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33rd Year

applications

Fall

What’s

Conestoga

to

Inside

— No. 17

on the increase Ontario colleges experience decline

Conestoga numbers up 7 per cent

but

By Laura Czekaj

increase to the population growth in that region.

Although Ontario’s colleges are tions for fall admissions, applica-

Key Performance survey has allowed information about the quality of the college’s programs and the success of graduates to filter out into the province, causing more interest in

case of

Application Service.

OCAS

7. 8-per-cent

a

reports

increase over last year in applica-

emergency.

PAGE

Indicators

according to a report the Ontario College

by

done

6

the school.

KPIs

Conestoga, while other

to

tions

Conestoga

one of

is

position

points ahead of St. Clair in Windsor, which has the second

over the

highest increase in application rates

said.

with three per cent. Other colleges that

application rates grow, too.” Leith added that the college’s

were Niagara College

is

Fanshawe

in

Fred

grown Harris,

Conestoga, said there are numerreasons ous behind the col-

including popula-

growth

therefore, the

more

students that

come

in

the perception factor,” he said. “Students see us as a good

makes

which

us

in

demand.” Harris said this area views educa-

to assist col-

the works.

He added that because the college becoming a desired commodity more people are vying for a place

places a great importance on educa-

tion has

grown

He

all

colleges that experienced increases

located

in is

southwestern

known

for

its

strong economy. He also noted that Waterloo

region

is

munity

a relatively wealthy

com-

and with more parents

being able to afford to send their children to post-secondary schools it’s

years our reputa-

in

an upward spiral

and, therefore, the

pointed out that

natural that enrolment

is

the

come

students

the better our reputation

he said. People from outside of Waterloo Region are being drawn to the colgets,”

lege, according to Harris.

He

semester roughly one-third of the college’s population

said

last

originated from outside the

region.

Harris

demand

up.

more

said for

the

trained

community’s workers in

The only college outside southwestern Ontario that showed an increase was Durham College in

areas such as information technolo-

Oshawa.

ondary education as a necessity.

Harris

attributes

the

gy, robotics and engineering is enticing people to view post-sec-

also varied.

Jeff Wolder, a third-year market-

Reactions to the Conservative government’s May 2 budget were varied at Conestoga College. Highlights include an extra $1.8 billion for more than 73,000 students and a second round of funding for SuperBuild projects. As well, students will be able to earn $600 $1,700 a year instead of

update and rebuild post-secondary

estab-

Conestoga applied to the fund but was denied money. A second proposal is currently in

that

was

Julie Porter

ment

last five

of the six

By

provincial govern-

was by

lished

“The

said.

gets mixed reviews

it affecting their OSAP. The SuperBuild Growth Fund was established by the province to

Fund

in the college programs.

he

for itself

community. The SuperBuild

same region. “The culture of Waterloo region

Ontario, which

act of compassion

name

is

are

Flushing pot an

able

in the

Laurier University and University of Waterloo are all in the

Wilfrid

Page 4

making a recogniz-

grow to meet increasing student demand.

tion as a priority since Conestoga,

tion,”

is

leges and universities to

“It’s

Commentary

Fund, the college

good

reputation and a skills shortage in the community.

second pro-

the for posal SuperBuild Growth

Registrar

Waterloo Region, the college’s

like the

reputation gets.” Fred Harris, Conestoga College

increased

decisions,

political

Provincial budget

that

with good press coverage and good

an upward

the better our

applications,

said

Harris

and,

spiral

at

in

and

Fanshawe.

2.4

at

registrar

college,

years

last five

our reputation has

per cent.

Gladiator dominates the big screen. PAGE 10

competition like UW, Laurier, Wilfrid

nearby

Mohawk

‘The

Durham

Oshawa

tion

success with increased applications impressive because of all the

at

College in

in

College

lege’s

Welland

couple of years,” she

last

“As our reputation grows, our

at 1.4 per

cent and

PAGE 7

is

increased

at 3.1 per cent,

Hamilton College

London

in

Mohawk

2.7 per cent,

Roll for

1

two years in a row. “We have excelled positively

4.8

to experience an increase

Mental Health Week.

of

Conestoga has maintained a No.

six colleges

and

surveys

annual

are

Ontario’s 25 colleges that establish excellence. in benchmarks

Ontario colleges are showing a sixper-cent decrease.

Walk and

status in the

1

Conestoga College have

increased,

installed in

Conestoga, said the college’s No.

at

tions to

New one-way phones

Jennifer Leith, associate registrar

experiencing a decline in applica-

ing student, said he feels that any contribution to the education sys-

tem

was greeted

The announcement as good news by

Conestoga College president John Tibbits.

would be good

“It

to

have more

funding for college operations,” said Tibbits. “We’re running a pret-

now.” Michael Harris, vice-president of academics of Conestoga Students

ty tight ship right

(formerly the

Inc.

Association),

optimistic positive

was

they put into is

better

than the alternative,” said Wolder. “With people getting OSAP,

$1,700 (as an earning ceiling) better than $600.”

is

much

For Joline Malleck, a micro-computer administration

student,

the

budget’s promises do not add up to much. “For me it’s a little too late. applied for

I

OSAP

and received

covered only 20 per cent of my tuition. That’s hardly enough,” said Malleck. According to Ontario education minister Janet Ecker the budget means good things for the educa$500.

It

“We have created many new stu-

tion system.

opportunities for

We

dents.

want any

eligible stu-

reluctant to get

university and college,” said Ecker

seemingly

message of the budget.

“I

know how positive I am until know exactly how they are going

spend it,” said Harris. “Everyone will receive an extra $200 in tax benefits but how many people would rather see it put into health and education? They’ve

to

taken so

much money

tion

about time they put some

it’s

money

and college

dent in Ontario to be able to attend

about the

money back

of

Student

Doon

don’t I

bit

universities

without

institutions.

better than nothing.

is

“Any

out of educa-

in.”

Harris said he is interested in finding out the outcome of the second proposal to SuperBuild. Students’ reaction to the budget

press

a

at

conference

at

the

Westmount Golf and Country Club Waterloo on May 5. Ecker said students need more technical training, to compete in in

the world job market.

“On

top of humanities, students skills,” said Ecker,

need technical

who

stressed the need for shared

degrees.

When

asked

if

Conestoga

College would be receiving new funding from the SuperBuild proj-

Ecker said people are working review those proposals that did not receive funds in the last round.

ect,

to


Page 2

— SPOKE, May

15,

2000

Conestoga gets ready for pilot projects with applied degrees By Sherri Osment

ones that might be in the running for the applied degrees pilot projects include the electronics cluster

engineering in the lead to be

mechanical

area looks like

it’s

the applied degree pilot project at

Conestoga College.

The college

will be using

the

help of a consultant to do research before a decision is made. The research will include looking at

other

said

Tibbits

The

student

cal engineering.

“So

that’s

Tibbits said there are not a lot of

level of graduate.”

now

right

Board

Assurance

will

that

approve the projects has not yet been set up. The board will be set up by the minister of training, colleges and universities to decide which applied degree pilot projects will be approved.

Conestoga College president John Tibbits said it would likely take a couple of weeks for a decision to be reached, but the first choice will probably be mechani-

Tibbits.

and possibly programs in business and information technology. regarding approval of applied degree pilot Quality the as project

like ones in British Columbia and Alberta, which have been successful with applied degrees.

demand and employer

demand,” said

we’re going to have to do, is get support from our employers, and we know we have that in the mechanical area. We know that they would like a higher

details

other post-secondary institutions,

Project presentation

“The basic

criteria right

now

other thing

the

Applied degree programs will be four years in length so changes

“The basic

right now are student demand and employer

demand,” John

need Conestoga

be

to

will

Enjoy bautiful field-grown fresh

Tibbits,

college president

are

Scented Acres Flower Farm

criteria

the

if

made

pilot

at

project

proposals are approved. There may also be additions needed to resources, equipment, faculty

and curriculum.

mean we’re going to away any faculty, but we

“I don’t

flowers

all

season long

-

delivered

take

may have

to

your

to

add faculty,” said

John Bald, a

Tibbits.

office weekly. Also

“I

wide

one

hope

that

we

pilot project,” said Tibbits.

selection of lowers

“I’d be happy to get one this fall and then hopefully within

(especially lilies)

the next five years we would have maybe 15 applied degree

summer weddings. To recieve more information about our farm’s for

third-year

computer programming analysis student,

explains his end-of-year project to an observer. focused on Moose Winooski’s restaurant and bar.

get at least

His project

The students

presented their projects to teachers, members of information technology businesses and the public on May 3 in the Blue

Room

cafeteria. (Photo by Laura Czekaj)

programs.”

Computer

flower subscriptions, please phone:

Services ( 519)

662-6951

Attention

or mail your name and address to: Scented Acres Flower Farm

all

students

needing money!

1740 Line Line 40, RR#l Hew Hamburg, Ontario

supervisor

terminated By

NoB 2G0

Sherri

Osment

Tony Pimenoff,

a

computer

serv

-

supervisor at Conestoga College, was terminated from his ices

position on

ORIENTATION ASSISTANT JOB DESCRIPTION

let

ASSISTANTS WILL:

the

Participate in a brief training

prior to orientation

development.”

Be a Conestoga College Tour Guide!!

“These decisions are

Assist in preparing orientation and registration materials

•Talk to

POSSIBLE JOB POSITIONS INCLUDE

not

Melody or Carol,

made

Information Centre, SCSB Or call 748-5220 ext 730

:

lightly,”

Grant McGregor,

dean of academic research and education services

*

Providing directions and information

.

Distributing orientation materials

Assisting with a variety of line-ups for services

.

Helping

*

Assisting with photo

at

at skill

sets

week)

Help with the successful orientation and registration of incoming students Conestoga College during orientation week

a question of looking

in

and directions,” McGregor said. “We’re going to place far more emphasis now on program

and orientation session (scheduled the week

to

*

4.

go was due to restructuring computer services division.

“It’s •

May

Grant McGregor, dean of academic research and education services, said the reason Pimenoff was

various registration tables I.

McGregor was not one

D.

also said the decision that

was made abrupt-

ly-

ORIENTATION WEEK FOR FALL

2000

IS

August

28"’

- September

1st

Teaching English

“These are decisions

made

IF

IS

A PAID POSITION

INTERESTED IN BECOMING AN ORIENTATION ASSISTANT, DROP BY STUDENT SERVICES (2B02) TO COMPLETE AN APPLICATION FORM PRIOR TO LEAVING SCHOOL THIS

as a

Second Language

A One-Year Starts this

Certificate

Program

September

SEMESTER Call for

more information

519-748-5220, All applicants will be contacted during the summer months to confirm involvement

ext.

656

that are not

McGregor

said. “It’s

been considered for some time by senior management.” Pimenoff was employed at the college for about 20 months and was also working for McGregor on

one

THIS

lightly,”

that’s

research for funding applications.

Conestoga College rj

McGregor

said

Pimenoff was

given an adequate severance package but said he could not go into the details.

Pimenoff, reached at his Waterloo

home, declined

to

comment.


SPOKE, May

401 may slow students down

Canada competitions

Skills By Donna Ryves

school students will be participating in the photography competition

annual

while the precision machining competition will include both secondary and post-secondary school

Skills

students.

Conestoga College

will host

of 40 competitions in the

Summer-semester students at Conestoga College may be slowed down by construction to Highway 401 and Highway 8 over the next few months.

The

of Ministry Transportation is planning road both highways. The stretch of Highway 401 to be repaired goes from Highway 8 to Homer Watson Boulevard.

work

to

According to an MTO representative from the regional con-

who

struction scheduling office

asked to remain unidentified, the extent of work will depend

on the current budget and fund availability. At this point, the ministry is in the planning and designing stage.

Scheduled for construction is the Grand River bridge on Highway 8 which is to be widened to six lanes. This is not a huge endeavour as the bridge was originally designed to

accommodate

six lanes, said the

MTO source. Other work will include widening Highway 401 to six lanes, ramp improvements in the

westbound lanes and a new median wall from Highway 8 to Homer Watson Boulevard.

two 11th

Technological Ontario Competition through Skills Canada on May 16. A conference will also be ^ held for young

women

SKILLS

by Skills Canada to encourage women to join ized

skilled trades.

The photography competition and the conference will be held at the college’s Doon campus and the precision machining competition will be held at the Guelph campus. The college will provide facilities and equipment for the events that are six hours long. Secondary

Project

Both competitions include a theory, hands-on and test component. Gail Smyth, the executive direcCanada, said that the students who have advanced to the

provincial level

“Our mandate

promote

how

out

and to keep it up-to-date. “We’ve gone through many changes at the college over the years and we believe the information we have is

Canada

opportunity

won

Smyth

among

province.”

where

The reporting system has been used by universities since the early

while Algonquin, Confederation and Lambton colleges will begin measuring 20 per cent per year for the next five years. If the four-month project proves successful, it will expand to facilities,

the other colleges in Ontario.

happy

to

be one of

it,”

is Milner said

you are one of the leaders, you have more say in it. It allows us, as a college, to once again be a leader within the “Obviously,

The

if

operating

costs,

the labour costs that are being partially funded by the summer expe-

rience program, are relatively low, said Milner.

Since colleges and universities have different facilities, such as animal space and undergraduate laboratories, the only problem Milner sees is defining those differences and changing them so that colleges can use this system.

Summer with.,

starting Tuesday

8 edition of

••

Spoke a

story titled Peer tutor receives

high praise from special needs student, stated a letter of recom-

mendation from a teacher essary

to

However,

name and tutor

become only

the

a

is

nec-

tutor.

teacher’s

on the peer application form is required signature

h'y Game ^

by student services. Spoke regrets the error.

WATERLOO

INN

NOW

HIRING!!

Our Catering dept,

is

currently looking for

hardworking banquet servers. Must enjoy working with people and be able to work weekends Please phone, fax or drop off resume to:

flexible

i

Human Resources Waterloo Inn St. North

Westmoun! Place Shopping Centre 50 Weetmount Rd. N.

475 King

ON N7J 2W6

Waterloo,

Phone: 884-0221 ext.

WATERLOO Ph.(519) 884-6558 Fax(519) 884-7733

TOttCAMAfilAN

(WN£D, OPERATED

ANOTWtOl

518

Fax: 884-0321

Oakville

.

Burlington

.

Barrie

.

which

include measuring tools and equipment, disks and the computers, which the school already has, and

Wheel in the

Correction

a

said.

to construction. (Photo by Ray Bowe)

is

future

provincial recognition in their

skilled area,”

the operating costs are going.

are quite

for

employment, Smyth said. “They can see on a resume has

the leading ones in

“We

made

is

Being a part of Skills Canada great

this will

the colleges to see

choice

first

colleges throughout the province.

Milner said. confirm that.” Also, calculating the square footage will help complete an report benchmarking annual accurate”

its

this is to reinforce the existing data

as

options. Skills

big school

square footage, but taking invento-

manager resources Physical Barry Milner said the reason for all

May

to

ry as well.

going around to each and every room in the college measuring the

In a

is

‘80s and is now being used at the college level for the first time. Conestoga is the first college in Ontario to measure 100 per cent of

the four students will not only be

Students who travel along Highway 401 near Conestoga College should get ready for some traffic jams over the

high-calibre

who promote technical

career tracks

up of about 500 elementary and high schools and 15 community

skilled trades in technology as a

“However,

Using good old measuring tapes,

are

students.

quite

find out just that.

officials

tor of Skills

will find

Have you ever wondered how big Conestoga College really is? Well, at the end of the next 16 weeks, four students working with the physical resource department will

choice career option to people because there’s a critical shortage workers in of skilled-trade Canada,” Smyth said. Skills Canada is a national nonprofit organization consisting of educators, students, employers, labour groups and government first

COMPETENCES CANADA

organ-

By James Campbell

summer due

—Page 3

2000

Conestoga College hosts

Construction on

By Ray Bowe

15,

Hamilton

.

Waterloo


Page 4

— SPOKE, May

15,

2000

Applied degree status step in right direction With the Ontario government deciding April 28 to allow colleges to grant applied degrees, numerous positive prospects and opportunities are opened for the college as well as the business community. The government is starting the program on a pilot-project basis, and colleges must submit proposals for applied degree programs by the fall. The Quality Assessment Board, an advisory body of the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities, will be the governing body that will grant or deny approval to

The board is expected to summer. Two of the main programs that may be in line for applied degree status at Conestoga College are the mechanical and electronic engineering areas. Mechanical engineering includes robotics, automated manufacturApplied degree status ing and design and analysis. colleges applying for the pilot projects.

release priority criteria this

has already been accepted in British Columbia and Alberta.

Electronics enginering encompasses computer engineering and

telecommunications. The reason these courses are first in line

is

because Key Performance Indicators show those programs as above average. KPIs are an annual survey of Ontario’s 25 community colleges to determine how they compare to each other in the education they deliver. In addition, there is a strong applicant pool, good job placement rates and strong support from industry for those programs. The college will use a consultant to do research before making the final decision on which program to pursue applied degree status for. Post-secondary institutions in British

Columbia and

Alberta already have the power to grant applied degrees. Mike McClements, dean of engineering technology and trades and apprenticeships at Conestoga College, said the main difference between university and college engineering students is preparedness. University engineering students have take many

OAC math classes in high school, including finite and calculus, whereas college applicants usually only have general mathematics.

While

this is the case, engineering students at

Conestoga have

a high lab-to-lecture ratio, directly opposite of university curriculums.

Pot flushed by police Police officer didn’t consider pot substantial evidence It

added to

Waterloo

The owners of the Revolution and Flying Dog, Gary and Sue Stewart, could lose their liquor

was nice

to

see that police

Applied degree status would turn these three-year programs

in the

their heartache?

had released the

officer

If the

information about the marijuana

into four-year tenures.

Region

have

license for charges of serving alco-

two ways the school of engineering could deal with applied degree if Conestoga were to be chosen

compassion

hol to an intoxicated person and

being found the media would have eaten it up, in turn causing the fam-

under-

allowing drunkenness and disor-

ily

derly behaviour.

pain and suffering.

McClements

said there are

The program could remain the same but add a fourth year to specialize in a specific discipline, or the whole program could be revamped. Although the process is in the initial stages, one has to wonder how it will work. Undoubtedly, there will have to be the addition of resources, equipment, faculty and, most importantly,

curriculum.

Sunjeet Chaudhuria, dean of engineering at the University of Waterloo, said the announcement should not affect his institution.

He

and

standing

for a pilot project.

pointed to the fact that admission into engineering pro-

UW

UW

choosare already in high-demand, and unless grams at es to expand its engineering school, applied degree status will not make any difference. focuses on mechanical engineering but also offers chemical, civil, system design engineering programs. “We’re not going to compromise quality or the quality of our

UW

co-op jobs,” said Chaudhuria. With the government giving colleges the power to grant applied degrees, the gap between a university and a college education is lessened. Hopefully, other college programs will also be included to give more students an equally great opportunity.

towards people

Wayne Szymkowski, who was

com-

injured in the accident, said he and

within the

MacNeill

munity.

An April

28

article in the

Record

said a local police officer testified

April 27 that he flushed a bag of

marijuana down the toilet after he found it on a young Kitchener man

who was

killed after

slamming

his

car into a street sign.

The

article said Const.

Breda, a

John Van

10-year veteran of the

Waterloo regional police, testified that he flushed the drugs down the toilet in

order to spare the family of

Ryan MacNeill, 19, more grief. MacNeill was killed Dec. 1998,

from

after

driving

Revolution,

6,

home drunk a

popular

Waterloo nightclub. MacNeill’s use of marijuana has become an issue in a hearing under the provincial Liquor License Act.

clubs in

first

drank

downtown

two

more

I

devastation, humiliation,

understand that the public needs

to be able to trust the police in col-

night-

lecting

all

Kitchener, then

senting

it

at

the evidence and pre-

to the public, but

does the

was marijuana use change the outcome of the horrible

shared a marijuana cigarette before going to the Revolution about 9:30

fact that there

p.m.

event that followed?

At the revolution, he said, they drank about eight beers and two shooters before they decided to go home. Van Breda was quoted in the April 28 story as testifying that he didn’t think the small amount of

Van Breda knew that no matter what he did, the boy’s life was lost and the boy’s family would suffer. He also knew that society would look down its nose at the boy for his decision to drink and drive.

marijuana was important evidenceand the only person he could have charged for the possession was

sion,

MacNeill, who was pronounced dead at the scene. It is bad enough for the parents to have to face the news that their son made the choice of drinking and driving. Do they really need fuel

Van Breda should not feel any remorse for his actions. He should be proud of the fact

As

well, he

knew

that the posses-

no matter how small, would ruin the boy’s image and reputation.

that he cared for the feelings of the

family and tried to do what he

was

right.

SPOKE

Keeping Conestoga College connected

is mainly funded from September to May by a payment from Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI). formally called the Doon Student Association, in exchange for the insertion of advertising in the paper. The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of

Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers

in

SPOKE

are not

endorsed by the CSI unless their advertisements contain the

SPOKE

is

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Laura Czekaj;

News

Editor: Ray Bowe;

Photo Editor: Donna Ryves Production Manager: Mike Radatus; Advertising Manager: Mike Radatus; Circulation Manager: Sherri Osment; Faculty Supervisor: Jerry Frank SPOKE's address is 299 Doon Valley Dr.. Room 4B14. Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 691, 692. 693, 694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

CSI

logo.

SPOKE

shall not

be liable for any damages arising

out of errors in advertising beyond the space. Unsolicited submissions

amount paid

must be sent

9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject

for the

to the editor to"

by

acceptance or

rejection and should be clearly written or typed: a WordPerfect

or

MS Word

tain

file

would be

helpful.

any libellous statements and

illustration (such as a

Submissions must not conbe accompanied by an

may

photograph).

felt


SPOKE, May

15,

—Page

2000

5

Distance Education

Wire service

takes to the Internet Additional Internet courses

on

line

during the

By Jes Brown

held

By Petra Lampert

the

in

important for people be aware of how to take care of themselves in order to get out of “I think it’s

A

self-defence seminar

may

be

held in September to teach students how to avoid dangerous situations. The seminar, discussed May 4 at a meeting of the college’s Women’s Resource Group held in the Blue

Room cafeteria, would be

an hour long and held in the third week of September. Statistics show that acquaintance

most common form of assault, the meeting was told. The seminar would consist of discussion and allow students to pracassault is the

tise self-defence

topics covered

techniques. Other

would include

street

and how to detect the early warning signs of mental abuse. Joan Magazine, a counsellor with safety

the college’s strident services, said

the seminar

would be

beneficial to

students because of the

violence in our society.

amount of Magazine

she believes every person needs to feel self-confident about said

Banner

Conestoga College

M

The Conestoga Blue

to

difficult situations,” she said.

Students wishing to attend the seminar would be required to make a down payment of $10. The money will ensure that students attend and would be refunded in full upon completion of the seminar.

Donna Spears, whose daughter was murdered by an abusive

may

boyfriend,

December

be

back

in

as a guest speaker to

about abusive relationships and how to detect the warning

talk

signs,

Magazine

told the group.

Women’s

The Group

Resource

recently received an from award appreciation

Conestoga Students merly

Doon

the

Inc., for-

Student

Association.

The group’s next meeting

will

take place on June 19.

attraction

i.tlti'

Policy

VW

ra

Quality Policy banner

w#

, *

...* }il *

f

f

hangs outside the

Room cafeteria. The new banner is also

located at the

(Photo by Tracy Ford)

said.

courses to go

credit

body,” said Stewart,

the costs of putting in place expen-

esting experience,

qualifying mathematics (business),

sive systems for distance educa-

still

methods 1 and continuous improvement process. These courses are offered from Contact South, a consortium of 20 of the 25 colleges in Ontario. Contact South started with just a

tion, but they felt that provincially

colleges.

colleges were the

taking care of himself or herself.

are

itself.”

“Actually, Loyalist and Niagara

fall

Most

towards a diploma.

said

may be

about 400, Stewart

one college couldn’t make distance education necessarily go by

few

Self-defence seminar

the realization of that time

students

that

are

quantitative

(Photo by Donna Ryves)

was

be coming

coming on line at Conestoga this summer. Four new courses have been added to distance education for the spring and summer catalogue. They are qualifying math (basic),

More Internet courses

regulations are being met.

for

the continuing education program. “It

Stephen Case, purchasing manager for the college, inspects dangling wires in a computer lab to ensure safety

summer

will

first to

begin,”

David Stewart, the director of

enough students

was

there

generate

couldn’t

Colleges

a

locally to justify

way

combine

to

know

if it’s

for every-

who

has taken

a couple of courses on the Internet himself. “Although

it

was an

inter-

my preference

is

be in the classroom.” He said that other people enjoy the disto

tance education courses because of

time constraints. With no set class,

resources.

“Two

“I don’t

students from Conestoga

College, four from Algonquin and

students can take the courses in their

own

time.

from some other place would add up to a nice healthy class,” said

raise the

Stewart.

courses in the future. There should

six

In the beginning only es

were

offered, but

two cours-

now

there are

Stewart said Conestoga hopes to

number of Contact South

be 10 more coming on fall

semester.

line for the


Page 6

— SPOKE, May

15,

urges Qonestoqa J ^ security students to empty lockers

watch out signs of

for

heat stroke By

2000

Julie Porter

By Jes Brown lure of the sun

While the tempting

now

that

exams

will

may be

are over,

don’t fool yourself by thinking that it’s safe to stay outside all day. Unfortunately, heat exhaustion and

The

halls

are almost

not

all

dents to empty their lockers,

of heat exhaustion,” says Wang.

According

to

Wang,

staying out

of the sun and wearing a hat are two ways in which heat exhaustion

“I think there’s a bit of a

among

a

many

Hunter

explained.

common

number of on a

the students if they’re here

said

will be re-issued

courses.

staggered

occupied.

misconception

case,”

they come.” Lockers are reassigned during the summer because the college has

notices

summer job entails working outaccording to Conestoga side,

still

“They

the

when

lockers

are

there

not

is

Hunter.

empty these days, but

Even though

are

“That

of the lockers are.

posted and the electronic message board flashes a message for stu-

being unwell are the warning signs

in the

fall.

of Conestoga College

heat stroke are very real concerns for this time of year especially if a

College physician Dr. Jodie Wang. “Increased thirst, dizziness, nausea, fatigue and general feelings of

have the same locker

two- or three-year program,” said Allan Hunter, the head of security

property room.

lockers, according to Hunter.

after the spring

“If

possible,” Hunter

it’s

can’t return to

said students

two-week grace period and then

finish their year

and assume they

the locks are cut off and the prop-

It is

try

students are spread

all

semester finished.

a drain on security resources having to empty the lockers during

said,

He added

inside.

He

Last year there were nearly 300 still had locks on them

lockers that

and notify the owners.” that sometimes notification is not possible because

“we

many

Security gives students a one- or

takes up almost the whole security

removed.

Books, clothing, tools, calculators and other electronic equipment are some things that are found in

Hunter said that if a locker is going to be vacant for a long time and locked, security would like to know because there could be food

for the college.

may be warded off. Wang also suggests sunscreen with a SPF of 30 as a good way to avoid

erty inside the lockers is

the

summer. Hunter

said,

and takes

people away from other duties.

300 lockers So does cataloging the property inside and attempting to contact the owners of “Opening close

over

the country working for the summer, or they have just moved on.

takes

Security holds the property they

some

to

time,” he said.

the property, he added.

owners for five-tomonths and then disposes of it. “We need to be rid of those things by fall.” Hunter said the property

“The

six

frankly

last is

thing

we want

to see

to see the student lose

their property,”

Hunter

said.

and heat stroke

“Drinking a lot of water on a is very important.” says

humid day Wang.

Gatorade

Drinking

or

sports drinks are a

keep up a good level of

body

to

salt in the

By

sweat, she says.

Wang warns cal

symptoms such

tion,

confusion or headaches could

severe condition.

“When

these

symptoms

occur,

time to seek medical attention,”

says

Osment

age at Conestoga because of the programs used on the college’s

The “love bug” computer

as disorienta-

mean that heat exhaustion has become heat stroke - a much more

its

Sherri

any neurologi-

that

Wang.

bug” enters computer systems through e-mails that say, “I love you” or “Love letter for you.”

obese people are particularly at “even a top athlete in superb condition can succumb to heat illness if he or she ignores the warning signs.”

The skin;

Journal cites dry, hot, red fever;

confusion;

rapid

or

shallow breathing; a rapid weak pulse; seizures; and small pupils as

warning signs that

its

time to go to

which we don’t use,” said Abraham. “It can get in but it won’t do any damage. Since

we

don’t use Outlook

ensure that the computers remain bug-free, like having most servers run the Norton anti-virus protection program. The program to

detects

when

viruses

files

are

saved on the G-drive and tries to file. If the file can not be

clean the

most costly and the most rap-

cleaned the

file

is

quarantined.

most effective Abraham way to stop computers from getsaid the

idly spreading virus in the history

of computing.” The virus is not able to do dam-

ting a virus is to use protection.

the hospital.

Your business education

it

can’t progress any further.” The college also has taken steps

consultants computer-security ICSA.net was quoted in a May 5 Record article as saying it is “the most virulent, the most damaging, the

to

Outlook,

Microsoft

Peter Tippett, chief scientist at

risk for heat illnesses but

be be using

(the virus) to

it

you have

effective

support specialist at the college. The virus known as the “love

Medical

to the British

“In order for

which recently caused chaos in computer systems around the world will not be a threat to Conestoga College computers, said Michael Abraham, technical

Journal, children, the elderly and

According

computers.

virus

call

to security at

Conestoga College

depleted through

gets

that

boxes add

College not bothered by ‘I love you’ computer virus

other

good way

New emergency

Not bugged

from the sun.

getting sick

By

Sherri

Osment

Tribe said that the addition in A-wing has created some new

the

Conestoga College has installed one-way emergency inter-

several

coms

to

make

the

Doon campus

a

safer place to learn and work.

remote areas in the school that are removed from the general flow and are quite far from the security office.

A person in danger can push the

One of

the

button on the yellow call box and

located in the

the call will go to a line in the security office. When the call is received at the security office the

exit.

comes up on the display. If there is no one in the security

location

office, the call is

forwarded to the

portable radios that the security officers wear, so a person in dan-

ger should be able to reach some-

one at all times. “We’re always looking for tiatives,”

said

John

ini-

Tribe,

a

Conestoga College security staff member. “Our mandate is to provide a safe and secure environment. We take a proactive approach to safety.”

new call boxes is new A-wing near

room 2A621 by Another

is

outside the

the

machine shop

located on the wall

Sanctuary by room

1B20. The third call box is located on the fourth floor near the elevator beside 4B19. The new emergency call boxes were funded through the women’s safety grant and were activated on April 21.

There are another three call boxes on the Doon campus, which have been in place for two years. One is located by 1D17, another by 2D 16 and the third is across from the bookstore.

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Security Supervisor Clifford Laurin shows off the new yellow emergency box located near the Sanctuary. There are several more located around the college. (Photo by Sherri Osment)


SPOKE, May

Community walks and

15,

2000

— Page 7

health

rolls for

College hosts the Canadian Mental Health Association’s walk-a-thon By Tracy Ford The sun was shining and the sunwas in abundance as participants of the Walk and Roll for screen

Mental Health geared up for this year’s fundraiser held at Conestoga College May 7. The walk-a-thon was part of fund raising efforts planned by the

Mental

Canadian

year hoped to raise over $22,000, said Lynne Sosnowski, a special event produce. “This year we expected 400 hun-

through

dred people to attend,” she said, compared to 226 people last year,

for

this

Health

Association to recognize National

Mental Health Week. The fundraiser has been held every spring for the past three years. Last year the organization earned $16,500 from pledges and

when

it

was also held at Conestoga The walk was a major

College.

provide

an opportunity for families to come out and socialize,” said Sosnowski.

The

while raising

money

for

Centre, Youth Line and the Centre

Mental Health.

Wendy Vnoucek, the volunteer chairperson who works at the Distress Centre, says the money is needed.

funding source for the year. “It’s (the fundraiser) to

it

various mental health needs in the community such as the Distress

association also wants to raise

awareness in the community about mental health issues. Each participant could either walk the course or roller blade

“It’s a great family event, just an afternoon to get out for a walk,”

she said. “It was fabulous last year and I wanted to do it again this year,” said Vnoucek.

Valerie Cole, a radio personality

from CHYM FM, an event sponsor, was appointed honorary chairperson of the event and also appeared as the host of the day. Participants were expected to gather pledges from friends, family

and neighbours and there were prizes awarded to the people who The collect the most pledges. grand prize for the adult with most pledges was a barbeque afternoon for up to 50 guest at Sports World and the child with the most pledges won a Waterpark pass. “We have less individuals this year and more groups,” said Vnoucek, but she said the turnout was more than the expected 400

Dennis Thompson, 43,

Tammy

(left)

Arnold, 15 (middle) and

members of Tri-City In-line Skate Club, take a rest before heading down the course at the third annual Walk and Roll for mental health held at Conestoga College May 7.

Adam

Mitchell, 16,

all

(Photo by Tracy Ford)

people.

Sosnowski said the event was Tropicana, a Caribbean music band, entertains the participants at the walk-a-thon held by the Canadian Mental Health Association at

Conestoga College May

7.

(Photo by Mike Radatus)

into the walk.

taining.”

other communities have had with

Sosnowski’s said Conestoga was chosen for the past two years

walk-a-thons.

because

success

selected because of the

“It’s fun, it’s

healthy and enter-

it is a central part of the area organizers want incorporated

“The campus

is

beautiful and

it’s

a beautiful trailright along the river. The college is the centre of all that,” she said.

Former presidents of Conestoga honoured during memorial service The Church family requested a

By Ray Bowe

A

tree-planting

service

was held

and memorial for deceased

Conestoga College presidents James W. Church and Kenneth E. Hunter May 7. Family and friends of both men attended the memorial service in the Blue Room that quickly moved outdoors to the pond area. About 65 people attended. Church was the founding president of the college in 1967 and remained in that position until 1974. He died Jan. 8 at the age of 83.

Church’s son David spoke about his father, including stories about

black walnut tree be planted because one of Church’s hobbies was woodworking. He used black walnut in much of his work. He

was

also involved in radar design

Steve Hunter told an anecdote about his father having to go through numerous interviews to gain security clearance from the U.S. government as well as taking

on U.S.

He

citizenship.

also told about

how

his father

and building Lancaster bombers. His tree’s plaque reads: “scholar,

overcame a

educator, gentleman.”

become an accomplished

Hunter became

president of the

college after Church in 1974 and remained in that position for 13 years.

Hunter died Nov. 11

last

year, at the age of 77.

Hunter’s family chose a red oak a memorial tree. His plaque reads: “Fair science frown’d not on as

his

humble

birth,”

taken from a

Thomas Gray poem.

stutter as

a child to

the family is honoured have Hunter’s name adorn the

He added to

recreation centre at the college. While Hunter was president of the college,

he was responsible for

acquiring the funding for the complex and it was his wife, Margaret,

who was in attendance but did not speak, who helped attain equal both male and female

facilities for

of

Hunter’s son Steve spoke about his father’s life, noting his work as president of Hycon, a developer of

Church was fond of

high-altitude cameras, starting in

using television and the graphic

1963. Hunter worked to develop cameras for U.S. missions such as

Tibbits,

since 1987.

“They have

Apollo 13 and the U-2 spy plane.

cy that will

last forever.”

his

teachings

at

Memorial

University in St. John’s, Nfld., as

well

as

Waterloo.

at

the

University

image is an essential learning one of the first to do so.

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College (j


Page 8

— SPOKE, May

15,

2000

Student Life

Journalism grads honoured at daily By Laura Czekaj

awards dinner was talking to other from other papers and the relaxed atmosphere that is nonexistent in the newspaper industry. She added that she was pleased that she won. Klager graduated from Conestoga in 1996, then went on to work at a small weekly newspaper in Espanola, in Northern Ontario, called the Mid-North Monitor. He moved to the Sentinel-Review shortly after because it was a bigger, daily paper and had better career opportunities, he said.

Scott Utting, news editor at the Woodstock Sentinel-Review, describes Bob Klager as a good,

thorough reporter.

“He is a big part of this newsroom,” Utting said. Klager was one of two Conestoga College’s journalism graduates who were presented with awards at the Western Ontario Newspaper Awards dinner held April 28 in Windsor. The other was Hillary Stead, who works at the Guelph Mercury. Stead won the Toronto Star for Editorial

engaged

papers under 35,000 circulation while Klager won the Canadian Press Award for Novice Reporting - under 35,000 circulation. To be considered a novice reporter, a reporter has to

newspaper for

less than

Utting said he

ward

said the

will

benefit

my

career,”

News

His goal daily, like

is

move

to

The Record, then

included in his submission covered

him,” said Utting.

such as Nicaragua and a councillor charged with fraud and drug possession.

Klager credits his training at Conestoga for giving him the basic

Stead submitted three editorials

enjoyed the program,” he said. “Working on Spoke taught me what I needed to know.”

topics

to the competition

and said she also

entered other categories, which she

skills as

She said the best part of the

a reporter.

also credits the college with

introducing

him

to his wife. Tara, a

employment, but also employ-

the student’s related field.

it thoroughly now that the charged is going to trial.

in

the

awards and he is happy about it, but after a week-long vacation he is looking forward to getting back into the swing of things. Stead, who graduated from Conestoga in 1989, declined comment on her experience in the colleges ’journalism program. Prior to attending Conestoga

to bigger and be hard to replace

“I

He

did not win.

it’ll

for

cover

newsroom have been congratulating him on his win at the WONA

“When he goes on

better places

refer-

man

reporter.”

and Mail.

of his writing as well as some photos to be judged. Stories that were

resume

“The cover letter and resume won’t get you a job,” Doersam said. “Its main purpose it to get you an interview.” Students may check the status of potential employment and find out where their resumes have been sent by calling the jobs hotline (748-5220 ext. 562), which is updated every Friday afternoon. Graduates of the college are able to use the resume referral

said Klager

“Bob cares a lot and he knows when something is a real story,” said Utting. “He is a very thorough

possi-

Conestoga College graduates or

the

service serve students looking

drop off a resume in the student employment co-op education and alumni services office where it will be referred to employers in

went into detail about the case and continues to

bly a national paper, like the Globe

Not only does ral

ers looking for trained staff.

He

to a larger

By Donna Ryves

those set to graduate in June can

covered.

Editor

Graduates can use resume referral system after graduation

started

working for the Sentinel-Review was a murder, which Klager

Sentinel-Review

it

he said

weekend Klager

there

best part.

during a recent interview. Klager had submitted six pieces

Klager moving on to

Citing an example of Klager’s thoroughness as a reporter, Utting

Scott Utting,

years.

looks good on a resume and

not looking for-

Klager said that people

Klager said he received a plaque and $100, but recognition is the “It

to

is

another paper because he is a valuable member of the newsroom.

hard to replace him.”

be on a

two

completing the

to while

program.

“He is a big part of this newsroom. When he goes on to bigger and better places it’ll be

Writing for

resume service

journalism classmate he became

reporters

Award

College offers

newspaper awards

Students may bring in their resumes and cover letters to have them critiqued by an employment officer. Tip sheets offering information on how to polish resumes are also available for students in

student

the

employment

Room

located in

The resume

months

free for the first six

The employment

include

said.

Currently, employers are able to

post jobs on the college

officers offer

lege, said that students

During the work term portion of Conestoga’s program, Stead worked at the Guelph Mercury and has remained there for 11 years. The WONAs were attended by about 400 people from 3 1 papers in

Doersam

advice on what to include in a resume.

of

University of

“The service is something you can use for the rest of your life,”

after

graduation and students are charged $25 each year after that.

Laurie Doersam, employment officer

at the

service for years after graduation.

referral service is

College, Stead received a bachelor arts degree Guelph.

office

2B04.

Web

(www.conestogac.on.ca) by ing out a job sheet.

site fill-

a

student

However, students are not yet

at

the col-

able to apply to the postings. In the future, the college is hoping to

sometimes

inappropriate

content such as marital status and age in their resumes.

update the site for students to access the postings and directly

in

and read the tip sheets before you write your resume,”

respond online, Doersam said. “The nice thing about the existing system is there is a personal

Doersam

advised.

touch,”

“Come

Doersam

said.

Ontario.

More housing a

PEER TUTORS AND PEER HOSTS DESERVE A THANK-YOU! !!

Rodeway

at

possibility

Suites residence

By Laura Czekaj

The

deal

involves

the

college

money into the currently privately owned building to construct a new wing that would extend towards Highway 401 The college would also have to investing

TUTORS AND HOSTS HELPED MANY STUDENTS THIS SEMESTER FROM ALL PROGRAM AREAS

Rodeway Suites Conestoga and Conestoga College are currently negotiating

would

a joint

project that

result in additional student

purchase property for additional

housing.

The decision rooms to the located

at

55

to

add about 100

existing

New Dundee

across from the college,

THANK-YOU PEERS FOR A JOB WELL DONE!!!

building,

is still

PEER SERVICES

Kevin Mullan, vice-president of

Rd.

finance and administrative opera-

ten-

tions,

Ryan McNaughton, genmanager of Rodeway Suites,

confirmed the college’s par-

tative, but

ticipation

eral

Suites, but

said negotiations look promising.

He

said plans

for the addition

have been drawn up, but financial matters are still up in the air.

-

parking.

in

talks with

declined to

Rodeway comment

further, saying the college

is

still

deciding on whether to proceed.

McNaughton could

start

said

construction

next September.


SPOKE, May.

College designs course to train students in ISO Committee ponders marketing plans ity in

as

Conestoga College

news ways

to involve students in

certification process

ISO

the

finding

is

implementing a new

by

general edu-

cation course as early

as next

September.

The course

currently being

is

ISO committee best way to market

designed and the is

deciding the

it

to appeal to students.

general and would give

certification of college

may

help students get jobs Conestoga

ISO

an example,” Edith Torbay, the quality assurance manager,

ISO

told the meeting.

ISO

Bill Jeffrey, the college’s

management

representative, said

course would include 16 hours of internal auditing, somethe

thing that

would benefit the

stu-

dents and the college. “If

we

can do a general educa-

on

tion course

quality, not just

ISO, these students

would be a

Conestoga is in the process of the by certified being Standards International

great

Organization, an organization that

audited,” said Jeffery.

advantage to the college because it will be constantly

required to maintain con-

Jenn Hussey, former vice-president of operations for the Doon Student Association, now known as Conestoga Students Inc., and a member of the ISO steering com-

tinuous internal auditing in order to maintain the level of quality

mittee, told the meeting the course would be a good way to

specified by ISO. By creating a program within the college to

explain

definable and documented

sets

standards for constancy and quality for businesses to follow.

Once fied

the college

it is

train students to

the college

is

becomes

become

certi-

auditors,

provided with a

“It’s

ISO

policies to students,

way

a good

to get

them

involved,” said Jeffrey,

An example for the final project would be

for the stu-

ready supply of auditors.

in the course

The ISO committee discussed re course and some of the possi-

dents to audit an external company, not necessarily Conestoga,

ble course outline at

its

April 18

The college

currently

trains

auditors, but the training is strictly

ISO

Students would benefit by takthe course, according to

ing

meeting.

oriented, while the pro-

posed general education course would cover numerous quality systems. By making it a education course the

would be available

Jeffrey,

because

it

shows

potential

employers that the student

is

familiar with quality systems, a fact that is

becoming more impor-

and industry. Joe Martin, dean of the school

tant in business

ISO

Conestoga College students may have a better chance at getting jobs once the college becomes ISO certified, according to spokespeople from two local automotive compa-

every program. “The course would be on qual

follow

all

guidelines.

the general education

mentation in each category

to

differs.

Different categories suit different

businesses better than others.

was looking

I

at

two resumes

and they were equal in experience, but one had ISO, that resume would be considered before the one that doesn’t have it,” said Theresa

employment co-ordinator at Lear Corporation Canada Ltd. in

Ullyot,

Kitchener.

She added that if local companies were aware of the college’s goal to become ISO certified and that the college

is

in the process of training

students

in

ISO procedures,

would be a bonus

when

it

to the students

“Standardization

would

in

that

way

definitely increase the level

of respect for the school,” she said. Conestoga is in the process of

becoming

certified

by

the

Standards

International

Organization that sets definable and documented standards for con-

and quality for business

sistency

to

follow.

Bruce Francis, human resources manager at Lear, said ISO training would mainly benefit students if

quite attractive.”

Sutherland Shultz Inc., located in

know

is certified.

“Automotive companies in this area are ISO certified and most other companies are involved in some quality system management,” she said. “People that have come through an institution that is registered as a quality system will be perceived to have gone through a

system where quality did matter.” Bill Jeffrey, dean of the school of services

not

we

would look at their qualifications

pany

grams would benefit as well. For example, he said, students in nursing would benefit from certification because hospitals have their own version of quality management systems in place and therefore, students will be used to a

student’s

ISO on a be would

said the benefits of

enhanced

resume if

the

student actively

“As long

putting a general

education course out and letting students

is all

said.

as

someone knows what

about, that

is

helpful, but

our procedure may work compared to another company may be entirely different.”

During the nies

are

initial audit;

given ideas on

compa-

how

As

certified.

a result, there

is

no

set path to

certification.

Sutherland Shultz certified its panel division in 1998 and is considering

further

certification

we will be

do some

However, both Fronchak and

internal

employees

at

Lear and

Sutherland Shultz, because both

companies incorporate ISO ing during orientation.

returning students and employees ISO Internal Auditor Training

O co

BE AN ACTIVE MEMBER OF CONESTOGA’S QUALITY IMPROVEMENT SYSTEM

LEARN TO BE AN INTERNAL AUDITOR AND HELP WITH OUR UPCOMING AUDITS te

Conestoga College np

Training Session:

Monday, May 15 and Tuesday, May 16 8:30 a.m.

-

4:00 p.m.

To register contact Wendy Leung at

748-5220

ext.

in

Francis said ISO training only plays a minor role when it comes to

Attention

a>

to

The companies then determine the best way for them to accomplish certification.

become

hiring

participates in the process.

“We may be

company, he

other areas, said Fronchak.

system.

quently hires auditors.

to

written Sutherland Shultz has and approved its own procedure.

how

an asset to students. He added that although ISO is more prevalent in technology and business, other pro-

in

being able to fit the application moreso than if they have ISO.” ISO procedures differ from com-

and the ISO management

for the college, agrees that being certified will be

He

it is

ISO

representative

the process.

would be a benefit, but

a necessity,” he said. “Primarily,

“It

and community

quality'

process.

a real-

college

they are directly involved in the auditing process because he fre-

Lear is currently ISO 9000 certiand is in the process of being certified QS 14,000 which is an documentation environmental

is

good thing because if an industry is ISO registered and they know the graduate is coming with a background in ISO, obviously that is ly

doubt students will benefit once the

assurance for the college’s ISO steering committee, said she has no

health sciences

they apply for jobs.

auditing,” said Jeffrey. “It

Cambridge, does not base its hiring on ISO training, according to Jerry manager. project Fronchak, However, he said it is helpful to

nies.

“If

attempting

is

become ISO 9001 certified by next fall. The difference between ISO 9001, 9000 and 9002 is the docu-

Edith Torbay, chair of quality

fied

to

— Page 9

2000

ISO

By Laura Czekaj By Laura Czekaj

15,

477

train-


— SPOKE, May

Page 10

15,

2000

Gladiator A once

full

great general

fight for his

Groove Station of passion releases album and must

sold into slavery

is

against the

life

By Donna Ryves

Roman empire

hard to go wrong with a compacked with current top hits such as Chris Sheppard’s Groove Station 6 CD album released May 2. The Groove Station albums are released annually in conjunction with the Groove Station radio show in Canada. The songs are picked according to what radio listeners request most. The dance album includes 18 It’s

pilation

energetic tracks

Maximus and his wife and son. Maximus escapes from the men who are supposed to execute him and races home to save his family, but he does not make it in time. Found lying in home, Maximus (Russell Crowe, right) must fight for his life in the in the film Gladiator, which is directed by Ridley (Photo by DreamWorks Pictures

Maximus

Roman arena Scott-

Sherri

Osment

effects in the film bring to life the

brutality

There

is

something about an

individual battling against incredible

odds that

within us

strikes

a chord

all.

General Maximus’s struggles in the movie Gladiator show the glory

and the grief that come

from

fighting

believe

what

for

you

in.

Russell Crowe’s (The Insider) portrayal of the

turned gladiator

Roman

general

a convincing

is

and powerful performance.

The

actors

and the

special

Roman

and beauty of the ancient

empire.

Gladiator

the

is

story

of

Maximus’s fight to bring the final wish of his Caesar, Marcus Aurelius, to

is

sold into slav-

When Maximus

forced to become a gladiator, a competition to

is

Colosseum brings him face

face

with

the

new

Caesar,

Commodus. The reality of the chaos and tality

of battle

is

played by Richard (The Field), wished for Maximus to succeed him in place of his son Commodus, played by Joaquin Phoenix (Return to Aurelius,

Harris

transmitted with

amazing camera work and the passion of the actors.

lence.

With incredible realism there little left

comes

to the imagination

when

is it

to the battle scenes.

father’s

Gladiator is a film that is well worth seeing on the big screen. Seeing the marvelous structures of ancient Rome, as if they were

cide

still

Paradise).

Commodus,

learning

of his

wishes, commits patriand orders the deaths of

standing,

is

Montell

popular

the

on the

featured artists

Jordan, Santana, Britney Spears,

Cher and Moby.

Some

of the songs are original,

while others are remixes.

It

does

get annoying listening to Sheppard

and throughout

some of the album. Sheppard has been part of Canada’s rave scene since 1988 and continues to produce albums annually.

bru-

Gladiator doesn’t spare any vio-

life.

include

carried

The

label.

at the introduction

ery.

in the

By

the ruins of his

BMG

awe-inspiring.

There will be a Groove Station 6 tour that will host three acts from the album. The show hit the roads

from coast-to-coast May.

starting

in

Additional information on the Groove Station show or album can be found on the album’s Web site

The popular song Maria Maria by Santana is redone in the Pumpin’ Dolls Club Mix that is a world exclusive. Other remixes are included, such as TLC’s song Unpretty, which is done in the Don’t Look Any Further Remix. In total there are about 10 exclu-

on the album, meaning

sive songs

(www.groovestation.com).

they aren’t available on other col-

The redesigned

lections.

site features weekfrom the radio show, and track samples from Groove

fans and a downloadable screen-

National radio stations who have supported the album’s release are Radio Station Groove the Network, Toronto’s Hit 103.5 and

saver.

Calgary’s

ly charts

offers

Station 6.

It

also has a contest for

Power

107.

Thomas debut album

Carl

a boring

delivers

collection

By Laura Czekaj Carl Thomas’s debut album. Emotional, inspires one emotion in its listeners

— boredom.

The CD, which is produced by Sean “Puffy” Combs, is a mixture of moaning, groaning and pathetic attempts to rap.

The

title

track,

Emotional, much so

extremely mellow, so

is

understood

it

pick-up lines that would

listeners want to catch up on their sleep, and it’s all downhill from there. The single I Wish, is a confusing diatribe about Thomas’s love for a woman and her love for him. However, she loves someone else and he then goes back to saying he loves her. The album should include a secret decoder ring so listeners can understand what is

makes

going on.

Emotional seems to be an attempt by Thomas to follow in the footsteps of such greats as R. 370 HIGHLAND RD.

Kelly,

W..

who

includes

interludes

among the majority of his songs. The difference between Kelly and Kelly’s interThomas is clear

KITCH

FOOD BASICS PLAZA

744-1011 385 FAIRWAY ROAD

ST.,

short

of an interlude that of entertaining is

Cadillac Rap.

The rap

WATERLOO

seems

BETWEEN HARVEYS 8 BURGER KING

Visit

us at www.bfatqofson.com

is

54 seconds, but

of

on this album, which is not something he should be proud of. In songs like Hey Now and My Valentine he chooses one catch phrase and repeats it 20 times. The lyrics are so confusing and the songs

repetitive

Granted,

it

like witnessing

is

a

its tail.

Thomas

However,

if

he

has the voice to

is

not repeating

same sentence over and over, he is moaning as if he were in

like

the average song

agony. If this

it

an eternity, especially is about three minutes. Thomas is incoherent throughout and what can be

when

884-7376

English?

And that is just the beginning. Thomas co-wrote the majority

the

An example falls

N.,

in

carry off soulful lyrics.

themselves.

cliche

nauseous.

quent whereas Thomas’s interludes are long, tedious and occur so often they detract from the songs

is

make any

Another interlude that inspires sickness is Trouble Won’t Last. The lyrics start off with, “But I’m saying. Here I am saying, laying and praying that I am laying something hot. ‘Cause baby it’s cold outside and even when it’s not it still is.” Now what does that mean

dog chasing

KITCHENER 402 KING STREET

the rap

ludes are short, soulful and infre-

CANADIAN TIRE PLAZA

893-2464

girl

is that

strate

album is meant to demonThomas’s writing and

singing abilities,

it

fails

unless of course this

miserably,

album was the

best he could do. If so, he should find another profession.


SPOKE, May

crowd

Alexandra as well as the turntable magic of DJ Sella.

the beats.

Fall

The long-awaited debut release from Toronto’s post-punk trio theivyleague

came

to fruition April

29.

The band’s label Flagship Sound hosted a Signal Sounds Series in Toronto at the Blue Moon Tavern, Queen Street East a few doors away from the Opera House. The lineup for the CD release located on

as they rocked their heads to

party included fellow label-mates

DJ

Sella,

also

known

as

Next to take young punkers

Ben

to the stage

were

Fall Alexandra, a

Searles, opened the evening with an eclectic mix of house, trance and dub foundations. The loud pounding bass riffs reverberated on the walls of the deep tavern. Moving back and forth from

talented quartet based in Stratford.

turntable to turntable, Sella inject-

quick quip, putting the rowdies

ed energy into the early evening

their place.

As the crowd grew, people moved up to the front of the stage band rocked. Following some humourous bantering from

as

the

the crowd, the singer replied with a

theivyleague released their debut CD Music From Open Windows April 29. theivyleague is Jay Harris on bass, Jay

Bradley on drums and Damian Valles on guitar

(right).

in

At about midnight, the headliners took to the stage, theivyleague, a math-rock trio out of Toronto, played every track from their eightsong, 50-minute debut CD titled

Music From Open Windows. The band’s sound is an explosive and healthy concoction of epic intros, mercurial climaxes and

2000

—Page

11

CD

theivyleague releases freshman By Ray Bowe

15,

able rhythmic tandem, especially Jay Bradley’s impressively off-beat

drum rampages. The band cleverly

dissects songs,

taking each one into a multitude of directions with soft-spoken vocals

with

coupled

Damian

sweet

screams.

Valles’s throaty holler

may

exceptionally unpredictable time changes. All the while, the bass and

be one of the best this side of any hardcore band. Keep your eyes open for this

drums combine

astute trio.

as

a more-than-

Opening acts

at the Signal

Sella (above)

and

Fall

Sounds Series included DJ

Alexandra. (Photo by Ray Bowe)

(Photos by Ray Bowe)

^

^

NO SUCKS

ALLOWED!

100 %

CANADIAN OWNED,

OPERATED AND TAXED!

HOME {

RICE, OF... DONOVAN BAILEY, JARRETT SMITH, JOANNE MALAR, MIKE MORREALE, STEVE PAUL MASOTTI, MIKE O’SHEA, VAL ST. GERMAIN, STEVE STAIOS, MIKE VANDERJAGT, CHRIS GIOSKOS, JEN BUTTON, AND COLIN DOYLE


Page 12

— SPOKE, May

15,

2000

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