Page 1

.

33rd Year

APRIL

Whaifs Inside

DSA

2000

17,

president resigns

By Mike Radatus

through the

summer and Luquin’s

co-op placement would make Paul Luquin, president-elect of

DSA,

the

has decided to resign

his position before starting his

term

May

1

LeBeau, who would have

,

will replace

Luquin as pres-

DSA.

ident of the

Luquin said he was approached by DSA executive members and asked to consider whether his summer timetable would permit him to devote 35 hours a week to his duties as

The

salsa sure was spicy at the Torture King’s

off-campus show.

DSA president.

DSA president Ellen Menage said the incoming president

amount of

give that

“He would be working

as presi-

40 hours at co-op,” Menage said. Luquin said initially he thought he could work around his busy schedule when he was asked to apply for the presidency by Menage and Jenn Hussey, vice-

Luquin a

is still

eligible to

member of the board

on the board as a

“I don’t

know

if I will stay

on the

board of directors,” said Luquin.

when you go from being president to a member of the

“It’s

hard

Luquin was

said.

eligible to run for

vice-president of operations, but

president to nothing.”

decided not to run.

DSA

said that the

has

be active

to

The new tions will

“Phil will do fine.

“The

guy,” he said.

vice-president of opera-

be Brad Whiteford.

them

He

all

his

a bright

is

DSA

be

will

losing a lot of experience with Ellen

Becky (Boertien)

am,” said Luquin. “I went from

encouraged Luquin

that he considers

(Menage, whose term

sit

representative for his program.

the

I still

and

could apply to

board of directors,” he

was very disappointed.

of directors.

hard feelings towards the executive friends.

decided he couldn’t. “I

become

Even though the deadline for applications was April 12, the DSA is still recruiting members to represent various programs. Luquin

president of operations, but he later

Menage

expected

is

be available for 35 hours a week

to

him to

Luquin says he doesn’t hold any

within the organization.

dif-

dent for 35 hours and then another

1

been vice-president of operations

May

ficult for

it

time to president’s duties.

from

Phil

— No. 14

up) and

is

leaving.

would

I

have helped with that experience, but everybody will do fine. all

They

are

bright and hard working.”

Luquin said as much as he looked forward to being the new president, he refused to drop or neglect his co-

op position. “School is always the No. 1 priority,” he said. “There was no way I was going to drop my co-op.”

FAGE10

Break out the jaws of

Mainland

life

clarifies salary

published by

paper

local Condor women’s soccer team headed for finals. FV\GE11

By Mike Radatus

part-time position doing psycho-

educational assessments to identify

A

newspaper’s job description

Conestoga College employee who earns more than $100,000 a year left out some key details. Marian Mainland, a counsellor and psychology associate at Conestoga College, was listed in article “The Record’s The as earning Sunshine List”

for a

$105,662, a figure that raised eye-

brows around the college. The story

public-sector

outlines

employees who make $ 100,000plus a year.

The Record

identified her occu-

pation in the April

counsellor

who

SNFU live

puts on at Call the

a stellar

show

Office in London.

FAGE10

when

1

in fact

Mainland,

has a master’s degree,

registered psychology

who works

a

as

counsellor, and

is

as

article

is

a

associate

special

needs

also the co-ordi-

programs: special needs and the learning opportuni-

nator of two

learning disabilities.

Mainland said about 70 per cent of her salary comes from her counselling position and the rest comes from her part-time work. Mainland received a call from Kevin Mullan, vice-president of financial and administrative operations at Conestoga College, warning her that the article in the Record listed her with an incomplete title and that it could cause

some

questions.

Mainland had received notice that information would be in the paper and realized it would raise questions among staff and counselthe

lors in special

has caused

“It

buy them coffee

She also wrote the proposal for Learning $3-million

jokes,” said

in the

I

have to

morning

for

the rest of the year, stuff like that.

This was the

ties project.

some

“People say

first

time her

name

has been listed in the $100,000

the

club and Mainland said she feels

it

Opportunities Project, a four-year

reflects the hours she puts in.

It

research project that will determine

causes some uncomfortable feelings for her with staff because she

what are the most

effective services

the college can offer for students

sees

with learning disabilities.

and

She also works about eight hours a

week with

als

three other profession-

from special needs services

at

a

them putting

in

equal time

“It

is

uncomfortable to have

your income advertised paper,” she said.

in

the

during

a mock

(Photo by Laura Czekaj)

DSA let

business manager go after eight years

By Mike Radatus

the

DSA, which has been under way

for the last

The DSA’s business manager has been

let

go

after serving the organ-

Becky

Boertien,

a

full-time

employee, was told about the deci-

weeks ago. The decision was made by the executive in order to create more opportunities for students. The executive has been reducing the number of co-ordinator and manager positions in an attempt to have students more sion about three

DSA.

made during

that the

more

student-oriented. it

is

important to have

students doing the things our support staff

The

was doing,”

said Hussey.

extra responsibilities will be

divided

among

the vice-presidents

and president.

A new position, vice-president of student

life,

has also been created

up the slack. The new posihas been filled by Tracy Evans,

to pick

tion

a general business student.

Jenn Hussey, vice-president of operations, said the decision

few months, and

changes will make the organization “I think

ization for eight years.

actively involved in the

effort.

as

needs services so she

explained the situation in advance.

Mainland.

woman

For story and additional

was

the reconstruction of

Boertien was given severance pay,

vacation pay, plus an extra

bonus for her outstanding work.


Page 2

— SPOKE, April

17,

2000

Documentary

Driver found not guilty

honours

mock

at

By Donna Ryves

criminal

the evidence provided.

The suspected

driver of a motor-

cycle involved in a

mock

accident

scenario on Conestoga College’s

Doon campus not guilty at a

was found

Feb. 15

mock

trail

held April

in

different

ways and

Kerry

Druar,

second-year

a

police foundations/law and security

administration

student,

who

will

not

motorcycle was damaged.

showed slushy

said.

tributed to the accident.

McConnell

said

he had

knowledge about the “I don’t

being

little

facts or the

accident.

want anybody to feel I’m of them,” McConnell

also

“Everybody played trial,”

said

part-time faculty

who

Lewis who won the Betty Thompson Memorial Bursary.

documentary honouring instructor

dent

which included dangerous

lawyer.

important for the students

have a keen interest

the police foundations/LASA pro-

Dougherty called an employee at the Condor Roost Bar as her first witness who testified that Druar was at the bar and had three glass-

gram.

es of beer before he left the bar.

scheduled for April 11 was cancelled,

played by students deliberated for

Sarah Pooley, a second-year police foundations/LASA student,

about 20 minutes.

played the criminal defence lawyer

took place.

The mock criminal

trial,

a fol-

low-up exercise to the mock motorcycle accident, was conducted by

The jury members who were

“We to

felt that

criminal intent had

be proven beyond a reasonable

doubt and in our minds there was doubt,” said

Mike

Falk, a second-

year police foundations/LASA student and a jury

member

Gordon McConnell,

at the trial.

former

a

provincial court judge in Ontario,

and based her case on the defence not being able to establish

who was

the driver of the motorcycle.

mock

at the

accident, wasn’t qualified to

played the part of the judge and

give information about traffic con-

guided students during the

ditions or the

trial.

McConnell said that the material was presented in a fair matter, and the verdict wasn’t unfair based on

mechanics of a vehi-

McGregor was

the

main witness

for the trial and used slides during

law enforce-

some exposure

to get

mock

The

to the

inquest

coroner’s

mock

civil

scheduled for the same day,

The

trial, still

was

cancelled

because some students

who were to

-

off

inquest

campus

were the

banquet

Dan

Fischer

who

to attend an event

same

day.

The

evi-

dence was entered at the civil trial in the form of affidavits. A criminal trial determines whether the accused is guilty and should be sentenced to a jail sentence or a fine. Civil

trials are

held

whether victims will

be compensated for losses or pain and suffering.

was presented

PEER TUTORS AND PEER HOSTS DESERVE A THANK-YOU! !!

THANK-YOU PEERS FOR A JOB WELL DONE!!!

1

50 people

CHYM

in years 1,

in

Jennifer Cross received $250 for

FM.

Scully for year

3.

donated by

and Telemedia,

Dr. John Tibbits,

president of Conestoga College.

Gavin Tucker presented the John Larke Memorial Scholarship

1,

and Joe

CHYM-FM’s

Andrew McLean. The Ken MacKenzie Award,

of $500 to

Tucker presented the awards of $250 each. The CJCS creative awards were presented by on-air personality Kathryn Magee. Jayson Doak won the writing award and

presented by retired program coordinator Gary Parkhill, was awarded to Tim Good. The $300 award was given to a student who innovative technology

uses

and

the production

applies

are judged on

Paul Cross, one of the various awards presenters, was one of the

award.

Award winners

Q 97.5

was presented by

Gavin

Lemay won

in

year 3 broadcasting. The award,

for year

for year 2

academic standing

the highest

2 and 3 of the program.

Dunat

Curtis

documentary or pro-

duction.

announcer of the

won

CHUM

graduated

from Conestoga College’s broadprogram in 1979. The $500 award was given to Curtis Dunat

year award was given to students Jennifer Ferguson

who

cast

FM

Lisa Richards of Magic

given to a stu-

radio performance

radio’s Paul Cross

newsperson of the year award was awarded to Curtis Dunat and presented by

The

CHUM

The

for best radio

The Magic

is

volunteers services to

award was presented by

attendance.

specific criteria including clarity,

first

voice projection and style, said

lege’s

Mike

Other

program

TUTORS AND HOSTS HELPED MANY STUDENTS THIS SEMESTER FROM ALL PROGRAM AREAS

to the

who

the community.

in

May. The documentary, put together by current students in the program, chronicled Fischer’s 40

Steve

co-ordinator

it

to broadcasting.

three inductees into the col-

new

broadcast hall of fame.

included

inductees

Bill

and Steve Coulter.

Thumell.

Elliott

The Rogers Cable award of $500 honouring a Rogers volunteer is based on projects and

gave an outstanding speech to the

overall performance.

of the program.

Mike Thumell students

said Paul Cross

on

the

success

ORIENTATION ASSISTANT JOB DESCRIPTION ASSISTANTS WILL: Participate in a brief training and orientation session (scheduled the

prior to orientation

week

week)

Help with the successful orientation and registration of incoming students Conestoga College during orientation week

-

retiring

is

The $500 bursary

years in the radio industry and

but the

to determine

cle.

in

who

legal process.”

participate

Pooley also tried to show that Jeff McGregor, a second-year police foundations/LASA student who played the lead investigator

ment

20.

Bingeman Park. The biggest surprise of the night came in the form of a 45-minute

in police

dent, played the criminal defence

driving.

Community

annu-

member

of

guilty

its

March 20

on

ed by Greg Grimes of Rogers

and

Broadcast-Radio

Other winners included Marie

criminal negligence causing death

was found not

The

Television program held

at

“They need a focal point to push them to their limits and it’s amazing what you see,” Main said. “It’s

driver,

the

al

practising civil litigation.

is

Dean Bauman was awarded

Heather Main, a

foundations/LASA and a lawyer

said.

broadcast awards banquet

at

By Ray Bowe

parts

their

Rebecca Dougherty, a secondyear police foundations/LASA stu-

played the role of the motorcycle

Video shown

honour. The award was present-

well and a lot of effort was put into the

critical

He

road conditions were which could have con-

have any preconceived ideas,” he

mock motorcycle

4.

I

trials

retiring instructor

testimony to show that the

his

“Various judges approach

trial

to

PEER SERVICES •

,

Assist in preparing orientation and registration materials

POSSIBLE JOB POSITIONS INCLUDE: •

Providing directions and information

Distributing orientation materials

Assisting with a variety of line-ups for services

Helping

Assisting with photo I.D.

at

various registration tables

ORIENTATION WEEK FOR FALL

THIS

IF

IS

2000 IS August 28

,h

- September

1st

A PAID POSITION

IN BECOMING AN ORIENTATION ASSISTANT, DROP BY STUDENT SERVICES (2B02) TO COMPLETE AN APPLICATION FORM PRIOR TO LEAVING SCHOOL THIS SEMESTER /

INTERESTED

All applicants will be contacted during the

involvement

summer months

to confirm


SPOKE, April

By Donna Ryves

held April

at

1 1

mock

a

civil

trial,

Conestoga College

ordered the intoxicated driver of a

motorcycle involved

in

mock

a

accident near the college’s recreation centre Feb. 15 to liability

pay half the

damages.

Kerry Druar, a second-year law and security administration/police foundations student,, who played the role of the driver in the scenario

$350,000 of the

liable for

is

$700,000

by

all

total

damages agreed upon

in

civil

was held

trial

the

at

Doon campus as a followup cise to the mock motorcycle

exeracci-

The family of

the deceased pas-

senger riding on the motorcycle at

Kitchener, performs at a tournament held at April 8. (Photo by Sherri Osment)

the time of the

Conestoga College on

mock

accident filed

a claim against Druar, Conestoga

College and the Condor Roost Bar.

Greg Brimblecomb, a part-time

Bursaries offered to Conestoga students

faculty

in continuing edu-

who was

in every discipline.

Mohawk

aboriginal

scholarship

conductor and com-

decided the college was not

poser John Kim Bell formed the foundation in 1985. Since 1988, NAAF has awarded over $7 million to aboriginal students through its education

Fairfax Holdings Limited have each announced bursaries available to students in the academic year 2000-2001. is

the bar to pay

$105,000 in damages and ruled that the deceased was responsible for the remaining $245,000. The jury

support the pursuit of excellence

The mock

liable.

mock

accident,

civil

a

a real accident that happened at a local university about 10 years ago.

either business or science.

college students. Fairfax, a finan-

A coroner’s inquest scheduled for

cial

holdings company, says

tions filed at the registrar’s office

before June 15.

Applications must include two letters of recommendation from

year, Fairfax is offering

teachers or professionals, proof

level

scholarships, 36 at the

and 24

of aboriginal ancestry, confirma-

at

ui

the college

e university awar<

and a transcript

as

)

of grades.

opposed

$3

to

es.

There are no

amounts

as

set

independently awarded funds according to their

award who need an

high academic s must be forwar. e’s registrar

this

program in 1997 to respond to the growing need for scholarship

by

Ma

He

Roost.

left the

Melissa Penfold and April McGinty, both second-year LASA/police foundations students, were the lawyers representing the

“The roads were slushy, unsalted and not properly maintained,” Druar said. The roads had been clear when he went to the bar, Druar testified.

college.

The mock

affidavit,

and the Roost

mock

at the

mock

him from

staff

driving

did offer them a

ride.

The purpose of

Druar had large pupils and admitted that he had been drinking. Dan Spicer, a second-year scene,

LASA/police foundations

when he

OK to drive.

felt

didn’t try to stop

a paramedic

student testified that at the

accident

bar and

also testified that the deceased

He

started with the

trial

lawyer calling witnesses.

plaintiff’s

said that he felt fine

who

a civil

trial is to

is

responsible for

liability for losses

or pain and suf-

determine fering.

A

student,

coroner’s inquest

is

conducted

make recommendations

to

for pre-

vention, not to place blame.

accident scene and tes-

To prevent accidents involving

Druar blew over the legal

drinking and driving, bar atten-

limit.

for the plaintiff

dants should properly be trained in

submitted a graphic photograph

identifying intoxicated patrons and

The

Pam

stop them from driving home, said Ted Wroblewski, a part-time faculty member in the LASA/police foundations program and a retired

Baxter, the bar attendant at the

Waterloo regional police officer

Defence counsel

that sparked debate in court.

the bar.

the picture.

The other lawyers Roost, to

called

Her testimony Druar and the

testify.

that

who the

teaches traffic

management

in

LASA/police foundations pro-

deceased drank about three beers at She also testified that she

gram.

would not serve the patrons other

take keys away, said Wroblewski.

Bars could also offer a taxi or

the bursary.

to

start

full/part-time positions

the TRI-CITY area.

I I 1 I I I ! i I I

outdoor sporting items. Scholarships available.

1

Interview now, begin after exams.

I I

in

housewares and select

1

Call today for details:

886

-

0909

or apply on-line

1 1 I I 1

at:

www.workforstudents.com/on

12J

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

8

Eating Disorders

8 8

1 is

hardworking banquet servers. Must enjoy working with people and be able to work weekends.

I I I

with customers

s

currently looking for flexible,

v--*

Flexible hours.

Work

admitted to driving the motorcycle.

students,

acted as lawyers representing the

Both the defence lawyers and the Roost lawyers agreed to partial

The college denied

April

(Photo by Donna Ryves)

.

they ordered because it would be “mixing.” Druar was called as a witness and

revealed

Our Catering dept

ent to be

$13.05 in

both

campus

drinks

and Melanie second-year

Fritz

English,

HIRING!!

Summer Work available

Michelle

a mock

judged

held on

student,

played the plaintiff lawyer.

davits.

WATERLOO INN NOW

financial

financial need.

have many

1 1

judge did not allow the jury to view

11

responsibility.

for the

assessed

We

Tarralee Campbell, a second-year

McGee

trial

college can noi

scholars

applicants

The foundation created

civil

was cancelled because some students had to attend an offcampus event. However, evidence for the inquest was presented at the mock civil trial in the form of affiApril

wants to achieve a high rate of return on invested capital. For the 2000-2001 ac;

ship should have their applica-

tion of admission

it

Murray

the defence lawyers for Druar.

tified that

all

Students seeking this scholar-

LASA/

police foundations students, played

LASA/ police foundations program. The re-enactments were based on

is

Jackson, both second-year

played the breathalyser technician

programs and scholarships.

The Fairfax scholarship

trial.

“Always stand and be careful not to annoy the jury,” McGee said. “The objective is to get people to see the end product of their work.” Gregory Hattie and Richard

and mock criminal trial held on April 4 were organized by the trial

available to First Nation status, non-status. Metis and Inuit peoples focusing on an education in

$3,500 bursary available to

advised students during the

Through an

accident scenario.

assistance and to encourage and

Aboriginal The National Achievement Foundation and

mock

killed in the

The jury ordered

By Ray Bowe

The

member

cation, played the role of the pas-

senger

McCormick,

McIntyre and McGee law firm in Kitchener, played the judge who

LASA/police foundations

dent.

Chung Oh’s School of Tae

a lawyer with

Mollison,

the

LASA/police foundations

the lawyers.

The

in

—Page 3

any responsibility for the accident.

Murray McGee,

The jury of

Kwon-Do

2000

$700,000 awarded

Brickwork

Perry Nicoiaou, an instructor at the

17,

8 i m i

Please phone, fax or drop off

resume

1

to:

Human

Resources Waterloo Inn

475 King Waterloo,

St.

North

ON

N2J

2W6

Phone: 884-0221 ext 518 Fax: 884-0321

'

Did you know that one out of every hundred women might become anorexic? Estimates of the frequency of bulimia vary from five to twenty out of one hundred college-age women. Men also develop both disorders, but in much smaller numbers. Anorexia nervosa is characterized by an all-consuming fear of fat.” There is an intense preoccupation with food, body size and sometimes compulsive exercising. Dieting can graduexceeding

ally lead to a loss

25%

of original weight. Serious

1 8 8 8 8

health issues such as cessation of menstruation, malnutrition

8

throat

and lowered heart

Bulimia

is

rate occur.

Some

through vomiting or the use of laxatives. This extremely debilitating pattern can, in more extreme cases, absorb nearly all of

1

1

i 1

a person’s time, energy and money, and lead to depression and

Frequent vomiting can cause damage to the teeth, and esophagus. Kidney and cardiac problems are a dan-

isolation.

An

step in overcoming Eating Disorders is for acknowledge to herself and to a professional that a problem exists. Medical and psychological help is available in this community. Talk to a counsellor in Student Services or the nurse in the Health & Safety Office. One immediate benefit is the feeling of relief at no longer having to keep such an

important

first

the individual to

important part of one’s

1

\ 8

starve themselves to death.

a cycle of uncontrolled binge eating and purging

ger.

8 8 1 8

1

“getting

A message from

life

a secret.

Student Services

(

Room

8 8 8 8

1 1 8

2B02).

8 8 iMajaiaiaisMSMaMaiajaMSMaMaMSMaisjaMaiaMiIn


Page 4

— SPOKE, April

17,

Commentary

2000

DSA

gives back to college Donations enhance reputation of students in the community The results from the Key Performance Indicator survey reveal only eight per cent of Conestoga students feel that the most important service the DSA provides is financial support to college services. The lack of students who consider it important that the DSA provide financial aid to college services is surprising considering the benefits. Perhaps Conestoga College students don’t realize has put into supplying the how much money the college with quality resources for students. has donated In the 1999-2000 school year the $84,000 to the technology wing in-fill addition, $30,000 to the broadcast program for a DJ booth, $3,450 to the recreation centre for a Vectra 4800 exercise machine, $5,500 to the learning resource centre for a data video projector, $1,250 to student services for a computer, $3,525 to security for a closed-circuit television security system, $2,250 to special needs for monitors and keyboards, $4,300 to the Ontario

DSA

DSA

Community

College

Parliamentary

Student

who

voice student concerns to government, and about $2,000 to the college’s student food bank for students who are in financial distress. The money used for these donations comes from the fee students pay with their tuition and from a slush fund, revenue which the DSA, a non-profit organization, has created over the past five to seven years. The DSA has also donated to several other worthy Association,

causes.

They donated a rose bush

women

killed in the

as a memorial to the Montreal Massacre, $40 to the

Cancer Society for daffodils, life necessity items to St. Mary’s Place, a women’s shelter, on Fredrick Street, in Kitchener, and coats and blankets to Reaching Our Outdoor Friends, a Kitchener organization that houses homeless youth. They also raised $ 1 ,300 for the Heart and Stroke Foundation with their polar plunge event.

DSA

president Ellen Menage says she believes the donations are very important because it increases the number of services the college provides to the students.

The donations

increase the outcomes of programs to students and donations to the community enhance the reputation of students to the community, said Menage. Students should be getting the most out of the program they are in and acquiring the skills to be successful in the workplace, but the donations to the college improve student life considerably. The contributions to the community reflect on Conestoga students as caring people who want to make a difference in the world around them. The DSA does a terrific job of providing financial support for college services, as well as representing the students in an honourable fashion. Students should recognize the contribution the DSA makes to student life and the educational experience at Conestoga through their financial support to college

DSA

DSA

Catholic school Taxpayers

Region

be moving out

will

of

awkward setup and say it would be nice to have some sort of grass on which to play sports rather school’s

in

Waterloo rejoice.

Catholic

downtown core

need of a whole

lot of renovations. Students at other schools have a whole lot more needs met.”

Downtown

than busing to other locations to

business owners are

protesting the board’s vote

by say-

board trustees have voted to spend tax dollars on a

the school board

worthwhile

sion in only a single vote. However,

cause, the con-

the decision to close 80 years worth of decrepit buildings, lack of facili-

restaurants and public places during

and scattered classrooms, need only be made in a single vote. The public is complaining that they were left out of the decisionmaking process and other options should have been explored prior to the vote. But the public seems to be ignoring the bigger issue, what is

they

school

obtain greenery.

Kitchener

of a new high school that will replace St. Mary’s high school, currently

downtown Kitchener. The board decided by a single

located in

vote to close the 80-year-old relic

and build a new school for 1,600 students located at

Homer Watson

Boulevard and Block Line Road open in September 2002.

to

Board officials said the new which will cost $26 million,

school,

will be a larger building with a big-

ger gym, improved science labs,

more change rooms and a

better

chapel, according to an article in the Record.

Mary’s is currently a hodgepodge of leased and owned buildings that are situated on two St.

hectares of land.

from

St.

Record

in a

struction

Students

services.

Mary’s set to close

St.

who have graduated Mary’s attest to the

Mayor article

Carl Zehr said

he

is

came

angry that

to the deci-

ties

Boundaries will have to be altered new school districts and buses will be brought into the equation, but this is a small price to pay for facilities that evoke a sense of pride and an expanse of grass rather than pavement, which will certainly win over students. “St. Mary’s is not a place where our students are treated equally across the system,” Waterloo trustee Dianne Moser said in a Record artito suit the

‘The building

the bigger picture. St Mary’s students tend to solicit at various their lunch

hour and even though

may spend money

is in

very serious

these

at

customers who avoid these places because of the students, could be spending greater amounts of money. locations,

The

adult

biggest selling point

is

core by using the

St. Jerome’s Mary’s campus as the new location for its adult education and English-as-a-second-language programs.

in the

St.

These programs

will

bring

SPOKE

is

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Laura Czekaj; News Editor: Ray Bowe;

dents.

St.

Mary’s currently has

1,470 full-time high school

Students can only benefit by the

new facility and the downtown might gain a new sense building of a

of maturity by replacing the current patrons, teenagers, with adults.

Photo Editor: Donna Ryves Production Manager: Ray Bowe; Advertising Manager: Mike Radatus; Circulation Manager: Sherri Osment; Faculty Supervisor: Christina Jonas; Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz SPOKE’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 691, 692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements contain the

logo.

SPOKE

shall not

be

liable for

any damages arising

out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the' editor by

9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions arc subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect

or

MS Word

tain

tile

stu-

dents.

Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed

DSA

in

1,320 daytime and 720 evening stu-

SPOKE is mainly funded from September to May by the Doon

Keeping Conestoga College connected

the

board’s decision to remain involved portion of the

best for the students.

cle.

ing the board rushed the decision. Business owners should focus on

would be

helpful.

any libellous statements and

Submissions must not conbe accompanied by an

may

illustration (such as a photograph).

j


SPOKE, April

DSA

deficit

By Mike Radatus

DSA

$258,484; $11,900 for pub expens-

budget for the coming

year projects a net loss of $10,224.

were most important. Thirty-one per

$23,100 for entertainment expenses;

cent voted for representation on stu-

and $800 for a subsidy expense.

dent issues, 23 per cent chose servic-

year, the

DSA considered the results

and eight per cent said providing

because they have a slush fund of

of a Key Performance Indicators

financial support to college services.

accumulated revenue from the past

survey that asked students what

seven to 10 years. Since the

DSA is

been advised by

their accountant to

When planning the budget for next

and

activities, representation

on

providing financial support to col-

slush fund

one reason why

is

The

raised since 1991.

slush fund

enables the

DSA to spend more than

make

without raising the fee

they

while

providing students with

still

lege services.

student issues

Out of

the

that all the

is

expenses are exaggerated

“You always plan on spending more so that you have extra money of an emergency,” said

Menage. The DSA’s year

is

to last year’s

revenue of

2,597 students

total

revenue

is

who

activities

$52,000;

and

entertainment $8,000.

Although

the

College Graduates

TESOL teacher certifiJoin the leading edge of a

by

Attention

correspondence). 1000s

In our continuing effort to serve our readers, Spoke asks that anyone who notices

of jobs available

FREE

an error in stories or cutlines please report these errors to:

NOW.

information

package,

new breed

of professionals!

Conestoga offers a variety of unique full-time Post-Graduate Programs

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revenue

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A One-Year Starts this

compared to last year’s of $168,075. Expenses include the total general and administration expenses of

September

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(Co-op)

Systems Analyst

Teaching English as a Second Language

more expenses.

posed expenses will be $370,884,

for

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now

Teaching English as a Second Language

increased this year, there will also be

This year’s pro-

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accumulated

from the following sources: administration, which includes student activity fees, $296,660; pubs $9,000;

(April 3-7, 2000)

answered the question, 31 per cent

ext.

$320,250.

The

5 days/40 hrs.

most important.

revenue for next

total

expected to be $365,660,

compared

teach English:

-

in the net loss is

scenario for net loss.

case

Travel

cation course (or

in order to predict the worst case

in

Classified

The survey showed

Conestoga College students think entertainment and representation on

entertainment and other services.

Another factor

trips

stu-

dent issues, services, bus trips and

The

seven per cent picked bus

are most important. The choices were entertainment

down, she

the student activity fee has not been

es,

DSA services

overspend to bring the revenue said.

—Page

thought entertainment and activities

activity expenses;

$76,600 for

DSA president Ellen Menage said this does not concern the DSA

a non-profit organization, they have

2000

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Page 6

— SPOKE, April

17,

2000

Conestoga’ s paramedic students take part

in

mock fire scenario setting

real

By Laura Czekaj

practise

to

the

warns the bedraggled, bleeding and burnt group of women on the porch to stay low to the

be paramedics.”

years.

1:30

p.m.

ground.

Scenarios were located

at the

The

frame.

He

firefighter quickly

inhales deeply then forces

the door

open

to

encounter a

the stu-

of injury according to importance.

face con-

cealed by a mask, steps onto

other car rolled over with vic-

triage a scene

tims trapped inside and a house

order

firefighter,

his

me

out of

Throwing me over

he carries me off the porch and into the cold, fresh toes,

air.

me

Paramedics crowd over checking

my

pulse, they pro-

The

fire

scenarios

included

a

The students were unaware of the context

of each scenario

commencement. Weather put a damper on the event when the early morning prior to

its

turned

rain

into

snow.

me

The cold temperatures forced the scenarios to proceed quick-

to half carry, half

drag

to the

this is

ly for the safety

teer victims

strewn

only a scenario!

of the volun-

who were

lying

around each accident

students from First-year Conestoga College’s paramedic program donned the role of

scene.

Baden during Emergency Day 2000, an event consisting of five emergency scenarios staged in Baden on

years, according to paramedic

April

pared for this event and the sce-

saviour

8.

The scenarios

tested the skills

of the students and acted as a training tool for the volunteer

members of

the

Baden

“It

A

the assessment

is

Paramedics are required to

upon

to

arrival in

determine which immediate assis-

tance.

caught up in a situaand I forget steps and it is tough to simulate what happens “I get

tion

in the field,”

he said.

“But they were good scenarios and I’d like to see more days like this.” Melissa Reaney, a paramedic student, said, “It is good for us because we can practise our

co-ordinator

Bob

said the students are pre-

narios are lessons in the funda-

mentals.

However, paramedic student

McDonald

said there should

be more scenarios. “We go away with a than

lot

when we came,” she

more said.

Victims were adorned in special effects

makeup

to simulate

burns and cuts.

Paramedic professionals from towns assisted in assessing the performance of various

Fire

Tina McDonald said she didn’t feel fully prepared for the sce-

the students and teachers pro-

in a

narios.

ing sessions after each scenario.

Department. gives them a chance

He

manage-

multi-casualty

ment. Triage

skills.”

The annual event has been held in Baden for about 10 program Mahood.

dents to use skills like triage

patients need

with multiple victims.

ambulance. The only thought running through my mind is thank god

ceed

(Photo by Laura Czekaj)

The scenarios teach

ing a cyclist, a two-car accident with one car in flames and the

his shoulder like a sack of pota-

her role as a victim.

this year.

side, a rolled-over car involv-

the group.

for

cheese factory and a house next

into

smoke creeps

the porch and singles

Baden.

an abandoned

and

A

firefighter in

fire hall,

The paramedic program at Conestoga has been extended to a two-year program from a one-year program beginning

farm accident, a two-car accident resulting in one car on its

the porch.

have trouble breath-

all

their lungs.

a

at

8 a.m.

women on ing as the

is

Baden

started at

to the factory.

black

of

They

Her father

The event and ended

smoke that quickly envelops him and the cloud

Amy White, 10, had makeup done

students suggested they

room,” said Wendy Spiegelberg of the paramedic program faculty. “It gives them a chance to

Grey plumes of smoke escape from the crevices in the door-

Paramedic students help a victim whose hand was severed (Photo by Laura Czekaj) by farm equipment at the scenario.

Some

were unprepared because the course content isn’t as concentrated now that the program has changed from one year to two

things they learned in the class-

volunteer firefighter lies on the ground in wet conditions for the allowed the students and firefighters to test their skills.

vided the students with debrief-

mock

scenario.

The event

(Photo by Mike Radatus)


SPOKE, April

Baden volunteer for

firefighters

examine a car

that

was turned upside down

at

a mock accident scenario held

in

17,

2000

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Page 7

Baden. The annual event has been held (Photo by Mike Radatus)

about 10 years.

Left:

A

firefighter

with

the

Department works at a fire scene at the Baden fire hall during a mock fire scenario on April 8.

Baden

Fire

(Photo by Mike Radatus)

Right: assist

Paramedic students a victim at one of the

The exercise allowed students to use the techniques theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve learned in class like scenarios.

multi-casualty

management.

(Photo by Mike Radatus)


!

Page 8

— SPOKE. April

Engineers

17,

2000

m

By Ray Bowe

He added

entries.

showed

The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers held its annual projects

awards presentation for and papers produced by

college and university engineering

students

March

program

nology

worthy

is

receiving applied degree

IEEE ranks

the

of

well as third-year engineering stu-

ing.

Hofer, an engineering pro-

Conestoga College, College’s Conestoga praised entries, saying they were superior all

at

but

digital signal process-

one of the university

bi-static

radar they

teaching the course, had

RCMP. Don Douglas,

phone

tions

and

for

my

said.

i

provincial special needs award.

Alice Kerr,

who works

services at the

in student

Waterloo campus,

eceived the award on April 4 eception held

at the

at

a

Doon campus.

Kerr thanked the special needs >ffice staff,

;pecial

her co-workers and the

needs students that she has

vorked with throughout the years.

“Without

these

people

there

The reception

also

memorial

award,

recognized

Dahmer

which

is

Conestoga College award. There were two winners of award, a faculty member and a

a

tl

way

I do what

tell

my

the guys that

end of the

now seem

shiti

stick.”

if I

hadn’t

Fisher said that the thing he

likt

gone

most about teaching the native

rel

tions course at the college

that he’s read

woi

I

group that not ever

I’ve

it

also said that his experiences

in prison

can

body’s out to see you get the

it.

that

through

“I

with in

to

be like a

about someone

is

th

the students in his class are vei eager.

“So

far the students

seem qui

appreciative of his contribution

else.

One of

the

ways

that

Fisher’s

said Douglas.

the police founda-

program co-ordihas been difficult committed person for the it

it is

not a full-time

said Douglas.

Fisher has worked in native rela-

seven years. The

for

last

this

four years he has worked at the

stu-

Guelph prison, where he helps

to

provide native inmates with both faculty

winner

was

Bill

Alderson, of the construction/engi-

Doon campus. The student winner was Pat

neering faculty at the

Lago,

n<

of the people that work in

all

“Very fortunately I had invited Brad to be a presenter for another course and then realized that he might have been able to fit the bill,”

tions

dent.

The

better for

is

thing the

book

helping the inmates to see that

position.

help,” she

the winners of the June

weeks

“horrendous”, but said

wouldn’t be able to do any-

He

experience assists him in his job

LASA

course because

Students helping students Conestoga College supportstaff worker has won the Glenn Crombie memorial award, which is

RCMP officer

of the class because of duties with the

repeater, placed third.

he

“I

through.”

working on. Stu MacKinnon and Rob Macintosh’s project, a cordless

would be no need

Guelph

to leave after the first eight

are

Fisher described his experience in prison as

instruct the course.

to find a

A

the

liai-

He

from the prison for armed

prison are against them.

gone

nator, said that

By Sherri Osment

a native

in

inmate. life,

robbery.

Correctional Centre, has agreed to

who was

placed second for their project, a

passive

at

age of 16 to 26,

that is

Michael Duke, the

Jon Brubacher and Paul Cholewa

dents from Conestoga College.

to

used

program

Brad Fisher, who worker at son

Conestoga College for the pres-

izer that

found-

Conestoga College.

first

entation of a 20-band audio equal-

ing there and as an

police

the

in

ations/LASA

Rajeesh Kalia and Mike Loder, both in their third year, placed

Osment

A new instructor has been hired for the First Nations course being taught

by

projects

Sherri

spent 10 years of his

status.

from the University of Waterloo and the University of Guelph, as

Rudy

By

school, rather than collectively.

at

instructor joins college

that the projects

Conestoga College’s Engineering Tech-

that

Electronics

15.

The projects were completed by fourth-year engineering students

fessor

New

deemed worthy

a.

third-year student in the

construction/engineering program.

spiritual

also

and legal support. He

involved with

is

interviewing

and training volunteers

at

the

prison.

Fisher

knows what prison is like sides, as someone work-

from both

Brad Fisher is the new instructor for the First Nations course being taught in the police foundations/LASA program. (Photo by Sherri Osmer

Artists Spoke

is

Wanted

trying to

improve its an attempt

cartoons in further please our readers.

We

are

currently looking for artists

who

ar*

editorial

to

draw cartoons on a weekly basis. Spoke will provide the general idea and you supply willing to

the talent. For further information please contact the Spoke newsroom located at 4B1 3.

Attention

all

students

needing money!

Be

a

Conestoga College Tour Guide!! Talk to Melody or Carol, Information Centre, SCSB Or call 748-5220 ext 730


SPOKE, April

17,

2000

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Page

Send or Receive Prices vary for local

& long distance m m

Colour Photocopier 8.5" XII" is $1.10/ copy

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9


— SPOKE, April

Page 10

17,

2000

SNFU creams audiences Torture King tests his mettle By Ray Bowe

Pig.

was

It

Some cleavers, butcher Flaming whipped cream, a Super Soaker, KISS masks and puppets were among SNFU’s bag of tricks. SNFU, an acronym for Society’s

F—

No

Use, doesn’t just play

in’

punk music;

it’s

performance

art.

The band’s frontman, Mr. Chi decked out in fishnet stockings,

Pig,

wrestling boots and his signature rooster-like

hairdo,

constantly

is

amusing the crowd with

his ultra-

energetic antics.

The band played at Call London on April 7 as

their

new

record, the Ping

released on

is

based out of

Pig’s high-

octane presence as the

mosh

pit

veered back and forth in an adrenaline-fuelled frenzy, especially as he

fed

them

During one song he

lit

a butcher

on fire. Then he sprayed the crowd with whipped cream and doused them with water from his Super Soaker. The band put on KISS masks, donning the one that matched their musical counterpart in KISS. Another mask Chi Pig covered himself with had a pocket cleaver

in front

of the mouth for the micro-

phone. This allowed

arms

One

much more

Now

him to flail his

Else Wanted

are comprised of seven-word

such as Let’s Get If You

Time and

Catch

No

Fish to

It

Right The

Swear, You’ll

name

but a few.

numerous live albums. Chi Pig mentioned the gig was being recorded as part of a

The band

also has

forthcoming

live

much

album,

Next came a devilish puppet

that

sang along with Chi

to

bill that

sword swal-

fire,

lowing, laying on a bed of nails,

eating broken

and

bulbs

light

dancing on broken glass.

As odd as this sounds, these some of the most sane. The Torture King places vegeta-

feats are

meat on

bles and

and

his chest

slams a sharp knife against them, cutting the vegetables and meat, but leaving his chest uncut, puts

night

concrete blocks on his chest, puts

artists

skewers through his biceps and electrocutes himself in order to

from Grimsby, Ont., who were tight and loud, and the Triple Crown Louisville,

Ky.,

who

were cocky rock greasers. At one point,

and breathing

Sector Seven hailing

included Epitaph recording 13,

blood and

Whiskey Jack’s April 5. The Torture King performs numerous feats including eating at

spears through his throat, smashes

Other bands on the

Union

little

the

who

students

to

the crowd’s delight.

someone

in the

crowd hurled

Crown

illuminate light-bulbs.

This

was not the

Zamora

has

time

first

entertained

Conestoga College students; year the

DSA

last

featured the Torture

Torture King breathes

fire

during one of his

many

stunts at

played that night could learn a valu-

SNFU on longevi-

causing the cameraman to stop

Whiskey Jack’s. The DSA held

filming and put his head between

of the year-end concert because

permit to

his knees.

concerts have been poorly attend-

she said. “So, at Whiskey Jack’s

ed.

people could drink.”

cup

Band’s

bassist

at the Triple

who

replied, “I’ll kick

your

promptly

ass, faggot.”

Classy.

All of the younger bands

able lesson from ty

and remaining true to

who

their fan

base.

maybe

the

truest

form of Union

13’s

rhythm

guitarist

SNFU T-shirt.

was wearing a

How

the DSA-hosted event held at Whiskey Jack’s on April 5. (Photo by Mike Radatus)

head,”

can someone endure the

kind of pain a normal person would feel

“It is all

mind over

he

ordinator

matter.

I

told

crowd

the

getting the event together.

at

“It

we

the event in place

for

the

DSA,

said

my

things easier because

sell

alcohol at events,”

50

students

attended. “I think everything

Whiskey Jack’s offered to hold the event and was a big help in

can

made

only have a special occasion

Approximately

Alycia Punnett, promotion co-

from trying these feats?

lock the thought of pain out of

LET

The

King in the Sanctuary. The Torture King has been featured on Ripley’s Believe It or Not, Real TV, 48 Hours and the Guinness World Records where he stuck 100 needles in his body

a plastic

respect and a fitting tribute.

enter a pig mask.

;haotically

To

Likely

And No One

To Play and Something Green And Leafy This Way Comes. Most of their full-length album

In

efficiently.

Most

Voted

Succeed,

Zamora

presented

King

weren’t afraid of a

Band from

the microphone.

DSA

gore

90-minute performance. The

crowd fed off of Mr. Chi

The

Torture

with audience requests, playing

First

Pong EP,

their set list

By Mike Radatus

songs from various albums like The

titles

Vancouver but whose members hail from Edmonton, puts on an intensive

They mixed up

1981.

the

Alternative Tentacles.

SNFU, which

punk tradition of spitting on band to show their appreciation, much to the dismay of the guitarist. SNFU has been around since

Zamora’s sideshow shocks and delights audiences

stupid

part

of the Ping Pong Tour, promoting

at its finest.

the

titles

Office in

SNFU

witless fans reverted to the

went well,”

said Punnett.

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Condors headed to By

soccer

Sherri

Osment

Conestoga’s ’93-’94 hockey team honoured

finals were scored

in the first half

by

Danielle Sirio.

College Conestoga The women’s soccer league team is on its way to the finals after a 5-2

win over Jack’s Girls during the at the 4 semifinals April Conestoga College recreation

Jack’s Girls

goal

in

managed the

Team

to get a

second

at

32nd annual

had five of their players show up for the game. This gave the Condors a one-player advantage on the floor.

Regan Courtney scored Condor goal.

the third

By

Sherri

first

Erin Marshall sealed the contest

by scoring the Condors

last

two

Osment

This the

new

Conestoga Hall of

addition

College

to

the

Athletics

Fame was announced

at

32nd annual athletics awards banquet on April 7. The Conestoga College 199394 varsity hockey team was inducted into the hall of fame at the banquet held at the Four the

goals.

Condors

two goals

A

final time.

Jack’s Girls also took turns in net

throughout the game.

win will

means

that

the

be playing against

Alumni team

in the finals.

Sheridan

Points

Hotel

in

Many

were honoured throughout the evening and a video was shown that looked back over the past year in sports at

athletes

the college.

The

first

awards of the night

were the varsity awards; all varsity team members received an award of recognition. The varsity coach’s award went to Dave Longarini, who played on the varsity hockey

Canadian award for defenceman this year.

The

athlete of the year

The men’s award

indoor

soccer

coach’s

went

Levent

Sherifali.

In

sportsmanship.

to

women’s indoor

soccer, the

most valuable player award went

The men’s athlete of the year award went to Paul Mouradian,

to

who

indoor soccer coach’s award was

played on both the outdoor

and indoor soccer teams

this

year.

The women’s athlete of the award went to Leigh

year

who

played on the

Daniela

Sirio.

The women’s

presented to Jolene Theriault. The official of the year award is

given to an individual

officiates, or

of

recipient

Marostega also won the varsity softball most valuable player award. The varsity softball coach’s award was given to Lori Walden. Erin Marshall and Rebecca Miller were winners of the women’s outdoor soccer most

Andrew Hill. The members of

valuable player award. Tanya Listar

won

the

women’s outdoor

soccer coach’s award.

This year’s

in college athletics.

varsity softball team.

Athletic

the

award

the Student

recognized for their contributions.

This year’s

SAC members

The intramural team of

the

year award was given to the

community

who

Conestoga

College’s

awards

Abramov ic. The men’s indoor soccer most

Certificates of appreciation were also given to members of the college and the business

athletic

support various

programs.

Conestoga College pi

Quality Policy Conestoga College continually seeks opportunities for improvement to Conestoga

meet and exceed the needs of our students, employees

asg

Erin Andraszkiewiez, McCartney, Marshall, Katie Rebecca Miller and Adam Ward.

Jody

during indoor soccer action April 4.

College np

was

Committee were also

best

team’s

who

keeps time or score

Individuals team.

varsity

Thede, who also won an All-

the ball from one of Jack’s Girls (Photo by Sherri Osment)

to Zlatko Lakoseljac.

complete all academic courses and show dedication and leadership, successfully

men’s outdoor soccer most valuable player award went to Marco Jurisic. The men’s outdoor soccer coach’s award was given to John

most valuable player award was given to Greg

tries to steal

valuable player award was given

who

The

team.

The

recipients are full-time students,

Marostega,

Kitchener.

Regan Courtney

athletics

hall of

Condors.

Jack’s Girls scored a second and

Jack’s Girls only

fame awards banquet

inducted into college’s

half,

bringing the score to 2-1 for the

centre.

The Condors’

early

and communities.


Digital Edition - April 17, 2000  
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