Page 1

33rd Year

— No. 9

College denied SuperBuild funds By Laura Czekaj

program

degree

in nursing with McMaster University in Hamilton. The SuperBuild Growth Fund, which held $742 million in its

offered

Conestoga College

not

is

among

the 35 colleges and universities to

money from

receive

the provincial

government’s SuperBuild Growth Fund.

The announcement was made

at

a press conference Feb. 24 at the University of Waterloo.

The announcement comes blow to the college,

was established by the government in an to modernize and build

up

the province

to the college later

by granting the college applied degree “It

he

effort

somehow we

post-secondary institutions, as well as improve education and

said.

“I’ve got to think that

are

going to get

something in the near future.”

Another college

that

received

as a

said

that could

“It’s a total shock,” he said. “We thought the worst that could hap-

get only

a

total

shock.

We

thought the worst thing

never imagined that

that

we would

money.” Tibbits,

higher rate than any other college at seven per cent.

Conestoga College president

Centennial is planning to use the funding to grow by 4,300 students,

John

available in the system in

is

currently full,” he

“Students wanting a college

education will have to go else-

where they expect

to get the stu-

Dave Ross, spokesman for the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities, said the proposals that gained funding were chosen by the government on the basis that they were more competitive and more closely met the

projects and

com-

munity support. Tibbits said he thinks the lack of

freeze tuition

Watch out

By Ray Bowe

tion can be ensured.

The Doon Student Association and the Ontario Community

lege tuition fees have increased

The

DSA and OCCSPA

109 per cent between 1990 and 1999. Also, in the academic year 1996-97, 38 per cent of the entire college system’s revenue came

climbing tuition costs.

from

DSA

vice-presi-

members of the legabout setting up an open forum at Conestoga. Although most of them have not responded out e-mails to

yet,

Kitchener Centre

MPP Wayne

has responded to Harris’s query, saying he would be interested in such an endeavour. Harris said students should not

Wettlaufer

wait for an organized

and urged students

to

symposium take it upon

While

enrolment is government operating

college

increasing,

expenditures are steadily falling, inevitably forcing

community

col-

leges to raise tuition rates, said

OCCSPA.

If

operating costs were

levelled out and sustained, there

would be a

possibility of freezing

tuition rates.

OCCSPA has

asked student gov-

enable a tuition freeze. OCCSPA said student leaders

from

to hear

Gerry

Kitchener- Waterloo Martinuk, MPP Elizabeth Witmer and Waterloo-Wellington MPP Ted Amott. According to a Feb. 14 press release, OCCSPA has asked student governments to invite their students to contact their local MPPs about how college educa-

for the plate!!

1990-91.

stop

was still waiting Cambridge MPP

page 2

tuition fees, support funds,

ernments to provide contact information for local MPPs to ask for an increase to operating costs to

it.

-

that

investments and donations. That figure is up from 23 per cent in

themselves to contact their local MPP about the rising costs of tuition and what is being done to Harris

See Snub

criteria

proposals

say col-

Student Parliamentary Association are urging students to voice their concerns regarding Harris,

in

dents.

than the other weren’t selected.

islature

11

would be

“Fanshawe said.

applications

Fanshawe had planned to use the money from the fund to add two additional buildings that

dent of education, said he has sent

PAGE

him that significant funding

their

Tibbits can’t understand

where.”

Mike

Condor men’s indoor

cate to

at the oversight.

with

decline,

who had good

College

soccer team wins berth in championship tourney.

Tibbits said the minister did indi-

nothing from the fund is Fanshawe College in London, The president of Fanshawe, Dr. Howard. Rundle, says he was shocked and dismayed

engineering, communications, nursing and emergency services including a

Priority: PAGE 7

but

meet increased student demand. Tibbits was warned Feb. 23 by assistant deputy minister David Trick that Conestoga had not funding. However, received

the near future for those colleges

technology,

Tibbits,

10 per cent this year compared to last year, while Conestoga’s applications are at a

growth in programs like information

mmm

to

down half or two-thirds of the

Conestoga’s proposal requested

Tequila!!

to be proposals like Fanshawe’s and Conestoga’s fail to meet the requirements set by the government to achieve funding and why other colleges,

colleges’

Centennial’s application rates are

only get

get nothing.”

Fun in the Mexican sun.

The big question seems

how some

According

happen was

we would

$39 million from the fund, which was allotted for a $66-million project to build a second campus in Waterloo located on property owned by the City of Waterloo beside Waterloo’s Millennium Recreation Project on University Avenue East. The campus would allow

proposal was more expensive than the other colleges’ proposals.

like Centennial, received funding.

half or two-thirds of the money.

We

would include skills training labs main campus. Rundle said Fanshawe wasn’t

at their

given any funding because their

status.

makes no sense unless they

had another plan for Conestoga,”

sense.

we would

it

coffers,

“It’s

that

may mean

make

will

provincial

Conestoga president John Tibbits, because it doesn’t seem to make

pen was

funding

supposed to be setting up meetings with local MPPs to disare

cuss public funding, tuition levels, student debt and related topics,

with hopes that Premier Mike Harris and Minister of Training,

Colleges and Universities Dianne Cunningham can find pragmatic

and

fair solutions to the

of Ontario students.

Kathy Best enjoys a

Grub Crawl Feb.

slice of pizza at

24. For the

full

story,

Jack Astofs during the see page 6.

concerns (Photo by Sherri Osment)


7 — SPOKE, March

Page 2

13,

2000

to students

More money The

government

provincial

announced a $40-million increase in

elementary

and

secondary

dents to be properly accommodated by special needs services or the

learning

learning opportunities project, a

need

provincial project implemented in

school.

September

Jan. 27.

learning disabled students in postsecondary institutions, said Casey.

tant with the Ontario

student

individual

and

intensive

The intensive support allowance, whose funding has been frozen since the 1998/1999 school year, involves an individual education plan, which includes psycho-edu-

assessments and

within the last three years in order the to effectively accommodate

dents.

will

intensive support allowance

have

an

automated

and

streamlined claim process, which will increase the number of successful claims by approximately

$40

Casey

According

students

with

specific

learning disabilities.

Such assessments are required

in

more

Teachers

better self-advocate their learning

which

increase,

allocated

school

to

September 2000,

could benefit learning disabled students and staff

money

at

Conestoga

is

given

to

“Selfishly for (the special needs)

assessments that

we

are currently

confronted with,” Casey Having up-to-date psycho-edu-

would save college time and

cational assessments

students and the

money, he said. “It would further reduce the time placed on our department to

with specific learning disabilities received comprehensive and timeassessments,” Casey said. “In it

not need to

said.

“I see several benefits if students

terms of the student,

we would

be doing the excessive amount of

assessments, said Casey.

ly

are

School

until

if

that

27 Ontario

The $40-million be

and

strengths

to a Jan.

department,

College

on secondary

accommodations

lion since 1995.

hopes the money number and frethe will increase quency of psycho-educational

services, said he

their

needs to teachers.

boards

school

already

College

Federation press release, education funding has been cut $1 bil-

Rick Casey, a secondary school with counsellor transition Conestoga College’s special needs

assessments done

to

reflective of their individual need, he said, adding that students could

Secondary

won’t

million, he said.

informed of

said.

with Tibbits

same

would

secure

funding and services to full scale psycho-educa-

complete

tional assessments,”

Casey

said.

recognized

why our proposal

process

is

is

the

didn’t succeed angry,” said

me more

left

Tibbits. “It

quite clear that the

highly flawed.”

The community seems

to agree

with Tibbits because he said the college has received an outpouring of support, both from businesses and from the public. bigger It’s going to have a

impact on the community than it will at Conestoga,” said Tibbits. “As this area grows and with the double-cohort issue it’s going to be harder and harder for young

people to get into this college.” The double cohort is an influx of graduates from high school the

result

will

that

year both

12 and OAC students graduate because of secondary

Grade

Conestoga in the Key

last year.

The annual survey of Ontario’s 25 community colleges establishes accountability and excellence benchmarks regarding programs, faculty, services and facilities.

The 1999 survey ranked Conestoga number 1 in overall and facilities of quality resburces,

rates

quality

overall

satisfaction.

and graduate

that basis alone

“On

of

placement

graduate

services,

you would

think that the provincial govern-

want

would

ment

fund

to

Conestoga,” he said during a

hope

that

working together we can

find

“I

recent interview.

exist for

what other opportunities Conestoga College.”

Arnott said as a result of the with Tibbits, other

meeting

MPPs

Tibbits also said he finds the'

involved

be

will

and

unbelievable

Arnott has called the minister of

because Waterloo Region has the

finance to express his view that Conestoga should be given other

announcement second

fastest

growth

in Ontario.

the region

there

is

is

demographic The economy booming and

funding opportunities.

Conestoga’s attempt

a skills shortage which

become said.

“I

a

community

think people

upset about this

issue,

he

will

get

unless

March 6

move

ahead with the second Waterloo campus unless it can find subbacking, said

stantial financial

some-

Tibbits.

edition

Healthy eatingregular physical

Dave

>

Longarini’s photo that accompanied the Condors end of season report card

growth

lege will not be able to

Correction the

at

impossible, because the col-

is

thing happens.”

In

funding,

the

Without

Conestoga can provide relief for. will “I guarantee you that this

Day Party

provincial

the

by

Performance Indicators surveys

school reform.

in

St. Patrick's*

for Waterloo-

government since ranked number 1

why in

Queen’s Park.

MPP

Wellington, said he can’t understand why Conestoga was not

area as Conestoga.

of

at

Ted Arnott,

were given money, even though

only

come

would

weaknesses, Casey said. The college could implement

gists,

why

compete with non-disabled students as they meet academic entrance requirements for

because school boards have had their resources cut so deeply and

of testing for special needs stu-

the reason

cold only angers Tibbits. The explanation we got as to

post-secondary study.

board psycholo-

is

both the University of Waterloo and Wilfrid Laurier University

Ross’s explanation Conestoga was left out

Conestoga

their

said that

also voiced their

support during a Feb. 29 meeting

Casey said students with specific learning disabilities would be bet-

Students

lost-

He

MPPs

Local

one...

they are both located in the

There have been problems getassessments up-to-date ting

have

Continued from page

dents would achieve their potential in terms of grades.”

student.

regulates the appropriate intervals

The

of

elementary and secondary

ter able to

which identify students with spedone cific learning disabilities, be

support allowances.

cational testing,

assessments,

psycho-educational

School Teachers’ Federation, said the money will be allocated to

requires

the college

He added

Secondary

level

their

to

stu“I believe as a result, these

1998 to better help

school special education funding

Dale Leckie, an executive assis-

accommodated in

were being

disabilities

shock'

'a total

specific

ensure that those with

order for Conestoga College stu-

By Tannis Fenton

Snub by government

' -

activity

was replaced by anothSpoke wishes to

er player’s photo.

apologize for the error

ri.

March

11:30am in

to

pi nwan

1

NEXT WEEK

1:30pm

to 24th

March 20th

the sanctuary

brought to you by the

www.paf‘1icipci^ior.t»m

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at

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office


7

SPOKE, March

News

13,

2000

— Page 3

Conestoga aims high Asks

for

$3.8 million

By Laura Czekaj Conestoga College has submitted

two proposals, one

Fund

Strategic Skills Investment

and another

to the Rural

the

to

Youth Job

Strategy Fund, to gain assistance

fund would go towards improving

strategic

learning facilities for students at

because the college had to match

Doon, Waterloo and Guelph cam-

their request with $1.1 million.

puses.

lion

said

strategic skills

and $1.2 million from the

firepower

fund

in a proposal submitted Feb.

youth fund submitted Feb.

1,

accepts a cheque

(left)

DSA’s Jenn Hussey on Feb.

1

for

peer tutoring from the (Photo by Ray Bowe)

.

the

said

become

college

is

By Ray Bowe

trying

information technology,” he said.

17.

den vice-president of opera-

prospective tutors

has

increased over the years,

says

learning skills adviser. er,

Shawna Bernard,

The

advis-

interviews

“We

don’t want the

campus, over 200 students received peer tutoring, an increase of 16 per cent from the fall of 1998. Peer services employs over 100 tutors in every major school of

activities

appreciation

such as a peer

week and

reception,”

may be clearly the IT (information technology) college in the sys-

government.

the strategic skills

Peer tutors are given a Christmas

is

(tetan

Movie

of-

the college proved to be eligible

Guelph

youth

from the

all qualify.

The money will go to developing seven new programs within the next 18 months. The only stipulation with the rural youth fund that all

is

programs must be made

available to students in rural areas.

college will find out if

it

receives any funding within the

next six weeks.

extension ^

IXligl-iT

and woodwork-

ing.

Pitt

Tues. March 24

and Edward

Norton

March

8:00pm

Charlotte vs. Toronto

Doon

Ministry

because Kitchener, Waterloo and

The to the rural

slightly different

Ontario

from the up by

is set

Live longer with daily physical activity, healthy eating and following your doctor’s advice.

Brad

Friday

fund

youth fund which

study on campus, including nursing, journalism

says Turner.

said.

The

The proposal

request assistance

rural

students

She attributes the increase in the DSA’s contribution to a higher demand for the services. “The funds go toward recognition

he

to

and handles

waiting too long,” says Turner. During the fall semester at Doon

approximately $500.

money.

he had originally

departmental overflow.

at

starting

to raise

said

to students wishing to use the

2000, says Turner. The annual allotment originally

Tibbits

department’s services.

The funds do not go toward the department’s operating expenses, such as staff wages, however. Peer services also employs a

Turner,

endeavour

also helps alleviate the cost bur-

Jenn Hussey presented $3,000 to peer services administrator Melissa Turner. The $3,000 contribution will cover program expenses incurred from September 1999 to April tions

mation technology infrastructure,”

also covers the cost

of training tutors, manuals and

DSA

president

tem.”

presented its annual allotment to peer tutoring services on Feb.

Tibbits,

Conestoga College

strategic skills fund has $100 million in its coffers and has been established by the provincial

“Once we get those proposals we

life is short,

The $3,000

some companies

Agriculture and Food. However,

the top information tech-

Money from

proposal

really contributed to the college’s

the

tion technology.”

to

“There’s a lot more firepower in

work.

informaJohn

reception as recognition for then-

The Doon Student Association

in

more

8.

nology college in the province.

Peer tutoring gets $3,000 DSA donation

lot

rural

College president John Tibbits

Melissa Turner

said

fund

thought the college wasn’t eligible

“There’s a

college requested $2.6 mil-

from the

skills

Tibbits

improvements would include new computer labs. “It would go to upgrading inforTibbits

with college infrastructure.

The

technology

for information

Students $55

Guests $60

49*}

includes transportation

Doon Students $2 Guests $4


SPOKE, March 13, 2000 Page 4 mmmmmmMmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmwmzmmmmmmm.

No. 1 college neglected Conestoga College will not receive provincial funding for

its

new

campus in Waterloo. The Ministry of Training, Colleges and

Universities announced at Conestoga is not among the 35 colleges and universities to receive money from the $742-million SuperBuild Growth Fund which offers money to help build, renovate and expand campuses. Conestoga’s proposal requested $39 million from the fund to contribute to a $66-million project to build a second Waterloo campus

the University of Waterloo Feb.

24

that

would make room for 2,750 new students. Conestoga would be able to move space intensive programs like nursing, information technology and robotics from the Doon campus to the new Waterloo campus to make room for the influx of high school students resulting from the double cohort. The double cohort will result in 2004 when both Grade 12 and OAC students graduate because of secondary school reform. Ministry spokesman Dave Ross said the 109 proposals submitted were judged on their ability to meet four criteria. The first was the number of new student spaces that would be that

created.

Conestoga College president John Tibbits said he was made aware during a meeting with assistant deputy minister David Trick, on Feb. 29, that the provincial government had developed an additional criterion that

He

no one was

told about.

said approval in this area

was gauged by

the

number of student

spaces per million dollars. Conestoga came extremely close to meeting the criterion in this category. Tibbits said proof of this is that Wilfrid Laurier University received $12 million from the fund but had a lower dents per space compared to Conestoga.

The second

number of

stu-

amount of partnership funding. had raised $26 million from outside

criterion is the

Tibbits said the college sources.

Centennial College, which received funding, had listed more

money

raised on their proposal. However, in actual fact, Tibbits

said, they

had released no documentation of financial backing to

the government. Tibbits was told by Trick that proposals had to meet the standards of the first two criteria before moving on to the third criterion, which

demand for both the institution and the programming to be offered in the new facility. Being that the fund is named the SuperBuild Growth Fund, Tibbits was surprised that student demand didn’t play a more important role is

Students fume over gas prices

the demonstrated student

choosing which school would be funded. When it comes to student demand, Conestoga seems to take the lead because it has the fastest growing application pool among colleges in the province. However, this seemed to mean little to the government because colleges like Cambrian in Sudbury, whose enrolment has been declining over the past three years, was awarded money. The government recognized Waterloo Region’s growth by giving both the University of Waterloo and Wilfrid Laurier funding, but even though skilled workers are trained at Conestoga, the college didn’t receive a dime. received funding because they more Ross said and

The

get

ridiculous.

The

it

WLU

met the criteria. “Only the strongest proposals were selected,” he said. Tibbits believes the system the government used to choose which schools received funding was flawed. ‘The explanation we got as to why our proposal didn’t succeed

the

nies;

on oil

companies claim

it’s

The numerous

students

may be

drive

the hardest hit

by the sky-

A

group of 12 University of

Waterloo students decided to show their displeasure

on Feb. 29, when

they pushed a student’s Toyota

Camry along

University Avenue. At

were

the time, prices

cents per

at

a measly 73

are easily pushing

76 cents per

litre

around Kitchener-Waterloo, with

no apparent end could very well

Is

spill

over a buck a

cost $10.50

my

seems,

it

revolve

occupation does

the

and ours

on

extremely influ-

enced by the transfer of goods, such

and vegetables.

as fruit

If truckers

the

across

strike

to

come about. One way to at least try and

lowest price possible site

US

at the

begin-

ning of March.

There have been suggestions

that

is

get the

by checking

www.gastips.com.

The

site

the

appropriate site map,

ombudsman

oversee

to

introduce legislation to put a freeze

on the premiums. Is

it

a

matter of supply and

demand or simple greed? Oil companies have known to tweak their sometimes by

as

much

been prices,

as three

or four cents a pop.

They

know

also

that people are

mercy of oil companies to provide them with gas. They can milk the consumer knowing they will pay the high prices. basically at the

rally

Web

one year ago, as

$30.50

escalating gas prices, or the premier

the price of diesel.

decided

barrel of crude oil

undeniably take

for that matter, relies heavily

are

A US

Premier Mike Harris appoint an

are justifiably

hit,

lives

to

impartial

who

biggest

Our

opposed

oil.

around the

solely

price of gas.

Truckers,

of crude

allows you to click on to

which

The only way is

to deflate prices

to eliminate the

demand, and

if

by the end of May.

includes both southwestern Ontario

prices keep hovering higher and

that unrealistic or insanely

and the Golden Horseshoe region,

higher people

and get up-to-date

leave their cars on the side of the

possible?

Could there be another gas sis

grows week by week. I know I’m being bamboozled and I don’t like it. However, as disheartening

out the

in sight.

At the current pace, gas prices litre

es the recent gas hikes to the price

province, a major crisis could natu-

litre.

Since the mini-protest, the rates

in

cap off my gas tank, especially as resentment deep-seeded the

I

upset. Their livelihood,

rocketing price of petrol.

closely

only left me more angry,” said Tibbits. “It is quite clear that the process is highly flawed.” The final criterion is assessment of the project’s contribution to the long-term economic strength of the community or region. Since the community is currently in dire need of skilled workers, the government’s decision not to fund Conestoga is a gross oversight that must be remedied. These four criteria were all closely met in Conestoga’s proposal and the community’s need for Conestoga College graduates is immense. The question that arises is why the college which ranks number 1 among all Ontario colleges in student satisfaction, graduate employment and graduate satisfaction failed to receive funding.

who

and the date. Energy expert Ron Harper said

a Canadian Press article he attribut-

not

vehicles to school, such as myself,

pointing the location of each gas bar, its price

pop the

as

the

government.

a luxury item?

cringe every time

I

compa-

the oil

became

gas

government blames

just left their cars

on the side of the road because

is

to

starting

in

UW

when people

soaring

price of gas

like

that

cri-

of the early ’70s

The tips

prices.

are posted

vers using a

by average

dri-

message board pin-

may be

forced to

street.

Stranger things have happened.

SPOKE is mainly funded from September to May by the Doon

Keeping Conestoga College connected

Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers in SPOKE are not in

DSA unless their advertisements contain the SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising

endorsed by the

SPOKE is published and

produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. News Editor: Ray Bowe; Photo Editor: Donna Ryves Production Manager: Ray Bowe; Advertising Manager: Mike Radatus; Circulation Manager: Sherri Osment; Faculty Supervisor: Christina Jonas; Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz SPOKE’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext 691, 692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca Editor: Laura Czekaj;

DSA

logo.

out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. .Unsolicited submissions must be sent to the editor by

9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect

or

MS Word

tain

file

would be

helpful.

any libellous statements and

Submissions must not con-

may

illustration (such as a photograph).

be accompanied by an


SPOKE, March

Mental health a concern By Walerian Czarnecki Mental health

is

an issue con-

fronting those in social services.

This was the topic of the panel

Behind the Mask,

presentation,

presented

College students

vidual’s

to deal with

mental health issues.

them

rience as a chef and had earned a

resources like social workers, psy-

at the

Region of

degree from Carleton University,

chiatrists,

when,

importantly includes people in

in

40 years of age,

at

his

problems began.

Kroger, co-ordinator

Hughes went through

three

medications could be found that could control his manic-depres-

chaired the panel of five speakers

sions.

each brought different per-

spectives to the presentation.

forum

this

to learn

emerging issues in the field,” said Kroger, who works for the Waterloo regional health about

department.

Hildreth,

a

speaker,

“I

but

Jane

Homes out of Kitchener and Cambridge and a graduate of Conestoga College, spoke about non-profit housing and support for those with mental

me

caused

“It

said

Hughes then got involved with

people -take for granted have a nice place to live,

include

doctors,

with

Waterloo

Regional

Self-

selves run the organization

He

support each other.

and

has been

involved for the past nine years. gration of people into the

inte-

commu-

Hughes.

nity,” said

Laurie Robinson, co-ordinator

of

the

program

partners

at

Lutherwood

and a part-time teacher at Conestoga College, said

said Robinson.

in residence at

nON

who

1

8-year-old daughter,

currently receiving treat-

is

ment for rapid bi-polar disorder, which is another term for manicdepressive

illness

Whitby

at

Mental Health Centre in Whitby. Casey touched on the various hospitalizations his daughter endured before the right medications were found, as well as the fact she was misdiagnosed, because of the limited resources that social services have due to

government cutbacks.

tions, she said.

Services that could benefit people.

Program

Robinson works for a new family-oriented program that

Shopping Centre. Heather Tebong, co-ordinator

allows children with mental

of the community psychiatric program at Grand River

owns nine

properties that support 180 peo-

even though

but housing,

ple,

important,

Many

is

not the main issue.

people are trying to rebuild

and need support because they might not have famitheir

ly,

lives

ness to be

more connected

chotropic

The

who

face a crisis situation

someone who

to talk to

can help them, she

“Many

said.

don’t have the social

-

.

children and their families

by

five times per

and need

at

Hospital,

in the past.

There those

YMCA

the

were

are seen

24-hour support for

The afternoon to

family and homes, unlike they

said Hildreth. is

ill-

to their

a social worker four to

week.

Strengths are focused on and built

upon so people can improve

their lives.

There

system

up so

set

when

is

also a crisis

that

someone

is

spoke

issue

current

the

in

Patrice Butts, a

She said there is a connection between mental health and the

member

is

a sur-

vivor of mental illness. “I

consider myself a lucky

child’s environment,

whether

it

psy-

students to offer exposure to a

major

someone, said Robinson.

who

about

The social services program at Conestoga College organizes this day for both first-and second-year

available

Regional Self-Help,

moved

trends of medication use.

them such support.” The second speaker was Ed Hughes, president of Waterloo

a client does need

session

Host Refugee Market Square

medications and the

connections,” said Hildreth. “This gives

hOv

Casey spoke about the experi-

Lutherwood

Hildreth’s agency

sro*

Rick Casey, a counsellor with Conestoga’s special needs services, brought the parent’s per-

at

Health

Room

gration into the community.

support them in difficult situa-

Mental

Meeting

about de-institutionalization of mental health consumers and inte-

there

various programs

The Crossroads

Lutherwood, spoke

a job to go to and family that will

are

4:30pm

Patty McColl, a social worker

so

where consumers them-

Wednesday March 15

bours, their friends and their family,”

ences of his

Help,

Meeting

such as their neigh-

lives

Homes Services and still does when he needs support.

Hughes got involved

BOD

more

but

spective to the presentation.

In 1991

IMPORTANT

formal

the organization Waterloo Regional

health issues to improve their quality of life,” said Hildreth.

a

quite

“We’re trying to promote

“We want to encourage people who are recovering from mental

Many

being a chef,

to

effective,”

great deal of personal anguish.”

health issues.

that they

was not

Hughes.

support co-ordinator

for Waterloo Regional

went back

I

may

that

their

and addictions counselling programs at Conestoga College,

first

to

Conestoga

hospitalizations before the right

The

“We’re helping families

for

“It

of community and mental health

“We have

to the indi-

—Page

life.

Hughes had 20 years of expe-

Kitchener on Feb. 17.

who

everyone connected

Services

headquarters

Amanda

16 and 24, he has seen who’ve had

With the permission of the Lutherwood works with

develop a support system around

Program Day held Waterloo

parents,

destroyed their lives,” he said.

Social

at

consumer in many ways,” he said. Hughes spoke about the many young people, between the ages of

2000

13,

that

social

is

services

delivery system every term, said

“It’s really

right

Conestoga faculty

in social services.

an attempt to bring

the

into

forefront current

be school, family or counselling

issues,

centre.

process,” she said.

in

terms of the political

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3 Page 6

— SPOKE, March

13,

2000

Students eat for awareness By

Sherri

Osment

restaurants included

Crabby

Jack Astor’s and Kelseys,

About 50 Conestoga descended on rants

one

five

local

students restau-

after another during the

DSA Grub Crawl on Feb.

24.

$10 each to participate in the crawl. They were transported by bus to the restau-

The

students paid

rants for all the

food they could

eat.

The

crawl

started

at

the

on the corner of Homer Watson and Manitou in Kitchener and ended at the pub night at Loose Change Louie’s, on University in Waterloo. The other

Edelweiss,

Fairway Road

The grub crawl was held

Joe’s,

on

all

in Kitchener,

and

of safe-break awareness week, which promotes a safe reading

Conestoga. The college’s

and Confused, a trivia game in the Sanctuary and a Nintendo

week

Waterloo.

reading

at

March Phil

week was

Feb.

28 to

game where

3.

LeBeau,

assistant for

DSA

promotions

awareness weeks, and

Kim

Kroeker, vice-president of stu-

year marketing student.

dent

affairs,

“Everywhere we’ve gone we’ve found the food to be not only

“Our goal was to promote that you can go out and have fun with-

ample enough, but delicious.”

out drinking,” Kroeker said, “or

event,” said

Jr.

Farrelly, a second-

al

The

restaurant.

DSA

(far left)

goggles smeared with Vaseline to simulate what vision

is

like

when

recommend doing another

initely

grub crawl next year. “I feel that everyone enjoyed themselves,” Kroeker said.

to drink that

if

you

ting around.”

already full while at the third

Mike Harris, vice president of education for the pated in the DSA hosted Grub Crawl, Feb. 24.

wore

driving.

“Mocktails” or non-alcoholic cocktails were served. Kroeker said that she would def-

have an alternative method of get-

business student, said that she

was

participants

and

drinking

organized the crawl.

you do choose

Kathy Best, a second-year gener-

promote safe-break aware-

ties to

ness week. The activities included a showing of the movie Dazed

East Side Mario’s on University in

“Grub crawl is an absolute blast. The DSA does a terrific job of and running this organizing

as a part

DSA

was among

also held other activi-

the students that partici-

Jr.

Farrelly receives

Grub Crawl, Feb.

a kiss from the

staff at

Jack Astor’s during the

24. (Photo by Sherri Osment)

(Photo by Sherri Osment)

Youth officer conference gets millennium logo

Gerry Watson

By Donna Ryves

for students to get volunteer hours in,” said

Conestoga College’s

law

and

administration/police

security

foundations program took part in

POOL SHOW Challenge Gerry to a

game S

« 30am

o

<P°"

| <

\

/

Mon. March Learn

they be selected.

The

selection

that

was

tion.

was held

It

College

in

at the

The students assisted the comby registering participants

mittee

for the Province of Ontario.

Ontario Police

and entering

The

Aylmer.

The conference titled Youth in New Mi llennium was held Feb. 17. The purpose of the conference was work with youth

data.

cost of their stay

by the police college.

15-

police officers were charged $65

and

to

share

and

who

others

were

attended

charged $145.

and

Educators

in

information

was covered However

the

who

to unite people

employees of the of

Ministry

ideas for the better-

Community

ment of youth.

Social Services and

workers

Douglas,

LASA/police foundations program coordinator,

was one of the advisers were volunteers at

for

foundations and journalism, contributed

by putting together a book-

and brochure for the conference.

The community and

social service

course in the LASA/police foundations

program requires 40 hours of

volunteer

work

of

Services also attended the conference.

Because

program LASA/police

Bortolussi,

administrator

the

in

Correctional

his students

Heather

and

Ministry

the conference.

let

new skills

memo-

advance requesting

based on academics and motiva-

by Committee of Youth Officers

and

1

in

the

Don

«P

randum

the provincial conference hosted

Ontario

The Sanctuary

Douglas.

Students had to submit a

for students to pass.

“The conference was a good way

named

the

Youth

was

conference in

New

the

Millennium, the committee

felt

new logo design was needed,

a

said

Douglas. He mentioned that Conestoga College had a graphic design program and several

stu-

dents entered their designs.

Alice Vellema, a first-year graphic

design student,

tion

won

the competi-

and was awarded $300.


Job readiness program leads to self-discovery ByTalisha Matheson

She explained the process of OSAP, where to

applying for

The

apply

who

about the dangers of credit cards,

are returning to school after a

“Some of these people have been out of school for nearly 20 years,”

Murphy

says.

Three things the students learn in the program include

how

to

do

self-discoveries through activities,

new

trends in the workplace and

how

to

search

for

the

proper

school suitable for their needs.

of Cancun, a Mexican city along the Pacific Ocean, is covered with hotels and beaches. Huts are used as beach bars where tourists can get alcohol or food. The area is known for its beautiful white sand and emerald water. (Photo by Mike Radatus)

The ETR program runs eight weeks with six weeks in class and two weeks on field placement. “At the end of it all there will be a dozen people going off in different directions,”

Murphy

She said everything

Drink on the beach Cancun’s

draws herds

nightlife

By Mike Radatus

boat

three-storey

Cancun where they

islands near

Students interested in escaping

can explore. People can go snorkeling on the

the cold next spring break should

on mountain bike on the beach. band entertains on the boat

try travelling to the tropical cli-

islands or go

mate of Cancun, Mexico.

tours, as well as sit

Cancun has grown

haven

into a

for tourists over the past

30 years

and many are students. This could be because of the

The downtown

nightlife. littered

strip is

with bars that are open

At the majority of

night.

people can drink

all

all

bars,

night for $20

US.

Coco Bongo

is

the

most popular

At Coco Bongo they have high-wire acts, live impersonations of famous musicians, two large screens of these nightclubs.

showing videos of the songs, confetti

falling constantly and an imi-

movie Cocktail with

tation of the

‘A

live

VHS

and

tapes of the tour are

available for

On

$20 US.

the Jungle Tour tourists drive

own

their

ski jet through a valley,

as they are led on a tour of the

There they stop to explore

island.

more than cheap drinks and

Cancun

is

sun-kissed beaches. some

ancient pyramids and learn

about the vegetation and animal life

of Cancun.

There’s lots tourists

of shopping for

who want

to

gifts,

tequila into the

Vendors will always

air.

floor is so

packed you

more than one

can’t take

step

In

to

get

more money than some of

the

merchandise

is

another club called Senior

try

worth.

Never take the

before hitting someone.

buy some

but they need to beware.

the bartenders tossing bottles of

The dance

different

to

first

price they

offer.

Frogs people drink beer by the yard. Patrons are

yard

sive

warned that mas-

consumption

enhance the appearance of others and they are not responsible.

They

also have drinking

see

to

titions

Corona the

compe-

who can drink or who can

fastest

drink the most tequila shots. loser has to

down water

The

climb a ladder and go

a waterslide leading to the

coast of the Pacific Ocean. is

The

Travel

-

teach English:

5 days/40 hrs.

(April 3-7, 2000)

TESOL teacher certification course (or by

correspondence). 1000s

closed off and only a cou-

of jobs available

ple of feet deep.

For those spending

Cancun

Classified

may

who

all their

don’t feel like

time

at clubs,

offers a variety of other

FREE

NOW.

information

package, call

toll-free:

activities.

The Sun Tour takes

tourists

on a

1-888-270-2941

of students advised to offer about 75 per cent of what is asked and then start bargaining. Tourists

are

agement, bursaries, scholarships

and fee

deferrals.

Walsh

she gave students

said

valuable handouts they

several

can look over.

“They that

also received a handout

we can

refrigerators,”

Jason Matthews, a 25-year-old

“It’s beneficial

people out of

because

who want to fife,”

he

on

obtain those goals.

Students finish the program with

have new

skills

the

Carol

Conestoga’s financial aid

Walsh, officer,

was well received and helpful. Walsh spoke to ETR students about financial aid and preparing for

it.

all,

they

and know what

wants.

by

helps

said.

they want, he said.

also mentioned the pre-

it

get something

Matthews said he feels the program enables students to discover themselves and their goals. It helps them realize how they can

campus within the ETR program depends on what the student

Murphy

said.

Cambridge student, said through the program he discovered what he wanted to do with his fife.

at the

sentation

put on our

all

Walsh

a certificate, but most of

said.

that goes

for

forms are assessed, money man-

one

long period of time.

The coast

OSAP, how OSAP

Employment/Training program (ETR) at Conestoga’s Cambridge campus has been a success, according to staff and students. Dianne Murphy, group facilitator at the Cambridge campus, says the ETR program is for people Readiness

Matthews said the hardest part of program was the self-discover-

ies.

“I challenge

people to

make

a

of 10 personal skills they know are good about themselves,” list

he

said. “I bet they’ll

time, but they will lot

have a tough

leam a whole

about themselves.”


Page 8

— SPOKE, March

13,

2000

need guidance

International students Some

By Walerian Czarnecki

to

Services

Peer recruit

is

looking

more peer hosts international

increasing

population

for

to

the

student

Conestoga College. a lot more internation-

at

students are

be paired up with a host. of them hear of the pro-

Many

gram from

the international office

or have been referred to

who have

ple

program.

looking for more volunteers,” said Melissa Turner, peer services

Bernard, learning

Conestoga College

there

Currently, hosts,

it

by peo-

benefited from the

“There are al students on campus, so there’s a greater need, so we are always

administrator with student services.

waiting

still

down from

are

10

13, said skills

peer

for a

good match,” she

said.

a great way to learn about diversity

and other

adding

it

cultures.”

gram

Writing Centre

More mature

tional

student peer hosts

ter semester.

“It

also reduces isolation and

shock for them,” she

culture said.

Death not as scary as public speaking Two

Drop

class covers core conten

weeks the

In those seven

Receive free help from the tutor on duty.

or

things that are dreaded

are death first

in

book an appointment.

more than anything

and public speaking, with the

latter

else

taking

negative thoughts.

“Those who are

just

in

interested

The ing,

topic

the

are

starts

with 30 students in the class anxiety,

its

More information?

Call 748-5220

The Writing Centre

extension 607

or

Lynn Gresham

extension 627

i

who take how to

has to contain a behavioural change that has bee

There are many

causes and

strategies that students

can use to

whether it is for tests, formance anxiety, which is related to co-op placement Students incorporate exercise and eating and sleej anxiety,

it.

1

class then splits into three options

performance anxiety and

-

public speak-

test anxiety.

ing patterns, said Gregory. “It’s phenomenal the changes

through during

The

the hardest one.

this time,”

that

students

students, not the teachers, set the goals so tht at their own pace, said Gregory.

Joan Magazine, a counsellor with student services, teaches public speaking, Barb Kraler, a counsellor

can develop

with student services, teaches anxiety and Gregory teaches the other public speaking option. The course is split into seven weeks of the option

comfort level,” she said. The key concept taught

“The goal

is

to start small

is

and gradually reach

a triangle, that

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Too few people chose performance anxiety, but there were enough for the public speaking option. “We had 20 students for that option,” she said, adding it is

to deliver pre

applied content, the students move into an independen learning project that will involve a change in lifestyle It

two weeks of theory about

9:30-12:30

how

o After the two weeks of theory and seven weeks

screened out.”

The course

Friday

change

then apply the content to their situation and try make some changes,” said Gregory.

with most people taking the public-speaking option

cope with

to

very applied course where students keep an< journal on a weekly basis about what they learn

interview for this course to screen for those who actually need help with anxiety,” said Gregory.

9:30 - 4:30

how

done on physiologica

“It’s a

“We

Monday - Thursday

is

sentations effectively.

place.

Carol Gregory, co-ordinator of student services, says the D block elective about anxiety awareness is full,

Doon Campus

Work

responses and the actual content of

this semester.

Room 2A118

the multicul-

is

about thoughts and their impact and

Get help with your writing.

at

but could be extended for the win-

30 new internastudents have arrived to add

By Walerian Czarnecki

already

tural support group, which formally stopped meeting Feb. 24,

In the past year, in

are

beneficial for the interna-

is

tional students as

to

dent population rises.

peer services administrator

who

100

Bernard said the peer host pro-

only

as the international stu-

growing

Melissa Turner,

the

Conestoga.

be academically strong,” she said. The program has only been in existence since 1996 but has been

with students services.

“We’ve had 24 students come

said,

involves one hour a week. “It’s not one where you have

“It’s

Shawna adviser

ence,” she

are currently waiting

who

dents

to

would be beneficial said Turner. “It’s a good volunteer experi-

and ask for a peer host this year,” said Bernard. “There are two stu-

.

Barrie

.

Hamilton Waterloo .


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13,

2000

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Page 10

— SPOKE, March

13,

2000

Feature "

Teaching English as a

Second Language

%

OPP

LASA program

A One-Year Certificate Program Starts this September Call for

more information

519-748-5220,

ext.

656

Conestoga College

officer praises

fjj

By

Sherri

Osment

includes written

Ever since her early high

Now

tests.

“We did sample tests within the (LASA) program which

school years, Const. Debra

really

Walker knew she wanted to be

gave you an idea of what you

a police officer.

were getting yourself Walker said.

At 23, she

now

is

a provin-

helped

because

that

into,”

that she’s

Walker said of her job

on the

job.

that the best part

is that

it

always

is

different.

“Everything day,”

Walker

is

said.

new every “No day is

the same.”

with the North

Walker said she finds cus-

Perth detachment of the OPP.

tody disputes the most difficult

cial constable

She

also

is

graduate of

a

“Everything

I

knew

Conestoga’s law and security

(LASA)

administration

pro-

we

how

intervene with a child

policing

getting a job

I

learned from

I

to

go about

are in

getting

a job

law and security program,” Walker said.

Walker graduated from the program when she was 19. She then went to the University of

learned from

Conestoga College, from the law and

OPP in Const.

Debra

Walker,

was the focus on how

OPP

to get

a

recruit,”

Walker

said.

much from that I used when I

“There was so course that

interesting part of

LASA

program. Walker

the

was her field placement. She shadowed a Waterloo regional police officer for two weeks on the job.

Part of the process of apply-

become a

“It

confirmed

wanted

to

my belief that I

be a police

she said. “I loved

applied.”

police officer

police

to

officer

a job with a

lot

of

Walker’s

boyfriend,

Rod

her lots of support and

is

proud

He added he does

worry about her a she’s

on

little

bit

the road at night

or in bad weather.

“I’m pretty excited,” Aitken

The most said,

“They’re very clear about what police services look for

it is

when

Walker said the most benefi-

job.

because

of her.

road since November.

LASA program

a

Aitken, said that he’s giving

October 1998 and was hired in

of the

become

challenges and opportunities.

July 1999. She has been on the

cial part

It’s

powers

Walker said she decided

security program.”

Walker applied to the

they

are limited.” I

Guelph where she earned her

BA in sociology.

is if

need of protection.

frustrating because our

Conestoga College, from the

ing to

can’t

said.

knew about and how to go about

“Everything

a

no custody order do anything,” Walker “The only time we can

“If there’s

about policing and

gram.

in

part of being a police officer.

this

me.

was

it,

officer,” I

knew

definitely the job for

said. “It’s a neat career. It will

be

of

full

her so

it’s

lots

of challenges for

a great undertaking.”

Every step she has taken high school has been

since

toward the goal of becoming a police officer, ‘1

Walker

said.

have the best job

in the

world,” she said. “I just hope

can

still

I

say that in 15 or 20

years.”

Const. Debra Walker dons the uniform she’s worked to achieve since high school. (Photo by Sherri Osment)


SPOKE, March

Second

Condors soar at regionals By

Sherri

By

Osment

The Conestoga men’s indoor team

soccer

be

will

Athletic

Colleges

Ontario

the

in

Association championships after

won

games. The Condors

and

scored within a minute.

24 ended in a 4-3 Condor loss to the Country Boy Freestylers. Despite the Condors’ efforts,

scored by Zlatko Lakoseljac and was followed almost immediate-

Country Boy led 3-0

Sherifali.

at the half.

The Condors’

ly

by

a

first

goal

goal

was

Derhan

from

The

Condor goal was

scored by Sherifali.

He

“We

also

and without turning to face the net, scored with a backward kick.

some awesome saves.” Condor Terry Lopes injured an

However, Country Boy managed to get the ball past Condor goalie John Abramovic one last time, giving Country Boy the 4-3

Condors

ankle toward the end of the sec-

ond

March

the Condors want ther in the game.

to

improve

3

to get

any

Dhanapala said Lopes

he’s hurt before,”

Condors

Sanjeeve Dhanapala, said the one-

on-one defence has

half.

aggravated an existing injury. “He went over on the same ankle

coach,

assistant

can’t rely on the goalie to

keep bailing us out like Johnny did today,” Dhanapala said. “He made

got the ball

Dhanapala

said.

coach,

assistant

Dwayne Shadd,

if

at

said that Lopes’s

ankle was slightly swollen, but

fur-

looked like

it

was only a

sprain.

4.

Conestoga got off

to a

good

on March

when

they

start

3,

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

trounced Confederation College 10-0.

GRIEF

game

Conestoga’s next

gave them their second victory

won

day when they

of the

against Centennial College

by a

You

March 4

These feelings are

they

Canadore and

Seneca 2-2.

The Conestoga women’s team tie

against

Centennial,

all,

against

up

March 4 but ended

in the

You

feel

dream

to

reach a certain goal. it

sometimes helps

give yourself permission to grieve. Feelings left bottled come out later, delaying the healing process.

you have a friend who

is

grieving, don’t

worry about

saying the wrong thing to them. Just be there, be a good listener or remind them how much you care with a card, a

to

OCAA will

be

hug or some time

championship held

at

the

Conestoga College rec centre on March 17 and 18.

Condor Bojan Djokovic takes the ball around one Boys during an indoor soccer game Feb. 24.

together.

of the

Country

for

your support

ISO Team Student Stelian

i

Q GO

A Message from Student Services (Room 2B02)

(Photo by Sherri Osment)

Thank you

o>

to

a counsellor as part of the healing

championships.

The games

numb.

to loss in

will only If

George Brown. The women’s team was eliminated and will not be playing

by losing 2-1

angry.

process. Writing your thoughts in a journal, reading books about grief, and talking to friends can also help. Most of

The Condors won again with 1-0

them over with

talk

with a 4-0 win

of

feel

Although these feelings are natural,

over Canadore.

score

You

normal reactions

or even the loss of a

Seneca, March 3 in their first game of the tournament. They this

all

won 4-2 over

tied

played to a scoreless

followed

can’t stop crying.

our lives to be a have only not does a reaction we call grief. Grief of kind any grieve We death. to loved one a result of losing health good loss of the relationship, of a breakup the loss:

score of 4-2.

a

third

— Page 11

save Condors

win.

three

one

tied

Centennial College on

and

The men’s Conestoga College indoor soccer league game on Feb.

qualifying

regional

games

The second half saw the Condors make a comeback with two goals

Osment

the

going undefeated during

OCAA

Sherri

effort couldn't

2000

13,

<0

George-Cosh

Jack Fletcher Carol Gragory Lynn Rpberts Barb Kraler Joan Magazine

Services Lynn Gresham Charlie Matjanec Monica Himmelman

Dan Randall Debbie Blumenthal

5*

Melissa Turner

Barry Cull Judy Hart

o

Elaine Brunk

Sue

Jeanette Walker Judith Bates Marian Mainland

Frank Abel Trish Weiler

Kelly Nixon

Peter Findlay

Roger Mainland Betty Morsink Rick Casey

Kristin Higgins

ts

O) 3ga

Lyttle

Patrice Butts

Deborah Hill-Smith

it


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<

<

it

4

4

t

<•

4

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*(

6 *

t

t

Digital Edition - March 13, 2000  
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