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33rd Year

What’s

College $2.6 million richer Funding

Inside

will

new

Conestoga College got a $2.6 arm from the

Doon, Guelph and Waterloo cam-

Fund,

puses. Additions to existing net-

Strategic

Skills

Initiative

addition of eight

which will help finance ongoing development of computer and net-

work

work infrastructure at the college. The new funding was announced by A1 Palladini, minister of Economic Development and

the

Trade, on April 20.

forms.

The

project will build

existing

information technology

training

centre

opened

that

in

Some

labs at the

May

of the

money being

raised

with

from local companies such as Research in Motion, Mortice Kern Systems, leading members of Communitech and

infrastructure will continue.

Phase 2 will begin

originates

infrastructure by the provincial government, has $100 million in its coffers. The college had requested $2.6 million in a proposal

submitted Feb.

1

application

global IT corporations including

Another provincial government fund the college is attempting to

servers to provide local business-

IBM, Hewlett-Packard and Corel

tap into

es and industries with access to

Corporation.

Strategy Fund.

training for their particular plat-

The phased introduction of new IT programming will continue

mitted a proposal to the fund on

Feb.

through 2004.

results pending.

in

of

installation

A major feature will be access to

upon the

September 1999 at the Waterloo campus with the establishment of five networked Internet labs. Phase 2 includes upgrading of seven computer labs, plus the

money for cancer

computer and network

benefit

million shot in the

BRT students raise

— No. 16

over $1 million worth of software, with a focus on e-commerce.

The

value of the compre-

total

College president John Tibbits said

during a February college

council meeting the college

become

hensive project in IT program-

ing to

ming

technology

$16.7 million, according

is

20 press release from

to an April

is try-

8

for

ernment is

The fund, which was established

with

The

within the next 18 months.

college

the

million,

Money from the rural fund will go toward seven new programs only stipulation

in

The college sub-

$1.2

the top information

province.

the college.

the Rural Youth Job

is

made by

the gov-

fund programs be available to

in regard to the rural

that all

students in rural areas.

research.

PAGE

5

Conestoga set By Donna Ryves

developed

specifically

Doon campus and

dure will be used for

people with a gun. situation is

when an

deemed a

individual

is

crisis

threatened or

harmed by another person using a firearm or other weapon.

Additional information address-

Cherished BRT teacher gets ready to retire.

ing the possession of weapons on

campus

PAGE 4

be added to the

will also

college’s procedure handbook.

A

lockdown procedure has been

the

for

a similar proce-

Conestoga College now has a lockdown procedure in place. It is an emergency response for students and staff to follow in the event of a crisis situation such as someone entering the school and threatening

A

lockdown

to all

the other

campuses. Allan Hunter, supervisor of secu-

wait for instruction.

It is

if

advised to

away from windows and doors when they have been made secure, stay

needed sense of safety and enhance existing safety, that’s what we’re here for,”

Hunter

said.

Students and staff should remain

Additions to weapon regulations

low and against a masonry

include restrictions on imitation

quiet,

weapons, ammunition, knives and

rity services at the college, consult-

wall and keep drapes closed and

ed with the Waterloo regional

lights

police in creating the procedure to

instructed not to permit access to

cals including explosives

be implemented in the

anyone unless they are clearly iden-

works.

fall.

an extremely safe place to be and there’s a very remote chance that anything would hap-

tiffed,

pen here, but anything is possible,” Hunter said. In a lockdown situation, if students and staff are in a secure environment, they would lock themselves in the classroom and

if

“This

is

As

off.

well,

they

are

prohibition on dangerous chemi-

and

fire-

Definitions and descriptions of

‘This will not prevent an insane

person from coming on campus, but

something

is

seen

we

can take

action a lot quicker,” Hunter said.

The Waterloo be contacted

in a

regional police will

lockdown

situation,

“I’m not trying to say there’s a but if we can give people a

risk,

firearms,

ammunition, weapons,

imitations and prohibited devices are in accordance with the Criminal

Code of Canada. The only exceptions

are for peace

and licensed guards carrying weapons for the purpose of their duties of employment. officers

CSI logo revealed By Mike Radatus

of the person

is

blue and the arms

are red.

The

DSA

the

new new name of

The “I” in the logo represents the body and head of a person, the “C” represents the right arm and the “S”

has released the

logo to represent the

Conestoga

organization,

represents the left arm.

Students Incorporated.

Conestoga

Jenn Hussey, vice-president of operations, said the

considered

DSA

numerous

ideas and designs, but

Slipknot gives beer kegs

a

new name.

PAGE

6

recognized

and the remainder of the

0^

the

DSA’s main goal. The logo was designed to show the organization’s

stride

toward unity among students, cam-

COMMENTARY

has a body reaching out that

symbolizes reaching out to students

Page 2

and

the

other

campuses,”

said

Hussey.

Is the to

media

blame for

youth violence?

>^

letters are blue.

DSA president Ellen

mj

^

Menage

said that

DSA

discussed a need to

The colours of the new design to show a connection

“It

was important

for us to think of

a new, fresh idea, instead of just a variation of the old design,” said

Menage. Until the design

is

complete, the

unknown because

were chosen

exact cost

with the colours of the college.

DSA

The CSI is written on the logo in way that you can see a person reaching out their arms. The body

for the creation of the design.

a

when

planning for the logo the

come up with something new.

puses, faculty and the college. “It

written over the right

£

1

decided on the logo that best

is

arm and Students Incorporated is around the left arm. The first letter of each word is red

is

is

the

being charged by the hour

The logo is estimated between $300 and $400.

to

cost

Daryl

on

Newcombe

April 20.

splashes through the

rain at

Conestoga

(Photo by Sherri Osment)

m m


Page 2

— SPOKE, May

2000

1,

College students

confused by university admissions Universities tend to have differing opinions as to

how much

weight a college credit deserves. College students

who wish to

pursue further education are faced

with an unnecessary obstacle in the form of university admissions. For example, in a recent interview Greg Bums, co-ordinator of the recreation and leisure services

program

Conestoga College,

at

had students from his program who left Conestoga with a 90 per cent average turned down by the University of Waterloo. These same students, according to Bums, then applied to Brock said he has

University in

Catharines and were promptly accepted.

St.

The question

arises,

why

such different responses from two

Ontario universities?

“We

are

all different,”

said Peter Burroughs, director of admis-

sions at

UW. He added that each university may offer the same pro-

gram in

title,

but each course differs from other schools because of

the professor teaching the course

That ity,

may be

method

a great

but college students are

and the content being taught.

to display a university’s individual-

the lurch, not

left in

knowing

if then-

college courses will stand up to university scrutiny.

“We

He

is

admission requirements,”

can’t evaluate programs the

Burroughs. “You sion

common

don’t have

said

same because admis-

specified differently for each program.”

said

some

college courses

may make

the grade, resulting in

a

transfer of college credits towards university credits, but how much credit a college course will receive

once again

differs

from univer-

Sensational media coverage leads to copycat crime

sity to university.

Brock

admissions policy that graduates of a three-

states in its

year diploma program with a cumulative average of 70 per cent, or an average of 70 per cent in the last two semesters of a three-year diploma program, will be considered for admission and may receive credit for at the

up

some cases where programs

to five credits. In

college and Brock are compatible, up to seven credits

may

With

extensive coverage given to

Columbine

the

Brock bases its transfer credits on

the compatibility of the college

comes

college and the grades achieved in college courses.

copycat crime happened on April

UW only states general admissions requirements and postpones its

judgment of college courses

until the student has applied to a

program.

when

it

comes

to admissions because

identities it

makes a

from

knife

a

bomb

in a

reference

any university and the marks they achieved

shooting

worth equal weight

at

in college should

be

prospective students, students

who have proven

in

college that they are capable and hardworking.

away college

attempt to entice rather than frighten If college students

students.

have the experience, money and drive

to pur-

sue further education, universities are foolish to turn them away. offered at

community

colleges are just as rigorous

who are applying to university who have completed col-

mass

place

at

school

These attacks may not have

many people

they both the

in

fell

sur-

considering

on the anniversary of

mass shooting where two

regard.

coverage of violent incidents.

18.

originate

lives

on April 20, 1999.

wounded another

in

a

Common

characteristics of kids

it

commit

has been

that indi-

these crimes as a

of what they’ve seen or

result

reference to the Columbine shoot-

read,” said Julian Roberts, a crimi-

ing on the anniversary, even though

nology professor

it

happened a year ago.

of Ottawa

A

cles

newsletter

may

as well have

been sent out to the downcast and “consider

saying

dysfunctional

April 20 as a possible date for vio-

lot

should

be

on the

Yes,

at the

University

has published

subject.

important to cover these

it is

media should be

incidents, but the

careful not to sensationalize.

Ontario have

in

increased “dramatically” since the

of time and energy to

Columbine deaths, and many of the threats refer to the

Columbine incident

underplayed,

at

all,”

but

it

to cover

said

David

of information and media studies

at

dent, said

Columbine

Van Allen

in the

article.

“Obviously the idea was picked

up from somewhere.” Sensational

media coverage

doing more harm than good.

is mainly funded from September to May by a payment from Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI), formally called the Doon Student Association, in exchange for the insertion of

advertising in the paper. this

The views and opinions expressed

newspaper do not necessarily

reflect

Conestoga College or the CSI. Advertisers

and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Laura Czekaj; News Editor: Ray Bowe; Photo Editor: Donna Ryves Production Manager: Ray Bowe; Advertising Manager: Mike Radatus; Circulation Manager: Sherri Osment; Faculty Supervisor: Christina Jonas; Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz SPOKE’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220,

ext.

in

the

in

views of

SPOKE

are not

endorsed by the CSI unless their advertisements contain the

SPOKE is published

691, 692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

CSI

logo.

SPOKE

shall not

be liable for any damages arising

out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by

9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection

or

MS

tain

inci-

Record

SPOKE

Keeping Conestoga College connected

arti-

to

would be a tragedy not these stories

who

School threats

seem

collectively,

Spencer, a professor in the faculty

shooting.

“For certain rare cases

documented by research viduals

made some

radio stations

“I think the

later in Taber, Alta., a

that

from highly publicized

vigorous coverage of violence.

dent and elitist attitude in this

on April

devote a

towards university

time universities changed their

article

and a teacher and then took

high school student killed one stu-

It’s

Record

in Littleton, Colo., shot 12 students

week

any wonder that teenagers

and links have been made to media

The media,

A

week.” it

Provincial Police, in a Kitchener

lent attacks.”

their

Is

Copycat crimes have been studied

stu-

lege courses should have the option of transferring college credits credits.

Jim Van Allen of the

dents from Columbine high school

own

as university courses.

to the

for a

with their problems?

Many

took

no

Ontario

crimes.

high

after extensive

is

of a similar event,” said Det. Sgt.

set off

Colorado a year ago.

prised

Universities should re-evaluate their admissions procedures in an

of school violence or

There

need to cover every hour nonstop

choose violent methods to deal

high school, where a

that

ration of information.

Copycat crimes are crimes

was made

Columbine

each and every university.

In the process of retaining their individuality, universities are

Students

an Orleans high

That same day, a Regina boy was

throughout their college careers should be viewed as a bonus for

Many courses

at

approach,

or sensationalized media coverage

school near Ottawa.

charged with threatening to

However, college students who maintain exemplary grades

away

were stabbed with a

technician

uni-

versity distinct.

turning

a

where four students and a lab

steak

Burroughs said universities maintain separate each other

20,

at

a copycat effect in

is

workplace violence

surprise

CNN

at the

they just give saturation upon satu-

instances

courses with Brock’s courses, the course content studied while at

you look

“If

been teased and bullied by peers

“There

it

that

the University of Western Ontario.

to

school.

no

as

seem

these crimes

be that they are lonely and have

school

high

shootings,

be awarded.

who commit

the

and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect file would be helpful. Submissions must not con-

Word

any libellous statements and

may

illustration (such as a photograph).

be accompanied by an

is


SPOKE, May

Founding fathers honoured with memorial trees By Ray Bowe

He was

Special trees will be planted in

of two of the college’s

which

Hycon

called

in the ’60s

cameras for the Apollo

built

founding fathers, Kenneth E. Hunter

13 mission and the SR-71 Blackbird

and Dr. James W. Church.

research aircraft.

Church, the founding president of

Conestoga College

Hunter became president of the

Church was

responsible for locating the

He

will

After leaving the college in 1974,

University in

Room

survived by

is

May 7 in the

1:30 p.m.

at

The

pond behind

the col-

The Church family chose a black

of

walnut, while the family of Kenneth

Hunter has chosen an oak

was president at Conestoga. Church was involved in wood-

families will also dedicate a fitting

According

building Lancaster bombers.

lege’s recreation

tant

on the

to

college president, the

the

col-

trees will

have

complex, died Nov.

up on the

rise

is

age of 77.

11, last year, at the

The

tree.

accompany each tree. to Helena Webb, assis-

epitaph to

working, designing radars and in

whose name

PEER SERVICES

lege.

Waterloo where he taught before he

Hunter,

-

trees

be planted prior to the event to

the left of the

on to Memorial Newfoundland and

later returned to the University

He

Speeches will be read

Blue

college.

went

1987 and moved to

retired in

four children and two grandchildren.

building the complex and also building up the academic stature of the

DONE!!!

nificantly.

Santa Cruz, Calif.

site,

THANK-YOU PEERS FOR A JOB WELL

president, enrolment increased sig-

than a few portable classrooms scat-

Church

During his tenure as college

years.

was nothing more

a field.

in

college in 1974 and stayed for 13

When Church was appointed pres-

tered across

Hycon

1967, died

with the college until 1974.

ident, the college

left

1971.

He remained

in

Jan. 8 at the age of 83.

He

—Page

TUTORS AND HOSTS HELPED MANY STUDENTS THIS SEMESTER FROM ALL PROGRAM AREAS

a geophysicist and aero-

company

2000

PEER TUTORS AND PEER HOSTS DESERVE A THANK-YOU! !!

space engineer. Hunter worked for a

memory

1,

to

be planted higher

because the two trees

are expected to reach great heights.

Learning opportunity project at halfway point By

Sherri

Osment

model

to help students with learning

disabilities.

Some

The four-year learning opportuConestoga at project College reaches its halfway maik summer. The project was

peer support groups and learning

way

started in

1998 as

to help students with specific

learning disabilities tion

make

from high school

the transi-

to post-sec-

problem solving, note-taking and study skills. There is also a computer lab with software that helps stu-

dents with learning disabilities.

“This

learning

capability to

of

Ministry

Training, Universities

as

needs

transition officer

at least potentially

average

project, said

transition r

,

the

Eight

projects

different

launched

in

were

post-secondary

13

officer

Bachelor of Commerce with an optional e-Commerce major

Bachelor of Administration

,

learning

Conestoga

is

not lower-

with a concentration Organization,

here, they

must meet the require-

uated on an ongoing basis.

ments

any other student does,”

programs will be reviewed to determine which aspects can be combined to

come up

with an ideal

that

project

is

University Certificate in Computers and Management Information Systems

University Certificate in Accounting

1

(CA,

services.

CMA, and CGA

Enrol in a

Annual book fair scheduled for May good opportunity to see many books at one time,” said

By Donna Ryves The

learning resource centre

holding

Blue

that the fair is a

its

Room

cafeteria

a.m. to 3 p.m. on

May

is

LRC

co-ordinator.

Study

in a

now

for

one

new

http://vital.athabascau.ca

textbooks for their stuusually have faculty saying

this year.

come

from the Toronto area including McGraw Hill Ryerson, the Oxford University Press and Pearson Educational Canada.

home-study course, or

e-classes!

more information, contact the

expected

of the publishers

flexible

September 2000 and January 2001.

from 9:30

Many

gf

paced, virtual classroom over the Internet! Register today for

e-classes that start in

For

just

9.

dents straight from the publishers.

“We

Douglas,

Sign up

program or

School of Business:

fair in the

The fair is held for faculty members to purchase courserelated

Jill

full

>

transferable)

About 26 vendors attended last year’s sale and the same turnout is

annual book

Industrial

Bachelor of Administration (post-diploma) by completing 10 to 15 courses

being operated

through Conestoga’s special needs

Health Administration,

said Casey.

The

in

Management, or

Relations/Human Resources

who

doesn’t have the capability to be

schools in Ontario and they are eval-

the end of the four years the

,3

...

, opportunities

not about someone

is

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must have documentation of a

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3


Page 4

— SPOKE, May

1,

2000

hangs up the mike

Fisher By Ray Bowe One of

-

the broadcast

radio and

program’s most well-

television liked

ther.”

members

faculty

ready to step into retirement in May.

Dan

Fisher,

who’s been working

in the broadcast industry for

years, has

made

over 40

a huge impact

on

and the program. “Students love Dan and he loves them,” said Mike Thumell, program

who was

in

arrival

prior to Fisher’s

“His presence

hired a year

is

1994.

6 p.m.

-

to

as the

midnight

-

man

Fisher was

Dan

bom in Pictou, N.S.,

Fish. Pictou

on

village

a small coastal

is

Northumberland

the

New

Strait just outside

village of under

as

Glasgow, a

500 people.

family

moved

Ottawa where

native

a

father,

to

of

his

Blackpool,

England, had taken a job with the Fisher started his career in broad-

by

when he was

hired

CHOV radio in Pembroke, north

of Ottawa,

Doak. “He’s more

Trout.

where he became Dan

He remained

at

CHOV

for

off,’

He would remain

He

took a job

at

in

on-air it fit

name

to

in better

Dan

Fisher, because

with the large

German

and for

The

radio talk

He

CKKW

served

added.

“You can

man-

ing people with local roots.

there,”

During his

community. Fisher sounded more

viewed

German.

Trudeau, John Diefenbaker and Joe

missions over the Web.

Clark.

being able to hear broadcasts from

is

quick to point out that

changing one’s name

is

not a part of

the broadcast business anymore.

was primarily done

It

to ease speaking

was

easier to say

‘Dan Fisher

interesting people

all

own right and had

in their

points and

bad

their

as far

listen

Australia, stereo,”

man

the first

With

to

alter

ego

When

on

or Farquharson

-

acter, said Fisher.

ments.

love the students and

I

love putting

is retiring this

month.

He has been

in

lis-

phon-

technological

latest

advance-

Fisher also sees the Internet play-

He

foresees music being bought right

ever-

over the station in 15 to 20 years, radio printouts and extensive prod-

claim

Fisher’s

it’s

uct information.

of the time.

“Respect. He’s fun to be with and

Fisher

still

present glee that breaks the tension a lot

booth.

Fisher

ing a big part in radio’s future.

people around the broad-

quarters

helm of the controls in the broadcast the business of broadcasting for 40 years. (Photo by Ray Bowe)

lag

“In communications, we’re on the

casting program’s third-floor head-

television faculty, at the

technol-

edge of a gigantic leap forward with wireless devices being improved.”

said. “I

into the industry.”

Many

new

no noticeable time

is

Fisher loves keeping up to date on the

and broadcasting

has been good to me,” he

full

ing in to the station about Christmas

he could

lists.

back

the advances in

One Christmas Day

tell

“I just love radio

want, and in

I

Web broadcasts.

which he was speaking to, even during commercial breaks. Herron would not come out of char-

not

can

said.

tened as Australians were

Fisher was interviewing -

if

he

ogy, there

is

in software I

a station in Melbourne,

to

of Kentucky Fried Chicken; Sir Hillary,

loves

Norway, and

as Oslo,

“With advances

points,” said Fisher.

with Col. Harland Sanders, founder

Herron

and

away

He

Nairobi, Kenya.

good

has also shared the microphone

He

matters, he says. “It

“They were

Charlie Farquharson.

radio

is

picking up short-wave radio trans-

Pierre

ministers

prime

he said. Another of Fisher’s hobbies

Fisher inter-

career,

Don Herron whose

-

information on

find

almost every conceivable thing out

climb Mt. Everest; and comedian

Fisher, broadcast

one of the most

Internet is

ager and admits he was fond of hir-

Edmund

Dan

news

sports,

features.

important tools in a newsroom, he

18

for

years as the station’s program

on entertainment,

ries

in the area for

years. Fisher hosted a

the next

also likes finding obscure sites

that are beneficial in cultivating sto-

wives.

CKKW

He

Dan

is

” joked Fisher.

media.

Fisher

CBC.

Fish signing

reports for both broadcast and print

and did court

sports teams

local

Kitchener in 1961 and changed his

In 1945, at the age of 10, the Fish

signing off’, rather than ‘This

40 show that was primarily a buy-and-sell show pitched at house-

show. In Pembroke, Fisher covered

tion.

ond-year broadcast student Jayson like a grandfa-

two years where he served station’s

casting in 1956 sec-

instru-

before taking over the mid-morning

equal to those

who’ve been here 20 years.” “He’s more than faculty,” said

was

part-time job into a full-time posi-

the students

co-ordinator

said Fisher

mental in turning what began as a

getting

is

Doak

40 years

after

May

After his

retirement, Fisher

he puts fun into everything,” said

plans to visit a few places he’s never

Thumell.

seen

“Dan’s a unique person,” said Doak. “He’s very outgoing and

Newfoundland

extremely humourous.”

visit

One

Columbia.

thing Fisher has kept up with

over the years technology.

came on

computers

“It’s

England

in

and

time to spend some quality

“Dan’s always there and he never has anything bad to say,” said Janice

However, today, with the growth

Saywell,

of the Internet, he loves searching for information, such as

knowledge

family

Fisher.

virtually a cal-

culator in today’s world.

cal

British

says he’d also like to

time enjoying everything else,” said

first

the market in the early ‘80s,

he bought a TRS-80,

He

and

Australia.

the advances in

is

When

including

before,

student.

guy and

genealogi-

second-year broadcast

a

“He’s an all-round good it’s

really sad to see

The new person

for compiling family

him

go.

will never really

replace Dan.”

trees.

College Graduates Join the leading edge of a

new breed

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B


SPOKE, May

BRT students Two

some

but

sort,

to do,” said

broadcast

radio and televi-

-

sion students raised over $1,000 for

Cancer Society by

the Canadian

camping out in the Sanctuary and the Wave Radio broadcast booth from 8:30 a.m. April 17 until 12:30 p.m. April 20.

Jayson Doak and Chris Lantz, both

BRT

second-year

The

5

raise over $1 ,000

sleep, but

they did get tired, one slept

while the other remained on the

air.

“When Thursday comes we’ll be Doak Monday morn-

“Down

in the Sanctuary

easier place to

go around

to raise

$500

Tuesday

opposed

to the secluded area

is

morning,

tribution

who

program,

one day.

from NCR, a company

tems and automated

teller

who donated

For the record, Lantz twice before

that

Doak

machines $500.

fell

asleep

slept once.

Doak was awake from 7 a.m. Monday morning until Thursday

as

on the where the Wave Radio

conferring

after only

engineers and develops imaging sys-

afternoon, close to 80 hours. Lantz left

Tuesday morning for some

shuteye around 10 a.m.

located.

After

$130

pair raised $1,034 during the

week, partly due to a generous con-

dents asking for donations,” said

with

Mike

Doak

BRT

noted that April

is

a telethon but wasn’t sure which

Cancer Awareness Month, the two

cause they should support.

students

a fund-raiser of

The

an

it’s

Thumell, co-ordinator of the

“We wanted to do

raised

to the stu-

Doak

be nice, too,” the idea to do

was hoping

in Waterloo,

booth

Doak came up with

pair

the Sanctuary.

ing.

will

The

before the end of the week, but

third floor

joked Lantz.

while accepting donations.

tificates

pair started

rough,” said

“A shower

we didn’t know what

Doak.

camping out in the Sanctuary Monday morning before moving up to the somewhat more comfortable confines of the Wave Radio booth on the third floor. The two finished up the telethon Thursday by returning to

students, tried to

go the whole time without

when

—Page

2000

students forgo sleep to help out Canadian Cancer Society

By Ray Bowe Two

1,

Jayson Doak,

right,

and Chris Lantz

in

the Sanctuary at the start of

their three-day fund-raiser.

(Photo by

Ray Bowe)

decided to support the

Doak

in the military.

participated in basic infantry

two years and during one went for one week with virtually no sleep, which drills for

exercise, he said he

During the week, the two

Canadian Cancer Society.

attributed this to training he

had received while

stu-

dents gave

away various

gift cer-

led to hallucinations at one point.

Student skater takes By

Sherri

Osment

Kerr,

22,

spends

much of her Kweens

time skating with the K.W.

While

many

students

Conestoga College find they

at

strug-

gle with classes and part-time jobs,

some have even more on minds. Jennifer Kerr

of

is in

management

their

her third year studies

at

synchronized skating team, which is

a part of Team Canada.

it

Kerr also recently skated in the

Canadian Championships, which

stress doesn’t

sure on herself.

However, now is

that the skating

over she does have a few

From March

to

too hectic.

September

“Some days we’d be driving to practice and we’re like, ‘Can we get in a car accident?’ and just not go. But, once you get there it’s fine,

is

the

has been skating since she was

from Wingham, where she was bom and raised. Because she is so busy she feels disconnected from family

a week.

lifestyle.

is

used to the busy

However, Kerr does admit that sometimes her life does get a bit

little.

only time Kerr can talk to her friends

and

live there.

she knows she has to keep the pres-

in fifth at this competition.

she

three

still

that her grades are better

came

months to relax a

much because

She said

during the skating season because

in sixth.

bother her too

and friends who

in Kitchener at the begin-

were held

season

Conestoga College, has a parttime job at Clarica and still manages to find time to skate 30 hours

stride

ning of March this year. The Kweens

She went to France to compete for the French Cup at the beginning of February, where her team came Kerr said that the

all in

it’s

'

just getting your butt there.”

(tank

I‘ln \ii<ll f

i

^SUCKS NO ^ ALLOWED*

100

%

CANADIAN OWNED, OPERATED AND TA) OF....

DONOVAN

BAILEY,

JARRETT SMITH, JOANNE MALAR, MIKE ST. GERMAIN, STEVE STAIOS,

PAUL MASOTTI, MIKE O’SHEA, VAL


Page 6

— SPOKE, May

1,

2000

Clarification 24 edition of Spoke about Conestoga College looking at shortening semesters from 16 weeks to 15 Weeks in length it should have been noted that several other models are also being conIn a story in the April

sidered. Consultation sessions with various groups including students

Slipknot tling effect

society.

the

of the bass was enough make you deaf. The moshpit was littered with bodies bumping into each other

they were slaves to the burden of

to

that

and several people had to be taken

Slipknot

out for medical attention.

of shock.

By Mike Radatus

and faculty are currently being held to gather input. Slipknot,

a

California-based

showed the crowd at Warehouse in Toronto, April 1 band,

,

the performer has authority.

band

Slipknot, a heavy metel

that

wears crazy-looking clown masks

Scented Acres Flower Farm Enjoy beautiful field-grown fresh flowers

all

season long

-

delivered to

your office weekly. Also wide selection of flowers (especially lilies)

the crowd, stopped their

crowd

the

tell

summer weddings. To

receive

more information about our farm’s

to

sit

crowd they minutes would not play anymore music unless they sat down, the crowd

show Slipknot

name and address to: Scented Acres Flower Farm 1740 One Line 40, RR#1 New Hamburg, Ontario

N0B2G0

to last long

because of

and the

the stops in songs

all

theatrical

performances by the members. Several times the band stopped to preach, often telling the

crowd

that

was on

stage for the

thrill

played

Slipknot

Overall,

Slipknot played a small set that

seemed

was written on was obvious that

- tt” it

a

The

performance.

shock-filled

music was loud, probably as loud as it could have been, and Slipknot played as hard as they

could for the audience.

with a

little

They

less flare.

tested

crowd

their ability to control the

told the

fists in

the air

and sing along with the verses.

A

or mail your

“People = S the wall and

sat.

few hundred people crammed

into the

(519) 662-6951

to

down. After 10

audience to put their

flower subscriptions, please phone:

show

of telling the

Later in the

for

from

that hide their true identity

keg

kills

Warehouse

to see the nine-

piece band run rabid on stage,

breaking equipment, hitting each other and setting an empty beer keg

on

fire.

Slipknot

is

full-length release

on tour for their

album,

a

first

self-titled

on Roadrunner records.

Slipknot headlined the show and

was

the

only band on

including Kitty and Dope,

the

bill,

who had

any original sound or real melody.

The old

saying, “If

it’s

too loud,

you’re too old,” could be tested by Slipknot.

The sound and body-rat-

A member was

of Slipknot plays

later set

on

drums on an empty keg

of

beer that

(internet photo)

fire.

Teaching English

Second Language

as a

A One-Year Starts this Call for

Certificate

Program

September

Conestoga

more information

519-748-5220,

ext.

College np

656

ORIENTATION ASSISTANT JOB DESCRIPTION ASSISTANTS WILL: •

Participate in a brief training prior to orientation

and orientation session (scheduled the week

week)

Help with the successful orientation and registration of incoming students to Conestoga College during orientation week

Assist in preparing orientation and registration materials

POSSIBLE JOB POSITIONS INCLUDE •

Providing directions and information

Distributing orientation materials

Assisting with a variety of line-ups for services

Helping

Assisting with photo I.D.

at

various registration tables

ORIENTATION WEEK FOR FALL

THIS

IF

:

IS

2000

IS

August

28'

h

- September

1st

A PAID POSITION

INTERESTED IN BECOMING AN ORIENTATION ASSISTANT, DROP BY STUDENT SERVICES (2B02) TO COMPLETE AN APPLICATION FORM PRIOR TO LEAVING SCHOOL THIS

SEMESTER

All applicants will be contacted during the ,

I

,

,

involvement

summer months ,

,

,

.

to

confirm


SPOKE, May

WATERLOO INN NOW Classified

HIRING!! Our

catering dept,

is

currently looking for flexible,

Travel

teach English:

Must enjoy working

with people and be able to

work weekends.

to:

Waterloo,

Summer

"starting Tuesday

" ^iST^JIdreh 28th

by

1000s of jobs available

Waterloo Inn St.

Wheel ih

correspondence).

Resources

475 King

— Page 7

TESOL teacher certification course (or

resumes

2000

(April 3-7, 2000)

Please phone, fax or drop off

Human

w'

'

4Agjy)' ¥

5 days/40 hrs.

hardworking banquet servers.

-

Vl15

l

1,

NOW. FREE h,

y Game UV

information package,

North

ON N2J2W6

call toll-free:

Phone: 884-0221 ext 518

1-888-270-2941

Fax: 884-0321

Attention

all

students

needing money!

Westmount Place Shopping Centre 50 Weetmount Rd, N.

Be

a Conestoga College

Tour

WATERLOO

Guide!.'

Ph.(519) 884-6558 Fax(519) 884-7733

1QO% CANADIAN

OWNED, OPERATED

Talk

to

I

Melody or Carol,

Information Centre, SCSB Or call 748-5220 ext 730

ANDHXE0I

Oakville

Thank you

.

Burlington

.

Barrie

Hamilton

.

.

Waterloo

for your support

Child Care Action

Team Lisa Horst

Shelley Schenk (Leader)

Manager, Child Care Centres

ECE Worker

(Lead Hand),

Driftwood Park

Ann Bain

ECE

Bev Laking

Program Faculty

ECE Worker, Waterloo/Glencairn

Laurie Benstead

ECE Worker,

John Darling

Anne McCourt ISO

Barb Glaser

ECE Administration

Conestoga College

qp

Support

Steering Committee

ECE Worker (Lead Hand), Glencairn

Staff

Nemec ECE Worker, Doon Violet


Page 8

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; SPOKE, May.

1,

1999

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