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33rd Year

Disorderly parking

— No. 6

Sumo wannabes

an emergency hazard By

Sherri

Osment

The parking

lots at

Conestoga’s

Doon campus have been

even

the rows in Lot 2.

scenes of

Hunter said

that this causes not

only a problem for people

The main cause of the problems in the lots has been the snow cov-

want

could also prevent emergency

ering the yellow parking guide-

vehicles

A1 Hunter, supervisor

of security services.

see the lines has caused

some

people to block in other cars.

Hunter said the cause of the parking is simply lack of

triple

consideration for other people. If security services

to get out

Some

of the

who but

it

from getting through.

of the problem in the lots

parking without permits. If a vehicle is parked illegally and is spotted by security it will be ticketed. Hunter suggests that if people

give themselves a

can determine

lot,

also being caused by people

is

Unfortunately not being able to

make playoffs.

have

the barriers at the end of

disorder this winter.

lines, said

to

People

rows.

the

moved

when

little

more time

arriving at the college these

who owns a vehicle that is blocking

problems can be avoided.

in another, they try to contact the

“A little bit of common sense, good judgment and consideration,” said Hunter, “would probably go a long way to help solve

owner to move the vehicle. Lot 10 has been the biggest problem for things like triple parking and parking outside of

Chris Coombs and Ron foundations, throw their

tirst-year students in police at the

around on January 31

DSA’s snowman

the Sanctuary. (Photo by Laura Czekaj)

the problem.”

College an investment A

1998 study shows 75 per cent

By Laura Czekaj

Unlike previous reports, the

Declan Nine performs at IndieBlast ’99.

PAGE

11

college’s

degree of satisfaction students

the community.

to

months of graduation and more then 75 per cent of them are find-

and employers have with college

“Conestoga has a wonderful work relationship with the community,” she said. “The community needs Conestoga College

future,” said

education.

Cunningham programs

from

the

Profile

1998

were released

said

examples of

that are

experiencing

an excellent job placement rate are technologies,

business and

by Dianne Cunningham, minister

food services.

of training, colleges and universi-

Graduates in business management have an 89 per cent employment rate and can earn up to

ties

Monday

during a press confer-

ence held at Conestoga College. “Clearly a college education

is

$25,552 a year. Business students

preparing young people for suc-

at

cess

Ontario’s colleges are finding

employment rate. “A college education has always been a good investment, but now

jobs in records.”

it’s

in

workforce,”

the

said

Cunningham. “Graduates from

The

Conestoga had a 93 per cent

a great investment,” she said.

KPIs are benchmarks of excellence and accountability established by annual independent sur-

details student

employment

rates

The annual

Conestoga

at

100 per cent take-up of

report has been pub-

and serves the

tributed throughout high schools in

He

information in the report so they

can make informed decisions on

by the minister’s

A

she

news

indi-

confidence

in

the

publication first

which programs

of the

step in the gov-

offer the best job

results.

She said students can

select a

program knowing how previous students

release from the event

the is

has

is

visit.

felt

about the education

received and whether

“We come

felt

it

it

led to jobs.

was important

to

to a college that has a repu-

tation to be excellent in the cours-

to

measure and publish job place-

es they provide and the success

university programs.

Tibbits

and the college’s faculty

who

for the

work they have done

college students

5,000 copies of

employment profile will be dis-

ernment’s blueprint commitment

all

provide useful information for

making career choices and program selections.

the

direct the report at students their parents,

dents,” she said. Conestoga’s over-

on cable

are

and

done

“The minister coming here

report

Conestoga College president John

potential

and

students need access to them.”

Cunningham encourages high

well in the surveys and this reflected

their stu-

improve college programs and

to

quality of a college education

school students to research the

said the school has always

stated

purpose of gaining information to

lished for 10 years

Cunningham. “These a testimonial to the

their

years, according to Tibbits.

have a

that regularly

are

of KPIs for the past 10

Conestoga has performed

own form

Conestoga,” he said.

“There are many programs here

figures

intelligent choices for the

Ontario and information about the

cation.

and

make

report can be found on the Internet.

colleges.

of Ontario’s college graduates six graduation

are giving

community

cates

after

we

students the information they need

veys of students at Ontario’s

She used Conestoga College as

months

college graduates,

To

graduates.”

an example of a successful edu-

the Internet

Page 6

relationship with

report features information

employment rate is 94 per cent. Cunningham congratulated

/eally faster?

good

gathered from more than 31,500

after graduation.

Is

publicizing the profile of

on part-time students and the

Results

COMMENTARY

“By

Nine out of 10 college graduates have found work within six

Employment

PAGE 6

key perform-

ance indicators as the result of the

study.

of ISO committee.

status in last year’s

found employment

1998 report contains information

ing jobs related to their fields of

Torbay is appointed head

of Ontario college students

in

meeting the needs of the economy.

She credited Conestoga’s No.

1

ment

results for all colleges

and

“I’m always pleased

University performance reports

and graduate employment will

be published for the

time next year.

rates of their students,” she said.

rates first

to

be

at

Conestoga.”

The

minister’s visit concluded

with a short tour of the graphic design wing and the co-op office.


Page 2

— SPOKE, Feb.

14,

2000

Students voice opinion By Adam Wilson

The

students

government

On

Feb. 2, a nationwide student

protest

to protest govern-

was held

want the federal

to use

some of its

sur-

Kitchener- Waterloo youth, not

all

marched

campuses and

in

the

streets

to voice

about the govern-

their opinion

ment’s cuts.

They were amounting last

to

annual

protesting

tuition increases

of 10 per cent

120 per cent

in the

10 years.

A student in post-secondary education today

is

facing an average

debt of $25,000 after graduation.

protests.

Carleton and Victoria shut

University and college students their

Students at York,

education.

15

down

explains

streets

faced

According to the Record,

shut

Queen’s Park

plus to increase funding to higher

cuts to higher education.

ment

in

and protesters

the

them marched of

students,

university

into Kitchener Centre

their

riot police.

But most college and university

K-W

students in

UW

Neither

University

they spoke to her by phone to

affiliated

attended classes.

or Wilfrid Laurier

undergraduates with

which

campus.

part of that group.

Western

Ontario

and

(CFS),

of Students

Federation

About 10 other students set up an impromptu tent city in the evening on the University of Waterloo

organized

are

Canadian

the

voice their concerns.

Guelph,

DSA Mike

campuses.

MP Karen Redman’s office, where

Students at the universities of

down

the

protests.

CFS

ed with the

Ryerson marched at

the

at

vice-president of education

Harris said the

DSA

Community

Ontario

and the College

Student Parliamentary Association

same things CFS, but they want to

(OCCSPA) want the

as

accomplish

it

the

“We [DSA] belong to OCCSPA,” said Harris. “And we voice lobbying

by

changes

tuition freezes

for

through an increase

Student Association

is

not

affiliat-

He

participate

didn’t

the

in

DSA

Harris added that he and

Menage met with grad students, who are a

president Ellen

WLU

CFS, and

part of the

talked about

the issues facing students across

the country.

DSA

take

didn’t

because they

that

felt

action

Laurier’s

agenda for protesting didn’t

affect

the college.

“I’m not saying we don’t agree

“We

with the CFS,” Harris said.

in operating grants.”

Doon

one of the reasons the

is

DSA

The

way.

in a different

WLU’s 800

College’s

which protest.

our

Conestoga

which

either,

absence

their

University of Guelph students and

graduate students are

protest

in

explained that the

CFS

repre-

sents a majority of universities.

just don’t agree with

doing

how

they’re

it.”

Union prepared to strike again

Scrimmage time

By Donna Ryves During

winter

the

of

1979,

Conestoga College’s support

members of

the

staff,

Ontario Public

Service Employees Union, went on for the

strike

first

And

time.

it

could happen again.

Support

say they are pre-

staff

pared to strike

demands

if their

aren’t met.

The the

current contract runs out at

end of August with a new con-

tract to

be negotiated in the spring.

This

the bargaining year for

is

community

all

colleges in Ontario.

Across the board, the top three issues for staff are wages, benefits

Support

and vacation.

staff are

asking for wages comparable to

what faculty and management are paid, according to a union survey.

“We're behind

Dan

in the times,” says

Randall, vice-president of the

support

union local at “The wages simply

staff

Conestoga.

don’t keep up with the cost of

liv-

Ruth Jensen, union steward with local 238, warns that if an can’t be met in the spring the support staff is prepared

agreement

(Photo by Donna Ryves)

to Strike.

ing.”

Some the

MiKe Harris, vice-president or education, snows on rus with fellow students during a four-on-four hockey tournament in the Sanctuary during Winterfest Feb. 1.

moves

(Photo by Sherri Osment)

Safe Break

of the improved benefits

union

include

seeking

is

improved dental coverage, benefits for retirees

and more vacation time

everybody

Ruth Jensen, a union steward with

About 235 people make up

the

Conestoga By Laura Czekaj

cleaners, cler-

ical staff, technicians

and workers

at the recreation centre to learning

resource centre

and sick days.

“The most important thing

that

is

revitalizes into

sub-

five

Awareness Week

ISO

need a

becom-

says the

revitalization,”

ISO management

representative

Bill Jeffrey.

“The goal

istered as a

9001

is to

facility

be reg-

by hope-

fully fall of 2000.”

Volunteers needed, see

Standards

International

Organization

is

an organization

definable

in

the DSA office

mittee, the critical tee, the

compath commit-

documentation committee

and the education committee.

The groups

are divided into cate-

gories that will lead to the overall

goal of becoming

Each group

is

ISO

certified.

responsible for the

and docu-

“We

if

really

needed

to put

subgroups together to

some

assist

us

how you

you’re a cleaner or a

technician.”

ISO plan has to be done before you do the “It’s

not an easy

process.”

The

steering

committee

had

originally planned to be registered

by

the

summer the

of 2000, reason

for

but the

Jeffrey

said

delay

that, unlike other colleges

is

who have

certified only in certain

Conestoga

areas,

intends

become fully certified. Conestoga has looked Lawrence College,

completion of their mandate.

to

to

St.

a partially cer-

tified school, for advice.

“We

say we’re having trouble longer than

we

with the process,” said Jeffrey.

and

mented standards for consistency and quality for businesses to fol-

The process has taken roughly two years to prepare the college

thought.

low.

for

worse than ours,” said Torl^p

that

sets

Conestoga’s attempt to become

Kim

committee, the quality

nication

policy and quality objectives

ISO certified. “On all journeys sometimes you

25

commu-

the

talization plan that will bring the

ing

Feb, 21 to Feb,

The groups include

ing committee has enacted a revi-

college one step closer to

matter

shouldn’t

“It

work,” she said.

groups. steer-

is

Local 238.

dress or

staff.

responsibilities

Conestoga College’s

treated equal,” says

support staff at Conestoga College.

The jobs range from

certified

is

being kept on track by

the committee’s decision to divide

certification,

said

Edith

it’s

taking

Then they

“Maybe

and professional development.

good things

lot

of research that

us their

horror stories and they are even

Torbay, chair of quality assurance

“There’s a

tell

come

it

by.”

is

because the reany

are not always easy to


SPOKE,

Feb. 14, 2000

— Page

3

Student debt earns banks $100 million By Ray Bowe

per cent

Rather than dealing with the prob-

lem of

and

rising education costs

Canada Student Loan

the

in

10 years.

last

employment

ing the youth

rate,

bailout,” said Ballantyne.

“To not

unaware of existing student

Meanwhile, the youth unemploy-

lowering interest rates and creating

put the

ment

a national loans remission program,

debt program, you have to wonder

student demographic

what they were thinking. They’d

more mature

rate lingers at 15 per cent.

“Any money should be going

to

capped

10 years, after which the

at

money

in a national student

assis-

tance and debt relief measures. is

students,

The

aging with

aged 24

to

help students,” said Veronica Chau,

loan

Program, the Liberal government

vice-president of education at the

has opted to give Canadian banks a

University of Waterloo.

Student

dent loans are increasingly high at

would be much

Between 1992 and 1997, the Canadian consumer index has increased six per cent, whereas

Association was contacted for com-

improving the Canada

the tuition fees have risen 43 per

ment,

prime plus 2 1/2 per cent and prime plus five per cent for the

cent.

Menage, who was unaware that the Canadian government has just

floating

Ballantyne, vice-presi-

dent of university affairs at Wilfrid

given Canadian banks a $100 mil-

of the key factors to unmanage-

the failing

$100 million

antidote to cure their

woes.

The $100

million

better spent

The two banks who handle dent loans,

CIBC and Royal

stu-

Student Loans Program, said Jason

Bank,

Debig, the national director of the

forgiven.

is

Cameron

amount of funding colleges and universities.”

rather lessen the

given to

When

Doon

the

DSA

president

are claiming they are losing large

Canadian

amounts of money through student

Associations

loan defaults. Therefore, the gov-

“Rather than bailing out the banks,

way Canadians have reacted to gov-

defaults,

ernment has decided to stagger the

they should be helping students

ernment action toward professional

be forwarded to

help themselves.”

sports but are less vocal

losses through a

$100 million

injec-

CASA

tion of funds.

The

cost of education has been

120

rising steadily since 1994, over

to

Alliance

Student

of

a press release.

in

asking the government

is

Laurier University,

comes

combat student debt by maintain-

ing consistent tuition costs, lower-

“It’s

is

baffled

by the

when

it

compensate for loan

lion bailout to

asked that the information

CASA

has pointed out which

problems need

kind of ridiculous on the

possible solutions.

(proposed) hockey

to

who

be addressed with

They say there is

a lack of information as students are

often have families.

Interest rates

on Canadian

and fixed lending

respectively.

These

stu-

rates

rates are

one

able student debt. Possible solutions put forth by

CASA

her.

to educational issues.

heels of the

Ellen

29,

include unifying financial

and career planning, lowering est

rates

Loans

to

inter-

on Canadian Student about prime plus one per

cent and loan remission.

Washrooms deserve respect By Laura Czekaj Something stinks

washroom as well. Reed said students in the

C

wing.

The condition of the women’s washroom, located by the

C

Sanctuary in the

wing,

is dis-

according to Melanie

gusting,

programs

in the

C

The lack of hand dryers shouldin the

wing, nursing

and recreation leadership, aren’t necessarily at fault. “It’s certainly not a problem of one program or one group of stu-

Reed, a professor in English lan-

dents,” said

Reed who

guage

problem

people

studies.

is

washroom and

figure

else will clean

up.

anyone with any sense of comfort

the floor, there

about

Reed

washroom’s proximity to the cafeteria and the Sanctuary may be the cause of the said the

messiness.

from housekeep-

Phyllis Caissie

ing services said the size of the

washroom is a factor. “A lot of people use room,

this

wash-

everyone

know

hits

because

if it’s

washroom

this

before going to the cafeteria, but

washroom

this

is

She said the Sanctuary isn’t solely to blame for the mess. A lot of nursing

frequent

students

The washroom

the

needs to either be closed as a wash-

room

The

Canadian

Reed at

is

Student Associations

of

(CASA)

launched an exciting and colourful

Web

site

The new

Feb.

site

3.

(www.casa.ca) fea-

need

it

use

to

it.”

is

a problem for

Doon

Student Association.

“The condition of the bathrooms is bad in comparison to the condition of the Sanctuary,” she said.

said.

its

worst

“Students could do a better job taking care of the college.”

their lunch.

year with students leaving garbage

“It isn’t

a question of it not being it’s

being cleaned on a

regular basis,” said Reed.

Caissie cleans the the A,

B

and

D

washrooms

in

washroom by

the Sanctuary at least five times a

She said part of the mess

C wing washroom

towels that are used. other

is

in

the paper

Most of

washrooms use hand

CASA’s ture

site

Canadian

the

dryers.

does not only feasites,

DSA

had a problem

in the Sanctuary.

The

DSA

last

chose

to close the Sanctuary for a

week

warn students to clean up their mess or it would remain closed.

Menage

wings about three

times a day and the

the

The

to

government agencies, mainstream media and campus media.

Alliance

who

Student’s lack of respect for col-

lege facilities

but also sites

said

Sanctuary

the

remained clean for about a week before reverting to its former

messy state. “Nothing “Basically

helps,

we decided

she it’s

said.

the cost

of doing business.”

Get educated on CASA’s By Talisha Matheson

or the people using

respect other people

between 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. when the majority of people have

day.

the busiest.”

paper on

the toilet seats.

quite disgusting,”

cleaned,

should be bigger,” she

it

said. “ I don’t

It’s

toilet

quite often excre-

is

the condition of the

washroom, according to Reed. “There’s no excuse for the condition in which it’s left. I think it

use the

someone

affect

n’t

Ellen Menage, president of the

“People are leaving

ment and urine on

a.m.”

1 1

it

thinks the

who

“The condition of the washrooms is terrible,” she said. “The washrooms can’t really be used by after

two

Web

site after

Phyllis Caissie

site

reading about

room

CASA

in

the

C

from housekeeping, cleans the women’s wash(Photo by Laura Czekaj) wing about five times a day.

in

a January article in Spoke. “I

heard about this thing called

CASA

and

I

wanted

to

know

around the world.

more,” Brooks said, adding the

Jason Conestoga student Brooks said he logged onto the

offers valuable solutions.

site

is

very

informative

and

tures regularly updated information

CASA’s

about

structure, policies,

campaigns, members and press releases.

On tors -

the “what’s

new” page,

can answer the

visi-

4:30pm

CASA question

an opinion poll on post-secondary

education.

The question posted on for February

who

is,

should

receive

Scholarships reject principle,

all

the site

students

The Cross Roads

Millennium them out of

Meeting

whether they benefit

from them or not? According to the

site poll

of 18

ygmde, Feb. 6, 88.8 per cent rS^nded no and 11.1 per cent responded yes to the question.

The

site

has over 400 links to

universities, student associations.

VS

Room


Page 4

— SPOKE, Feb.

14,

2000

Squeegee kids under attack On Jan.

government implemented the Safe Attorney-General Jim Flaherty’s attempt

31, the provincial

Streets Act,

which

to rid Ontario of

is

its

so-called squeegee kid problem.

The Safe Streets Act bans squeegee kids from roadways and prohibits panhandling aggressively on sidewalks and enclaves such as bank machine kiosks. Disposing of syringes and used condoms in public places

is

also prohibited under the new legislation. First-time offenders can be fined up to $500, while second-

time offenders can be fined up to $1,000 or face six months in jail.

Flaherty launched the Safe Streets Act Nov. opposition from anti-poverty activist groups. Flaherty, responding to activists’ flack,

2 under much

was quoted

in the

Toronto Star Nov. 3 as saying, “Ontarians have the right to walk down the street, drive on the roads and enjoy public places without feeling intimidated.” While squeegee kids may bother some people, the reality

they are trying to

make money

is

to survive.

Sarah Vance, an organizer with the Ontario Coalition Against Poverty, said she doesn’t see squeegee kids as a problem,

because they are trying to earn a living. “It shows what kind of poverty exists in

this country,”

she

said.

Those who are adamant about ridding cities of squeegee kids should be giving them options to get them off the streets, instead of limiting their resources. The Safe Streets Act is merely replacing one problem with

by forcing squeegee kids to find other means of surcould result in more crime. which vival, Vance said the government should be helping people get off the streets, instead of prohibiting them from trying to survive

another,

there.

A

greater emphasis should be put

on creating a more viable

social assistance program.

down

commercials which have the teens young

European region. The second investigator,

stating that the

five

new phone

even open up the

phone lines compared to cable, the newer technology, so one would expect phone service to be slow. Unfortunately, traffic also seems

line

be processed, according to Sharon Martin, a social worker with Waterloo Region social services.

expensive gim-

While applicants can use a friend or relative’s address, many people don’t have that option and, for those people, this creates

peting

ly

pay

bills

is

barely enough to rent an apartment,

and buy groceries. housing, such as

And temporary

While there are homeless conditions within

let

alone

shelters, is another

problem.

shelters in almost every city, the

some can be

appalling and there

is

a general

their efforts

on creating

affordable housing, she

added.

“The government should be providing some

stability,

so peo-

ple aren’t scrounging to survive,” she said. issue of squeegee kids being a

is

arguable.

at

home.

goes from the cable into an

modem

external

and right into a

PC card plugged Maybe that’s Internet

utes

1 1

is

slow.

into

It

my

at

laptop.

1.5

MB At

tried

during peak hours

around 4 p.m. Before I jumped

any conclu-

But

itself.

I

realized that

know enough

I

to under-

stand the various aspects of this

technology. All

can do

I

offer

is

my hum-

bling experiences surfing the net.

Unfortunately, they have been

all

cable,

I

times, get a

while surfing on

message

my

that

have

I

server and

sion that Rogers has been trying to

been timed out of

“bamboozle” me, as the commer-

have to reconnect. Sometimes,

I

cial says about the claims of other

to search another topic, so

type

I

researched further.

In the spirit of investigative jour-

But since the government has deemed them to be a problem, giving it should work on solving it in an efficient manner by

nalism that Dateline

squeegee kids options instead of limiting them.

customers to

proud

The

of,

I

first

NBC would be

asked two other Rogers try the

same

thing.

investigator reported

what

I

am

I

try

looking for in the search

box and nothing happens.

I

have to

reconnect. This could be because

am

on a congested link as too

people are trying to use

That

as well.

is

what

it

I

many

the

more

comes

SPOKE is mainly

Keeping Conestoga College connected

on Highway 401, the slower the

traffic,

you have ever you know that some waves are slow and some are fast. It is the same situation when surfing on the Web. Sometimes it’s fast and sometimes it’s slow. speed will be.

If

surfed,

In

my

case,

it’s

like trying to surf

Lake Ontario, futile. While researching all the sites for modems and services, my pro-

gram kept performing an

illegal

operation and shutting down.

Cable certainly has not lived up

phone

claim that

my

lines, in

faster,

but for

slower.

it’s

faster than

opinion.

Rogers probably

In theory,

So

I

me

is

has been

it

hope everybody

signs up for Internet on cable.

Why? So Internet

in a year,

on phone

I

can get the

lines,

people, including me,

where

who

can’t

get fast cable service, will use

the

it.

really

,

Just like traffic

to the

negative.

Many to

looking up information

about the T-l and other types of modems and services on the

did not

1.4K per second.

modem

cable

service. tried

Internet

view the same graphic.

to

I

my

Conestoga College it took three minutes 45 seconds at 6.4K per second

and

my Terayon

and

took 12 min-

reason

the

seconds to view a

services,

problem

faster

thought the best

comparison would be between Conestoga’s T-l modem and service

have Internet on cable

Both were

The government should concentrate more employment opportunities and

much

against the

I

lines are

have a negative effect on cable

to

ables involved,

Rogers’ cable service. I

after

of vari-

lot

net.

an older technology, and there are more users on

held the

site that

Traffic

to.

Phone

minutes of waiting, could not

Since there were a

have no chance of com-

that

graphic

lack of space in them, Vance said.

The

micks

it

graphic.

Internet are just

It

$500, which

that

has seen those

services for the

You need an address to get social assistance, but you need the money from social assistance to get an address. Even if an applicant is successful in obtaining social assistance, the most money they can get in a month is approximate-

on the

took just less than nine minutes to get an image of the graphic, which is just a map of a

Everybody

Social assistance applicants over the age of 18 need an address in order to establish a residence for their application to

a catch-22.

an Internet problem

Traffic

Internet

quickly

because

there will be less traffic.

funded from September to

May by

the

Doon

Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed of in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views

Conestoga College or the DSA. Advertisers

in

SPOKE are

not

DSA unless their advertisements contain the SPOKE shall not be liable for any damages arising

endorsed by the

DSA

SPOKE

is

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College. Editor: Nicole Furlong; News Editor: Tannis Fenton;

Student Life Editor: Talisha Matheson Photo Editor: Donna Ryves Adam Wilson, Advertising Manager: Walerian Czarnecki; Circulation Manager: Mike Radatus; Faculty Supervisor: Christina Jonas; Faculty Adviser: Sharon Dietz SPOKE’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext 691, 692, 693, 694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

Production Manager:

logo.

the out of eirors in advertising beyond the amount paid for

space. Unsolicited submissions

must be sent

to the

cdiKnjJ^

Monday. Submissions are subject to acceptan^B rejection and should be clearly written or typed: a WordPerfect or MS Word file would be helpful. Submissions must not con-

9:30 a

tain

m

any libellous statements and

illustration (such as a

may be accompanied by

photograph).

an


SPOKE,

Newborn FM

Letter to the editor

Think before you write would like to thank Spoke news editor Tannis Fenton for

be made accessible

her informative article Think

basis of capacity

before you complain, Jan. 31.

priate

I

I

thought

saw

I

three other pro-

testers at the Oct. 15

demonstra-

states that higher

the progressive introductions of free education, Tannis that education is

education.

not a right.

However, the well thought out

two

were only

protesters.

The

Article

C

state

And

of our

although

of the United Nations

was also filled with on Canada’s growing

The Centre

we have

in.

Maybe

the blankets tight

to

proposal quite

I find this

acceptable.

warm bed

a

if

we

all

enough

pull

of

all

our problems will just go away.

Covenant on Eco-

Matthew Albrecht, Conestoga student

for

ing a contest to will

form of

Communication

gift

name

sponsor-

is

the station.

for first prize

with the

College.

quency.

and good rep-

Martin, dean of applied

resentation of the college.

for the

amount of and $150 for

The

must not conflict with

FM,

station will

call letters or station fre-

For more information, contact Mike Thumell at extension 223; Joe

Entries will be judged for origi-

Ideas

sion

424 or Pat

St.

arts,

air at 88.3

the broadcasting

but the call letters have not

Deadline for submission

yet been assigned.

25

at

4:30 p.m.

radio and tele-

program, says the new

name should be

imaginative, but

also reflect the fact that

it’s

a col-

lege station.

“This

is

going to serve the com-

munity as a spokesperson for the college,” said Thumell.

Teaching English

Correction In

Feb.

the

SPOKE,

7

edition

of

an incorrect price for

as a

Second Language

Mon.

chocolates being sold by the

CBSA was

published.

The chocolates

A One-Year

boxes and were sold Feb. 8 and 9 by students at

SPOKE

Certificate

Program

cost $5 for 3

Door

3.

Starts this Call for

apologizes for the

September

more information

519-748-5220,

error.

ext.

tf

Conestoga

;

Fet>.

1

4

8:00pm The Sanctuary

•brought to you by the

656

COME CELEBRATE WOMEN AT CONESTOGA COLLEGE ALL The Women's Resource Group of Con estoga

An evening

WELCOME College,

in

honour of International Women's Day invites y ou to

comedy and son ns

of gourmet dining, women's WHERE:

Waterloo Campus Dining Room

WHEN:

Tuesday, March 7

Cash bar 5:30

th ,

p.m. -

2000 8:30 p.m.

Entertainment 5:45 A during Dinner Dinner service 6:00 p.m.

MENU

-

MARDI GRAS

ENTERTAINMENT:

Donna McCaw, Author/Comedian &

Nancy Hamacher's Quartet de champignons sauvage A crispy streudel of wild mushrooms Feuillete

TICKETS

ON SALE MON. JANUARY

game hen with a truffle scented stuffing -OR-

COST:

$22.00; after February 14

Timbale of oven roasted root vegetables Jardiniere de legumes frais Assorted fresh garden vegetables

Timbale de couscous

th

TO

FRI.

FEBRUARY 25 th

(tickets are limited)

Poussin fargi a I’essence dc truffes

Cornish

17

th

$24.00 (cash

only please)

price includes tax and gratuity

ANY PROFITS WILL BE DONATED TO LOCAL WOMEN’S SHELTERS TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE FROM THE FOLLOWING PEOPLE: Off ice - Carol Walsh (ext. 758) Doon Campus - Mary Andraza/Jeanette Walker (ext. 337) Alumni Services - Monica Himmelman (ext. 459) Cambridge, Guelph, Stratford, Waterloo campuses call Carol Walsh, Registrar's

Tiramisu a

An

ma fagon

original interpretation of

Tea/Coffee

an Italian Classic

Registrar's Office, ext.

758

Commu-

nication Studies, extension 539.

co-ordinator of -

exten-

John, vice-pres-

ident of the Centre for

be on

match

Entries do not need to

to all stu-

prize.

Mike Thumell, vision

open

other radio stations.

be awarded in the certificates

is

dents and employees of Conestoga

nality, marketability

college bookstore in the

second

mendation made was to remem-

radio

doesn’t have a name.

Studies at Conestoga

Prizes

nomic, Social and Cultural Rights

International

it still

$250

sleep

awareness around the

and

and hunger and the only recom-

would be a good idea education system.

an opportunity,

FM

Conestoga College’s

contest

— Page 5

needs a name

station The

station will hit the air next fall,

problems around homelessness

ber that

to raise

reminds us

article

statistics

my eyes are now opened to the meaninglessness of my actions. In my ignorance I thought it Also,

on the

to all,

by every appro-

means, and in particular by

tion around the rising costs of

article stated that there

By Pamela Hopwood

education shall

Feb. 14, 2000

to reserve tickets; follow up with cash by mail

is

Feb.


Page 6

— SPOKE, Feb.

14,

2000

to help others

Conestoga bleeds Sherri Osment Canadian Blood Services collected 66 units, or pints, of blood at the

By

blood donor clinic held College on Feb.

at

ing, dentist visits or if the

feeling

Conestoga

ordinator for

4.

The

clinic

blood being

collected

CBS

from 66

donors.

CBS was

isn’t

year marketing student, was also

Annmarie

giving blood for the second time.

donor

Schweitzer, a junior recruitment co-

was held in the Sanctuary at the Doon campus, with

The

said

well,

hoping to receive dona-

clinic

CBS. was conducted by 28

nurses and clinic

assistants

to help other

She said she donates people.

The process of donating blood takes about one hour

from the time

with six student volunteers from the

the donor walks into the clinic but

Conestoga nursing leadership pro-

the actual time for the donation,

gram.

when

The

student volunteers helped in

the blood

is

being removed,

takes about 10 minutes.

from 75 people at the clinic but Evelyn Hudecki, the clinic’s head nurse, said that 66 was a good num-

the areas of admissions, recovery

and refreshments. Aiesha Depeazer,

need for blood and a single donation

ber of donors.

a third-year nursing student, said the

can save up to four

experience of helping at the clinic

three per cent of Canadians donate

was a good one

blood.

tions

“It’s 66 more than we had when we

started this morning,”

Hudecki

There were 84 people into the clinic to donate

there

were 18

said.

for her.

Allan Richer, a first-year

who came blood but

deferrals.

but only

lives,

on mobile

relies

clinics

ond time

said Schweitzer.

I

at the clinic. it’s

a good thing to do what

of the top areas for recruiting regular

Karen Creed-Thompson, a

donors,” Schweitzer said.

third-

Elections

0am 2pm Tues. Feb. 5 0am -2pm Wed. Feb. 6 0am -2pm 7 Thurs. Feb. The Sanctuary -

1

1

1

1

1

1

“Colleges and universities are one

can to help people,” said Richter.

£Voting DSA

CBS

always a

to get the majority of their donations,

“I think

number of reasons including recent ear or body pierc-

The

is

student, donated blood for his sec-

People can be deferred from donating blood for a

LASA

Schweitzer said there

Take the time to VOTE - it is your student government!

Mark Ramos, a first

third-year nursing student, donates blood for the

time at a donor

held

clinic

in

the Sanctuary on Feb. 4. (Photo by Ray Bowe)

Pushing students to the extreme are

students

If

in

need of a

quick pick-me-up during the cold winter season, the adrenaline club

may be

saw

some extreme sports and Student Doon the

Association’s clubs as a

do

nized and 20 people attended the group’s first meeting, but the

skydiving and rock climbing

club

way

to

at

Most of the events take place on to

fit

around people’s

schedules, but Hunter

willing

is

on

to organize things after school

All of the sports are held wher-

convenient and wherev-

it is

er the group wants to go.

Hunter said there

is

never a set

destination unless there has to

so.

He said having a club with the DSA is good because, in some instances, they can fund

up

to

year, there

he

come

to

out.

In the world of extreme sports,

be.

“We had school

go

to

to

parachute

Arthur

in

and

to

can get some money towards their events, said Hunter.

He

Hunter said he cuts the costs with help from the DSA and through discounts wherever the

meetings

As long

served basis.

for

first-

as forms

are filled out quickly, the club

event

is

happening.

The adrenaline club has taken

said he hopes to hold this

more

semester before he

health

risks

involved.

ticipate in

money

some

are

there

Hunter said he didn’t have time to hold any meetings last semester because of school and work.

provides

on a first-come,

group

and he encourages more people

For

DSA

the sport the club

Hunter stressed the fact that anyone can show up to adrenaline club meetings and events

you’re

The

last

30 people,”

is doing, the size of the

ing,” he said. “But other than that, the group usually picks.”

the clubs

to

said.

Depending on

Sportsworld for the rock climb-

half the total cost of an event.

skydiving

were 25

usually fluctuates.

certain days, if he isn’t busy.

ever

growing.

is

“When we went

Sportsworld.

weekends,

the answer.

The club was formed last year by Sean Hunter, a third-year computer programming analysis student, who decided he wanted to try

including beginner scuba diving,

part in all sorts of extreme sports

By Adam Wilson

adrenaline

the 1

club,

and

8 or older,

if

in decent

physical condition, you can par-

any event.

Hunter said that a person’s weight doesn’t play a factor either. There is always equipment for each sport that will fit any size person.

finishes school.

a year

Hunter can be contacted with

ago, there were 20 people that

ideas for sports to try at adrenal-

signed up to be officially recog-

inclub@hotmail.com.

When

the club began

Cops

LASA

instruct

By Donna Ryves

students

officers are assigned to a class.

“There’s a mutual benefit,” says

College Graduates Join the leading edge of a

new breed

Waterloo regional police officers have been instructing a course

of professionals!

Conestoga College since January.

Conestoga offers a variety of unique full-time Post-Graduate Programs

Apply

now

for

management is offered week and incorporates tac-

Conflict

September

once a

Career Development Practitioner

Environmental Engineering Applications (Optional Co-op) (Co-op)

Systems Analyst Teaching English as a Second Language

Technology Marketing

Woodworking Manufacturing Management For information

748-5220,

ext.

call

656.

Ask about our part-time Post-Graduate Programs too!

Conestoga College rp

5

days?40

always

hr.

2000) teacher certifi-

(April 3-7,

TESOL

cation course (or by

correspondence). 1000’s of jobs available

FREE

NOW.

information

package,

Waterloo regional police have

call toll free:

1-888-270-2841

sup-

ported

“It’s

For the college,

teaching classes provide

students with current information.

For the police, there

is

the opportu-

nity of finding potential recruits.

very sensible,” says Driedger.

“It’s

“The students

force.

Travel-teach English:

officers

communications and use of

tical

Computer Numerical Control

Human Resources Management

at

Sgt. Paul Driedger.

learn

more than

read-

ing a textbook.” a very

“It is also

The more

very sensible.

practical

way

of

Conestoga’s

students learn

law and secu-

than reading a text-

Douglas,

book.”

LAS A/police

adminis-

rity

pro-

tration

gram, but is

the

time

a

Sgt.

this

“We

Paul Driedger,

Waterloo regional police

has

been

in

the

ordinator.

partnership

seminars

community

sensitive,”

A total of eight officers teach on a at the college.

for

is

to

condu^

Waterloo regioi^p

police officers.

One upcoming

seminar will inform officers about

Bob Gould.

voluntary basis

foun-

Conestoga’s role

partnership

are

Don

dations program co-

first

formed.

says Sgt.

learning,” says

Two

new

legislation,

ments

to the

such as amend-

Young Offenders

Act.


)

SPOKE,

wannabes

Firefighter

Feb. 14, 2000

— Page 7

Heads up

must meet challenge By Walerian Czarnecki

because

tant

who

strate

Conestoga College’s pre-entry firefighter program, which will begin in September 2000, will require applicants to pass physical fitness testing

and academic

unique for admission,”

“It’s

says Bill Jeffrey, dean of health

fear of high places.

of training at the Kitchener Fire

The actual physical mimic situations any

Department.

could face and the standards are

we

equal for both male and female

Don

the job, said

“If

Trask, director

put someone through a

one-year program and they could

never pass physical testing,

standards for acceptance.

fined spaces, and agoraphobia, a

would demon-

it

has the ability to do

would not be

candidates.

Candidates must be able to

it

dummy

them,” said

fair for

The two-semester program such

communication,

as

haz-

practice,

firefighter

tions,

fire

opera-

fire-ground

behaviour,

will

with courses

ardous materials and psychology of rescue.

Course instructors will include

“If

we

put

someone

meet

Strength testing will mimic

physical testing,

water.

to establish the

fair for

bricks will be pulled 25

but within certain parame-

feet, tres.

Don

One

Trask,

test will entail

Kitchener Fire Department, director of training

up and down a

The

test,

which

Candidates must complete a firefighter profile, which allows them to demonstrate any past experience that could assist them

Waterloo, consists of hearing,

and medical

visual

The

of

Jeffrey.

the

at

was designed

testing

for

firefighting.

These

have been sub-

tests that

hours before physical testing. Candidates could fail on these

stantiated as viable for firefight-

aspects.

ers will help candidates realize

blood pressure is abnormal, it will have to be checked by a doctor before a candidate will be

what kind of physical standards have to be met and maintained in

include English and biology at a

allowed to proceed with the

Trask.

general or advanced level would have to be met. The physical testing is impor-

ing.

being a firefighter, such as

in

paramedic or military experience.

The academic standards

that

If

Once

Candidates will also be tested

cally,

Conestoga College’s learning opportunities project for

its

is

preparing

September 2000 student

Rick Casey, a secondary school transition counsellor with special

the source

by working

directly

with the 22 secondary schools in

Waterloo Region.

The learning opportunities implemented was ect

proj-

in

September 1998.

cific

learning disabilities in post-

secondary institutions. Its strategy is to provide adaptive technology,

as

Casey

the

“My main focus

make sure

is

academically, that

what

transition

from second-

the proper documentation

they can accommodate the student, given the nature of their

he said. Casey has seen approximately

Rick Casey,

secondary school transition counsellor

45 students through admissions contacts, although not all of those will get in and more students will approach the project after

March

31,

when

students

are notified of college accept-

The

first

step in preparing for

September 2000 special needs

ance.

The learning opportunities

proj-

Casey said he deals with special education and guidance depart-

and learning opportunities proj-

ect currently has 83 students reg-

ect students is to ensure each stu-

istered in the program.

to identify specific learn-

dent has proper documentation, said Casey.

During June and July, the project will offer post-secondary

“That form of documentation can be everything from medical

accommodations support strategies, a program designed to

to a psycho-educational assess-

familiarize

ment,” he said. “Regardless of

services available to them.

ments

ing disabled

who

students

are

looking at post-secondary education,

particularly

at

Conestoga

College.

He’s also been working closely with Conestoga College’s admissions

and liaison services, he

“My main

the nature of the disability,

must have some

we

level of docu-

mentation.”

said.

focus

is

to

make

& 8 1

healthy relationship. Here are a few paraphrased ideas: no put downs, no Respect for the other person

insults,

appreciation of different needs and beliefs and

recognition of the possible need for separate as well as

together time.

no emotional or of utmost importance already is there physical violence. If there is even fear, Safety

is

disability,

services are available to them.”

develop profes-

ary to post-secondary schools.

has been put in place, project counsellors determine whether

prepared of

demands of those programs,’

Once

they’re

aware

at

said Casey.

to

changes that being a full-time student bring. A local Individual, Couple and Family Therapist, Barbara Pressman, developed a list of primary principles for a

what types of programs

you’re interested in and what are

Relationships

Being a student and in a committed relationship can bring enjoyment and pleasure and also feel conflictual in terms of responsibilities and demands on time. A healthy relationship is more likely to withstand the pressures and

let’s

look

said.

development activities for and students and develop a

model of

a chance to say ‘OK,

“It’s

well as the special needs office,”

sional staff

accommodations can’t be

said,

for prospective students, he said.

project)

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

properly put in place.

types of support they can put in

they’re

was established to better accommodate students with speIt

fire

Acquiring proper documenta-

(the

APPLY AT STUDENT SERVICES (ROOM 2B02

hired by a

tion is also an education process

come

needs services, begins his work at

is

them

are available to

they

place through

intake.

a firefighter

department, current tests

here and the

when

TUTORING COSTS $15.00 FOR 5 HOURS

September

that they’re aware of what

services

APPLY EARLY!!!!!!!!

must be completed.

for claustrophobia, a fear of con-

sure they’re prepared academi-

By Tannis Fenton

PEER TUTORS PROVIDE SUBJECT SPECIFIC HELP FOR STUDENTS EXPERIENCING COURSE DIFFICULTIES

the career of a firefighter, said

test-

Project prepares for

MAYBE A TUTOR CAN HELP!

flight of stairs

people w'ho want to do the job of

two

tests

EXPERIENCING COURSE DIFFICULTIES

four times.

will be con-

University

ducted

prospective

wearing weights around their ankles and waists, while carrying a wound-up hose

firefighters

same

rigours as the job itself,” said

Peer Services

it

Heavy

would not be

the bus.

lift-

ing a ladder off a truck and walls,

as a firefighter.

“We want

first-year general arts tiling for

as well as gripping hoses full of

employ-

to gain

out a victim,” said

could never pass

will be similar to those candi-

ment

a

Trask.

through a one-year program and they

The admission requirements dates must

ity to carry

them.”

local firefighters.

lift

weighs 90.7 kilo-

that

grams and mimic a rescue. “They have to have the capabil-

Trask.

sciences.

offer the training

will

tests

firefighter

Without documentation, Casey

its

students with the

hoping to extend the program from three days to five and hopes to have at

Casey

least

said

he’s

25 students participate.

S I i

i i i i i i i m I a m I

i

hurt.

Caring behaviour and emotional support such as listening without judging or blaming and encouraging each other’s

interests.

Inclusive decision-making regardless of earnings,

compromising differences avoiding a win/lose result. Open communication including the capacity

advice (unless sought), and willingness to be assertive

about expressing needs.

Communication includes

affection

and sexual

expression.

These need

to

fit

the needs of each couple and be

mutually satisfying.

The counsellor with

at

your campus

is

available to assist you

relationship issues.

G=

1 m

g

v

to

share feelings, to be listened to attentively without giving

A Message from

Student Services (Room 2B02)

I I I I

I I 1


*

Page 8

— SPOKE, Feb.

14,

Conestoga

2000

Ring

provide training to Polskie Radio By Laura Czekaj

will

with suggestions on

how

in

your graduation!

their

schools can help the radio sta-

Conestoga College has been chosen from among nine col-

and

leges

communications

established

programs

to provide consulting

management

and

with

universities

training

to

Conestoga College was

tion.

among

the respondents.

Conestoga learned

initially

October 1999 and submitted proposal

time

in

November

Polskie Radio in Poland.

College

about the request in

1999

its

the

for

deadline.

The fonner communist regime

Conestoga was selected as the

has been experiencing technical

consultant for the radio station

difficulties in the establishment

shortly before Christmas.

of a public broadcasting system. Polskie Radio emerged in 1993

when

the previously amalgamat-

St.

John, vice-president of

training

and development and

Pat

continuing education, will repre-

ed Polish radio and television

sent the college

agency separated into two inde-

ing session.

He

pendent media. In a request for proposals sent to colleges

Ontario,

Polish

in

authorities

“management and pro-

wrote,

gram

and universities

delivery technical assis-

to

go to Poland

his

He

said this

is

a breakthrough

consulting.

.

‘This

is

extremely good for the this,”

he

said.

very exciting for us to com-

pete and win at the level they

place.”

request also asks for assis-

tance in developing a capacity training

employees

and

St.

will

John said he hopes this lead to an international

placement for faculty and

implement new technology.

dents.

Out of 20 schools

that received

New

chair of quality assurance appointed

asked for in proposals.”

acquiring the skills required to

the request, only nine responded

Deb Kaiotinis, a representative for Jostens, displays rings that were being sold for a 10 per cent discount at Conestoga College on Jan. 31 (Photo by Donna Ryves)

for the college into international

“It’s

for

is

casting field.

college to win

The

first train-

25-year experience in the broad-

caster in a competitive market-

is

on the

said one of the reasons he

was chosen

needed to assist Polskie Radio to define its role and mandate as a public broadtance

COLLEEI

RING NOt

He

stu-

By Laura Czekaj

currently preparing the college to

become ISO 9001 Edith Torbay

is

a people person.

one of my skills is people management,” she says. “They “I think

will

be leaving for Warsaw,

Poland, on

March

wanted somebody who could work with people and I guess they thought I could do it.” Her people skills were among

19.

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for

management of ISO and

ty

assurance in addition to her

responsibility

quali-

professional

for

development.

Torbay was informed of the appointment Jan. 20.

get

currently chair of

“There of

work

is

a tremendous

College’s

ISO

steering committee,

said Bill Jeffrey,

dean of the school

of health sciences and community

who

is

the

ISO manage-

representative.

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work with people and guess they thought could do it.” I

Edith Torbay, chair of quality assurance

registered,”

name of

the

some-

quality standards are

“There

is

it

said

in.

no such thing as a per-

fect world,” she said, “but

ISO

at

least

helps you get to have as

much

control as possible.”

ISO procedures for some time. She was a member of the original taskforce that recommended the college become ISO certified and she has worked with manufacturing companies in the ty

during their attempts

communiat

gaining

certification.

Torbay has been working for “She has been a longtime supporter of ISO,” he said.

“On

very energetic and she’ll

the other hand. I’m comfort-

is

it

thing Torbay firmly believes

ISO

amount

and thereafter

after

ISO

system,

Torbay has been familiar with

somebody who could

to maintain the system,” she said.

“She’s

make

it

Conestoga College for 20 years and has held the position of chair of almost every program in the college.

Standards

work in her new position.” The position of quality assurance manager means that Torbay will

an organization

bring the college to registration,

ous departments,” she said. “There

and document-

then proceed to oversee the sys-

are an awful lot of really

ed standards for constancy and

tem once it is in place. She will work with other managers, includ-

people in this college and that

ing Jeffrey.

with them.”

able with

it.

So I’m edgy but I’m

comfortable.”

The

International

The ISO

GUELPH

“They wanted

effective-

registered and maintain

it

Jeffrey. “That’s the

be done in terms of get-

to

work

game.”

I

is

quality.

us.

Student return fares from Kitchener

ca

is

to

a key contributor to Conestoga

services,

that sets definable

.

who

“We’re going

ly together to build this

professional development, has been

ment

Organization

.

Torbay,

the factors that contributed to her

ting to certification

www greyhound

time within the next year.

being appointed chair of quality

She said her first reaction to the news was to feel overwhelmed.

GST

some-

assurance assuming responsibility

PARTY

Go Greyhound and leave the driving to

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steering committee

is

“I think

for

how

I

have a really good

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people work in the vari-

I

good

know

because I’ve gotten to work


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Doon Student Association Annual Awards Criteria for

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Certificate of Appreciation - The Recipients of contribution to College Life has been significant.

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24


SPOKE,

Feb. 14, 2000

— Page 10

«

The Jesus By Ray Bowe

song Monkey Trick recorded Their record label describes The

London, England,

The band played

Jesus Lizard as “equal parts sex,

live in

show The Bangkok in their first

Chicago and recorded

their

Lizard are no longer.

album Head, which

accompa-

on July

Touch and Go Records have bid a Texan quartet

by releasing an album

littered

with

B-

obscure seven-inch releases,

bootlegs of indeterminate

sides,

origin,

cover

impressive of

songs all,

most

and,

powerful

live

The Jesus Lizard was widely

at

later

first

shows

At

around.

a

Toronto, vocalist David

reached his

down

show

Yow

in his pants

underwear off

in

once

and

tore

in a spastic surge

of energy.

Jack

Daniel’s

or

either

Wild Turkey,

titles

are four-letter words.

Show

was recorded live in 1993 at the legendary punk haven CBGB’s in New York City.

Both

albums.

Touch and Go,

1996’s

twist

comes out

in the

open

to the

audience.

When Scream came

out,

it

was

dubbed a “horror” film, when in fact it was meant to be a satirical look

at the

cliche-filled horror

Now, with

the

three

and

final

instalment, the mixture of satire

and horror blend perfectly

to create

one of the best horror movies to

hit

the big screen in the last 10 years.

Scream 3 focuses on the making 3,

the movie-in-a-movie

about the murders that happened in Woodsborough. This was the fic-

can be said

sums up

is

all

Scream movies with a decent

payoff.

location

of Scream

and

witty

2.

The villain of the Scream movies, The Ghostface Killer, is killing people in the same order they are killed in the script for Stab 3, making

it

apparent that

it is

either a die-

hard fan of the movies or someone

working with the movie.

As

the cast dwindles to a select

few, the movie’s interesting plot

3, like the

tures blood

other two, fea-

and gore, mixed with

humour and genre jokes

galore.

Fans of the

trilogy will enjoy the

from the past two films, including Sidney (Neve Campbell), Dewey (David Arquette), Gale (Courteney CoxArquette) and Cotton Weary (Liev Schreiber).

Scream

Thank you

3

also

marks another

highly noticeable change was

made to the band in 1998, when drummer Mac McNeily quit and was replaced by James Kimball and later Brendan Murphy for a short stint.

Wm.

McNeily and

bassist

are the soundtrack

closure to hardcore fans with 20

Sims, a chartered accountant,

potent tracks.

Chalk another great band up on

comprising one of the tightest

the now-defunct

Craven,

outside

who has com-

kill.

Scream 3, the killer is smarter and uses more clever ways of lur-

In

gies of all time.

ing victims out into the open.

final act in the trilogy is the

darkest and all-around creepiest of

While the

someone’s window or

behind a door, waiting for the

pleted one of the top horror trilo-

The

list.

Scream

directing notch in the belt of horror

Wes

moonshine brawls.

Jesus Lizard’s career and offers

David

clicked on each and every record,

Now

that the

Scream

trilogy has

been completed, fans are wonderfirst

one was funny,

in

come up with The Scream movies were his

ing what Craven will

a scary sort of way, and the sec-

next.

ond was just plain dumb,

“comeback” after terrible movies Vampire in Brooklyn. Like Star Wars and Indiana Jones, good things come in threes. The Scream trilogy as a whole is a good thing that provides some

the third

probably the scariest of the

three.

One of the main highlights movie

is

the

in the

ingenuity of the

killer.

In the previous movies, the ki ller

would always use the “Wanna play a game?” line over the phone, and always end up being

George-Cosh

like

great

scares

Hopefully,

it

along

the

way.

will stay a trilogy, so

we won’t have

to see a

Scream

movie 20 years from now.

Services Lynn Gresham Charlie Matjanec

Monica Himmelman Dan Randall Debbie Blumenthal

Melissa Turner

Barry Cull Judy Hart

Elaine Brunk

Sue

Jeanette Walker Judith Bates Marian Mainland

Frank Abel Trish Weiler

Kelly Nixon

Peter Findlay Kristin Higgins

Roger Mainland

College fi

riffs

for your support

Jack Fletcher Carol Gragory Lynn Rpberts Barb Kraler Joan Magazine

Conestoga

His

The Jesus Lizard played their last show on March 25 last year in Umea, Sweden. Bang is an hour-long retrospective that covers all aspects of The

ISO Team Student Stelian

missile.

for backwater

is

return of the heroes

tomahawk

crushing like a sonic

Shot and

the three.

Scream tional

Scream

movie.

third

all that

that the conclusion

horror genre.

The second movie in the trilogy was supposed to be satirical as well, but ended up being a cheesy,

of Stab

of the movie,

ed guitar never ceases, always

label Capitol Records.

master,

Without giving away the ending

’90s.

driving distort-

1998’s Blue were released on big-

Satirical slasher series’ last By Adam Wilson

Duane Denison’s

wig

A

The Jesus Lizard would go on to record Goat, Liar, Lash, Down, Shot, Blue and Bang. In case you have not noticed, all of their album

label

rhythm sections of the

was spent on

they did release two major label

nied 1990’s Pure EP. revered as one of the best live

Yow, usually fuelled by

tracks.

1989,

1,

Lizard’s 10-year span

Chicago indie

in 1992.

comedy, dementia and showmanship.” Sadly, The Jesus danger,

most of The Jesus

Although

unleashes a vocal assault in the

fdfid farewell to this

supper

Lizard’s last

Betty Morsink Rick Casey

Lyttle

Patrice Butts

Deborah Hill-Smith %


SPOKE,

Feb. 14, 2000

— Page 11

IndieBlast collides with Sanctuary Sanctuary proved to offer some

By Mike Radatus

RCD

Lawn

with the

variety

The DSA, Molson Canadian

Jockies

opening with a funk’n’rock meets

Music Limited

groove’n’soul style, followed by

organized a pub and concert night

Declan Nine with an alto-pop twist

in the Sanctuary Feb. 2.

and Sid Six headlining the show

Rocks and

The event was used compilation

CD

to

promote a

called IndieBlast

that features a collection

pendent

of inde-

Jockies were on the

gave away the

free IndieBlast

for

list

Conestoga College show

the

that

CDs

to

IndieBlast

and hoped “It

was

to return

at

Conestoga

some

day.

great to see people sitting

through the whole show and clap-

The people here

ping.

are great to

play in front of,” he said.

100 people.

first

Damian, the lead singer of the Jockies, said they were

Lawn

happy with the show

artists.

Sid Six, Declan Nine and the

Lawn

with a rock/pop groove.

was established to pro-

mote, distribute and publish inde-

Declan Nine, a band

that

had a

song featured as background music

show Dawson’s

pendent musicians

on the

couldn’t do

who possibly on their own due to

Creek, was also impressed with the

or support.

way

it

money

lack of

Each group on

the

album

gets

said

television

things went with the show, Brendan Browne, vocals and

CDs

to sell at the shows they play. The purpose of being on the CD is

guitar.

to get all the musicians’ material

good sound and

distributed to areas the

band them-

selves might not have been able to.

RCD

Chris Case, president of

Music, said the compilation

good

tool the

bands can use

is

a

to get

indie

bands either don’t

have the time or patience to do the

little

things that

we do,” he

all

said.

Case said the best thing about the

CD

is

the fact there

is

such a vari-

ety of groups that people can

always find a couple bands on they

it

like.

The

bands

be happy with

lights so

that,”

he

had

we had to

said.

Sid Six has a busy time ahead of

them with

the release of their

CD

full-length

March

16.

first

coming out on

The band plans on

tour-

ing the record in April.

themselves in the door.

“Most

We

“Everything went well.

featured

in

the

Until then Sid Six will be pro-

moting the IndieBlast CD.

Ryan McCaffrey, drums,

said the

CD is a good taste of what the band about.

is

“You have

to

be honest.

If

you

lose track of the honesty in the

music you leave people with an empty experience,” he said.

Declan Nine performed played include

in

the Sanctuary Feb. 2 to promote the CD IndieBlast ’99. Other bands that stores. Sid Six. IndieBlast ’99 can be purchased at

HMV

the Lawn Jockies and

(Photo by Mike Radatus)

WalkSafe -

--

Leigh Marostega and Marc Guran are part of WalkSafe, a group put together to help who are worried about walking alone to their car at night. You can use WalkSafe (Photo by Mike Radatus) between 6:45 p.m. and 1 0:45 p.m„ at Door 1 and 5.

people

^ Beat Goes Or OUTL USED CO

(Across

from McDonalds)

622-7774

(Canadian Tire Plaza)

893-2464

Between Harvey's

&

Burger King

884-7376


— SPOKE, Feb.

Page 12

14,

2000

Playoffs almost out of reach for By Nicole Furlong

Hickey and Craig McBrearty skated off the ice only minutes

The Condors put themselves tough

a

straight

in

two games Feb. 4 and 5, position,

losing

later,

both being called on

insti-

gating.

Seneca managed

to rack up 125 minutes while scoring eight goals to win the game.

penalty

the Ontario Colleges Athletic

league

Humber, Seneca and

The Condors couldn’t shake second game against Fleming reads much the

behind

their loss, as their

Sir Sanford

Fleming colleges.

same.

Conestoga was defeated 8-2

in

Although the penalty minutes

both away games on the weekend

by the second and third place teams respectively. Assistant coach Jason said

this

their last

road

Humber College where won 4-2. “This

is

Snyder

weekend was a

change from

not the

flared, especially in the

which resulted in the fourman toss and 107 penalty minutes

<£oU-e<!&

The Condors’ depleting record of 5-8-1 shuffles them to fourth spot in

Galbraith

for Conestoga.

of reach.

Association

Tempers

by

third,

pushing a playoff spot almost out

game, assisted and Traynor.

Condors

vast

trip to

the

same team

team that

were much lower

The game

started drearily

and

just got worse.

the same.

Conestoga didn’t put themselves on the board until about 10 min-

Conestoga, as they

utes into the second period, after Seneca posted two goals in the first and one in the second.

Mike

Traynor

netted

played against Humber,” he said.

Condors’

“Our heads weren’t in the game.” There were several contributing

Dave Galbraith. With a 3-1 score heading

first

goal,

assisted

the

by

factors to the loss against Seneca,

the third, Seneca didn’t let up,

including high penalty minutes for both teams and a rash of players

scoring three minutes into the

being thrown out of the game.

Matt Turcotte started the puck rolling getting called

on a game misconduct with 14 minutes left in the third period.

Dave Longarini followed two minutes later with a

final period.

They continued to whiz four more pucks past goaltender Anthony Gignac, only allowing Conestoga one opportunity

to

score their second goal early in suit

10-

minute game misconduct. Jamie

the third.

Dave Conestoga’s

Stewart final

scored goal

Fleming

of the

game,

the

walked left

over

all

the arena

shouldering another 8-2 loss.

Fleming came off the bench fury, scoring the first goal

game 30 seconds

into

in a

of the

the

first

period and the next with eight

minutes into

in

unfortunately the score remained

left.

Conestoga answered back with six minutes left on the clock, leaving the score at 2-1 at the end of the first.

Traynor scored the Condors’ goal, assisted

first

by Greg Thede and

Condor Dave Galbraith looks to pass the puck at a game Feb 5 Conestoga was defeated 8-2. {Photo

by Nicole Furlong)

However, scoring four

Fleming prevailed, more goals, ending

Turcotte.

the

Fleming scored early on in the second period, but Brent Shantz,

“This was the most important game of the season,” Snyder said.

assisted

by

Conestoga

in the

Galbraith,

kept

game by answer-

ing back and scoring a minute

later.

game

at

against 1

A

a familiar 8-2.

Cambrian College on Feb.

8 in Sudbury.

playoff spot

is

still

“The team couldn’t come through

ish

with a win.”

Conestoga must win away game.

Conestoga has one game

left

on the

horizon, depending on how the top three teams in the league fin-

out

their

seasons, their

Thursdays ^ no

^

SUCKS ALLOWED!

^ L7ame

Westmount Place Shopping Centre 50 Westmount Rd. N.

WATERLOO

Ph.(905) 844-8558

HOME

OF....DONOVAN BAILEY, JARRETT SMITH, JOANNE MALAR, MIKE MORREALE STEVE RICE PAUL MASOTTI, MIKE O’SHEA, VAL ST. GERMAIN, STEVE STAIOS, MIKE VANDERJAGT CHRIS GIOSKOS, JEN BUTTON, AND COLIN DOYLE

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Digital Edition - February 14, 2000