebel, the main

did not disclose the results of the tests until after the bacteria was first noticed.

So what does very wrong.

PUC

May 21

-

official,

six

days

mean? What it means is something went means that the public is forced to think that

this all

It

Koebel was not doing

his job.

and private sector must have accountability, and that they must take their jobs at the utmost level of seriousness. It means that the public has a right to know that the people employed to keep them safe are going to do so. It means that systems must be put in place to ensure action will swift and drastic action so that small slips, or errors in be taken judgment simply will not be allowed. Canadians are owed private and public accountability so that when we tip a glass of water to our lips, we have the peace of It

means

that people in the public

mind

not to question

if

it

is

site

proves market exists for

a lethal concoction.

be

serial killer

the fact that, without a market to

By Sherri Osment

such morbid merchandise to, the site couldn’t exist. People are actually buying these signatures. The very idea of glorifying mursell

Some

peo-

do

will

ple

make

potentially deadly strain.

According to local

Web

anything to

at that.

it

was

corrective measures were being taken.

Killers shouldn’t

derers for profit

it

means

bid and “an insult to victims worldwide.” Mahaffy is the mother of

the victims. Without the victims,

Leslie Mahaffy,

these killers wouldn’t be the very

and

Osment

profiting

from

serial killers, rapists

A Web

site called

fonts.com

www.

killer-

selling electronic sig-

is

natures of serial killers through the Internet.

Any

twisted and depraved

individual can purchase a signature for $9.95

US

or three for $19.95,

and with every purchase of three signatures

By are

thing they are exalted for

and cannibals.

comes

a

free

Simpson signature. The saddest thing about

O.J.

this is

sad and pathet-

hero out of a killer there seems to be one thing they are forgetting

Sherri

tion of oth-

ally-removed and bloodthirsty time we are living in that people are

Debbie Mahaffy, of the Office for Victims of Crime, a victim-rights group, said in a May 22 Toronto ic. I

the from victimiza-

mark of what an emotion-

their families.

Sun

we

a

ging them into the limelight with a total disregard to the victims and

sending a message that killing is not only OK, it’s the fastest route to fame. When people decide to make a

ing.

ers.

Instead of letting them rot in solitude, people are once again drag-

treating criminals as icons,

profiting

It is

but to go

out and to create a site that will achieve this is absolutely disgust-

money, even if

is sick,

mementos

By

“This

is

frightened to think of the

who would want

these.”

Mahaffy also called the

— mur-

slain

mor-

site

who was tortured by Paul Bernardo.

Knowing

that

someone is profitsomeone you

ing from the death of

collecting and/or capitalizing

these

am

type of people

derers.

on

article,

mementos,

disgusting

how much normal human

people are showing just they are lacking in

empathy. This site is giving even more power and gratification to murderers than the media coverage surrounding their arrests and trials.

loved must be a horrible thing to deal with.

People should be more willing put themselves in

someone

position and consider the conse-

quences of their actions. Every signature of a killer bought from that site is a profit being made from other people’s suffering.

is mainly funded from September to May by a payment from Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI). formerly called the Doon Student Association, in exchange for the insertion of

SPOKE

Spoke SPOKE is

Keeping Conestoga College connected

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor. Laura Czekaj; News Editor: Ray Bowe;

Photo Editor: Donna Ryves Production Manager: Mike Radatus; Advertising Manager: Mike Radatus; Circulation Manager: Sherri Osment; Faculty Supervisor: Jerry Frank SPOKE's address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 691, 692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

The views and opinions expressed in newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the CSI unless their advertisements contain the CSI logo. SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the

advertising in the paper. this

space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by

9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect or

MS

tain

to

else’s

Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not conany libellous statements and may be accompanied by an

illustration (such as a photograph).


SPOKE, June

Surveys

will

No.

use key performance indicator survey data

1

college

will

By Laura Czekaj

in

ter learning experience,

according

Kevin Mullan, vice-president of finance and administrative operato

tions.

Results from the

survey were March, but the exact

announced

in

data about

how

and

individual schools

programs

ranked

wasn’t

released until April.

The KPIs

annual surveys compiled by the provincial government of Ontario’s 25 community colleges and consist of 95 mutual and five college-specific questions regarding programs, faculty, services and facilities. The survey is an are

Thunder Bay with an average of

and

excellence

the

any of the four surveys

first

in

areas

- graduate employment

rate,

graduate satisfaction, employer satisfaction and student satisfaction.

Mullan

with Confederation is an achievement because the competition among colleges to improve is increasing. He said data from this survey and last year’s will help Conestoga decide which areas need improvement. The next step, according to Mullan, is to present each school and program with individual results so they can improve where needed. Conestoga’s college council formed a sub-committee at its May 8 meeting that will deal with KPI tying

said

issues.

government

Greg Bums, vice-chair of the council and co-ordinator of the

uses to decide which schools are to

recreation and leisure services pro-

receive additional funding.

gram and

accountability

benchmark

that

Conestoga

for first

tied

place

overall with Confederation College

a

member of

the sub-

committee, said the committee will focus on discussing the importance

to

of KPIs with faculty and support

The committee

staff.

will also look

of the college that did not

make Finding a place to live while going to Conestoga is going to get a little easier. A housing registry will be the first active part of the new Web

Conestoga College’s student services department is planning to create over the summer. Lynn Robbins, a student services counsellor, has been working on the idea since January and site

described the

her

site as

summer

who has been overseeing the project, said student services hopes to have the

project. Robbins,

don’t live in the area to see what

offered at Conestoga when making the choice of which college to attend. The current process of getting

housing information to potential

who don’t live in the area very slow, Robbins said. It

students is

involves

and

calls

registries sent

“I’m really excited about it,” Robbins said. “I think it’s definitely a bonus in our marketing and letting students know who we

June.

selling find

site

only contains a short descrip-

of the services and the locaof the student services department. There is a need for students to have direct access to more detailed information of the services provided at the college, Robbins said. She hopes the site will enable student services to be more interactive with students through answering questions by e-mail.

by regular

mail.

are.

Web

phone

long-distance

housing registry portion of the up and running by the end of this time, the college

who

easier for people

it

is

Some

site

At

site will also

people it

who need coun-

difficult to

approach

a counsellor, Robbins said, but she hopes the site will enable stu-

tion

dents to look up those types of

tion

services as well and feel

comfortable going in to the student services offices.

The

site will also

the

at

Sherri

Osment

satellite

give students

campuses the

opportunity to learn about servic-

The student services site will be accessed through the existing Conestoga College home page at www.conestogac.on.ca.

will

help

the services provided.

gram includes campus Starting college can be an intimi-

ent students with

The

pro-

tours to ori-

important loca-

tions such as the learning resource

new faces and heavy workloads. The special

centre, the bookstore, student services

and the Conestoga Students

needs office

Inc.

(formerly the

is

working

at

to

Conestoga College

make

this transition

PASS

(post-secondary

Student

Association) office.

Beyond

easier for students with disabilities.

The

Doon

finding their

the

satisfaction,

employer satisfaction and graduate placement. Mullan said the government intends to tie

She

survey

way

is that

for

the data

is

the only

the college to pinpoint

problem areas that need improvement but it doesn’t give answers on

how

to improve.

Last year, the college prepared for the survey by organizing focus

groups for faculty and students in specific programs. However, Mullan said, focus groups are labour intensive, so not every pro-

gram was involved. Group sessions were held from June to October. The government views KPIs as a method to determine how to distribute a small percentage of addi-

way around

campus, the program helps dents identify study strategies.

before beginning the

cial

fall

semester.

The program, which runs from Doon cam-

July 4 to July 7 at the pus,

is

and is available to who wish to come

free

dents

stu-

to

Conestoga.

PASS

familiarizes students with

.PASS

stu-

introduces students to the

technologies provided by the spe-

needs office to help students

with disabilities. The computer lab is

Microsoft

employment

the

Campus Agreement,

Simply Accounting Version 8, C ++ Builder Version 5, Autocad 2000 (ACES), Visual Studio Enterprise Version 6 and Borland

Microsoft Project 2000. Donna Runions, manager of college academic and administration

rate

and student

Conestoga Students ly the

Doon

issues,

summer

courses are over so stu-

said

funds from

according to

by students

to lack of participation

LeBeau, president of the CSI. The CSI was permitted a question on the Conestoga College survey.

in

The question asked students to rate CSI services in order of importance. LeBeau said entertainment and educational issues ranked

chase a new photocopier for student use and to provide better serv-

highest.

representation they needed,” said

Mike

Harris,

vice-president

activities.

Information from the surveys

“We made

Studio

installed at

Macintosh labs

in

the

sure students got the

software

college labs except those at the

and

to pur-

Menage.

Cambridge

campus

CSI

ices for students.

new

get

CSI

also encouraged the

of

the

Enterprise

Doon

in

Version

6

2A302.

The 90 copies of Microsoft 2000 will be at Doon in rooms 2A207, 2A308 and the open

graphics

department.

Project

There are 180 copies of Simply Accounting Version 8 coming to the college to be spread among the Doon, Guelph, Waterloo and Stratford campuses. Simply Accounting will be found in computer labs 2A314 and 2A309 in the Doon campus. Sixty copies of Borland C++ Builder Version 5 will be installed

Autocad 2000 will be installed at both the Guelph and Doon campuses. Thirty copies will be installed in Guelph and 120 copies will be installed at Doon in rooms 2A201, 2A202, 2A203 and 2A302. There will be 30 copies of Visual

mer,” said Runions. But she said it cannot be installed until all the

will

entertainment, even though it ranked high on the survey, was due

Phil

ning through the summer are over. “The software will actually be various times throughout the sum-

the decision to take

is

at the Doon campus in room 2A209 and the open access lab

arriving at the college probably at

campus event on-campus make up the difference. She

Inc. (former-

be end of August when most of the programs runservices, said the software will

installed near the

said, the removal of funds will not diminish CSI activities because the money saved by moving one off-

using the information from the survey to provide more funding to

educational

was removed from funding for However, Menage

entertainment.

satis-

Student Association)

DSA, now known as the CSI. said the money given to educa-

tion

faction.

will

The new software includes

Ellen Menage, former president of

funding to additional questions in the future, such as graduate

access lab (2A218).

Correction In the June 5 edition of Spoke, in the story entitled Support staff

seek 5%, Ann Wallace, president of OPSEU Local 238, was not the source in the story who said support staff were seeking a five-per-cent

When

(2A218).

did

wage

increase.

interviewed,

mention

not

a

Wallace specific

amount. The figure came from a previous article which said the

union would request between three and eight per cent.

Spoke

regrets the error.

who have already started a summer course do not have to change software part way through. dents

The

cost of these programs

known

is

not

yet because the college

is

working on the costs of the Microsoft Campus Agreement and AutoCad 2000 (ACES). Runions said these programs are being upgraded because the college wants to stay current. The Microsoft Campus Agreement software package, which includes Windows ‘98 and Office 2000 (Word, Excel, Access, Power Point) will be installed in all

students

time in the lab said

is

very hands-on,

Lynn Gresham, learning

skills

College Graduates Join the leading edge of a

equipped with aids such as

speech recognition software, scanning and reading dictionaries, and a device to improve word recognition, spelling and grammar. The

new breed

of professionals!

Conestoga offers a variety of unique full-time Post-Graduate Programs Apply

now

for

September

Career Development Practitioner

advisor in the special needs office.

Gresham

said the

program also

gives students a chance to get to

know

Computer Numerical Control Environmental Engineering Applications (Optional Co-op)

the faces behind the services

available at the college.

Human Resources Management

Matjanec, employment advisor, said another element of the PASS program is having suc-

Teaching English as a Second Language

Charlie

accommodation support strategies) program is designed to give students with disabilities a head start

sub-committee, was given $3,000 from the CSI budget to use for campaigns, forums, guest speakers and advertisements, said tion

do well they need to be improved.” Bums said the committee has yet to meet but he added the first meeting might occur in June. Mullan said the problem with the

new

dating prospect for anyone, with

unfamiliar surroundings,

education and head of the educa-

still

es that are available to them.

PASS program By

more

He

is that

vide grant entitlement are graduate

College will be upgrading several pieces of software this summer.

Robbins said the

Mullan.

said

said the government’s intent

cern, but for those areas that didn’t

said. “It’s not a

Conestoga adding and

Osment

funding,

tional

1,” he school-wide con-

rank well in the surveys. “We want to remain No.

By Jes Brown

Sherri

improve individual schools and programs

by 2002, 10 per cent of grants given to colleges will be dictated by KPI results. Questions on the survey that pro-

at areas

Housing list to be College posted on Web site By

—Page 3

2000

be used to improve Conestoga College

85.5 per cent, but failed to place

Data compiled from 1999’s key performance indicator surveys will be analyzed and used to give Conestoga College students a bet-

12,

cessful students share their experi-

ences with the

Gresham

new

students.

said the

program also

(Co-op)

Systems Analyst

Technology Marketing

Woodworking Manufacturing Management

helps people working in the special

needs

office,

giving

opportunity to get to

them

the

know new

students before the semester

Matjanec said he hopes to see at 30 students in the PASS program this summer.

least

For information

748-5220,

ext.

call

656.

Ask about our part-time Post-Graduate Programs too!

Conestoga College pi


p age 4 -<• SPOKE, June

12,

2000

Conestoga employees grace the green Employees of Conestoga College took time May 30 to play nine holes of golf at the Ariss Valley Golf and Country Club during the

both the tournament and the dinner. The tournament has a maximum of 40 players because Carruthers said it is easy to manage fewer peo-

annual Conestoga College employees golf tournament.

The tournament was originally scheduled for May 23 but was postponed due to inclement weather. The 24 participants included

ple.

vice-presidents, faculty and staff,

pus.

who were

to

Grace

arts

raderie

“Some are outsome are beginners.”

said Carruthers.

John, vice-president of training development and continu-

Student

Web page on

line in

Seaforth

St.

ing education, said he enjoyed the tournament but admitted he is only

an average player. The tournament also included a

A Web

page produced by three from the microcomputer administration program was chosen by the business retention and expansion committee of Seaforth to be placed on line. The Web page, designed by Karolina Malycha, Anna Donczar and Joanna Gonczar, was chosen out of 26 submissions.

manual for keeping it up for the town of Seaforth.

size.

“The thing

opportunities

to

program, said that many good things have come about since the projects were presented in the are

for a second-

Andy Clow, dean of the school of business, said that the project was valuable to the students and applauded them for promoting their

spring.

town

year student.

program and the

tackiest gifts are like

from a garage

some-

sale,”

LeForge. The tournament was played

in

created in the

Sheila Hyslope, co-ordinator of the microcomputer administration

The college and the town

member

design brochures for the town. Also, a work placement has been

to date

ferently

than

said

dif-

most golf games each team member

because after took a shot, the group decided

which shot to play on. Team’s were required to use each person’s drive twice and all shots had to be played within one club length of the original shot, as long as the ball’s place-

ment was no closer to the hole. Another rule was that women were allowed to play off the red tees, which is a beginner level, and men played from the further away white tees.

the Seaforth business retention and

expansion committee, said he was elated with the partnership that has developed between Conestoga College and Seaforth. The three students were each awarded a certificate of achievement from the mayor of Seaforth and a $10O gift certificate from the college bookstore. On June 2 they

were invited to the Seaforth town

college.

Ron Lavoie, vice-chairman of

hall for lunch with the committee.

Thursdays ^SUCKS NO ^ ALLOWED'

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a

pair of shoes, each shoe a different

staff.

including

was ever given was

est gift that

LeForge said although the tournament was for fun, players were expected to keep score and follow the rules to enable them to win prizes. Prizes were awarded in two low gross, the numcategories ber of times they hit the ball, and a low net, which takes into account a handicap and which LeForge said favours weaker golfers.

er,

received a gift from the accu-

dis-

working on future projects togeth-

This was part of a second-semesproject for the students to develop a Web page and a user ter

first-year students

among

which

two

tournament is essential because it promotes fellowship and cama-

on their registration forms so teams with mixed ability could be put together. “There are all levels of golfers,” ability

gift,

mulated gifts at the end of the tournament. Carruthers said the tacki-

general arts and sciences, decided to resurrect it. Carruthers said the

resource centre. She said players were asked to indicate their level of

By Jes Brown

gift

and sciences program, and

Jean LeForge, a faculty

Carruthers, one of the organizers and an employee in the learning

Grace Carruthers, employee in the learning resource centre, tees at off at the Conestoga College employees golf tournament held (Photo by Laura Czekaj) Ariss Valley Golf and Country Club May 30.

was

one wrapped

could be tacky or decent, and indicate whether it was for a male or female. All those who brought a

continued for a year until she, Fran Painter, co-ordinator of the general

The teams were chosen according to the playing level of the indi-

Pat

said,

years ago the tournament

according

to bring

originally

However, Carruthers

divided into six teams of

standing and

The event was

prizes and participants were asked

organized by the Waterloo Campus Employee Association and was run out of the college’s Waterloo cam-

four people.

vidual,

The team that was proclaimed the most honest golfers was also awarded a prize. and bookstore Conestoga’s Beaver Foods donated some of the

hot buffet dinner and prizes. Golf and dinner cost $24, golf alone cost $15 and dinner alone cost $9. Carruthers said most people attend

By Laura Czekaj

Barrie

.

Hamilton .Waterloo


SPOKE, June

Grad turns junk

gems

into

could build

through again and again for each individual echo or delay craved. “I’ve always been into psyche-

things a lot

delic music, so there’s a

even had some of his gear

on

listed

line in the e-Bay’s hall of fame.

“When I realized I my own gear, it made

While most would see an old ‘80s Pong console game as trash, Eric Warren would rather deconstruct

down

it

cheaper and opened the doors to more creative sounds,” he said. In addition to his electronics wiz-

to its bare essentials

and create a useful piece of recording equipment. Warren, who graduated from Conestoga’s two-year electronics

ardry,

way

the

learning

worked.

B oratory

school would get

wanted

“I just

a better job.

to learn the stuff,”

Warren learned repair electronics and about

In the program, to

the guts of analog electronics.

1998, after graduating from

In

Le

first

He

drum machine

which added to his already massive electronics inventory which includes old Korg and Roland analog synthesizers and his most prized possession, a Korg Mono-poly. He says these olderstyle analog units were the first concert keyboards produced. “That’s what you hear on almost every rock album since ‘74,” he

said the 26-year-old.

how

called

in 1996,

electronics

him

own

Studios in Kitchener.

purchased his

wasn’t about which

It

studio

recording

engineering technician program in 1996, admits he went into the program based on his interests in

his

Warren also runs

said.

bad way

to look at

to dissect

it

it

now,” he

who had the

as Sunkissed. Grove’s act

Warren in awe. Grove was creating sounds that left W’arren

dumbfounded This was also

as to their creation.

the

realized he could

first

do

too.

Warren has played live P.A. at house parties under the stage name Sticky Midget, where his equipment consists of drum machines, synthesizers

sequencer.

a

Live P.A., while different from DJing, combines many of

the

Arts of

Institute

time Warren

it,

the

Canada north of Montreal where

same

aspects,

drum

including

Matjanec

Rick Casey

(left)

and Charlie

Matjanec show their career development awards, sponsored by the Waterloo Region Independent Living (Photo by Sherri Osment)

Centre.

By

Osment

Sherri

A

member of the Conestoga College special needs office has received recognition in the com-

munity. Charlie Matjanec, employment advisor in the special needs office,

won

Living

Independent

the

year.

tre

is

After graduating,

than scratching, but

that

was developed in 1982 to help

the

Warren says he can cover a wide range

people living with disabilities lead the most productive and fulfilling

including sounds, anything a DJ can do to funky electronica.

lives possible.

one

he taught

at

school’s

sister

campus in Stoney Creek for four months. Since finishing

When Warren was

Warren Eric Warren records Trevor Casemore’s found good Boratory Studios in Kitchener.

school,

has

new album

gigs in the indus-

of

helping to record Canada’s biggest names.

try,

Warren jokes about star”

moments

“rock-

his

since getting into

the industry.

“My

first

experience with rock

stars was pushing the Tea Party’s van out of a ditch.” But in his real duties he set up the microphones, did headphone mixes and repaired equipment at the studio. Warren helped run sound at the Stardust Picnic tour which featured Canadian acts like Blue Rodeo, 5440 and Great Big Sea. Ever since he revamped his first

theremin in his

last

year of college,

Warren now sees potential

in all

The theremin was invented in 1919 and is played by waving your hands near two metal antennas, one controlling other volume. pitch and the Basically the body becomes part of

old electronics gear.

the electrical current,

create

the

helping to

contraption’s

spooky

sound.

One of Warren’s newfound hobbies is building gadgets from old junk.

He’s transformed a

Pong console game

amp

1980

into a tube pre-

for microphones, guitars

and

drums, which pumps out that vintage ‘60s “tube sound” by upping the levels and adding harmonics.

Warren has been influenced by some famous recording virtuosos. He views the late Frank Zappa as god-like and even has an angelic portrait of him above one of his keyboards. Warren said the studioside of Zappa’s music was highly

a non-profit organization

he

said

has

been

abilities.

“They (employers) are saying, ‘We are looking for talented, qualified people. The package they

come skill

not as relevant as the

in is

and quality of the person

coming

to us.’

This is the second year the Independent Living Centre has offered the award. Last year the award was won by Rick Casey, a needs counsellor at special

Conestoga College. Casey said winning the award last year was a humbling experience and he was thrilled when Matjanec won this year. Casey said although awards are nice, it’s the students who come back to the special needs office to say what they have learned that really shows the impact on people’s lives.

Matjanec

the

said

award

is

Matjanec’s job at the college is to work as a liaison between

reflective of the college’s philoso-

and employers prospective Conestoga graduates with special

nity.

needs. “I help demonstrate to potential employers of our graduating stu-

dents the abilities that they have, as opposed to looking at the perhaps obvious disabilities or barri-

Wheel in

digital technology that was coming about in the late- ‘80s. “He was way ahead of the pack,”

new

phy of involvement

in the

commu-

Both years Conestoga’s special needs office was, as a whole, also

nominated

for

the

community

partner award.

The awards were presented

at

Country Hills Community Centre on May 17. the

th

Summer

starling Tuesday

'ith...

March 28th

said Warren.

have impacted that Others Warren’s views include My Bloody Valentine for their complicated sound. Orbital as a techno influence and Speedy J as a live electronic artist. Far different from these synthesizer-laden acts

Butthole

Surfers,

whose

is

the

singer

operates an effects console on stage

and add sound “The Buttholes play unconventional music and it makes you think, ‘How does that sound come

to distort his vocals effects.

about?’

Warren shows great admiration Lee Perry, grandfather of

for

Jamaica’s

Dub

culture that flour-

ished after reggae began to subside. Perry’s early experimenting with tape delays and echoes were arduous tasks, to say the least, especial-

when you look at the archaic equipment available to him at the ly

When Perry was experimenting in the early ‘70s, the recorded time.

into something circa 1973 groovy and in working order. He’s

tape

as

production.”

creative in terms of his use of the

He’s currently working on modifying a theremin/eight-track-player

about the asked Le Ray Bowe) future of the recording industry, he was blunt. “There’s no good money to be made in recording, it’s just fun,” he said. “The money is in corporate videos, Internet studios and postat

(Photo by

success

pleased with the response from employers to students with dis-

Centre of Waterloo Region Award for career development. The cen-

for

in

said.

well.”

machines and samples. It sounds more computer-generated

he studied recording engineering

face

vocational

achieve

left

and

at

certain

most profound effect on his career was a native of his hometown of Owen Sound, Pete Grove, also

known

they

Matjanec

said, referring

how

three

study

employment,” “They have achieved academic success. I’m just hoping to ensure they also ers

tend

sounds are obtained. However, the person

Warren went off Recording

I

to trying to pinpoint

Conestoga, to

development award

good and

because

5

Special needs officer recognized with career

Warren influenced by Zappa, Perry and Speedy J By Ray Bowe

—Page

2000

12,

was manually removed from

the multi-track recorder and played

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Page 6

— SPOKE, June

12,

2000

Diversity vital for tots, day-care staff told By

Petra Lampert

“This

is

a thank-you to the day-

care centres in our

Guest speaker Gyda Chud of Vancouver lectured on the importance of understanding diversity in early childhood education, in the

Blue

Room

cafeteria

May

31.

The workshop was hosted by

the

college’s early childhood education

program

for the staff

from various

local day-care centres.

community who

take Conestoga College

ECE

stu-

on field placement,” said Birdena Hamilton-Armitage, coordinator of the ECE program. Chud, co-ordinator of the early childhood education program at dents

Vancouver Community College, has lectured throughout Canada on many themes, including diversity.

“If we think about meeting the needs of a child’s development, knowing or understanding about diversity helps us

do

more

that in a

powerful way,” said Chud. Hamilton-Armitage said that the seminar will benefit the day-care

who

cation between students and staff at field placements, ’’she said.

Chud said that having a clear understanding of diversity is important because she feels it’s foundational to everything we value and believe about early child-

attended because the students are learning in class the same

hood education. During her seminar, Chud said

ideas that are in the workshop.

that learning is only a

staff

“This should enhance communi-

temporary

loss of security.

Chud is also the co-author of the widely used texts: Early Childhood Education for a Multicultural Society and Honouring Diversity in Early Childhood Care and Education: An Instructor’s Guide. About 50 people attended the two-hour workshop, titled the Charm and Challenge of Diversity in Early Childhood Programs. Tickets were $3 per person.

Aubrey Hagar award winner

Attention

Students all

students

By

Burns

call

Julie Porter

‘lover of

Bums’s students have no trouble Bums lives what he

believing that

needing money!

Enthusiastic,

passionate and a

many

“His energy and motivation in

phenomenal. He gave me a reason to be there,” said Chris Zamin, a 1993 graduate of the program. For Muriel Jeung, a 2000 gradu-

lover of

life

are three of the

The recipient, Greg Bums, coordinator of recreation and leisure services,

has

been

teaching

at

Conestoga for 1 1 years. He graduated from the recreation and leisure services program in 1971 and later served as director of parks and recreation in Cambridge. In 1985, he started his own consulting firm where he worked exclusively with municipal government and social services, facilitating training

and

fund raising. “Facilitating learning

comes easy

me,” said Bums. “I love what do There’s not a morning that don’t love coming to work.” for

Talk

to

Melody or Carol,

Information Centre, SCSB Or call 748-5220 ext 730

Bums

in,”

“He’s a riot,” said Jeung. “I’m very grateful for the opportunity to get to know him. His teaching will stay with me for a lifetime. He’s well-deserving of the award because he makes learning fun,

which enables retention.”

Bums said that he believes that being passionate about students and learning is vital to teaching. “I get very emotional at convocamoment, but

said

Bums

It’s

sad

a

tion.

are the four cornerstones on my teaching. I believe that one must

what you believe

it was Bums’s infectious sense humor that she appreciated.

I

said he follows a four-part

is

ate,

I

method when teaching. “Laughter, living, loving and learning. These

live

the classroom

of

there

and a proud is something

about the cutting of the umbilical cord, watching the students go on, that

I

find very emotional.

proud that they mature further as ers,” said

Bums

do some important

to

“I spent a lot

reflection.

of time on

staring at the ceiling.

in.

ways the winner of this year’s Aubrey Hagar Distinguished Teaching Award is described by his students.

Be a Conestoga College Tour Guide!!

believes

life’

I

feel

go on and livers and learn-

will

Bums in his

convalescence

I

was on 19

mittees and to

me

tell

Bums.

think

I

to

slow down,” said

and the second was to live each day as it comes. I’m lucky, though I work at the No. 1 college in Ontario and I wear that like a badge of

honor.”

The day when John Tibbits, ident of Conestoga College,

pres-

came

Bums that he won the award, he was shocked into silence. “Norma Ewing, of the recreation and leisure services program, said, to tell

‘Dr. Tibbits,

book.

It’s

Greg

Bums

less,” said

Bums

mark

day in your day in 1 1 years has ever been speech-

the

this

first

Bums.

said

what was especially

touching about receiving the award was the recognition he received

from his students. “The thing that makes fuzzies

came from

is that

the

me feel

the

the initiation

students,”

Bums.

n

Conestoga College continually seeks opportunities for improver xnt to Conestoga

meet and exceed the needs of our students, employees

trying

“I

Quality Policy

College tj

com-

different

God was

Conestoga College

back

made some lifestyle changes and made a few declarations. One was to love what I do,

warm

suffered a stroke in 1986

and was able

stroke

my

Before the

and communities.

said


SPOKE, June

nee succeeds with greatest

Diva

Houston

By Donna

still

spit out a great

can

Ryves

The two-CD compilation She’s been

dubbed

soulful and sexy

songs would sound the way they did they were first released, some of the songs, such as I’m Your Baby Tonight, How Will I Know and I

and not so

when

car-

Wanna Dance With Somebody

almost all songs that have kept fans happy over the last

the

includes

20,

h e

The

decade.

first

CD

explosive version of

Right But

stray

It’s

songs,

WATERLOO

with

and a duet with Enrique Iglesias. The second disc,

Throw Down,

is

a collection

of upbeat tunes that consists mainly of remixes. The songs Fine and If I Told You That, which is a duet with George Michael, are featured tracks.

world, and

despite

recent negative

media

cover-

age,

Whitney

CD

covers all of Houston’s hits from 1985 to the present. It includes the slower

The

first

Travel

mon

song, which

Jermaine Jackson,

HIRING!!

think that “greatest hits”

jobs available

2000)

means

to

(or

by

off

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to:

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the

Not Too Late To Register For The

Employees For Excellence

'

and be able work weekends.

with people

information package,

sound outdated. Though one would

It’s

Food has never sounded so good

hardworking banquet Must enjoy working

hrs.

correspondence). 1000s of

are prob-

With every note Houston

is

Please phone, fax or drop course

rather than the original radio ver-

The dance remixes

dept,

currently looking for flexible,

TESOL teacher certification

faster tracks,

ably featured so the songs wouldn’t

sings, her

(April 3-7,

Eyes Are Beautiful. Not only does the CD demonstrate Houston’s growth vocally over the last 15 years, but it shows her professional

sions.

teach English:

You Say

My

growth as well. Disc two contains

NOW

servers.

a duet with

is

titled If

-

5 days/40

The disc even includes an uncom-

You Give Good Love and Saving All My Love For You. tracks such as

INN

Our catering

Deborah Cox

Not

couple of songs on the CD are I remain undecided.

A

Classified

a duet

It’s

OK is amazing.

new and

which includes two

new

— Page 7

CD

hits

the

is

Down,

Cool

titled

2000

Yet David Morales’ mix of So Emotional offers a sexual force, and

from the originals too much.

Houston’s

of

diva t

May

is

label, released

on the Arista

ried

voice

crafted as to be overpowering.

album.

12,

Education Conference -

In

2000

Contact the Registrar’s Office

By Ray Bowe

June 14

About 1,500 people braved a chilly and windy summer night June 2 to take in some of the freshest sounding DJs. The Meals on Wheels of Steel Tour, featuring Ninja Tune Records’ Kid Koala and Strictly Kev from DJ Food, held a free show at Kitchener’s city hall. The DJs played from the second floor

There Are

Come and

from the collaboalso known as Kevin Foakes Kev DJ Food, was the first well-known act to take to the stage. His beats and set, featuring a minimal amount of scratching and more breakdowns, lasted nearly two hours. Other members of the project DJ Food include Coldcut partners Matt Black and Jonathon More Strictly

,

th

Workshop Spaces Available

But They Are Going Fast!

balcony as cameras projected their likeness onto the underside of the balcony’s canopy, also adding delays and filters. There were spinning-wheel graphics signifying the tour logo.

Still

15 & 16 th

th

Celebrate

New Frontiers!

ration

and

PC

(Patrick Carpenter).

DJ Food recently released the album Kaleidoscope on Ninja Tune Records, whose North American head office is based in Montreal. This album was mainly composed by Strictly Kev and PC. The collaborative also have an awesome multimedia Web site at djfood.com featuring puzzles, soothing reading music

and information galore.

They call themselves “food for DJs,” hence the name. The last Food album was Recipe for Disaster in 1995. Kid Koala came to the stage at about 10 p.m. as a solo act, warming up for the crowd. He apologized to the dancing crowd in advance, stating in his playful nature that his set was not very dancefriendly. After initiating

minutes, he

was

an all-out barrage on the decks for about 10

fired up.

On some songs his five-piece jazz outfit Bullfrog backed him up. They joined him for songs such as Bullfrog-original Rattlesnake and then Roboshuffle, a track from his most recent album Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, a very-well done record. The crowd bobbed their heads to the beat of Music For Morning People, which features samples of a robust aerobics instructor. When Koala was not accompanied by Bullfrog or scratching solo, DJ P-Love backed him up, as they began to duel on the turntables, back and forth. Koala played for about 45 minutes before saying farewell to the crowd. Other highlights in his set included a tribute legend s to Louis Armstrong, as Koala dissected some of the jazz

records into a

melody of a

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— SPOKE, June

12,

2000

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