Page 1

Q ^ i~sA Vzaot*

\T/-v

1 1

Nutrition

important for students By Donna Ryves

portable foods, such as wraps, precut vegetables and salads.

March

nutrition

is

month and

Beaver Foods asked a registered College students on nutrition and

young age, said Morgan, who travels to colleges and universities provincially to

food-industry concerns.

provide credible information and

speak with Conestoga

dietitian to

Masonic Foundation awards bursary.

RQGE2

important to develop healthy

It is

Carol Morgan, a dietitian/nutri-

eating habits at a

promote healthy eating habits. “The food-service industry is focusing on nutrition more and more and Beaver Foods offers to

programmer and culinary developer for Beaver Foods, set up a resource table and conducted a survey March 15 in the main cafe-

nutritious foods for sure,”

teria.

said.

tional

“Nutrition

is

very

important

Healthy foods available

college include soups, sandwich-

more conscious about

Beaver Foods has also developed the Raw Power program, which offers a variety of cold salads and

eating and

Chanh Lam, a second-year computer programmer-analyst student

“I’m concerned with being healthy and it’s important to be said,

informed.”

The

at the college is

selection of food

OK,

said

and yogurt. “Our goal is to make sure the

es, salads

selection is there,”

on the run, students should try to eat well, Morgan said. She suggested students with full schedules choose

By Mike Radatus

DSA

has announced the

board of directors committee will get an overhaul.

Commentary Paee 4

Canada turns on one of her own

Grill also offers stu-

dents hot entrees such as

Fast-food

stir-frys.

are

restaurants

by offering

healthier items such as

grilled chicken,

Morgan

wraps and salads,

“College students enjoy foods

One member from each

school

be elected in September, serv-

30.

bers.

next.

February,

A

chair

or

when

part-time students, but they must

April.

be paying an activity fee and pos-

The

tech-

nology students, two access and prepatory studies students, two health and sciences and

communi-

include fruits and vegetables in

Morgan

Beaver Foods held a draw for a package, which included a T-

gift

water bottle, cloth bag,

shirt,

note pads, pens and measuring

said.

The amount of food a person

spoons.

and creating various awareness

and they will work for a term from May one year to April 30 of the

two

and cholesterol intake and

committee

summer and

students,

In general, people need to watch

program, drug plans and services,

dents will be elected in February,

good academic standings. The committee will now include

variety,” she

responsibilities, policies, informa-

26 members, seven elected in September, 14 members from the

sess

“Everybody needs a

Each member will be expected to serve on one of the following committees: the student advisory com-

within Conestoga College in April

full-

on the

added.

really popular.”

their fat

varies depending

lack of time for an election.

two applied two Guelph campus students and two Waterloo campus students. This makes a total of 14 board members over the summer.

This will bring the committee to

The members can be

and Vietnamese food have become

consumes

person’s age and activity level.

arts students,

bers elected from each school

In other years stu-

flavourful.

ty services students,

15.

of this year.

and

of directors overhauled

ing a term from Sept. 30 to April

mem-

spicy

are

Ethnic cuisine such as Japanese

their diets,

said.

will

two business

her back

that

The Market

The decision was made at a board of directors meeting March There will be two board

RAGE11

said.

fruit dishes.

DSA board The

Morgan

responding to consumer demand

Lam.

Despite being busy and constantly

OCAA championships.

the

at

among college students. It ties right into learning ability,” Morgan said. “When students reach the college and university level they become leading healthy lifestyles.”

Condors eliminated from

Morgan

May

five executive

will

be

mem-

elected

in

except for this year

the chair will be elected in

chair will serve a term

from

of one year to April 30 of the

next and can be from any of the schools within Conestoga.

This year members

of directors

will

of the board

probably

be

appointed or asked to serve due to

mittee, the awareness

student advisory committee

by the vicepresident of education and will will be co-ordinated

consist

of a

minimum

WalkSafe

co-ordinating with peer services

weeks.

or the student fife committee.

The

tion week, assisting the

of five

The student

life

committee

is

co-ordinated by the vice-presi-

dent of student sist

of a

life

minimum

and will conof five board

of directors members.

members. Their duties will include assist-

Their duties will include co-ordi-

Week

ing with the operations of the

nating

KPI committee,

Winterfest,

assisting

with

the co-ordination of forums,

sit-

of

Welcome,

theme weeks, tourna-

ments, special events, pubs, con-

and co-ordinating events

on the ISO sub-committee and educating students on the Ontario Community College Parliamentary Student

certs

Association.

from planned

activities,

The awareness committee is coordinated by the vice-president of

releases, posters

and banners.

student affairs and will consist of a

ductivity of advertising events in

minimum

order to create better awareness of

ting

of five members.

Their duties will include club

at

the residence.

All committees will help with all promotional elements evolving

press

This will be done to help the pro-

DSA events

for students.


Page

— SPOKE, March 27, 2000

2

Masonic bursary awarded By Ray Bowe Foundation

of

awarded a bursary to management student at Conestoga Ontario

Krista Kramer, a materials

March 14. Although the amount of

College, on

the bur-

was not disclosed, financialaid officer Carol Walsh said the amount of the Masonic bursaries is usually between $500 and $800. The bursaries are awarded to stusary

who exemplify

dents

crucial

need

good academic standing. really nice to go hand out

and are “It’s

in

cheques, even though

come

of

out

mason

it

doesn’t

pocket,”

said

Lawrence. “I get the

Bill

kudos for

my

it.”

The Masonic Foundation of Ontario was officially recognized Canada

as nursing, radiology,

nutrition,

lab

According to the foundation, over $175,000 was contributed to its bursary fund in 1995, up $25,000 from 1994. It also spent over $100,000 on its Nip Drugs in

health care administration.

Bud program, an increase of $25,000 from 1994. Lawrence said children’s

its

r5JBM5Mg.iL

is

“We

Toronto office 329-9780. tion’s

call

1-800-

The Canadian Federation

of

Women

University

has donated $750 to be dispersed through three

$250

The

Some of the foundation’s traditions remain shrouded in secrecy still.

and

The deadline for applications is 15. To contact the founda-

hearing disability

don’t really advertise that

technology

June

for

much, as far as service clubs go,” said Lawrence. The Masonic Foundation was originally formed in the 1700s when a group of stone masons in Europe formed a secret group.

bursaries.

federation’s

K-W

local

chapter holds an annual book sale as its sole source of fund-raising.

This year the federation’s 36th annual sale will be held April 7

from 1 1 a.m.-9 p.m. and April 8 from 9 a.m.-l p.m.

Anyone who wishes

to donate 740-5249. The federation also has a pick-up service

books can

call

news, the Aboriginal Foundation is

March 30. The deadline to apply for this year’s bursaries is March 30. The successful recipient must be

offering bursaries to aboriginal

enrolled in a health sciences pro-

pursuing education in fields of professional

gram, demonstrate financial need and show intellectual achievement and promise.

various is

money

research fund called Project Help.

thropic endeavours.

“In this day and age, education

the foundation

currently trying to raise

other National

in

thing,”

the

1964 through a special act of provincial government. The foundation is dedicated to relieving poverty and advancing education through various philanin

added

grams such

the

The Masonic

most important

Lawrence.

In

bursary

Achievement students

health care, which includes pro-

Frosty meets spring

available until

A

lone snowman fights to survive against the warm spring weather. Temperatures have reached a high of 12 C and are expected to increase. (Photo by Ray Bowe)

BMBJBJgJgMBJBJBjlig

Broadcasters get

Classified

Special Needs Office

The Special Needs Office

is

holding

its

Travel

room 2A1 Presentations

10.

will

begin

4:00 p.m. Each year the Special Needs Office recognizes individuals who

(April 3-7, 2000)

TESOL

teacher certifi-

cation course (or

by

at

have gone beyond

By Ray Bowe The

5 days/40 hrs.

on

Tuesday, April 4, 2000 from 3:30 - 5:00 p.m. in

teach English:

correspondence). 1000s

of jobs available

NOW.

first-ever

inductions into

FREE

information

is

CHUM

news radio

Conestoga College’s BroadcastRadio and Television program’s new broadcast hall of fame will be

Cross

a highlight of their 25th annual

ments changes

awards banquet on March 20.

has also

Inductees include Steve Coulter, Paul Cross and Bill Elliott. Class of 1975, Steve Coulter is now a technical operations man-

journalism.

ager at television stations

their

who graduated in an on-air personality for

Paul Cross, 1979,

annual awards presentation

-

and

CTV

CFTO

Ontario.

in

Toronto.

a former president of the BRT’s advisory committee at the is

college which devises and imple-

won

to the

fame

hall of

program.

He

various awards for

Paul Elliott, from the class of 1973, is a freelance television director involved with numerous

shows including the Red Green Show.

There are plans for a

hall of

fame

display and every year the depart-

ment hopes

to induct

two more

people.

The banquet is being held at Bingeman Park’s Marshall Hall, which

is located at 1380 Victoria N. in Kitchener. The reception begins at 6:30 p.m. with dinner at 7:30 p.m.

St.

Tickets cost $32. For more information,

BRT at

co-ordinator

contact

Mike Thumell

extension 223.

usual duties to help

package,

students with special

needs. All

Bye-bye busy phone signals

call toll-free: 1-888-

are welcome.

270-2941

By

Sherri

Osment

company is

A the

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: 1 A Healthy Lifestyle 1 I 1 1 1 1 I 1

The pressures of school can

easily cause students to lose the balance between taking care of themselves and the need to put their best efforts into succeeding academically. School, part-time jobs, family and relationships all make demands on us which can cause stress and stress-related illnesses. But there are

ways

s ,1

1 I

I

1 I 1 1 i i

lines at the

College student residence the works.

is

in

owns

the residence,

data lines for Internet use.

“Hopefully,

much

because

of

phone

McNaughton

Conestoga, says the busy signals occur when students are using

again,” said

the best connection they can get

added that phone lines into the residence wouldn’t solve the problem

at the

phone

lines for Internet use.

Campus Living

Centres,

Memories

the

in

we

and then shouldn’t have a problem lines for Internet

McNaughton, who simply putting more

the making

in,

covers both bases,”

it

said.

“It gives students pretty

the

same time

phone

as

lines.

much

freeing up

it’s

a win-win

It’s

situation.”

Bands won't be battling By Mike Radatus The

DSA

had planned a

battle of

the bands, but not one band felt up to the challenge.

Paul Luquin, president-elect of

balanced meal daily, maintaining appropriate body weight and monitoring our use of alcohol, caffeine and tobacco are choices that will help us live longer and prevent illhot,

the

DSA,

said the event

was can-

celled because too few students

signed up to participate. The DSA was looking for bands

ness.

that consisted of

Living a healthy lifestyle will also help now, by boosting concentration, memory and stamina. Having a balanced, healthy lifestyle helps us feel more relaxed, in control of the present and our future direction.

Conestoga

stu-

dents.

Although the

DSA

this

event

fell

through,

plans to have more live

performances in the future, but nothing is confirmed.

touches the famous Stanley Cup which was on display at Conestoga’s rec centre on March

Keenan Linehan, 1

[3frlfiilli3n3fi3rr3[[3[plfFllrl|f3fplfi3[r3l Fll3[rin3lr][?3[plfl [a1

putting these special con-

Ryan McNaughton, general manager of Rodeway Suites

may mean

A Message from Student Services (Room 2B02)

“By

nections

to maintain our health

one

because phone lines have a slower connection than the highspeed lines and busy signals could still occur.

students won’t use the regular

reserving several hours a week for a fitness activity we enjoy. We need friends we can talk to about personal matters and daily life, and people to just “hang out” with and do something purely for fun. We need to feel comfortable in being alone, with time for relaxation and quiet reflection. Getting eight hours of sleep nightly, eating at least

the

greater connection speed,

and keep an equilibrium between competing demands on our time and energy. Scheduling in time for selfcare

1 1

on Conestoga

solution to busy signals

phone

that

negotiating to install high-speed

5.

2,

(Photo by Laura Czekaj)

“We would bands

to

sign

more The

as we get comedians, there be more bands,” said Luquin.

same will

like

to play at the school.


SPOKE,

Passwords first line of defence By Laura Czekaj She said everytime she do something on the computer she has to change her password. To remember her password disagrees.

Most of us

remember

can’t

where

we

alone

remember our computer

put our car keys,

let

tries to

password.

she said she has started writing

However, Conestoga College faculty is expected to change their passwords every 60 days, compared to students who change their passwords every 240 days. The issue was addressed at the

down.

it

She added that the biggest problem in remembering the password is

system won’t allow

that the

teachers to use the

same password

twice.

March 13 college council meeting when Tony Pimenoff, director of

reusing passwords because there

information technology services

are

for the college, explained that

that are

it

is

Pimenoff

can

be a security risk depending on what type of user you are,” he said. Pimenoff said computer users were profiled as to the type of “It

against

computer programs available made to decode them.

He

a matter of security.

warned

said the safest type of pass-

word

is

one that contains

six to

eight characters and one should

be a numeric

digit.

“A conscious effort should be made to pick a password mean-

access they have in order to deter-

ingful to you,” Pimenoff told the

mine how often they should

council. “But

change

detect.”

their passwords.

Students were in the lowest risk

He

should be hard to

it

else choose the

protect their personal files and e-

because

mail.

things that are familiar to them, it

tend

pick

to

could be easily

dete rmin ed.

He added

that constant

word changes

pass-

common

are

IN

THE “BLUE ROOM CAFETERIA”

PLEASE PLAN TO ATTEND AND HELP US CELEBRATE WITH OUR PEER TUTORS AND PEER HOSTS FOR A JOB WELL DONE !

REFRESHMENTS AVAILABLE PRESENTATIONS AT 5:00 P.M.

z

R.S.V.P.

Jeanette Walker or Celeste Davey Ext. 337 by March 3 2000 1

H-H

“We are trying to reflect the real world,” he said. “This type of security is the norm.”

them access to student marks, exams and other sensitive

evaluation of the user profile

information.

be needed.

Pimenoff said so far things have been working fine. However, Sharon Clarke, a fac-

protection,

member

in

business.

However, Pimenoff said a

give

ulty

Please join peer services Thursday, April 6, 2000 From 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

password for you

people

which means

and financial data are in a high-risk category and are therefore expected to change their passwords every 30 days. Teachers fall somewhere in the middle of the high- and low-risk category because their passwords to servers

PEERS AND GUESTS!

suggested having someone

category; they have passwords to

College employees with access

z 0 HH H H HH

M arch 27, 2000 — Page

re-

may

“In the assessment of risk versus

in health sciences.

we’ve done

grand scale,” he

said.

have to reassess

it.”

it

on a

“Maybe we

Tues. Mar.

28 /f\

V

and Wed. Mar. 29

Step into a rewarding career with Peel Regional Police

Ut

of an organization on excellence

Be a part Built

the.

Saucttuuuj

Committed to serving the public Investing in training you

Peel Regional Police

is

accepting applications from young

career-minded individuals from Inquiries

Now

all

walks

of

life.

welcome.

HiringSMow

HirmgNow

Hiring

Bring your games or use ours o°N

Attend in Person Mon.

- Fri.

8:30

a jn. -

3:30 pjn.

Peel Regional Police 2 County Court Blvd. Ste. 100, Brampton, ON

(905) 453-2121. Ext. 6002

In Writing Recruiting Bureau Peel Regional Police 7750 Hurontario St.

Brampton, ON L6V 3W6 Fax (905) 453-8043

sro

a

A

3


— SPOKE, March 27, 2000

Page 4

Harsh

reality

money

is

The

financial

talks

bottom

line

takes

to helping students

precedence

Federal banks involved with the student loans program seem more worried about the bottom line than with helping students get a decent education. Statistics

Canada

$6.5 billion in 1998, lion in 1996.

Even

bank

reports chartered

up from $4.7

after

profits to

billion in

have been

1997 and $4.5

announcing such gargantuan

bil-

profits, the

banks recently withdrew from the Canadian Student Loans Program. Chartered bank s include the big

Toronto Dominion, the Bank of

five:

Nova

Royal Bank, CEBC, Scotia and

Bank of

Montreal.

And

if

the profit margins

default rate has dropped to

seemed

staggering, consider the

27 per cent

20 per

in 1997, close to

cent less than that of private institutions.

Even though the Canadian renew

federal

government was trying to

Bank

the deal, the negotiations, including those with the

of Nova Scotia, Toronto Dominion and the Bank of Montreal, dissolved.

The program will be taken over by Human Resources Development Canada on Aug. 1, the day after the current deal expires.

Mike

Harris, the

DSA’s

Canadian faces deportation

vice-president of education, said stu-

dents might be better off under a government-controlled system,

noting the government

may show more leniency toward defaults.

“Banks are strictly looking at this from the money-making They see one line, the profit line,” said Harris. But will the government be so willing to take on such a

side.

volatile situation? Default rates

when

the rate went from

1996 before leveling out

can fluctuate

24 per cent

in

drastically,

such as

1995 to 30 per cent in

at

it anymore? What happens if Are we going to start selling off huge chunks of higher education

Americans? Not

likely.

In a Canadian Press article, the Canadian Student

Loans

Program was deemed high-risk and costly and is likely the reason none of the major Canadian banks wanted to take on the program.

Reform MP Maurice Vellacott said in the confident with the

It was not necessary to prove Oberlander committed any war crimes. Vita said. But he added, “there was probably circumstan-

he lied trying to become a Canadian. Key facts during Oberlander’s trial have revealed holes in the

mother

tial

evidence, in my view.” evidence Circumstantial should not be allowed to force

Crown’s case.

article that

he

is

not

HDRC taking over the program.

from

The

he

students

said.

who

could experience problems during the

would be those going to school during the summer. The Canadian Alliance of Student Associations says it views

transfer

the withdrawal not as a crisis but as an opportunity. “First of all, I want to assure Canada Student Loans Program

them

back on one of her own.

Oberlander to leave his home and his family in Canada. Immigrants to Canada leave their countries and come here to

a Oberlander, Helmut Waterloo resident and Canadian

There

an

Aebig added

that the process of attaining funds

qualifying and acquiring It

seems

-

that there is as

it’s

applying,

would remain unchanged.

much confidence toward the program

as there are equal parts wariness, but until the

hands,

-

program switches

no joy for an individual

fresh with tain

no family or job

hole in particular

is

the

assumption that Oberlander was most likely interviewed by a RCMP officer upon entry into Canada. Oberlander denies this happened upon his arrival and he has been backed up

by other people who emigrated from Germany shortly after the war who have contacted the German-Canadian Congress to

to

leave his or her country and start to sus-

ily.

them.

say the

RCMP

never interviewed

them.

During the trial, no direct evidence of Oberlander’s immigrainterview

arose.

Justice

Andrew MacKay, who

presided

There is also the possibility Oberlander did commit heinous crimes during the war. However, without proof of this, the courts should not be allowed to punish him by deporting him. Furthermore, what has Canada got to lose by allowing him to remain in the country? For 46 years Oberlander has done nothing but be a law-abiding citizen, raising a family and living peacefully. Sending him back to Germany for lying seems like a

tion

petty argument.

stop the government from using its

satisfied with the court’s ruling to

Let us also keep in mind that Oberlander has not committed any crimes and will be sent back to

deport Oberlander.

Germany

In a recent federal court ruling,

Oberlander, 76, was found guilty of concealing his position of inter-

German

preter for the infamous

dubbed

Einsatzkommando

unit,

the

from

“killing

unit”,

that

RCMP

interviewed

applied for Canadian

However, the court

him cit-

failed to

having committed any war crimes or even aiding and abetting in the

commission of crimes. Government lawyer Peter Vita said

in

a

recent

Waterloo Record

anyone’s guess.

One court’s

better life for themselves.

enter Canada.

find any evidence of Oberlander

association press release.

is

German forces during the Second World War while he was trying to

izenship.

in

make a

Oberlander lying to gain entry into Canada may have been the result of his wanting a better life for himself and his fam-

when he

CASA,

is

being threatened with deportation. The government claims he lied involvement with about his

be a

education,” said Jason Aebig, national director of

46 years,

citizen for the past

in financing then-

still

over her

officers

students that there will to assist

all

the world, has

“HRDC couldn’t handle this in the past and that’s why it went to the banks,”

to

immigrants

turned

27 per cent in 1997. the government can’t handle

to the

of the free, land of the brave and

Canada, home

Kitchener-

article,

he was

that

solely

on the basis

over the

trial,

seems to have based on a balance of

his finding only probabilities.

There remains the possibility Oberlander is guilty of committing crimes against humanity during the war. However, the court should not deport him without any proof of any crime. that

If the court feels in

it is

justified

deporting Oberlander with no

factual evidence,

power

what

is

going to

to prevent other

immi-

grants from entering this country

every time the government disapproves of their origins?

that

SPOKE is mainly

funded from September to

May by

the

Doon

Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed

Keeping Conestoga College connected

in

this

newspaper do not necessarily

reflect the

Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers

in

views of

SPOKE are not

DSA unless their advertisements contain the STOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising

endorsed by the

DSA

SPOKE is published and

produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. News Editor: Ray Bowe; Photo Editor: Donna Ryves Production Manager: Ray Bowe; Advertising Manager: Mike Radatus; Circulation Manager: Sherri Osment; Faculty Supervisor: Christina Jonas; Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz SPOKE’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext 691, 692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca Editor: Laura Czekaj;

logo.

out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by

9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed: a WordPerfect

or

MS Word

tain

file

would be

helpful.

any libellous statements and

Submissions must not con-

may

illustration (such as a photograph).

be accompanied by an


1

Mens

^

conning to take

is

GRADUATION PHOTOS i

n the Cross Roads Meeting

Weekdays

Room

Jan. 27 to Feb. 8:

30am

1

4:30pm

to

LAST CHANCE up

Sign

in

the DSA office

Management Internship Program

Guests $4

Textile

The Textiles Human Resources Council

looking for technology,

is

who

engineering and science graduates

are under 30 years of age for our

- a program with The Conference Board of

one-year Textile Management Internship Program (TMIP)

100%

industry placement and national winner of

Canada’s National Partners

TheTMlP

is

in

Education Awards!

program delivered

a unique and innovative post-graduate

by McMaster University and

Mohawk

College, both located in Hamilton,

Ontario, and North Carolina State University in Raleigh,

The next TMIP scheduled •

world-class education in

to start textile

September 2000

offers:

technology and M.B.A. curriculum

paid four-month work placement within the

one week at North Carolina State linwersity ’s

excellent well-paying career employment opportunities

All for the

Canadas $10

modest

textile industry

state-of-the-art facility

tuition of $2,500.

billion textile industry

is

'7

have a great paying job, a

unique, supplying more than 150 manufac-

workplace that appreciates

turing sectors with traditional, innovative

and world-first products. for a challenging arid

NC.

If

and respects me because of the

you are looking

uniqueness of

rewarding career send

and a future

your resume to the contact information

to

below. Qualified applicants will be sent

my

education,

that brings a smile

my faceP

Scott O’Neil

TMIP

an application package. B. Sc.,

1999 Graduate University of Windsor

Completed applications must be received at the address below by Friday, June 2, 2000

Textile

Management

Conestoga

yostens

College

Textiles

Conseil dcs

Human

ressources buraamcs

Resources

de I’industrie

Council

du

Internship

8:OOpm Tm. April 4 (j

textile

Program do Textiles ON KIP 5H1

66 Slater Street, Suite 1720, Ottawa, E-mail: shirley.mckey.thrc@sympatico ca

Web

Human

Resources Council 613-230-7217 ext. 310 www.3 sympatico.ca/thrc

Tel:

site:

YOU’RE INVITED TO ATTEND

GRADFEST APRIL 4™

& 5™

11:00 a.m. - 7:00

Doon Campus

- Blue

p.m.

Room Cafeteria

WE HOPE YOU’LL JOIN US AND MEET WITH REPRESENTATIVES FROM:

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT REGISTRAR’S OFFICE ALUMNI SERVICES

College Graduates Join the leading edge of a

new breed

DOON STUDENT ASSOCIATION

of professionals!

BOOKSTORE

Conestoga offers a variety of unique full-time Post-Graduate Programs Apply

now

for

JOSTENS

September

Career Development Practitioner

Computer Numerical Control

Convocation

Environmental Engineering Applications (Optional Co-op)

Human Resources Management

is fast

approaching, and

we want to ensure smooth arrangements

your achievement. Staff will be on hand to answer

all

for celebrating

of your Convocation questions, in

addition to the following:

(Co-op)

Systems Analyst

* Assist with your job search through one of many resume related services

Teaching English as a Second Language

* Discuss post-diploma educational opportunities * Place transcript requests and address changes

Technology Marketing

* Place orders for custom diploma frames and graduation rings

Woodworking Manufacturing Management

* Graduation photographs taken by Jostens Photography For information

748-5220,

ext.

call

656

.

Ask about our part-time Post-Graduate Programs too!

* Class composites will be distributed

Conestoga College np

Be

sure to enter our draw for an official Jostens School

We hope to see you there!

Ring and a Sony Discman.


— SPOKE, March

Page 6

27,

2000

Symbolism helps student win contest By Donna Ryves

project,” said

Vince Sowa, a

year instructor in

John Hogenbirk,

a

graphic design student,

program.

first-

the

graphic

“A

student

ing “closed” and the red meaning

“open”, Cruickshank said.

The council

already using the

first-year

design

won

designed a logo 10 years ago and

design that will appear on busi-

was successful so they came

ness cards, stationery and T-shirts.

first

place in the Waterloo Regional

it

Labour Council logo competition

back

About 30

to us.”

is

first-year graphic stu-

on March 9. The Waterloo Regional Labour

dents competed in the competi-

Council, located in Waterloo, acts

bol,

as

the

arm

political

The council

unions.

for

on Conestoga College’s board of governors and the Labour Regional Waterloo sits

Council executive board, college on

March

at

the

15.

Mitch Heineken and Lisa King, first-year graphic design students, tied for

second

I

the

new

if

logo could be turned into a class

Visitor

design have to be presented in

colour but also in black and

Hogenbirk’s winning logo. (Photo by Donna Ryves) Hogenbirk’s design stood out from the others because of the colours he chose and the explanation

made during

his presentation

to the council, Cruickshank said. lots

of symbolism in

John’s design,” Cruickshank said.

The “W” design represented linking arms, with the blue

mean-

and

universities

in

college in Ontario in

number more ways

recent visitor to the college, registrar for the

Sydney Arthur,

Barbados Community College Barbados,

number

1

rated

at

designs until

we

said.

“We’re trying to

younger

attract

a

with

a

generation

newer design.” Overall it was a worthwhile

John Hogenbirk, a first-year graphic design student, took top honours in the Waterloo Regional Labour Council logo (Photo by Donna Ryves) competition held March 9.

brighter,

ect. It

was very

proj-

valid because the

students experienced a total learning package,

Sowa

said.

was a lengthy process. The students had to prepare prelimi“It

nary roughs and go through a

It

was a

project the students real-

he said.

series of critiquing.”

ly liked doing,

They had to hand everything in before March break, so they had

“One thing that made it difficult was not being able to really define

to prepare their presen-

or pinpoint the exact thing the

one night

tations to the council,

Sowa

said.

in

World Bank

to assess perform-

council does.”

Arthur said he came to the con-

results of their input, he said.

with the appraisal system the college currently has in place during

interview.

faculty,”

assessment of the

Arthur was sent to Canada in a

combined effort by

his college

and

He

attributes

lege’s desire to listen to

its

students.

a meeting with the

four-week tour also

Arthur’s included

visits to the

University of

Waterloo, University of Guelph,

are not asked their opinions about

opinion

about

Arthur said. “Or is

asked nothing

Algonquin College

assessment of the system, in the

Mohawk

done

form of annual student surveys, rather then every two years, which

Wilfrid Laurier University and

is

in

College in Hamilton,

Mary’s Hospital

in Kitchener.

for your support

George-Cosh

Services Lynn Gresham

Jack Fletcher Carol Gragory Lynn Rpberts Barb Kraler Joan Magazine

Charlie Matjanec

Melissa Turner

Judy Hart Sue Lyttle

Elaine Brunk

Jeanette Walker Judith Bates Marian Mainland Kelly Nixon

Roger Mainland Betty Morsink Rick Casey

Ottawa,

ommends Conestoga perform an

if their

it.”

Stelian

m

president

Ellen Menage. However, he rec-

ISO Team Student

College

DSA

“In a lot of institutions students

Thank you

Conestoga

the current method. This would

ensure the students would see the

Conestoga’s suc-

my

is

1

clusion that students were pleased

cessful appraisal system to the col-

“Based on

Conestoga as

out of the other seven

the

performance appraisal systems of the institutions I have visited, Conestoga is top on my list of colleges,” he said during a recent

the

than one.

A

looked

ance appraisal systems.

Ontario he has toured.

1

“We

were cross-eyed,” Cruickshank

colleges

is

white.

from Barbados college rates Conestoga No.

By Laura Czekaj Conestoga College

logo

the

that

appeal to youth. Not only did the

A SOUR COUNCIL,

“There was

designing a

council to see

WATERLOO REGION AL

f

place.

“We were approached by

included

should be less traditional and

represents

cash prize by Joyce Cruickshank,

They had to design a symword mark or logo. The cri-

teria

labour

203 local unions, which totals about 27,000 people. Hogenbirk was presented with a

who

tion.

Monica Himmelman

Dan Randall Debbie Blumenthal Barry Cull

Frank Abel Trish Weiler Patrice Butts

Peter Findlay Kristin Higgins

Deborah Hill-Smith

St.


SPOKE, March

Satellite

campus students

27,

2000

— Page

7

on involvement

split

By Laura Czekaj

DSA has been attempting to

The

student response at Conestoga College’s campuses in Cambridge, Waterloo and Guelph evaluate

determine

to

if

students there are

Andrew

interested in joining the associa-

Comeau,

who

is

doesn’t

know

if

many people

are

tion.

upgrading from high school, said

interested.

The majority of students polled random survey on March 16 at the Waterloo and Cambridge campuses welcomed the idea of becoming DSA members, but

students and Cambridge tend

in

“At least half of the people here

to provide their

are just upgrading so that they

here.

other students said they needed

chili-off,”

further information.

Nancy Brown, who is in the employment training readiness

He mentioned he is interested in joining the DSA, however, he will be going to Doon to take

program, said students go to the

electronics

Cambridge campus and are

telecommunications

in a

only

to

upgrade

there

for a short

period

he

in

Doon can

attend school there for

up

to three

years.

why joining

the

doesn’t interest her.

“I’m here basically for a short

would be nice

computer software program,

become a member more information.

to liven

up

cam-

to,”

is

ing

who

she said.

don’t

even

have a lounge.”

upgrading from high

aren’t informed about the majori-

school, Peer

ty of activities the

agreed that

he wouldn’t mind paying an added fee to be a member of the DSA so he could take part in activities. the

said

is

much

tak-

ation

Clark

students

the

with

DSA

Doon campus. Clark

hosts at said

would

she

said.

“But would

defi-

nitely

Walter

DSA

like

know

to

more about

be a good thing for Waterloo students. “It would be interesting to see

how many people get involved because the school itself isn’t very populated compared to the Doon campus,” he said. “If they can get a lot of people interested

it.”

M

k e Turner

1

Turner, who

is

also taking

software, wants

about the

1

t THIS EVENT WILL TAKE PLACE AT THE

FOUR

KITCHENER.

microcomputer

more information

DSA before he decides.

“I would have to see they’re offering,” he said.

TICKETS MAY BE PURCHASED AT THE RECREATION CENTRE FOR $7.00.

DOWNTOWN

she had

I

1

POINTS HOTEL

if

depends on what membership

COME OUT AND CELEBRATE AN EXCITING YEAR OF CONDOR ATHLETICS ON FRIDAY APRIL 7, 2000.

t

Greulich

to

involves,”

might

in Waterloo

she

said

“It

food

said associ-

campus

He

“Doon

Rory

who

said

Jeremy

Cambridge

from the Cambridge campus, but he

in

is

micro-

Walter,

“We need something this

“We

DSA

have some-

who the

want

go

puter soft-

for the

to

Greulich,

better than our campus.”

to

agement,

may be worthwhile

well.”

tainment.

ware.

it

Waterloo campus. “It

would work out

it

thing here instead of the cafeteria

is

to assess students’ response

it

would be worth the money to have more entertainment at the

microcom-

the

he

Kristen Hutt, a microcomputer

who

currently

it,”

software student, agrees that

and beverage man-

at

time,” she said.

and

would be worth

Sarah

taking

is

DSA

engineering

it

Cambridge, because they say their campus needs more enter-

Clark,

at

that is

pus feel differently from those in

said.

Shaun

campus Brown

Students at the Waterloo cam-

enrols at Doon.

Peer,

Doon campus,” he

said.

pus,”

to

She said

a barbecue

September and therefore will become a DSA member once he

students

who

we had

We’ve had a potluck and a

pared the

can go to the

entertainment.

“Last Friday

of

com-

time

own

faculty

“I think said.

what


Who knew

Education could be such a

Grant

MacEwan

College, a leader in

distance education, and Canadian

Learning Television have teamed

up to offer you an open

elective in

Human

Sexuality, transferable to

college

and

Start

Work

university degree

Tune

programs across Canada! Covering topics

all

like sexual health,

to CLT's Sex Help! TV program

three credit course

in

Human

Sexuality.

ages can get an academic edge

in issues

in

Turn on to MacEwan’s challenging

anatomy, and cultural behavior, learners of

whenever. at your own pace.

Drop out of

of sex, gender, and sexuality

that boring class that has

you snoozing

without ever leaving the comfort of

more

For

your couch!

in

your

info, or

seat.

to register,

call

1-888-

440-4640 or check out the website

at:

http://humansexuality.gmcc.ab.ca/

m 28th March Tues. Brunswick Fredrick Lanes

Grant

MacEwan College

w

ffeWM

FINAL

£#MS

Your business education

is

our business

11:30 -I

W6D.WL 12™

12:30-1:30

Neep net?

Fly higher, faster

.

Bachelor of Commerce with an optional e-Commerce major

*

Bachelor of Administration with a concentration in Health Administration, Organization,

Management, or

io expect

mftHop

in

STUD6NT

workshop but cannot attend

University Certificate in Accounting (CA, CMA, and CGA transferable)

Shawna Bernard, Student

Sign up

now

for

one

new

flexible

e-classes!

in a

at these times, please see

Services.

Teaching English

paced, virtual classroom over the Internet! Register today for e-classes that start in September 2000 and January 2001.

as a

For more information, contact the School of Business:

1-888-449-881 3

are interested

home-study course, or

in a

http://vital.athabascau.ca school. of.business@athabascau.ca

S6WeS (pOOM 7m)

If >(ou

University Certificate in Computers and Management Information Systems

Study

iml

Industrial

for the above workshops.

just

on the

mimm m\m eeww

Bachelor of Administration (post-diploma) by completing 10 to 15 courses

program or

POOM 3M05

Utilizing active review strategies?

Please register

full

JDl4

Planning 'jour review activities?

Relations/Human Resources

Enrol in a

POOM

with....

Knowing what

Your college education is a crucial step in launching your career. Continue your education at a distance through Athabasca University. We can help get your business career off the ground •

WO

MON. WPILIO™

Second Language

A One-Year .

_

Starts this

Athabasca University iJ Call for

Canadas Qpen University”

Certificate

Program

September

more information

519-748-5220,

ext.

656

Conestoga College


Thursdays

:

^SUCKS NO ^ ALLOWED*

TT v<v

O*, h,

y Game

Westmount Place Shopping Centre 50 Westmount Rd. N.

WATERLOO

Ph.(905) 844-8558

%

100

CANADIAN OWNED,

OPERATED AND TAXED!

^ DJ ^ DANCING! v 1 0pm y HOME

JARRETT SMITH, JOANNE MALAR, MIKE MORREALE, STEVE RICE VAL ST. GERMAIN, STEVE STAIOS, MIKE VANDERJAGT, Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;SHEA, MIKE PAUL MASOTTI, CHRIS GIOSKOS, JEN BUTTON, AND COLIN DOYLE OF.. ..DONOVAN BAILEY,

Oakville

.

Burlington

.

Barrie

.

Hamilton

.

Waterloo


bloody stop

Final Destination a By

Sherri

Osment

In the tradition, of movies like Scream and I Know What You Did Last Summer, Final Destination delivers lots of chills and a few laughs.

The

film

is

R.

rated

probably

because of the amount of violence and

ibly lucky until they start to die

gore, including the very real-looking

by one.

removal of the top half of someone’s head. This movie

who

anyone

The

first

is

is

definitely not for

easily nauseated.

scenes have the cliched

dark and stormy night plete

with

ominous

effect,

com-

music

and

is

plot is actually interesting, but

by the

delivered unconvincingly

see

the death

In the

From

premonition of the plane he and his

ror

classmates are travelling on

scares

i

Wheel in the Tuesday Slimmer With. ##

m* nmm scraps "starting

that death doesn’t like its

advice Alex begins to try

this

before anyone else

it

The movie

is

with the

filled

usual blunders of the hunted in hor-

movies and quite a few sudden that

startle

the

audience,

women

in the theatre.

If you’re looking for

some good

plane are not allowed back on, which turns out to be a blessing when

expecting great acting and a less than

the plane really does explode.

The

survivors

LET

seem

and can handle the gore, this is a movie worth seeing. But if you’re

obvious plot

to be incred-

line,

wait until

it

US BUY YOUR USED CDS & DVDS

HEAR

CD...

y Game W*

SEE DVD...

Westmount Place Shopping Centre 50 Westmount Rd. N.

WATERLOO Ph.(519) 884-8558 Fax(51 9) 884-7733

AM0TUED1

Oakville

.

Burlington

.

Barrie

.

Hamilton

.

Waterloo

comes

out on video.

h,

lOMCAMACW

he can

is killed.

chills

i

OWED, OPERATED

a

explains to

one of his teachers. The people who left the

(internet photo)

who

causing a scream from one of the

Alex panics and leaves the plane

Hands, plays Alex who has dark

morgue Alex encounters

plans to be altered.

stop

to Paris

the

that death has a plan for every-

one and

along with five of his classmates and

film Idle

was a suicide as

cryptic mortician

The main character is a high school student named Alex, played by Devon Sawa (Idle Hands), who gets a vivid

exploding after takeoff.

Devon Sawa, who also appeared in the premonitions of death and disaster.

if

authorities believe.

to decipher death’s plan so that

this film.

sur-

Alex heads to the morgue to

won’t be any

actors; there probably

Oscar nominations for

first

vivor,

him

jagged forks of lightning.

The

After the death of the

one

622-7774

BURLINGTON

8847376

893-2464 G

U

E

.

P

H


SPOKE, March

College hosts finals By Diane Santos Special to Spoke

Christien Lauziere.

OCAA indoor varsity soccer finals

men’s bronze medal game, Humber defeated Royal

on March

Military College 3-2.

March 18

the

at

Kenneth E. Hunter Recreation Centre.

The Conestoga men’s team was eliminated after playing two games on Friday. They were defeated 2-0 in both games.

the

In

Scorers

Humber

for

were

Mehmed Mehmed

Arturo Alava,

Oglu and Jason Mesa.

The beginning of the gold medal round began at 4:10 p.m.

men’s or women’s team brought

with the women’s teams from

home

Humber and St. Lawrence. Humber defeated St. Lawrence 1-

men

a medal this year, the

had successfully stayed

which

in turn

afloat dur-

championship

regional

brought them to the

OCAA championships. But unfortunately their best kick

enough

was not

were unsuccessful

as they

any shots, leaving

at netting

their

competitors victorious.

The women’s team was

elimi-

nated at regionals.

The women’s

semi-finals,

which

at

ted St.

Lawrence against Nipissing

10 a.m. on Saturday,

pit-

Lawrence winning 2-1. Game two of the women’s division saw Humber defeating St. St.

Humber and

Clair 3-1 placing

Lawrence

in the gold

St.

medal round.

more excitement

little

game.

collided with his

Fleming player

own

player and

was knocked to the ground. The game was delayed shortly while a stretcher was brought out to carry Seneca defeated Fleming 2-1

to

capture the gold.

After

Clair,

The women’s bronze medal game had St. Clair and Nipissing

Centennial had one each.

facing one another, and St. Clair

division

took the win in a 3-2

Humber and Melissa Stevens from

Fleming

Goal scorers for

defeated

battle.

Clair were

St.

losses.

College recreation centre.

The Condors played Humber at 11 a.m. on March 17

College

and

lost 2-0.

Humber

scored their

with less than a minute

goal

first

left

before

the half.

Despite their efforts, the Condors

Top

Condor Paul Mouradian hurt

the

final

gold

Fleming,

RMC,

Lawrence

St.

game

his

after a

few

scored again with

10

in the

minutes.

Humber minutes final

left to play,

bringing the

score to 2-0 in favour of

Humber. head

Johnstone said results

the gold medal round.

Sandford

Athletics

The championships were held March 1 7 and 1 8 at the Conestoga

Condor

the player off the playing area.

Nipissing,

12 p.m. on Saturday, Sir

two

was back

point, a

placing Seneca and Fleming in

at

College

ankle while trying to score, but he

Royal Military College 4-1 and Seneca defeated Humber 1-0,

began

which

Ontario

the

Association championships after

Tensions mounted resulting in two red cards and a yellow in the

medal round, the all-star teams were announced. Six all-stars were chosen from the men and six from the women. Humber had four, Seneca had two, and

In the men’s semi-finals

soccer team was eliminated from

weren’t able to get a goal.

final

OCAA championship

Osment

Sherri

with more physical play.

At one

began

with

0 with the lone goal scored by Adrianna Cataldo. The men’s gold medal round brought a

Men’s team loses By

The Conestoga College men’s

Goal scorers for RMC were Steve Neta and Marcel Plada.

Although neither the Conestoga

the

Geoff

although the

were disappointing, the

team played “I

coach

that,

thought

Condor Daniel

Mihelic steals the ball during the

onships on March

1

7, at

to

Nipissing in the

Mike

(Photo by Sherri Osment) it

was an even game,

March

18, but they lost the

game

but the breaks went their way,”

against the Royal Military College

said Johnstone.

team by a score of 2-0. The Royal Military College team

The Condors had to win their 7 game to continue to play on

p.m.

scored both of their goals in the

first half.

The Condors were able to keep them from scoring again, but weren’t able to get any goals of their

own.

St.

and

from

Silva

women’s

division.

Women's team triumphs Sherri

Osment

indoor soccer league recreation

The Conestoga College women’s

won

indoor soccer league team their

6-0

March 14 game by a score of

.

The Condors played Blue Monday, the last place team in the league, at the Conestoga College recreation centre.

The Condors managed

keep

to

the ball in the opposing team’s

end

for

most of the

first

half

when

they scored four times.

The

first

Melnyk scored of the game as

Jen goal

the second

well as the

Rebecca Miller scored the goal of the

first

last

half and the last

The Exsonics widened

assistant

coach Marlene

Ford said the Condors played a

in the

The

before

out quickly

second half scoring twice. third

Condor goal

m

was

<r

Condor Daniel Shamon’s goal

failed

few minutes of the game the Condors were playing well, but

seemed to relax. She added that the Condors could have had another five goals. then they

wasn’t a lack of effort, everyjust

relaxed

a

little

bit,

almost too much,” said Ford.

The Conestoga College men’s

to take

one of which was

%

exlent p}-

the lead again with another two

sloppy. Ford said that for the

body

the gap

tied the score 4-4.

goals,

first

9lIxi/rcJv 29

halftime.

lit-

“It

with another goal

The Exsonics managed

goal of the game.

tle

ecL.

for the Exsonics.

scored by Daniel Mihelic.

fifth goal.

Condor

4:30pm/

Tsatsas bringing the score to 3-2

The Condors came

scored by Danielle Sirio.

game at the March 16

ended in a 7-5 loss for the Condors against the Exsonics. The Exsonics were leading by three goals before the Condors managed to score. The first Condor goal was scored by Jeff Viveiros. The second Condor goal was scored by Ilias

again

and third goals were

centre on

after a

Condor penalty shot. Condor Marek Idzik scored the fifth and final Condor goal on a

C

J)§d’ Ay $ 8-4

000 do4xaido4v to

penalty shot.

The Exsonics scored again

to

tlve/ tc/cJi n o

take a 7-5 win.

Condors

head

coach

Geoff

Johnstone said that he was pleased

with

the

relaxed,

tension-free

atmosphere of the game.

champi-

well.

goalie honors in the men’s

went

OCAA

Conestoga’s rec centre.

Misty Findlay (2) and Jocelyn

By

— Page 11

Condors eliminated

Nipissing scorers were Cassidy

Conestoga College hosted the

ing

2000

Cullion.

Bowker and

17

27,

Waaixj^


If

a $750 rebate

seem much now,

doesn't like

just wait until

you see

your

first

paycheque.

2000 CHRYSLER NEON

THE $750 GRAD REBATE $750 Grad Rebate. Use

it

in

You’ll

combination with any other offer

including the completely redesigned

2000

need to

all

the help you can get. That’s

why

there’s the

purchase any new Chrysler, Dodge or Jeep vehicle

Chrysler Neon. Unfortunately you won’t be able to afford to take

o

it

anywhere.

tl^O Reb<nfe

CHRYSLER

Dodge Jeep

Only at your neighbourhood Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep® Retailer.

Offer applies to select

models excluding Dodge Viper and Plymouth Prowler. Rebate includes GST. Limited time

offer applies to university or college

graduates between October

1

,

1

997 and September 30, 2000.

Digital Edition - March 27, 2000