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33rd Year

Support

5%

pay increase encouraging about management proposals and that support staff

Wage

increases of about five per

cent are

among demands of college

support staff in contract negotia-

demanded

The bargaining team for support staff met with the Council of

past years

Employees Union. The current contract runs out at the end of August. The union, representing about 15,000 academic and support staff, will negotiate a province-wide agreement with the Council of Regents, which repre-

Dan Fisher

management of

sents the

PAGE

5

have been supportive of the college when they lacked funding. She added that support staff have not

tions with the province.

Regents on May 9 in Toronto to exchange contract demands. Support staff at Conestoga College are represented by Local 238 of the Ontario Public Services

last farewell to retired technologist

seek

staff

By Donna Ryves

A

the col-

large

The council responsible

is

“Support

for

on behalf of

arts

it’s

and technolo-

gy with their academic and support staff, and for the appointment of

demic bargaining, college presidents were present to represent their colleagues.

“When

the support staff met with Council of Regents there weren’t any college presidents there,” Wallace said. The bargaining team was invited to the Kempenfelt Conference Centre, at Georgian College in

the

staff

have

to the

It

reviewing salaries,

our turn.” Ann

recommending

and

three issues for the col-

lege’s support staff are wages, ben-

and job

“Money

is

security.

is

a priority for

bargaining team,”

said

Ann

Wallace, president of the union local at Conestoga and a member of

Wallace,

“We

are looking for a substantial

that college presidents are interested in

By Tracy Ford

Awards for Ontario. Convocation is an important

support Wallace

The alumni services office is busy planning its biggest event of

event to the alumni association,

the year

tion

staff,” said.

“We

them

to

it’s

get information out to

important to

members

as

quickly as possible.

Regular updates along with the union and management’s proposals are posted on OPSEU’s Web site. “Support staff have been good to the colleges. This time it’s our turn,” Wallace said. Wallace said there is nothing

— convocation.

Monica Himmelman,

president

centre staff and physical resources

employees.

Himmelman

Support staff include electricians, plumbers, early childhood education workers, switchboard operators, all

admission

staff,

recreation

Under the current contract support at

staff,

the hourly pay starts

$13.14 and goes to $25.81. The is asking for about a

five per cent

pay increase. could strike

staff

if

an

agreement can’t be negotiated, said.

“We work

in

a right-to-strike

environment,” Wallace said. “There is always a possibility of a withdrawal of services if there is no

would be a huge impact.” Wallace said the goal is to have a tentative settlement by August and not to withdraw services. Meetings are scheduled through deal. It

the

summer

for

more

The pins

for

college local

Wallace

increase.”

Wallace said that

College convocation set for June 21 and 22

of the Alumni Association, and her team of volunteers plan to distribute pins and pens to each graduating student at convocation on June 21 and 22, something the association has never done before. “We have never had a freebie that we could hand out before,”

Support

the bargaining team.

wage

were

they care about our work, and the way to do so is to be at the bargaining table. It’s a matter of respect.”

the top issue this year

and communication this

relation-

talk

demonstrate that

plays a key role in

dents.

efits

better

told

employment for college administraemployees and college presi-

PAGE 4

building

“We

Conestoga College

terms and conditions of

The top

to

about

encouraged

president of Local 238 at

tive

24th annual cat show held at Doon recreation centre

Barrie,

ships.

college boards of

governors.

locals

academic barganing. Wallace said that during the aca-

colleges. This time

colleges of applied

increases in sister

were awarded substantial wage increases durring the last round of

been good

collective bargain-

wage

and that

leges.

ing

— No. 20

bargaining.

said.

are a

new

addition to

the other volunteer activities that the association does,

which include

and diploma frames. At last year’s convocation they sold over 1,000 roses. The association also began selling disposable cameras for people selling roses

who

forgot their cameras, lost their

film or had their batteries die.

Next year the association wants hand out alumni of distinction awards at end of year banquets to former graduates who have had many achievements since their graduation. Winners of the alumni of distinction awards are automatically nominated for the Premier’s to

Himmelman

said, and the associawants to make it special for

each graduate. The convocation team consists of 25 people, the majority are volunand former graduates. The association is in charge of keeping track of Conestoga College’s 28,000 graduates from the past 30 years, many of whom have started their own businesses or received promotions to the top of local companies. “We are now finding our past teers

graduates are hiring

new

graduates

and providing co-op placements

Himmelman said. One problem the association has is making sure the line that moves for them,”

across

the

stage

as

graduates

diplomas runs smoothly, since the diplomas are given out in alphabetical order and by program. The college makes up dummy diplomas in case someone who had not been expected shows up. “Our graduates are very important people and we like to treat them right,” she said. receive

their

Tom

Cruise wins over audiences again

with Mission: Impossible 2

PAGE

7

Commentary Page 2 Walkerton \ E.coli tragedy

Student council board adds By Mike Radatus The board of directors of Conestoga Students Inc. has decided to hold meetings throughout the summer due to restructuring of the

constitutional power back to the board of directors, which carries it through the normal school year. Phil LeBeau, president of the CSI, formerly the Doon Students Association, said the board of

organization.

directors

oversees

This is the first time the board has decided to hold meetings in the

executive

may

budget, unless

summer meetings

“The government body has to be It is what keeps executives honest. The chair of the board of directors has more power than me. there.

The

my

tatives

ing

from the school of engineerand trades and

technology

apprenticeships,

the

school

of

access and preparatory studies and

said

representatives from the Waterloo

LeBeau. However, the board is looking for members. The board has members from the

and Guelph campuses. The board of directors decided at its May 24 meeting to meet on the last Wednesday of each month at 8

corporate law to

school of business, the school of

p.m. during the

health sciences and the school of

normally holds the constitutional

have a board of directors and they hold an important position in the

power

decisions involving student

During the normal school year, the board of directors meets twice a month.

summer semester. Due to this, the executive, which in the

summer, handed the

LeBeau

said

all

issues

the

have, including the it is

it is

under $500.

life.

chair

applied

is

boss,”

arts.

The CSI

is

looking for represen-

summer

semester.


Day weekend once Victoria

again claims

many

lives

- commonly called the May 2-4 The Victoria Day weekend camping and drunk drivweekend - and its tradition of parties, of long weekends summer a off ing continued this year, kicking results make waves weekends’ long The for. Canada is famous

each car wreck, each boating as newscasters are heard reporting accidents were abnormal for the if incident and each fatality, as time of year. notice when each long dense do people have to be not to s highways and Ontario on out plays weekend the same scenario

this

How

service announcements waterways? Any number of public drunk driving doeswith associated which point out the stupidity thick-headed, invincithe all of minds the n’t seem to penetrate put the key in the ignition. ble cowards who repeatedly Monday and of course Labour Civic It’s May 2-4, Canada Day, that has police officers month, a weekend long Day almost one of the public’s extra day off work.

cringing at the thought long weekend On average, up to 10 people die over the May between all fatal wrecks happen of Half roads. on Ontario Transportation. of Ministry the Friday and Sunday, according to to the province s fatalities, Ontario’s waterways also contribute year. each people 200 injuring killing or .

May left mne peopl The most recent long weekend in camp spots or lakes various at drowned drowned or presumed . across Ontario. per cent of people Social and public health services say 39 and the summer s long aged 19 to 24 binge drink monthly, load up on a couple weekends provide perfect opportunities to

more beers than usual. Young adults binge drink almost twice

as much as older adults. had five dnnks or students university-aged Seventy per cent of to 37 per cent of compared year at one sitting in the past

more a<

considered by the medical Five drinks or more at one sitting is community to be a binge. vehicle accidents are Not all Victoria Day weekend boating or to be the major pastime, seems drinking but alcohol, caused by their hours to area’s liquor stores extend

when

especially

the

accommodate the Friday rush. among law enforceHoliday weekends are considered hellish regular emergency to responded ment officers. They not only laid more than 3UU also but holiday Day Victoria calls on the speeding, careless drivcharges for traffic violations including ing and alcohol-related offences. senes highThe increased police presence along Ontario’s 400 Christmas of reminiscent is ways during Victoria Day weekends Victoria Day is weekends, long summer the holidays but as for the worst.

The

.

Day weekend marks Queen

Victoria

.

,

.

Victoria s birthday

gardens.

Muskoka. Although spirits

sumed

their

shadows they head

for the north country in ,

,

chugging easy to get carried away when you are you have conand you lose track of the number of drinks throughout the five, the message stays the same it’s

after

The most rific

thing

town

the

many

statistics

don’t scare people,

commercials get turned off and the road get ignored, what will perpetual boozing and driving?

if it

the

if

number

the public service of bodies lying on

take to stop the

May

aware of the possibility of E. coli in the water he ordered town residents

in

bacteto boil their water to kill the the after days three was This ria.

of

Walkerton may not be the water that pours out

PUC

ritual

of

That leaves only one question wasn’t the town warned on May 18? McQuigge has been quoted as

why

knowledge

that the E. coli

contamination that

found out about the contami-

nation.

of the taps, but the

after

of virus until three

hor-

killed

seven people as of June 1 and infected 1,000 others preventable is being hailed as a

saying he blames the delay for the needless deaths and illnesses, calling the crisis “preventable” if key information had been shared publicly

tragedy.

The deadly strain of E. coli that its way into the town’s water supply was detected by A and L Canada Laboratories on May 16

found

and Walkerton’s Public

Utilities

when

When

first

the

made

available.

symptoms,

flu-like

stomach cramps, diarrhea and nausea that Walkerton residents were experiencing were first linked to the E. coli virus, McQuigge said he

Commission was made aware of on May 18. However, the town’s residents were not made aware of the con-

the problem

taminated water until

ages. If the

Town wasn’t aware

,

winter, when many and is recognized as the unofficial end of organizing their begin Canadians open cottages and pools and only when Day, Groundhog It is like February’s

Canadians see

warned? Why wasn’t Walkerton was days

May 21 when

Murray McQuigge, the area medical officer of health, became

Dr.

suspicious and decided to conduct his own tests on the town’s water.

When McQuigge was made

was led on a wild goose chase trying to locate the cause of the poiwhich he originally soning, believed to be food related. He said that when he called the PUC on three separate occasions to determine

if

the E. coli source

was

the

water supply, he was told by PUC workers the water was fine. Residents of Walkerton seem to

found

it

opinion,

McQuigge’s

share

because the question that rang in Premier Mike Harris’s ears when

he visited the stricken town on May 27 was from Veronica Davidson, a resident of the town, who demanded Harris answer area residents questions and was upset when he refused to do so. “He said cutbacks haven’t had an impact on services, but believe

I

don’t

she said after Harris questions that weren’t

it,”

ignored

directed from the media.

The provincial government has come under fire as to whether the government’s privatizing of water-

was

testing

partially to

blame

The

province,

A

and

Keeping Conestoga College connected

being

left in

the dark about the poi-

soned state of their water. But the most horrifying fact remains that seven people would person still be alive today if one health alerted had PUC the from officials.

May by a payis mainly funded from September lo called the ment from Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI), formerly of Doon Student Association, in exchange for the insertion expressed in advertising in the paper. The views and opinions

journalism students of Conestoga College. published and produced weekly by the Bowe; Editor: Laura Czekaj; News Editor: Ray Photo Editor: Donna Ryves Manager. Mike Radatus; Production Manager: Mike Radatus; Advertising Jerry Frank Supervisor: Faculty Circulation Manager: Sherri Osment; Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. 4B14, Room Dr., Valley Doon SPOKE’s address is 299 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca 748-5220 ext 691, 692, 693. 694 Fax: 748-3534

SPOKE is

Phone-

this

newspaper do not necessarily

reflect

the

views of

Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers in SPOKE contain the endorsed by the CSI unless their advertisements arising CSI logo. SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arc not

out of errors in advertising

beyond the amount paid for the must be sent to the editor by

space. Unsolicited submissions

acceptance or 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect rejection

and

Submissions must not conby an any libellous statements and may be accompanied illustration (such as a photograph).

or

MS Word file would be helpful.

tain

L

Laboratories and the PUC all managed to partake in the errors that led to the residents of Walkerton

SPOKE

Spoke

for

the E. coli outbreak in Walkerton.


SPOKE, June 5, 2000 —Page

m

Labs made

OCCSPA

By Donna Ryves

conference attended by CSI By Donna Ryves

The

college

gloves at $3.75 a pair instead of latex gloves at $1 a pair.

allergic reactions to the substance.

association represents about

138,000

students

Research at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions in the United States (available at the

Web

site

Conestoga Students Inc.'s president and vice-president attended

throughout Ontario and lobbies

www@infonet.welch.jhu.edu)

the government at the ministry

shows

a changeover conference for the

level

on issues such as tuition, student safety and learning.

health-care

Ontario Community Student Parliamentary Association on May 4 to 7 at Fanshawe College in London.

Mike Harris, CSI was elected as

vice-presi-

dent,

vice-presi-

dent of the southwestern region

which encompasses Niagara, Fanshawe, Lampton, Mohawk and St. Clair Colleges. Philip LeBeau, CSI president, will be on the Ontario College Application

Services appeal board and review

committee.

The purpose of the conference was to review the constitution and devise policy plans. Other discussed were applied degrees, key performance indicatopics

which measure college per-

tors

formance, and

OCCSPA 1975 and

OCCSPA issues.

was established

in

a student-run, bilin-

is

gual association that lobbies and

networks

for

students

community

Ontario’s

of

colleges.

Workshop

Some

speakers at the confer-

ence included Susan Bloomfield, chair of the Association of Colleges of Applied Arts and

Technology of Ontario and Deputy Minister Bob Christie,

Sherri

About 80 teachers from seven Ontario colleges, including around 17 from Conestoga College, took

two of the Western Region college educator development program May 15 to 17. The program, held at Ridgetown

part in phase

College located off

Agricultural

Highway 401 about 75 kilometres west of London, is designed to help new probationary and part-time teachers learn

how

to teach effec-

Phase two is part of a three-phase program. The first phase of the program for the involved teachers

was held

last

Students Inc., formerly called the

Doon Student Association. LeBeau said there are many viewpoints and

it

was good

1000s of jobs available

NOW.

to see

“The ministers were willing to answer all the questions that we might have had,” LeBeau said in his

OCCSPA conference report.

“It

was a good opportunity

to

pus our views forward,” Harris said.

teachers

they had difficulty or want to improve. Geoff Johnstone, a facilitator for the program, said that much of the emphasis for the second phase was

on evaluation, such as how

to eval-

uate group presentations.

Johnstone said he feels the prois important for teachers at

gram

Conestoga. “We’re very conscious of the fact that

most of our teachers don’t from a teaching back-

come

ground,” Johnstone said. it was interesting from teachers how the first phase of the program helped them

to hear

over the past year. During the span of three days,

program

ied,

sessions that var-

depending on which courses

they teach.

Teachers

Lambton,

Mohawk,

St. Clair, from Fanshawe, Niagara, Ridgetown and

Conestoga colleges attended the program.

NOW

INN

catering dept

is

currently

hardworking banquet servers. Must enjoy working with people and be able to work weekends. Please phone, fax or drop off

resume

to:

Human Resources Waterloo Inn

FREE information

package,

475 King Waterloo,

call toll-free:

1-888-270-2941

uses latex catheters and

The

are allergic to latex

exposed

to the

“Unless you get a breakdown of the elements, you wouldn’t be aware of what is in it,” she added. Latex exposure may result in all

symptoms such

cuffs.

biggest problem with people

as a rash, redness,

feelings of hotness, life-threatening

is

being

asthma, anaphylactic shock and

powder found

inside

respiratory failure.

Students find out that they

Bev

St.

ON

North

N2J

2W6

Phone: 884-0221 ext. 518 Fax: 884-0321

may

Barr, a nurse tech-

services

program

at the

Barr said that over a period of a year the department has tried to eliminate latex items and replace

them by purchasing new items. The estimated loss from the changes about a couple hundred of

Christmas card makes student a winner By Donna Ryves

engineering firm in Kitchener which sponsors children through Foster Parents Plan of Canada.

the government perspective.

looking for flexible

course (or by correspondence).

still

it.

dollars, Barr said.

Our

TESOL teacher certification

the lab

blood pressure

is difficult to

environment,

because anything that is made with rubber has a percentage of latex in

total

teach English:

(April 3-7, 2000)

anatomical training equipment such as arms, hips and legs. Also,

it

a latex-free

nologist in the health sciences and

WATERLOO

5 days/40 hrs.

sciences

because some supplies

needed,” Hacking said. The apparatus still being used in the labs containing latex include still

create

community

HIRING!! -

health

all,

certain articles,

it.

that

from entering the labs. Students now have to purchase

some foundation

Travel

college’s

but not are

that has latex in

Hacking said

“You can remove

who

latex products.

The

nurse.

a problem identifying everything

there than through anything I could have read,” said Philip LeBeau, president of Conestoga

dents and conducting

Classified

ures to eliminate the majority of

and a registered

at the college

sary, said

attended a series of workshops and

group that just completed phase two will be held in June 2001. Phase two focuses a lot on reviewing how the past academic year went for the teachers and seeing if there were any areas where

environment or have taken meas-

gram

with synthetic rubber, with the goal of becoming latex-free, though it is

such as balloons and latex gloves

teachers taking part in the

tests.

hospi-

Nancy

Hacking, chair of the health sciences and community services pro-

be allergic when they learn skills where the use of gloves is neces-

ing, lesson planning, assessing stu-

third phase for the

many

riences latex problems, said

Most hospital environments are moving towards replacing latex

signs outside training labs. This includes prohibiting latex items

August and centered around teach-

The

result,

function in a latex-free

one student yearly expe-

ment initiatives. “The conference was very beneficial, I learned more from being

about recent govern-

Johnstone said

tively.

As a

least

the sterile gloves.

for

Osment

allergies.

workers have latex

At

college and a registered nurse.

department has addressed this problem by posting latex-reduced

who spoke

focuses on evaluation By

that about 12.5 per cent of

tals either

latex-allergy friendly nitrile

Conestoga College’s health science department is trying to eliminate latex, traditionally used in sterile gloves and other medical items, because of concerns over

3

A

first-year graphic

design student earned

some

Drumond was

required to incorporate the

company

extra cash for the summer.

logo, adhere to a given size and incorporate the pic-

Sasha Drumond, was the winner of the Walter Fedy Partnership award by designing a corporate Christmas

tures of foster children.

card.

She competed with about 30 of her classmates and won $200 dollars and a year’s subscription to a

Drumond

design magazine. The Walter Fedy Partnership

Drumond’s card had a cut-out snowflake on the out and inside with the logo on the inside. The company’s owners conduct the judging.

is

an architectural and

“You

just

design

something

they

will

like,”

said.


Page 4

_ SPOKE, June

5,

2000

she said, adding that breeders want encourto promote their breeds and

the cats.

The Conestoga recreation centre was filled with meows from 215 cats on May 27 at the 24th annual cat show of the Golden Triangle

age responsible breeding. “Breeders like myself want to promote responsible breeding as

is

Cat Fanciers Association. This is the first year the cat show has been at Conestoga’s Doon cam-

who

By Tracy Ford

pus and organizers hoped the change in venue would attract more spectators and competitors. There are 33 breeds of cats available for cat breeders to show and all were represented at the show, which drew crowds of up to

almost

1

,000 people. Many of the contestants travelled

from

all

over North America

opposed

The

cats responsibly the animals should

be spayed or neutered. She said breeders have to be dedicated to the breed and should want

all

lot

of work to take care of

Bulmer and Jenn Mercer,

Sherri

both graduates of the recreation and leisure program, co-ordinated

Conestoga

the

College on May 24 and 25. The event was held in the Sanctuary and provided training supervisors in

workshop

as their field place-

ment. They were assisted by Trevor Eagles and Nick Boertien, who are going into their second year of the program. Eagles said he chose the workshop as his field placement because it gave him a of responsibility.

behaviour management, public relations and networking. The goal

lot

of the event was to give the supervisors the opportunity to speak to

in a realistic setting,”

and learn

experts in their field skills that will help them train their

“It is a

good hands-on experience

by 26 superby organized

event, attended

visors,

was

Conestoga students in the recreation and leisure services program.

he

said.

Boertien agreed, saying organizwas a lot of work but

ing the event

worth

it.

Bulmer

staff.

The

said.

she recommends

Bennett said

do a

a large

involved

amount of preparing showing pure

with

breeds.

There isn’t much money in the said, she business, breeding because backyard breeders can offer cheaper prices. There was a second section to this year’s competition, the household pet competition where anyone could enter a household pet to be judged against other household pets. The competition had disappeared for a few years due to lack of partic-

“Some people household

pet

like to take then-

be

to

shown,

Bennett said, “so we decided that this year if there were people in the area

who wanted

to

show

their

household pet, they should be given a chance to do it.” The cats were separated from each other and were only taken

from

their

separate cages

when

StreeM^aine Coon cat^layswith

centre

said organization of the

event started in February and had taken her about 300 hours to set up. She added that only 210 hours are required to fulfill her field

May

they were being judged. The cats entered in the pure breed category are judged on the individual body parts of the cats as well as

for

Zehrs, Second

interested in sending supervisors to

training

The

directory

lists

municipalities that offer recreation services and profit and non-profit

organizations that run camps. Supervisors are sent by their organizations, whether it is a private

camp

Students Inc.,

from 9:30 a.m. until 8 p.m. on Wednesday and 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. Thursday. Supervisors were fed breakfast, lunch and dinner as well as snacks, all of which were donated by outside organizations like

camp

Cup and Conestoga who donated pizza.

Topics that were discussed staff,

at the

coaching and risk

management. Sarah Barber,

Tracy Ford)

how

the parts

come

together to

form the whole cat. The association says

that there

isn’t a perfect cat.

supervisors

workshop were team building,

supervisor for Elora, said the workshop provided her with ideas she can use to help her organize events in the upcoming summer. Allison Schindler, a recreation

Care Centre in Kitchener, was one of the guest speakers at the workshop. She was asked to speak at the event

therapist at the Trinity Village

summer camp

supervisor in Elora, Fergus and Belwood, said the event was a

worthwhile experience and she

by Norma McDonald-Ewing, a

learned a

faculty

lot.

member

in the recreation

impressed by the depth of

and leisure services program, and

information given, especially the

she said she was well suited for the part due to her seven-year experience as a leader for various sum-

“I

or a municipality that

doesn’t offer supervisor training, and the organization is charged $125 per person. The event ran

am

stuff

on behaviour management

and public relations,” she said. Barber works for the Township of Centre Wellington during the Trent attends and summer Peterborough in University through the winter. summer Erin Nudds,

camp

mer camps. She said volunteering at the event was important to her because she has something to offer supervisors in training by sharing her experiences.

Conestoga College rp Co

o>

-He

O 00

Quality Policy Conestoga College continually seeks opportunities for improver, ent to

Conestoga College pp

by

ph0,°

<

27.

placement. She said most of the work was contacting the organizations listed in the parks and recreation directory to see if they were the workshop.

his favourite cat toy, held

Fanciers owner Julie Cozzarelli, at the Golden Triangle Cat recreation college’s the at show cat Association’s 24th annual

conference provides training

Pattycake and clown noses were a common sight at the second annual Soup’s On supervisor train-

summer camp

who

that unless people intend to breed

to

the animals

Not only do

require everyday care but also there

ipation.

comes into the show,” Bennett “Anyone can enter the show.”

to

By Laura Czekaj

for

enter

by the

don’t screen everyone

“We

showing is to like a dog show.

at

who pay to

the ropes.

objective for

ing conference held

contestants,

hopefully have established breeders as mentors to help them learn

prizes awarded.

On

make money,” like to encour-

organization to ensure that ‘backyard breeders’ are not entering. Bennett said that new breeders

media representative for the show, the entrants competed for ribbons but there were no monetary

Soup’s

to

it

“We

the show, are not screened

the

It’s

said.

age responsible cat ownership.”

to the

“The win ribbons.

‘backyard breeders’

to

are just in

Bennett

show. According to Carolyn Bennett,

come

meow

at recreation centre the cat’s

Show

meet and exceed the needs of our students, employees

and comnyunifies.


SPOKE, June

College stacks up higher than Sherri

5,

2000

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Page

5

CN tower

Osment

^

Teaching English as a Second Language A One-Year

Certificate

September Call for more information 519-748-5220, ext. 656

Starts this

Stephen Case, manager of me high a stack of paper 1 ,600 metres college. the at programs

iterial

Program

of services, stands in front of a tower increase the attributes annually. Case

ConeSt

^

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Technologist retires

Summer with

Westmount Place Shopping Centre 50 Westmount Rd. N.

WATERLOO Ph.(519) 884-8558 Fax(519) 884-7733

OWNED, OPERATED

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Oakville

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Burlington

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Barrie

Hamilton

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Waterloo


.

— SPOKE, June

Page 6

5,

2000

Drug plan costs remain the same CSI drug plan rates

Bookstore’s best sellers not just books By Petra Lampert Conestoga College’s bookstore has more to offer than just books clothing and computer soft-

$71 .68 per year

ware top the bookstore’s best ers’

By Mike Radatus

including oral contraceptives, to a maximum of $2,000 per insured person.

Conestoga students will not have pay more money than last year for the Conestoga Students Inc. to

Students get up to a 20 per cent discount on eyewear if purchased

prescription drug plan.

through a network of practitioners

Ramy

Michael, vice-president of student affairs for the CSI, formerly the Doon Students Association,

across

Canada

affiliated

with

PVS

Vision Services.

released this year’s drug plan at a

Benefits include an

board of directors meeting May 24. Michael said the price of the drug

80 per cent coverage for prescription drugs,

plan will remain at $71.68 and probably won’t go up in the future,

including oral

contraceptives, to a

maximum

All full-time students are eligible for the drug plan that is underwritten

by

RWAM

Michael said he believes the drug plan

The coverage period of

this

is

beneficial to students.

Last year, from Sept. is

from

year to Aug. 31 of

the next year.

Benefits include an 80 per cent coverage for prescription drugs,

Graphics student wins postcard design contest

1,

1998, to

Aug. 31, 1999, there was a total of $119,507 claimed by students on the drug plan; this year from Aug. 31 to April 1, there has been $75,726 claimed by students.

By Donna Ryves

sells books for and continuing education

store manager.

until late in the

Therefore, the statistics show students are saving more money.

Loose fitting hospital pants, which always sell well, says

be posted in mid August.

“It will definitely

pass the year before because students are more familiar with the way the plan

works,” said Michael. Students who have a card with the old DSA logo on it can still use the card even though incoming stu-

CSI

new

card with the

logo.

doesn’t

make

sense to make more cards to replace the old ones. We’re trying to cut costs as much “It

Kelly,

come

colours

and

in

a

sell for

variety

of

$19.95 plus

tax.

Shorts

Campus

sell for

$17.95, and Hot

Collection T-shirts cost

between

$16.99 and $18.95. Sweatshirts and windbreakers bearing Conestoga’s logo sell for $27.95 and $45.99, respectively. Other items with the college logo include Outbound knapsacks

as possible,” he said.

which start at $29.95 and crested caps which sell for $11.99. AH

who have insurance from an outside source or are covered from their parents’ or spouse’s

items are available in a variety of colours and sizes.

company can opt

insurance the

CSI

out of

plan.

Students can also buy other items like magazines, gum, mouse pads,

disk holders,

calculators,

In order to opt out of the college’s plan, students must show proof of

birthday cards and day planners.

coverage from another insurance

from

Computer software is priced five to 50 per cent below

full-time

courses.

The booklists courses are not

By time

for

full-time

made available summer and will

the bookstore’s busiest

far is in

September

after

Labour

Day, during the first week of classes, Kelly says. Kelly recommends students

come in prior to Labour Day, or even during Orientation Week, to avoid the lineups which often reach outside the store.

For security reasons, students are required to check their bags at the entrance while they shop.

The bookstore permits returns within two weeks with a receipt and software can be returned if it is

unopened. Beginning June

1,

Monday

to

hours are

the bookstore

Thursday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. The bookstore is

located in the main building

through door No.

1

firm.

received a scanner because

She won a Snapscan 1212 scanand Conestoga College

ner,

The bookstore

list.

last year.

it

had

more than 20 people competing. Lisa King, a first-year graphic design student, won the Canadian Goid award for Agfa's city-in-apostcard photography contest.

and there is a limit of one software package per student.

Michael said that at the rate it is going there will be more money claimed this year than there was

Students

Administrators Inc.

1

$2,000

the

Co-operators Life Insurance Company and administrated by Insurance

Sept.

of

per insured person

sell-

Students must present their stuID to purchase the software

dent

Items such as hospital pants, Tshirts and sweatshirts are extremely popular among students, says Vanda Kelly, book-

dents will have a

either.

Students can add a spouse or child for an additional $71.68.

regular retail prices for registered students, staff and faculty.

— to stay at

anymore

There were 3,000 entries worldwide with about 200 being Canadian competitors. The students had to visually depict in a postcard the city in living or study-

which they were

ing. Only students enrolled in a graphic arts or photography curriculum were able to enter the contest.

King’s picture was taken in

Dundee an older

New

and depicts sitting under old-

in a hair salon

woman

fashioned hair dryers.

“Everybody in New Dundee knows her. She walks around town and people who have lived there for about 10 years know her,” King said.

The platinum award winners also receive a trip to Belguim, where the judging took place.

College Graduates Join the leading edge of a

new breed of professionals' Conestoga offers a variety of unique full-time Post-Graduate Prograt Apply now for September Career Development Practitioner Computer Numerical Control Environmental Engineering Applications (Optional Co-op Human Resources Management (Co-op) Systems Analyst Teaching English as a Second Language Technology Marketing

Woodworking Manufacturing Management For information

748-5220,

ext.

call

656.

Ask about our part-time Post-Graduate Programs too!

Attention

Conestoga College all

qp

students

needing money!! 370 HIGHLAND RD W„

KITCHENE FOOD BASICS PLAZA

744-1011 385 FAIRWAY ROAD

ST.,

KITCHENER CANAOIAN TIRE PLAZA

893-2464 402 KING STREET N„

Be

a

Conestoga College Tour Guide!!

WATERLOO BETWEEN HARVEYS A BURGER KING

Talk

to

Melody or Carol.

Information Centre. SCSB Or call 748-5220 ext 730

884-7376 Visit

us at

www.bMtqogson. com 9 '

*

A

/

t

f

,

T~.


.

Braid says farewell

Cruise combats chaos between Cruise and Scott at the end of the film is by far the best directed and most exciting scene in the movie. It will have you holding your breath and clinging to the edge of your seat. The final

By Petra Lampert

Tom

Cruise returns as special

agent Ethan Hunt in the movie Mission: Impossible 2 and leads his IMF team on a mission to capture a deadly

German

“chimera” before

it

fight

virus called

scene

is

nothing short of

heart-stopping.

released to

is

Band covers songs by

Mission: Impossible 2 delivers

terrorists.

Ving Rhames (Bringing Out the Dead) joins Cruise for this sequel and reprises his role as resident computer genius. Thandie Newton

scenery throughout the movie pro-

thrilling, fast-paced, intense blaz-

vides the perfect backdrop and

ing action and suspense. Simply

(Beloved) plays the beautiful professional thief Cruise must recruit

Woo

for the mission.

love interest

is

film

is

directed by John who once again

played by Dougray

worldwide

Mission:

Impossible 2

is

The movie opens with

a stun-

receives the call for his mission.

and furious, this film maintains a steady and suspenseful pace right up until the fast

Even

not to mention

numerous

Billy

seveninch singles during tenure, Braid

released two

breathtaking ending. There are many surprising twists

and turns as the plot thickens. The

Battle of the

on

fire.

One

thing’s for

sure. Cruise has never looked better.

The motorcycle chase scene

The

to

be held

The lineup for the Battle of Bands was decided May 26. Tripping Stone won the last entry round to advance to the Battle of Bands

My

13

Movie Music

five-piece

band which plays FIX and

Starving Friday to

become the last

band to qualify for the competition

The

Battle of

at Stages.

Bands

will

Tom

Cruise plays Ethan Hunt

M:l-2. In the opening scene he climbs while on vacation. in

m§m

be held

CDs

'

Bands Kenghk,

competing

Vol. I contains all

day before.

band’s last studio song recorded in May 1999. None of the tracks on Movie Music Vol. I have ever been

farewell

II

consists of

songs from various label compilations and six cover songs. Braid familiar transform eloquently songs, adding the band’s beautifulmusical straight-forward ly approach, and take them to another

.

include

.UNIT, Rich, The Stone Stone, Tripping Prophets and Astrokick. The winner will receive studio time and a cash reward of up to

place.

Ego

The album reveals a diverse sound, ranging from punk tracks to more elaborate guitar-laden songs bringing together every imaginable genre. They cover songs by the bands that inspired them most.

3> -

Dismemberment

of Braid’s seven-inch recordings in chronological order, as well as the

CD. Movie Music Vol.

at

Plan.

Aug. 22, 1999, at Mabel’s in Champaign, 111., with Sarge. However, they also surprised fans by throwing an unannounced show in their hometown of Chicago the

released on

(Internet photo)

at Kitchener club V

mostly cover songs, beat

source tapes. The two

down

Braid played their final show

contain 36 songs.

Cruise performs most of his own stunts throughout the film and it is easy to see that he’s in top physi-

Bands

By Mike Radatus

inal

the

of the orig-

all

1993, tracks laid

famous recording engineer Steve Albini’s pad in 1995 and an alternate version of Roses in the Car remixed by Travis Morrison from

Although everyone in- Braid the band was dissolving, the two CDs, Movie Music Vol. I and Movie Music Vol. II, were a high priority. It took the band nearly two

down

the earliest recordings in

some of late

revis-

stages of

including

band’s existence,

the

has filled

knew

tively during high-speed chases.

the screen

CDs

separate

all

its

as a final tribute to the band.

years to track

CD

The

went

with unreleased tracks, compilations, split singles and cover songs

of the star. Amazingly, Cruise’s hair always looks perfect, and even manages to flow seduc-

and

Joel

Burt Bacharach. No word of a lie.

six-year

their

Cruise fans will be delighted to see that there are a lot of close-up

set

Foundations,

full-

length albums and

fantastic.

moves

the

Smiths and the

after releas-

three

ing

effects and camera angles used are

cal shape. Cruise’s cool

the

as

Pixies,

shots

ning scene of a vacationing Hunt mountain climbing and nearly plummeting to his death before he

such

By Ray Bowe

with a huge Polyvinyl Records bang.

has done a spectacular job. Woo’s

Joel

Billy

and others, plus other unreleased material

out

awesome.

totally

(Face Off)

ing the fast-paced action, chase and fight scenes. The special

havoc.

Beginning

The

always on

Scott (Ever After) from releasing the virus and causing

visually stunning.

talent for direction is evident dur-

Cruise’s mind as he races from sunny Australia to Spain to stop the villain,

put.

is the

Newton

who

is

the Smiths,

Members

of the band posted a

note on their

Web

site

has been the greatest experience of all our lives, but all of the work has taken a bit too much of a toll on our creative

which

stated,

“It

output and most importantly, on our friendship. So rather than sacrifice

our care and respect for each we decided to put an end to

other,

was pulling us apart. This also clears the way for us to start anew and pursue other musiexactly what

cal

and educational

Movie Music Vol.

interests.” II

encapsulates

an excellent band, one to be put down in the history books as one of the best bands of the ‘90s. There goes another one.

NO ^ SUCKS

^

ALLOWED!

°Vy Garnet Shopping Centre Place Westmount 50 Westmount Rd. N.

WATERLOO

Ph.(905) 844-8558

STEVE RICE STEVE STAIOS, MIKE VANDERJAGT, PAUL MASOTTI MIKE O’SHEA, VAL ST. GERMAIN, CHRIS GIOSKOS, JEN BUTTON, AND COLIN DOYLE

Oakville

.

Burlington

.

Barrie

.

Hamilton .Waterloo


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Digital Edition - June 05, 2000